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larasndar
Nov 30, 2006

by Ozma


When my uncle moved in with my aunt, he brought with him over 40 beagles. This was nearly 15 years ago. Since then, we have successfully reared between 2 and 17 puppies (the latter distributed between three litters!) every year. None of the beagles are spayed, neutered or Kennel Club registered (we are in the UK).



But it's okay - they are a working pack of beagles! All puppies we rear are integrated into our own pack, drafted to neighbouring packs or, very rarely (if they are too small to work, for example), carefully rehomed as pets. And while they might not be registered to the Kennel Club, each litter is registered to the national stud book. Our pack will be celebrating its centenary within the next decade, and we can certainly trace our pedigrees back to its origin. Phew! No back yard breeders here, then.

Now, hunting with hounds is a particularly emotive subject within the UK. While I'm usually willing to debate the moral and political issues involved, I'm not sure that Pet Island is the best place for it. Obviously the law has changed recently, and hunting as a sport has changed considerably - and my uncle uses his hounds absolutely within the law. I'm in the rather complicated position of being fundamentally liberal minded and absolutely geared towards animal rights and conservation, but yet having spent every summer since I was 6 years old with these beagles and people who I love so much. I find the concept of hunting down and killing a wild animal pretty hard to stomach, yet I think I've gained a fair amount of insight into the reality of the sport, and the people who participate it. They certainly aren't as demonic as they are widely held to be.

With that said, then - the beagles!

This is where they live;



The kennels are divided into 6 'lodges'; three for the boys, three for the girls and the kennel kitchen in the middle. The floors are poured concrete and slope down towards a central drain, which makes for easy cleaning. Each lodge has a raised concrete bench, which we bed with newspaper (this is changed every day).



Here is the back corridor;



Every hound responds to his or her own name, and we call them individually back into the lodges after we've cleaned them out. Not only that, but they know to seperate into boys and girls when we return home from a walk! (Well, more like each hound knows whether to go left or right).

Did somebody mention walks?



The hounds are walked a couple of miles just about every day during the summer months. While they are kenneled in a rural area, they do walk along roads (albeit quiet ones). This means that each hound must learn road manners, such as bunching into the side of the road when my uncle says 'Car - over!'. A useful tool in this regard is the 'couple' - two leather collars attached to each other by a chain. When puppies start to walk out with the pack, at about a year old, they are 'coupled' to an older, wiser hound. This might sound a bit silly, or even dangerous, but it works perfectly well and is a pretty old technique. Here is an example;



Does Vagrant look at all concerned that he has a horrid puppy tethered to his neck? I don't think so!

As I say, the puppies only get integrated with the rest of the pack when they are about a year old. We breed every year, as I have mentioned, and probably average at 8-10 puppies a year. I personally have witnessed the whelping of 6 or 7 litters over the years, and it is a truly magical (if nerve-wracking) experience. Each litter is named with a sequential letter of the alphabet (so Stringer and Spitfire are brothers, and the next litter after them contained Trinket and Tapestry etc). This here is Meadow with the newly born 'Y' litter.



We plan our litters meticulously, and breed for temperament, working ability and type. There is a lot more variety in the appearance of working beagles than the Kennel Club show strains, but nonetheless a standard is maintained through the summer showing circuit.



Pups stay with their mum til she grows tired of them, pretty much. It's very much up to her. While we might aim for for 8-10 pups a year, it is not an exact science.



. That was the year of 17 puppies. I had to look after them for a week while my uncle took the pack to a different county - never again. I was feeding, cleaning and excercising them from dawn til dusk.

Once the puppies are around 8 weeks old they spend their days out in our two puppy pens. Pretty much their only job from then on is to chill, play and be cute.

















So yes, that is a brief introduction to my little beagly friends. I love them so much. We are expecting a litter within the next couple of days, so fingers crossed!

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Schweig und tanze
May 22, 2007

STUBBSSSSS INNNNNN SPACEEEE!



Pure. Awesome. So great to see the dogs doing what they were bred to do, and oh god, the puppies!

Corsair Canard
Aug 17, 2004

Let's croak us some Toads!

Leonard Cohen posted:

Pure. Awesome. So great to see the dogs doing what they were bred to do, and oh god, the puppies!

Yeah thats pretty much what I would have said.

I can't imagine dealing with 40 of them, my god! How do you do it?

Skutter
Apr 7, 2007

I was curious to see how far you'd go to find me. Well, here I am.


Those pups were adorable. I've never see a blond spotted beagle before, usually only the normal black/brown combo. Very nice pics.

larasndar
Nov 30, 2006

by Ozma


Corsair Canard posted:

Yeah thats pretty much what I would have said.

I can't imagine dealing with 40 of them, my god! How do you do it?

Well, my uncle and aunt do not have the internet or a television. I think that has quite a lot to do with it!

Basically, they live for their hounds. My uncle is up at 6.30 each morning to feed them and clean them out, back home from work at lunchtime to check on them, and works outside either with the hounds or looking after the land/poultry until the sun sets. He gets about 3 weeks holiday from them a year, when I come over to look after them for him - but he always takes at least a couple of pups with him (they have a cottage by the sea). I really don't think there is a moment of the day when he isn't thinking of his hounds.

Also, working beagles have been bred for centuries to live together amicably, so they really are tailored to the kennel environment. As with all dogs, routine is the key. That said, it is obviously a lot of work - I'm always very pleased to hand the keys back to my uncle after I've done my yearly stint!

MoCookies
Apr 22, 2005



Oh dear god - I can't hardly stand the beagleyness of this thread! I'm a huge fan of hounds, and have been really fascinated by the fact there are still packs around used for hunting. I've looked online a bit, and there don't seem to be any near where I live. From your post, I gather that hunting is much more taboo in the UK than it is here in the US. Living in Texas, its pretty common to hear about people going hunting on the weekends. Anyway, what game is hunted with the pack? Do the dogs too old to hunt get retired to the couch? Does your family make their own dog food, or do they have to just buy it in bulk? Do all the beagles curl up and sleep in a massive beagle pile?

Also - I love the "lemon" beagles, I've always thought they were especially handsome.

SachielDVangel
Jun 4, 2003


God that is awesome.

larasndar
Nov 30, 2006

by Ozma


MoCookies posted:

Oh dear god - I can't hardly stand the beagleyness of this thread! I'm a huge fan of hounds, and have been really fascinated by the fact there are still packs around used for hunting. I've looked online a bit, and there don't seem to be any near where I live. From your post, I gather that hunting is much more taboo in the UK than it is here in the US. Living in Texas, its pretty common to hear about people going hunting on the weekends. Anyway, what game is hunted with the pack? Do the dogs too old to hunt get retired to the couch? Does your family make their own dog food, or do they have to just buy it in bulk? Do all the beagles curl up and sleep in a massive beagle pile?

Also - I love the "lemon" beagles, I've always thought they were especially handsome.

Yes, hunting has been a pretty controversial topic in the UK over the past few years. An often cited statistic is that over 700 hours were spent debating hunting in parliament, compared to only 7 hours debating the decision to enter Iraq. Emotions run very high on both sides of the debate - my uncle has been threatened with letter bombs, and has had people invade the premises with the intention of stealing the hounds, or beating him up, or something. My grandmother saw them off! One time I remember my uncle had to sleep out in the kennel kitchen for a week due to a specific threat to steal a hound of ours who had won a fairly high profile show. Other packs have faired much worse - see the Wye College.

Traditionally, beagles hunted the hare - the Brown hare in mainland Britain, and the Irish hare in Ireland. However, hunting with hounds has now been banned in England, Scotland and Wales, and there is a special protection order on the Irish hare, so now beagles in the UK hunt aniseed trails! I think most US packs hunt the jack rabbit.

With our old timers it really depends on a number of factors. Obviously, by adding pups to the pack every year we also have to say goodbye to old friends at the same time. We have successfully rehomed older hounds on a number of occasions, and I can think of 8 or 9 of our former hounds who are probably curled up on a couch right at this moment! However, we've also had quite a few real catastrophies. Harlequin, who was an old favourite of mine, was rehomed to a family who seemed perfect - he wouldn't be left for more than four hours, they had a well fenced garden and time to give him plenty of walks. However, I think the mum of the house got a new job, and Harlequin ended up tethered in the back garden of the grandmother. Being a beagle, he got bored very quickly; chewed threw his rope, scaled the fence and went off exploring. He ended up geting hit by a train .

The trouble is that once hounds have lived 9 or 10 years in kennels, they mostly find the transition to home life pretty difficult. They are noisy, messy, have short attention spans and would be very inclined to roam. You need an awful lot of patience to rehome an ex-hunting hound. After what happened with Harlequin, and a couple of other bad experiences, my uncle has decided that he won't rehome to strangers any more. We also work on the basis that it would be cruel to keep hounds at our own home where they would hear all the others heading off hunting every Saturday and not be able to join in. They hate getting left behind under normal circumstances (if they are injured or on heat, etc), and it would be just cruel if they had to miss out week after week. So, when it gets to the stage that they don't enjoy going out any more, I'm afraid more often than not it's a phone call to the vet . Just recently we had to say goodbye to Justice, Merlin and Lapwing - each of these guys I've known from puppyhood, and it's so hard. .

Dog food! We make our own. We get free boxes of crusts from a local sandwich shop, which we soak and mush up into a sort of gruel. In addition we add a few shovels of 'meal' (complete racing greyhound kibble) and offcuts from the local butcher at 5 per week for three large bags. Often these 'offcuts' include cow tongues, livers and hearts . Plus any household scraps. These get mushed up into six buckets and are left overnight to 'set' - then fed in the morning in troughs. When we have pregnant bitches they get fed extra eggs and milk and so on, and while the pups are getting weaned they get fed bread and meal soaked in warm milk (powdered that you get for orphaned lambs). It works out fairly cheap, all things considered.

And oh goodness, yes they all curl up together at the end of the day . When I was little if I hadn't been seen for a couple of hours they always knew to look for me in the puppy house, where I would be fast asleep with them all in a big pile. I may have been known to fall asleep in a hound pile rather more recently, when we had them in a display pen at a show. It was sunny!

Also:

larasndar fucked around with this message at May 24, 2007 around 04:20

Hadra
Dec 20, 2004
OWW.... logic hurts.

that is a lot of beagle.

I was wondering, is their kennel cooled or heated? I can imagine it getting pretty hot in there.

SelmaDVangel
Apr 26, 2007


Very cool. I do notice that the British Beagles tend to be noticably bigger than our American Beagles. Or is that more of the hunting vs show thing? Anyway, cool doggies, I can almost hear the "arroooo arrroooo!" he he.

PS--Have ya'll ever considered Harriers, or are Beagles perfect because of their small size? I ask because you mentioned some of the Beagles are put into pet homes if they are too small, so my first thought was--"hey, what about Harriers?" I always wondered what would make someone decide for Harrier vs Beagle. Thanks for any info .

larasndar
Nov 30, 2006

by Ozma


Hadra posted:



I was wondering, is their kennel cooled or heated? I can imagine it getting pretty hot in there.

Those pictures are a bit deceptive; each lodge has an outside run as well as an inside bit:



The doors are open all day, so the place doesn't heat up too much. One thing we have to watch for in the summer is the water buckets getting too low. They are shut inside at night, so if it's really hot we might leave the top of the doors open, but apart from that the place ventilates itself for the most part

SelmaDVangel posted:

Very cool. I do notice that the British Beagles tend to be noticably bigger than our American Beagles. Or is that more of the hunting vs show thing? Anyway, cool doggies, I can almost hear the "arroooo arrroooo!" he he.

PS--Have ya'll ever considered Harriers, or are Beagles perfect because of their small size? I ask because you mentioned some of the Beagles are put into pet homes if they are too small, so my first thought was--"hey, what about Harriers?" I always wondered what would make someone decide for Harrier vs Beagle. Thanks for any info .

In Britain, show beagles would tend to be much heavier set than working beagles, who are taller and leaner for the most part. We have the same upper height limit - 16 inches - and it used to be that working hounds would be booted out of the stud book if they were found to be overheight at a show. However, most packs would hold onto and even breed from an overheight hound if they were good workers, where as I'd imagine show breeders would not. Different packs breed for different characteristics according to the type of country they hunt over - we tend towards larger hounds as they actually hunt slower than smaller ones. Our country is pretty much all small boggy fields and thick hedges, and if the pack hunted too fast my uncle would be left behind in no time!

Harriers hunt the same quarry and much the same country as beagle packs, but it's often a very different set up to beagling. Often the hunt is mounted, as opposed to beagling which is on foot. My uncle is terrified of horses . Also, in the UK harrier packs tend to be split between the followers, so maybe 10 individuals will house three hounds each, and get together at the weekend, rather than the kennel set up that we use. It's just a different way of doing things, really. My uncle grew up with this pack of beagles, and I don't know that he's ever been actively involved with a harrier pack - I'll have to ask!

leokitty
Apr 5, 2005

Well I had to phone his friend to state my case, and say he's lost control again.

And he showed up all the errors and mistakes, and said I've lost control again.

notsoape posted:




That is the best picture of dogs I have ever seen. Thank you for sharing this with us, the beagle pack is awesome.

edit: I'm so jealous that you got to sleep in puppy piles as a child.

leokitty fucked around with this message at May 24, 2007 around 05:10

Moraine Sedai
Jan 16, 2006

Nap time yet?

I have a question if you don't mind... How do you handle the breeding? Is there enough diversity in bloodlines in your own pack that you breed your own males with your own females or do you breed with another person's studs who has a different pack?

They are absolutely gorgeous, by the way, and I am jealous of your experiences with such a well-established pack.

Zombiesinmyshower!
Nov 14, 2006

by angerbotSD


That is a amazing and such a testament to well established pack structure being great for dogs! I bet they make an ungodly racket when they get going huh?

I love the "coupling" training too. Thanks for sharing!

larasndar
Nov 30, 2006

by Ozma


Moraine Sedai posted:

I have a question if you don't mind... How do you handle the breeding? Is there enough diversity in bloodlines in your own pack that you breed your own males with your own females or do you breed with another person's studs who has a different pack?

Really it's a bit of both - here's an example;



This is as close as we would ever breed - you can see that 'Flicka' appears twice among the great grandparents. Where the names have initials in front of them, that means that they were from another pack. So we maintain diversity within our pack by using outside sources fairly regularly - it's worth noting that there are no stud fees within the world of beagling, nor do we ever exchange money when we pass hounds on.

Here are a couple of photographs of another activity we do with our beagles during the summer - show displays! Pretty much, we bring a van load of beagles



Set up a pen, and let kids come in and play with the hounds at 50p a go



Beagles are insanely tolerant, and we have never had an issue with growling or whatever. The kids get to stay in for as long as they want, and get a rubber or pencil and fact sheet when they leave . It is a lovely way to spend a day.













FrenchyPoo Fagnasty
Dec 20, 2006

I'm not gay but my wiener is.

OMG! Beagles! They are such great dogs. My love for them has been recently rekindled by adopting a rescued beagle (Fern). It's incredible to see them working and living as a pack, doing what they were meant to do. Thank you so much for this thread.

I grew up around dogs also. My parents used to breed labs. Falling asleep in the puppy pile is an experience no kid should grow up without. It was also interesting to me that your uncle feeds his beagles a similar blend to what my parents fed our labs. And every puppy I've ever seen weaned has been fed the bread, milk and kibble slop. I guess dog nutrition is the same across the sea.

SelmaDVangel
Apr 26, 2007


Thanks for the info on Harriers vs Beagles, OP . Yeah, in the US, Beagles are supposed to come in at 13" or 15", two different breed varieties. So, I guess the British Beagles are somewhat bigger if they come in at 16". I always wondered why there was a 13" and a 15"--it doesnt seem like a huge difference, but I guess there may be if the smaller guys are more hyper on the hunt as you said.

Beautiful hounds and thanks for the glimpse into your life. If Afghans did not take so much coat care, I would want my own "pack" of them one day, he he.

Sachiel and I have seen a pack of English Foxhounds kept by an American couple in Georgia, and these people are as close to landed gentry as the US gets--they have hundreds of acres, many beautiful horses on numerous gorgeous pastures, and they have their own foxhound pack--it was really neat to see all the dogs together. It looked to be a similar situation to your beagle kennel.

BTW, I love the word "beagling"--that is great .

EVG
Dec 17, 2005

If I Saw It, Here's How It Happened.


I want to live on a beagle farm! That is so awesome. It reminds me of the end of the cartoon 101 Dalmatians, where they sing about having a 'Dalmatian Plantation'.

So lucky!

BOrangeFury
Feb 18, 2005

by T. Fine


notsoape posted:



A petting zoo, only it's just beagles?! BEST IDEA EVER.

larasndar
Nov 30, 2006

by Ozma


BOrangeFury posted:

A petting zoo, only it's just beagles?! BEST IDEA EVER.

It is certainly a lot of fun - although pretty tiring!



I think what this thread needs is some more puppies. The white pups you saw earlier are the 'A' litter - their mum is Orchid



She is a sweetie pie. She is also a pretty rare, old hound colour called 'badger pied'. Orchid is the daughter of Inca, who is a truely special beagle. Inca is so wise, calm and loving - she is now coming up 11 years old and the oldest hound in kennels, yet still full of energy and life. Here is Inca with my good friend Aly (who looks a lot like Kirsten Dunst)



So the A puppies then - Admiral, Anchor, Aztec (like Inca, see?), Ambush, Antrim, Alder and Acrobat. Here they are out on a walk;





The scruffy looking dog there is Anna, a Glen of Imaal terrier. She is a sweetheart, and loves to play with the puppies.















MoCookies
Apr 22, 2005



Oh dear PI, please make the beagle pictures stop! I can't possible have any more dogs in my house, but all these puppy pics are creating an obsession. Please make it stop. Thanks - Mocookies

Seriously though, the pics are amazing. If I ever make it to the UK, I'm going to drive over to the pack and kiss all 40+ of them.

Moraine Sedai
Jan 16, 2006

Nap time yet?

Thanks for the answer on the breeding question. I wasn't sure if enough diversity could be maintained within a single pack, but didn't think so.

And OMG! I know it's a lot of work, but I would LOVE to be able to work with those dogs for a couple weeks during the summer! I soooo envy you! heh

Those little faces and eager, happy dogs! I'm going to suffer a cuteness overload.

Are you able to get video of them actually being worked/trained? If so, I would just *die* if you could provide some for us to watch.

larasndar
Nov 30, 2006

by Ozma


Moraine Sedai posted:

Are you able to get video of them actually being worked/trained? If so, I would just *die* if you could provide some for us to watch.

Your wish is my command!



"OH BOY A WALK! YAAAAY!"



Chillin' after a long, hard day of showing.



The 'A' puppies (now a little older) doing what they do best (that is, being cute).

I do have a couple more clips of showing and so on, but I'll save those for later. Unfortunately I am at pesky university at the moment, so I can't record any new material right now . Sorry for the pixelatedness also; that is Photobucket's doing.

larasndar fucked around with this message at May 24, 2007 around 20:14

Moraine Sedai
Jan 16, 2006

Nap time yet?

omigosh! That was wonderful! Seeing them all running their moks. Beautiful dogs.

Thanks for sharing that! *dies*

tee hee

MoCookies
Apr 22, 2005



What's the rationale behind the size of the pack? Is 40 a magic number, or does it have to do more with the facilities to house them? Obviously, you could be producing massive amount of puppies if you wanted to, but it sounds like the size of the pack is somewhat static.

Also, thank you for the videos

Silkenray
May 20, 2007

Willy the Magic Kitty

AAAIIIEEE!!! I want to meet them! I live in the UK. It's a small country. Please let me meet them.

larasndar
Nov 30, 2006

by Ozma


MoCookies posted:

What's the rationale behind the size of the pack? Is 40 a magic number, or does it have to do more with the facilities to house them? Obviously, you could be producing massive amount of puppies if you wanted to, but it sounds like the size of the pack is somewhat static.

Also, thank you for the videos

Really it has to do with the way the pack hunts. Beagles (traditionally) follow the scent trail of the hare, who might be fields away from them as they pursue her. It takes a real variety of scenting abilities and levels of intelligence, experience and speed/stamina to follow the line/lines over miles of varied terrain in the course of an afternoon's sport. Working with a pack of around 30 hounds (assuming that 10 are back home either as puppies or in season, etc) is enough that you get the necessary range of skill but are still able to exercise control over the pack. My uncle needs to be able to call the hounds back if they catch the scent of a deer, or stray into private property, or end up near to a road or railway line. He also needs to be able to quickly scan them to make sure they're 'all on' (he isn't missing any). '15 couple' (beagling-speak for '30') is therefore a good number to aim for - any bigger and the pack would be liable to split up and harder to control, any less and they wouldn't be able to work together quite so effectively.

Professional packs who employ staff to look after the kennels might keep double the number that we do, and hunt more days a week (taking half of the pack out each time). We have had over 50 hounds in kennels before, but any more than 8 hounds in a lodge is really pushing it a bit, and you would be more liable to see fights breaking out during the day time. Also, producing more puppies would be a bit of a false economy - hounds tend to be a bit of a nuisance in their first couple of seasons hunting, and in the first few weeks my uncle will only take three or four of the new guys out with him at a time. Young hounds are more an investment in the future of the pack, really - while instinct is important, it's experience that really counts out in the field.

Hope that makes some sense.

larasndar
Nov 30, 2006

by Ozma


Breaking News!

The phone JUST rang and Twilight (mum to be!) is 'spotting'. Puppies are on the way! If everything goes according to plan, in less than 12 hours time the 'B' litter will be with us. Fingers crossed!

Silkenray
May 20, 2007

Willy the Magic Kitty

Puppies! Puppies, puppies, puppies puppies!!!

Uni or not, you NEED to get us pictures ASAP.

Moraine Sedai
Jan 16, 2006

Nap time yet?

Most excellent! Keep us updated as you can on the progress and post pics (and/or vids) when they are available!

larasndar
Nov 30, 2006

by Ozma


I will do my best! For now, though, a bit about the family.



This is Twilight, mum to be. She appears to be a bit shy about getting her photograph taken, as this is the only one I could find of her. What you can't see in this picture are her beautiful kohl eyes . She is a very shy hound in general - sulky, some might say, but they'd be wrong. She is very sweet and loving so long as you sit calmly and quietly with her. You can just about see that she has freckles on her front paws - those are passed down from her grandpa Wisdom, who was a black/blue roan colour.

Twilight is the daughter of Icon and Meadow.



This is Icon. Icon was an remarkable hound, and one of our most successful in the show ring. He had very pale lemon patches as a young hound, but these quickly faded to ghost white. He was a real old-style, heavy set beagle, and had beautiful ear and stern (tail) carriage. He was effortlessly respected by the other hounds - he didn't have to throw his weight around, they just knew not to mess with him. He was always very independent, and grew pretty senile in his dotage - he seemed to be in a world of his own a lot of the time. Sometimes he would snap back to his old self, especially in the show ring - he would start showing off and prancing round like he owned the place. Other times he would just stand there with a glazed expression, not really fussed. Even though he was never particularly friendly, I had a real soft spot for the old guy.



This is Meadow, looking distinctly unimpressed at having a bucket on her head! This was when she was suffering from a haemotoma. Meadow was a very naughty puppy, along with her brother Merlin, but she soon settled down. She's a real sweety pie - quite shy, like her daughter, til she gets to know you. She can also be very silly . She has had two litters of her own, but this will be the first time she'll be a granny .

Dad-to-be is Smuggler;



That's Smuggler's head in the foreground (the beagle behind him is Vagabond). Smuggler is lemon and white with some pretty unusual markings - he has white tips to his ears and a triangle of three little lemon dots on his white markings, with an equivalent triangle of three little white dots on his lemon markings (sort of hard to explain!). He is very chilled and laid back - he's one of the hounds we put in first with the puppies once they're old enough to live properly in the kennels. Conformation wise he's not perfect - he's leggy, and spindly, and his head's a bit rubbish. But he's got a lovely character, and he makes a great contribution to the pack .

Smuggler's parents were Harmony and Envoy. I don't have pictures, unfortunately, but Harmony was a real scatterbrain tricolour hound, with one white ear and lots of freckles. She was very happy, but just a little bit . Envoy was a lemon and white beagle who took life altogether more seriously.

Pepper
Sep 30, 2002

"I escaped Arkham Asylum and all I got was this crappy sidekick gig..."

Oh dear Lord!!!
*amazingly high pitched squeal* Puppies!
There's too much puppy to document!

Good luck with Twilight, and please post pictures of the new cutiepies!

Hadra
Dec 20, 2004
OWW.... logic hurts.

I'm loving these black and white photos.

Good luck Twilight! I guess goons should start thinking of names that start with "B"

StarryEyed
Oct 5, 2006


notsoape posted:


OMG *dies*

Toadpuppy
Apr 8, 2003


Thank you for the beagle pictures. I love beagles

Tasty_Crayon
Jul 29, 2006
Same story, different version.

notsoape posted:



Good lord, thats a if I've ever seen one.

Apparently my maternal great grandpa had a bunch of beagles and loved them to death. When it was all said and done (they ran afoul of a bees nest ) my mother did not take that with her. She can't stand the breed and thinks they are annoying smelly creatures. I dunno about smelly, but I love their cry.

FrenchyPoo Fagnasty
Dec 20, 2006

I'm not gay but my wiener is.

Besides Anna, are there other dogs around besides the beagles? Is Anna strictly a pet or does she have a 'job' also?

Again, awesome thread and very educational. Thank you.

larasndar
Nov 30, 2006

by Ozma


Pupdate

Three tricolour puppies so far! A bitch, a dog, and another bitch so my Aunt reports. They've all been breech and it's been a bit of an effort, but Twilight is being a 'perfect mother' and looking after them beautifully . Hang in there Twilight!


FrenchyPoo Fagnasty posted:

Besides Anna, are there other dogs around besides the beagles? Is Anna strictly a pet or does she have a 'job' also?

Again, awesome thread and very educational. Thank you.

Anna is the only house dog at the moment; her only job is to see rodents off the premises (she takes this *very* seriously) and otherwise just be a very good girl (she is good at this). We used to have a big old sappy black lab named Florrie, but she died last year at 16 years of age . Prior to those two my Aunt and Uncle had another Glen of Imaal (Duster), and before Duster there was a white Italian Spinone (Polo) and a little scrappy terrier (Bramble). Bramble in particular saw the pack of beagles like a big litter of unruly puppies that she had to keep in line, it was amazing to see .

Glad everybody is enjoying the thread! I'll check back in later, hopefully with some more good news on the puppy front

Fearless_Decoy
Sep 27, 2001

You shall all soon witness the power of my Tragic 8-Ball!

This thread is amazing. I've been reminded of the rescue beagle my parents adopted and I'm actually welling up a bit. But I'm not going to spoil sweet puppy awesomeness with a sob story.

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Fasheem
Feb 19, 2007



notsoape posted:



This is a really good looking dog! I don't know much about dogs, but even without reading his blurb, I can tell this is a good one.

I also love the happy kids in the petting show pics. Awww.

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