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Xtanstic
Nov 22, 2007

I have the same feeling every time: my head's ready to explode, I want to kill somebody cutting across the blue line and I want to score the goal and celebrate.

Hi guys. I'm not exactly an expert computer builder but I have built a few PCs in the past with help from this forum. I've had my computer die on me. It wouldn't boot at all (not even to the BIOS screen) so I assumed my mobo died. I ordered a new one, swapped it out and reformated. Things were okay until I realized that the fan on my video card died so my PC keeps crashing because of an overheated video card.

Now, my problem is that my computer is old (built in 2008) and I had been planning on building a new PC in August/Sept because I will be moving from Canada to the US for grad school. I was hoping to buy a cheap part to be able to play videogames until I move and build my new PC, or else I would have bought a laptop to tide me over until then. What are my options right now? Replace the video card with a cheap obsolete one to tide me over? Can I replace the heat sink on my current video card and have it work?

Oh yeah, I did disassemble the heat sink in order to reapply some thermal paste onto the GPU. I don't think I broke the fan, but honestly it hasn't been running so smoothly even before that and even if I use a can of duster on the fan it doesn't move.

If you need my build:

I dual screen 1920x1080 and 1400x900 but obviously I'll probably have to make do with just the one if necessary.
ATI HD 4850
2x2GB DDR2 Ram
Intel Core 2 Duo E8400

I just installed this
MSI G31TM-P21 LGA775 G31 mATX DDR2 PCI-E16 2XPCI Video SATA LAN Sound Motherboard

to replace
Gigabyte GA-EP35-DS3L ATX LGA775 P35 1333FSB 1PCI-E16 3PCI-E1 3PCI SATA2 Sound GBLAN Motherboard

I'm hoping to spend no more than around 50ish for a cheap video card to tide me over? Or a 30$ cooling system for my card maybe? Or should I just bite the bullet, build my PC now, and move with my PC later?


Summary: Mobo died. Replaced mobo. Works! GPU fan died. What are my options?

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Alereon
Feb 6, 2004

For me but LEFTHANDED

Xtanstic posted:

Hi guys. I'm not exactly an expert computer builder but I have built a few PCs in the past with help from this forum. I've had my computer die on me. It wouldn't boot at all (not even to the BIOS screen) so I assumed my mobo died. I ordered a new one, swapped it out and reformated. Things were okay until I realized that the fan on my video card died so my PC keeps crashing because of an overheated video card.
One option you might want to look into is just getting a decent videocard now. The Radeon HD 7800-series is pretty sweet and was just launched, though you won't be able to actually buy them until the 19th, so that may be too long for you to wait. You can use the onboard video on your motherboard for basic desktop use, though granted thats certainly not enough for gaming.

Blackclaw
Jan 4, 2008

DUKE NUKEM FOREVER HAS A BETTER CHANCE OF RELEASING IN AUSTRALIA THAN ROCK BAND EVER WILL


Hi guys,

Doing some work on my brother's computer, he bought himself some new RAM and he's had trouble installing it:

Any attempts to start up the system result in a POST code of 1 long, 2 short beeps. For his motherboard (Asus P7P55LX) it apparently means it's a memory issue.

However even using his old memory results in this POST code, making me suspect that it's an issue with the DIMM slots (e.g. contamination).

I know that 1 long/2 short for POST generally implies a display/video issue but Asus literature claims it to be a regular memory issue - which would make sense as we haven't touched the graphics card.

Is there anything else left to consider, or should I just spray some CO contact cleaner into the DIMM slots and see how that goes?

e: To add to that, we're using the right slots, and we've tried sticks of memory in both slots (one at a time) - neither seem to work. :/

Blackclaw fucked around with this message at Mar 6, 2012 around 10:57

BonoMan
Feb 20, 2002


RAID 5 question. We have a QNap 8 drive NAS with 8 1Tb Samsung "Raid Class" drives in it. Specifically this one.

As you can see it no longer exists for purchase. Now one of our drives has failed. What are my options for replacing that drive? A similar (1tb 32mb cache 7200 rpm Samsung) drive? Or do I have to replace them all to make insure compatibility?

Factory Factory
Mar 19, 2010

Oh dear, oh my,
that shouldn't be said.


The difference between the Spinpoint F3R and the vanilla F3 is not great. The F3R has some extra anti-vibration hardware, two extra years on its warranty (which probably happens because of 1) increased quality control and 2) workloads that involve less turning off and turning on again), and a firmware feature called TLER - time-limited error recovery.

When a desktop drive encounters an unreadable sector, it will spend up to two minutes trying to read the sector to recover the data. This is great for a desktop drive, because the data may not be anywhere else. Then the drive will go on its merry way - reallocate the sector, decide it was readable after all, whatever. The error might not be drive-endingly bad, either, so the drive may still be useful as-is. However, a RAID controller will only wait 8 seconds, and if the drive still hasn't sent any data, the controller will decide that drive has just gone offline. It will fail the drive and set the array to degraded.

TLER limits the amount of time a drive will try to recover a read error to 7 seconds, one second shorter than the RAID controller's limit. This then leaves it to the controller to decide how to do error handling - including simply re-writing the data (rebuilt from parity) after the sector is marked as "bad" without trying to read it unnecessarily, then alert the operator so a new drive can be secured and the array rebuilt at a more opportune time.

So, bottom line, a new Spinpoint F3 should work just fine in the array and last at least as long as the rest of the drives, but if it happens to look like it's developing bad sectors, the drive could fail out of the array prematurely, even if it's just a one-time hiccup.

BonoMan
Feb 20, 2002


Factory Factory posted:

The difference between the Spinpoint F3R and the vanilla F3 is not great. The F3R has some extra anti-vibration hardware, two extra years on its warranty (which probably happens because of 1) increased quality control and 2) workloads that involve less turning off and turning on again), and a firmware feature called TLER - time-limited error recovery.

When a desktop drive encounters an unreadable sector, it will spend up to two minutes trying to read the sector to recover the data. This is great for a desktop drive, because the data may not be anywhere else. Then the drive will go on its merry way - reallocate the sector, decide it was readable after all, whatever. The error might not be drive-endingly bad, either, so the drive may still be useful as-is. However, a RAID controller will only wait 8 seconds, and if the drive still hasn't sent any data, the controller will decide that drive has just gone offline. It will fail the drive and set the array to degraded.

TLER limits the amount of time a drive will try to recover a read error to 7 seconds, one second shorter than the RAID controller's limit. This then leaves it to the controller to decide how to do error handling - including simply re-writing the data (rebuilt from parity) after the sector is marked as "bad" without trying to read it unnecessarily, then alert the operator so a new drive can be secured and the array rebuilt at a more opportune time.

So, bottom line, a new Spinpoint F3 should work just fine in the array and last at least as long as the rest of the drives, but if it happens to look like it's developing bad sectors, the drive could fail out of the array prematurely, even if it's just a one-time hiccup.

This was information I didn't even know I was looking for! Thanks!

Space Gopher
Jul 31, 2006
CRYBABY FUCK


BonoMan posted:

RAID 5 question. We have a QNap 8 drive NAS with 8 1Tb Samsung "Raid Class" drives in it. Specifically this one.

As you can see it no longer exists for purchase. Now one of our drives has failed. What are my options for replacing that drive? A similar (1tb 32mb cache 7200 rpm Samsung) drive? Or do I have to replace them all to make insure compatibility?

It has a seven year warranty. Call Samsung and get a new drive.

If that's not an option for some reason, make sure you get RAID-compatible drives as replacements; they have modified timeouts that make sure the controller doesn't see the drive as failed on a simple read error. You shouldn't need to match things down to exact specs if you just want it to work, although gross mismatches will hurt performance.

e: f,b, with a much more complete explanation of the whole TLER thing to boot. But, still, you paid for a seven year warranty for exactly this situation. You might as well take advantage of it.

Space Gopher fucked around with this message at Mar 6, 2012 around 16:16

BonoMan
Feb 20, 2002


Space Gopher posted:

It has a seven year warranty. Call Samsung and get a new drive.

If that's not an option for some reason, make sure you get RAID-compatible drives as replacements; they have modified timeouts that make sure the controller doesn't see the drive as failed on a simple read error. You shouldn't need to match things down to exact specs if you just want it to work, although gross mismatches will hurt performance.

e: f,b, with a much more complete explanation of the whole TLER thing to boot. But, still, you paid for a seven year warranty for exactly this situation. You might as well take advantage of it.

Huh. Didn't even think of the warranty! I'm so used to limited 1 year warranties and what not, it didn't even cross my mind. Thanks!

edit: Ugh turns out Samsung sold their HDD division to Seagate now I have to go through them.

BonoMan fucked around with this message at Mar 6, 2012 around 16:32

Xtanstic
Nov 22, 2007

I have the same feeling every time: my head's ready to explode, I want to kill somebody cutting across the blue line and I want to score the goal and celebrate.

Alereon posted:

One option you might want to look into is just getting a decent videocard now. The Radeon HD 7800-series is pretty sweet and was just launched, though you won't be able to actually buy them until the 19th, so that may be too long for you to wait. You can use the onboard video on your motherboard for basic desktop use, though granted thats certainly not enough for gaming.

Oh that's an interesting idea, I had not considered that at all. Would that be a problem though, using a superior videocard on my obsolete tech? Will that damage the video card? Or will the video card just run fine and basically the rest simply can't extract all of the potential out of the card?

Rexxed
May 1, 2010

Dis is amazing!
I gotta try dis!


Xtanstic posted:

Oh that's an interesting idea, I had not considered that at all. Would that be a problem though, using a superior videocard on my obsolete tech? Will that damage the video card? Or will the video card just run fine and basically the rest simply can't extract all of the potential out of the card?

A new video card should run fine in your older PC. You may not get all of the FPS that it's capable of if the rest of your PC is the bottleneck to its performance, but it will work. I replaced my 4850 with a 6870 last year and it was a good performance boost for this PC I built in 2008. When I upgrade the rest of the system later this year I will probably just move the 6870 over to the new build.

Xtanstic
Nov 22, 2007

I have the same feeling every time: my head's ready to explode, I want to kill somebody cutting across the blue line and I want to score the goal and celebrate.

Rexxed posted:

A new video card should run fine in your older PC. You may not get all of the FPS that it's capable of if the rest of your PC is the bottleneck to its performance, but it will work. I replaced my 4850 with a 6870 last year and it was a good performance boost for this PC I built in 2008. When I upgrade the rest of the system later this year I will probably just move the 6870 over to the new build.

Ah I see. Is there anything else I should double check, in terms of compatibility between video card and mobo or should it run fine since the only thing I need to check is that they both slot into a PCI-E?

Rexxed
May 1, 2010

Dis is amazing!
I gotta try dis!


Xtanstic posted:

Ah I see. Is there anything else I should double check, in terms of compatibility between video card and mobo or should it run fine since the only thing I need to check is that they both slot into a PCI-E?

The only considerations are typically case size (some new cards are long and some take up two slots to support a bigger heatsink/fan) and power supply output. Personally, I got a 750 Watt power supply when I put this system together so it was more than capable of handling the new card. It's probably overkill, really, but I run 4 hard disks, SSD, optical drive, etc, so I wanted to be sure. If your old card ran, the new one probably will, too.

Alereon
Feb 6, 2004

For me but LEFTHANDED

Xtanstic posted:

Oh that's an interesting idea, I had not considered that at all. Would that be a problem though, using a superior videocard on my obsolete tech? Will that damage the video card? Or will the video card just run fine and basically the rest simply can't extract all of the potential out of the card?
I would still recommend you upgrade the rest of your machine when able because of the CPU bottlebeck, but your motherboard should be fine with that card (you probably want to run a memory diagnostic, and if it passes, update the motherboard BIOS first before upgrading cards though), and it should have plenty of longevity so you won't feel bad about dropping it into the new system and using it for awhile. The other two issues are case size and power supply capacity, case size probably won't be an issue because the 7800-series cars are going to be rather small physically, and their power usage is also pretty low so the power supply should be fine too. If your power supply only has one PCI-E power cable and you don't want to upgrade right now, the Radeon HD 7850 should do just fine for you.

SplitSoul
Dec 31, 2000



Anybody else have any suggestions for my friend's Razer Banshee woes? He's in the process of reinstalling Windows now, but I imagine he'd like to try to get them working once he's done. I'd really appreciate it.

Ceros_X
Aug 6, 2006

US Marine


Blackclaw posted:

Hi guys,

Doing some work on my brother's computer, he bought himself some new RAM and he's had trouble installing it:

Any attempts to start up the system result in a POST code of 1 long, 2 short beeps. For his motherboard (Asus P7P55LX) it apparently means it's a memory issue.

However even using his old memory results in this POST code, making me suspect that it's an issue with the DIMM slots (e.g. contamination).

I know that 1 long/2 short for POST generally implies a display/video issue but Asus literature claims it to be a regular memory issue - which would make sense as we haven't touched the graphics card.

Is there anything else left to consider, or should I just spray some CO contact cleaner into the DIMM slots and see how that goes?

e: To add to that, we're using the right slots, and we've tried sticks of memory in both slots (one at a time) - neither seem to work. :/



Eh, might want to try a Haus of Tech Support thread - might get more responses. That being said, can you verify that the RAM is good? (IE, you have a working computer you can put it in, take all the RAM out of it, and then run it one stick at a time to see if there are any errors). If that doesn't work, you could try spraying out the ram slots with compressed air but if the ram is good then the MB may be bad. Find a way to check and see if the RAM is good and you'll cut your troubleshooting down a bit. Also, did you buy ram that was on the approved list by the MB manufacturer?

Ceros_X fucked around with this message at Mar 6, 2012 around 23:52

Factory Factory
Mar 19, 2010

Oh dear, oh my,
that shouldn't be said.


Eh?

Ceros_X
Aug 6, 2006

US Marine


Factory Factory posted:

Eh?

Quoted the wrong post, whoops. (Got distracted by your Ponytar) Fixed!

Xtanstic
Nov 22, 2007

I have the same feeling every time: my head's ready to explode, I want to kill somebody cutting across the blue line and I want to score the goal and celebrate.

Alereon posted:

I would still recommend you upgrade the rest of your machine when able because of the CPU bottlebeck, but your motherboard should be fine with that card (you probably want to run a memory diagnostic, and if it passes, update the motherboard BIOS first before upgrading cards though), and it should have plenty of longevity so you won't feel bad about dropping it into the new system and using it for awhile. The other two issues are case size and power supply capacity, case size probably won't be an issue because the 7800-series cars are going to be rather small physically, and their power usage is also pretty low so the power supply should be fine too. If your power supply only has one PCI-E power cable and you don't want to upgrade right now, the Radeon HD 7850 should do just fine for you.

Hmm. I looked around town today and my options either too underpowered or too expensive for a temporary solution. I looked in the PC building megathread and the impression I got was that the "sweet spot" build is about to be replaced by new things in the pipeline (CPU-mobo in the summer) and the 7800 series? I think your advice sounds like my best route and I'm going to get the HD 7850, that is coming out in like 2 weeks for about 250$? My google-fu can't seem to confirm a release date/price for Canada, so I wanted to make sure there are no issues with international release as there is for electronic gadgets. Come summer when that shiny Intel CPU comes out, I'll probably build a new PC using the video card as well and give my current PC to my parents.

Alereon posted:

your motherboard should be fine with that card (you probably want to run a memory diagnostic, and if it passes, update the motherboard BIOS first before upgrading cards though)

I uh... don't know how to do this / understand why this is needed? (The only things I can do in the BIOS is fiddle with boot sequence). Currently I'm running onboard graphics and will slap in my future card, and then installing its drivers. Are you saying, I can't do this?

Alereon
Feb 6, 2004

For me but LEFTHANDED

Xtanstic posted:

I uh... don't know how to do this / understand why this is needed? (The only things I can do in the BIOS is fiddle with boot sequence). Currently I'm running onboard graphics and will slap in my future card, and then installing its drivers. Are you saying, I can't do this?
That should work fine, but it's generally recommended to update the BIOS on older motherboards before doing significant upgrades to give the best chance of a smooth experience, it's most important for CPU and memory upgrades. The BIOS is a program stored on a chip on the motherboard that handles initializing hardware, updating the BIOS refers to actually loading the newest version of that program to the chip. Here's a link to the BIOS download page for your motherboard on the MSI website. I recommend doing a memory diagnostic first just to make sure you're not experiencing memory issues, as a memory error or other issue like the system powering off mid-update can kill the motherboard. Reviewing the changelog for the BIOS for your board, I don't see anything graphics-related, so if you want to skip updating the BIOS you'd probably be fine.

Fool on the Hill
Oct 21, 2010


I was having problems with my desktop always crashing and after running a few tests I discovered I had some faulty RAM. Last week I replaced my RAM, hoping everything would be back to normal. Now my computer doesn't randomly crash like it used to, but now it does crash when I am using graphic-intensive programs (TF2, Tribes:Ascend, SWTOR...). I will be gaming along and out of now where I get a blue screen.

I haven't read the blue screen in its entirety but it does note something about messing around with RAM settings in BIOS or doing something with recently installed hardware.

So, anyone have an idea on what I should do?

Alereon
Feb 6, 2004

For me but LEFTHANDED

Fool on the Hill posted:

I was having problems with my desktop always crashing and after running a few tests I discovered I had some faulty RAM. Last week I replaced my RAM, hoping everything would be back to normal. Now my computer doesn't randomly crash like it used to, but now it does crash when I am using graphic-intensive programs (TF2, Tribes:Ascend, SWTOR...). I will be gaming along and out of now where I get a blue screen.

I haven't read the blue screen in its entirety but it does note something about messing around with RAM settings in BIOS or doing something with recently installed hardware.

So, anyone have an idea on what I should do?
Run the memory diagnostic again. If it fails, try backing off on the memory clockspeed or timings in the BIOS. If you need more assistance you'd probably be best off posting a thread in the Haus of Tech Support with details on exactly what motherboard, CPU, and RAM you have. Make sure you use the template in the sticky Rules thread!

Fool on the Hill
Oct 21, 2010


Alereon posted:

Run the memory diagnostic again. If it fails, try backing off on the memory clockspeed or timings in the BIOS. If you need more assistance you'd probably be best off posting a thread in the Haus of Tech Support with details on exactly what motherboard, CPU, and RAM you have. Make sure you use the template in the sticky Rules thread!

Nope, the RAM checked out fine. I'll head over and see if they can figure this out. Thanks though bud

Blackclaw
Jan 4, 2008

DUKE NUKEM FOREVER HAS A BETTER CHANCE OF RELEASING IN AUSTRALIA THAN ROCK BAND EVER WILL


Ceros_X posted:

Eh, might want to try a Haus of Tech Support thread - might get more responses. That being said, can you verify that the RAM is good? (IE, you have a working computer you can put it in, take all the RAM out of it, and then run it one stick at a time to see if there are any errors). If that doesn't work, you could try spraying out the ram slots with compressed air but if the ram is good then the MB may be bad. Find a way to check and see if the RAM is good and you'll cut your troubleshooting down a bit. Also, did you buy ram that was on the approved list by the MB manufacturer?

Took a magnifying glass to it, there seemed to be electrical damage in one of the DIMM slots (and my brother complained about smelling something weird from the case) and a bent-out pin in one of the others. Bought him a new motherboard and everything's going swimmingly. Thanks for the help.

Fire Storm
Aug 8, 2004

what's the point of life
if there are no sexborgs?


Does shutting down your computer every night actually cause hardware failures? Could the way I use computers cause parts to have a higher failure rate or am I unlucky as all hell? I ask because another hard drive died on me tonight with the dreaded click of death.

Hard drives are set to have a single large partition, if that matters at all.

Hard drives seem to have an average lifespan of 12-18 months before failure, with power supplies not faring as well (6-12 months for cheap ones, most recent pretty decent quality and power rating is currently at 18-24 months).

Laptop, desktop, does not matter. If *I* am the primary user, parts die quickly. I play games, browse the internet, some programming, watch movies online, nothing too extreme. No distributed processing (SETI@home, Folding@home), not running a high availability SQL database with lots of cache writing, not a media server for more than 1 PS3, nothing too unusual. I use the computer before work, shut it down, boot it up when I get home, and off again when I go to bed. Current UPS is 18 months old, computer and a cell phone charger is the only things plugged into the UPS.

Alereon
Feb 6, 2004

For me but LEFTHANDED

Fire Storm posted:

Does shutting down your computer every night actually cause hardware failures? Could the way I use computers cause parts to have a higher failure rate or am I unlucky as all hell? I ask because another hard drive died on me tonight with the dreaded click of death.
Nope. Basically nothing you can do to harddrives short of knocking them around, feeding them lovely power, or letting them get stupid hot (>50C) will affect their lifespans. For what little it's worth, I've got three WD harddrives in my system and I shut it down every night, they're going strong in their fourth year.

Ceros_X
Aug 6, 2006

US Marine


Fire Storm posted:

... power supplies not faring as well (6-12 months for cheap ones, most recent pretty decent quality and power rating is currently at 18-24 months).

...

... Current UPS is 18 months old, computer and a cell phone charger is the only things plugged into the UPS.

What power supplies have you been using, what one are you using now? What brand of UPS? What brand of HDDs? Did you buy them all at the same time from the same place? Do you have a lot of brown outs, power outages/surges, etc?

Meep
Oct 7, 2000


So my Logitech G9 mouse that I was never very fond of anyways just died on me and I need to replace it. My favorite mouse that I've owned is probably the old original IntelliMouse Explorer. I've gone through a few mice since then but none have fit my hand quite as well. I've never tried a Logitech G5 though it's shape looks pretty similar to the Explorer and I suspect I might like them.

Can anyone give me any suggestions? Wireless would be quite handy with my current set up but I'm not willing to sacrifice comfort or performance for it. I'll be using it for gaming mostly. After a quick glance at MS's and Logitech's current offerings the most likely contenders seem to be MS's Comfort Mouse 3000 or 4500, and Logitech's G400, G500, or G700. I'd love to hear any other ideas though.

scanlonman
Feb 7, 2008
your new superman

What's the entire process of repairing a motherboard that has water damage? What tools would I need, any good guides out there? I love repairing electronics, and this is something I would love to get into to.

Bloodly
Nov 3, 2008

Not as strong as you'd expect.

Odd problem suddenly cropped up recently. Playing one of two games: Star Trek Online, Medieval 2 Total War(In battle only). The screen cuts off. In STO's case, everything keeps running. Sound's there and all, but the screen's blank. Restarting fixes the matter. In Medieval's case, the thing just restarts-and again requires another restart just to get the screen running. Doesn't help that it says 'The System has recovered from a serious error'.

Can I presume there's a issue with my old(NVIDIA GT240) graphics card? It's not like there's visual issues-they run perfectly fine until this sudden business.

In truth, my system is, it feels, behind the times. Windows XP, Pentium e5700(Whatever that means)2 cores DXdiag says is at 3Ghz, 2 Gig Ram...The worst part is looking at the various processors and things(even pre-builts), I don't understand what the various numbers mean anymore. Probably would need to replace everything for a second time(It took upgrades over time to get where I am, a few years back). Frankly I'm not sure if the motherboard(Gigabyte G41M-ES2L) could take the latest graphics cards and RAM numbers flying around.

At least the power source is enough at 650W.

I need to know what can be left and what needs replacing, and what else needs to bulk up if necessary.

Bloodly fucked around with this message at Mar 7, 2012 around 17:45

Factory Factory
Mar 19, 2010

Oh dear, oh my,
that shouldn't be said.


scanlonman posted:

What's the entire process of repairing a motherboard that has water damage? What tools would I need, any good guides out there? I love repairing electronics, and this is something I would love to get into to.

Depends. Did it get wet and shut down quickly? Just rinsing it with distilled water and letting it thoroughly dry might be enough - get rid of the trace mineral deposits on contacts. If it had a major short and torched a chip, that chip may not be replaceable at all because the board has multiple layers of conductive traces that aren't easily replaced by hand, or it may be prohibitively expensive to find a spare chip. And if the heat from the short fused traces? Forget about it.

Fire Storm
Aug 8, 2004

what's the point of life
if there are no sexborgs?


Ceros_X posted:

What power supplies have you been using, what one are you using now? What brand of UPS? What brand of HDDs? Did you buy them all at the same time from the same place? Do you have a lot of brown outs, power outages/surges, etc?

Power supplies: I forget the ones I've used over the years, everything from generic retailer brand, the one that came with my Acer (current PC, 2007, 3rd or 4th hard drive, 4th power supply, 2nd video card), to the current PC Power & Cooling Silencer 750. Everything is at least surge protected, my PC is the only one on a UPS (Desktop, desktop, laptop), no apparent change in part longevity.

UPS: Currently CyberPower, which I got after my APC died (most of my UPSs have been APC)

HDD: Over the years... everyone. WD, Maxtor have been common brands, a few Hitachi, a few Toshiba and the one that died was a Seagate. Currently have a WD 500gb and 2 Seagate 1.5tb. Almost none of the hard drives have been purchased at the same time (Example: There was almost a year separating the purchase of the 2 1.5tb drives). Used to frequent CompUSA, Office Depot and Circuit City for hard drives, recent have been going to Microcenter. Drives have been a mix of OEM, OEM packaging, and retail packaging (current ones have been Microcenter and I think retail packaged drives (Definitely the WD 500, not so sure about the Seagates))

Power is pretty stable here. Same at the last 2 houses. Been in this house for 6 months now, first hardware failure.

For the record, this is over about 15 years. Laptop drives die quicker (esp optical, even unused), desktop power supplies die quicker. Original parts usually live about 6 months longer than replacements. Monitors live forever. Motherboards... before 2004 I was lucky to get a year out of a desktop motherboard. Went to pre-built PCs because I was sick and tired of no real warranty, motherboards survive years now. Considering building again.

intheflesh
Nov 4, 2008


How does one go about adjusting the spin down time of an external drive? Is this even possible?
I have an external drive, on which lives music, which I listen to nearly 100% of the time the computer is on. Problem is, I use Spotify, and not all the music that is played lives on my computer. Many times, if a song in the playlist lives on the internet and not locally, that is enough time for the external to decide it is bedtime. This would just be an annoyance waiting for the drive to spin back up, and I can endure a large break between songs, but the main issue is that while the external is re-discovering itself and spinning up, EVERYTHING locks up. Very aggravating if I'm gaming, kinda annoying anytime else.

movax
Aug 30, 2008



intheflesh posted:

How does one go about adjusting the spin down time of an external drive? Is this even possible?
I have an external drive, on which lives music, which I listen to nearly 100% of the time the computer is on. Problem is, I use Spotify, and not all the music that is played lives on my computer. Many times, if a song in the playlist lives on the internet and not locally, that is enough time for the external to decide it is bedtime. This would just be an annoyance waiting for the drive to spin back up, and I can endure a large break between songs, but the main issue is that while the external is re-discovering itself and spinning up, EVERYTHING locks up. Very aggravating if I'm gaming, kinda annoying anytime else.

Star Wars Sex Parrot (e: Star Wars Sex Butt now apparently ) would know for sure/let you know if I'm full of poo poo, but external drives rock different firmwares than their desktop counterparts (obviously). Pretty sure their time is set at the factory (and probably changeable with some internal tool). I haven't gotten Windows HDD-spin down working reliably with externals, but you could check to see if that timer is set to something "low" (like 10 minutes)

The most irritating thing though is that some installers, especially Microsoft update packages, cause my external to spin-up, stalling everything for 10 seconds because the installer is (presumably) checking to see what drive to use for temp storage.

spasticColon
Sep 22, 2004

In loving memory of Donald Pleasance

My MSI HAWK GTX460 burned out...literally. I was having bluescreens while running games so I decided to run Heaven Benchmark while checking temps and there was a flash then a puff of smoke and there is a burn/scorch mark on the back of the video card. I put an old video card in the system to make sure there was nothing wrong with the rest of the system and it boots into Windows okay but I haven't run any games or put a load on it. So does that mean only the video card burned out? I don't need to worry about the rest of the system do I?

Rexxed
May 1, 2010

Dis is amazing!
I gotta try dis!


spasticColon posted:

My MSI HAWK GTX460 burned out...literally. I was having bluescreens while running games so I decided to run Heaven Benchmark while checking temps and there was a flash then a puff of smoke and there is a burn/scorch mark on the back of the video card. I put an old video card in the system to make sure there was nothing wrong with the rest of the system and it boots into Windows okay but I haven't run any games or put a load on it. So does that mean only the video card burned out? I don't need to worry about the rest of the system do I?

There's no guarantees, having one component die due to an electrical fault can kill others. However, I have seen video cards die and the system continue on with a replacement. You may even be within the warranty period for an RMA on the card itself. If the system is working alright with a replacement card you might be lucky!

spasticColon
Sep 22, 2004

In loving memory of Donald Pleasance

Rexxed posted:

There's no guarantees, having one component die due to an electrical fault can kill others. However, I have seen video cards die and the system continue on with a replacement. You may even be within the warranty period for an RMA on the card itself. If the system is working alright with a replacement card you might be lucky!

The card should still have a warranty because I got just over a year ago and I think it has a two year warranty. When I had the system running earlier, it installed the driver for the old video card and had to reboot and did so without issue so that's promising. I have the system turned off and unplugged for right now but later I'll run memtest and Prime95 on it and watch it like a hawk. I just rebuilt the system last year so the components should still have a warranty I would think.

intheflesh
Nov 4, 2008


movax posted:

... I haven't gotten Windows HDD-spin down working reliably with externals, but you could check to see if that timer is set to something "low" (like 10 minutes)...

Thanks, I'll try using that, maybe give a call to Seagate support to see if they have any insight. This particular external is just a fancy USB/power base thing that a normal seeming internal drive in extra plastic cladding plugs in to. The base and drive seperate easily, and the drive looks the same as any SATA internal, except for the plastic surround. Would it perhaps fix my issues if I ditched the USB dock and ran it internally? In all reality, the drive is attached to my main computer 99% of the time, I really don't use the 'portability' of an external.I've plugged other old internal SATA HDDs onto this base to pull files, and those all worked fine, so I only assume that the drive will work when plugged in internally.


COMPLETELY UNRELATED
Picked up a cheap crappy old Asus netbook (eee pc 1000HA) to use for skype/internet while I'm at work. Problem is, the webcam is upside-down somehow. Apparently this is an issue with this model, something about the cameras being constructed incorrectly. I've tried taking the thing apart to physically flip the camera in the housing, but it is such a shape that flipping it would require making new mounting holes and elongating some wires on a very very small connector, which my low amount of soldering skill does not agree with. I've used Manycam, and it works perfectly, but this thing is too old to run both Manycam and Skype at the same time. 1.6Ghz atom or something, 1GB ram. According to taskmanager, Manycam eats up about 80% of processor power to flip the webcam's image 30 times a second, leaving not enough power left to run Skype. Is there another program or something I could use that would flip the video in real-time without using all of my processing power?
And yes, I've tried many drivers. This netbook apparently shipped with like 10 different webcams, I've tried all the drivers, and every one that worked had the same upside-down image.

TL;DR
Thanks for the external HDD advice, I'll try stuff.
Is there a very lightweight program that will flip a webcam's video in real-time?

MOAR
Mar 6, 2012



intheflesh posted:

TL;DR
Thanks for the external HDD advice, I'll try stuff.
Is there a very lightweight program that will flip a webcam's video in real-time?

I think "ManyCam" can do it - not sure if available on the freebie version, there is also a pro (paid) version from what I remember.

Glans Dillzig
Nov 23, 2011



knickerbocker expert


MOAR posted:

think "ManyCam" can do it - not sure if available on the freebie version, there is also a pro (paid) version from what I remember.

intheflesh posted:

I've used Manycam, and it works perfectly, but this thing is too old to run both Manycam and Skype at the same time. 1.6Ghz atom or something, 1GB ram. According to taskmanager, Manycam eats up about 80% of processor power to flip the webcam's image 30 times a second, leaving not enough power left to run Skype. Is there another program or something I could use that would flip the video in real-time without using all of my processing power?

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Eletriarnation
Apr 6, 2005

People don't appreciate the substance of things...
objects in space.


Alereon posted:

Nope. Basically nothing you can do to harddrives short of knocking them around, feeding them lovely power, or letting them get stupid hot (>50C) will affect their lifespans. For what little it's worth, I've got three WD harddrives in my system and I shut it down every night, they're going strong in their fourth year.

This is maybe a bit pedantic because it doesn't come up much, but running hard drives below 25C will begin to decrease their life too according to the big Google study. Although "normal" ambient temperature is around 22, in my experience a running drive in a well-ventilated case will usually reach equilibrium around 30C so that's safe.

Doing what I used to and using outside air for your intakes in the winter is probably not a good idea, though.

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