Search Amazon.com:
Register a SA Forums Account here!
JOINING THE SA FORUMS WILL REMOVE THIS BIG AD, THE ANNOYING UNDERLINED ADS, AND STUPID INTERSTITIAL ADS!!!

You can: log in, read the tech support FAQ, or request your lost password. This dumb message (and those ads) will appear on every screen until you register! Get rid of this crap by registering your own SA Forums Account and joining roughly 150,000 Goons, for the one-time price of $9.95! We charge money because it costs us $3,400 per month for bandwidth bills alone, and since we don't believe in shoving popup ads to our registered users, we try to make the money back through forum registrations.
«496 »
  • Post
  • Reply
Smackbilly
Jan 3, 2001
What kind of a name is Pizza Organ! anyway?

Does anyone else experience the problem with Amarok where the episodes of a podcast show up in pretty much random order?

When I subscribe to a podcast, the episodes under the podcast heading in the playlist sidebar show up in seemingly random order, and they re-shuffle randomly every time I click the "playlists" header (the one which should alternate sorting between forward and reverse order).

Does anyone know what causes this and/or how to fix it? This makes the "keep only x episodes of a podcast" option entirely useless because it will basically end up keeping x randomly selected episodes, rather than the most recent x episodes.

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

iceslice
May 20, 2005


I've got ubuntu hardy running dual monitors. Is there a key command to have all open applications center on the main monitor. I find my self watching movies with my monitor turned towards my bed and don't want to get up to move things from my secondary (which is block by the first being turned). I'm sure there is a gnome trick that I can bind to a key combination to solve this.

cocaine
Apr 12, 2008


Im running arch with openbox and pcmanfm as my file manager (without the desktop daemon).

How do I get a fully functional clipboard? I can copy and paste no problems as long as the app I'm copying from is still running when I paste. I want a clipboard that remembers even after I've closed the poo poo I'm running (ala ubuntu, windows, etc).

GringoGrande
Jul 27, 2001
Nah...

Is it possible to "intercept" file access in linux? Most programs usually dumps the config files in $HOME and to avoid having to recompile every program to put it somewhere else, would it be possible to write a daemon that automatically maps access of the file $HOME/.foo to $HOME/.config/.foo? I was casually looking into inotify, but I don't know enough about kernel hacking to know if that is up the wrong tree, since it might not be fast enough.

JoeNotCharles
Mar 3, 2005

Yet beyond each tree there are only more trees.


You've got lots of options for this.

If the program only uses $HOME for its config files, you can probably start it with "HOME=$HOME/.config appname". You might be able to use chroot to make it run completely in its own directory. Or you could write a library that redefines the "open" system call (at least) and load it with LD_PRELOAD. Or if you want to install one daemon which monitors everything system-wide, try libFAM. (That's a higher-level wrapper around inotify - use that instead of using the kernel directly. I don't know too much about it so I'm not sure if it's completely suitable.)

Peanutmonger
Dec 6, 2002


JoeNotCharles posted:

You've got lots of options for this.

If the program only uses $HOME for its config files, you can probably start it with "HOME=$HOME/.config appname". You might be able to use chroot to make it run completely in its own directory. Or you could write a library that redefines the "open" system call (at least) and load it with LD_PRELOAD. Or if you want to install one daemon which monitors everything system-wide, try libFAM. (That's a higher-level wrapper around inotify - use that instead of using the kernel directly. I don't know too much about it so I'm not sure if it's completely suitable.)

What about the easiest way, symlinking ~/.original to ~/.config/.original? Those other options seem likely to break other things...

edit: However, I guess that still leaves a file in your home directory. But that's what hidden files are for, anyway.

GringoGrande
Jul 27, 2001
Nah...

Peanutmonger posted:

What about the easiest way, symlinking ~/.original to ~/.config/.original? Those other options seem likely to break other things...

edit: However, I guess that still leaves a file in your home directory. But that's what hidden files are for, anyway.
That pretty much misses the point entirely.

But thanks, JoeNotCharles, your answer lead me to searching around that someone has already done it the LD_PRELOAD route and it's called libetc.

Heran Bago
Aug 18, 2006





I installed ubuntu not too long ago and have some random questions. Sorry if I'm unclear or use Windows-specific terms. These could also be more debian or distro specific.


Is there a linux equivalent of Norton Ghost? I really don't want to have to go through the driver issues and various set-ups again should I wipe the drive.

How can I make the directories whose names begin with a period normally visible?

How can I make the graphical file browser as dangerously free as windows'? I want to be able to open text files and edit/save them right from the GUI as that's what I use to locate a lot of things. I can only seem to do it with sudo from the terminal. Basically, I want the explorer-equivalent to have sudo powers.

I also want to change the permissions on my NTFS drive but I can look that up. I know that these kinds of things are disabled for safety but poo poo.


Also, what are the best window decorators? I only remember Emerald from when Beryl was the cool thing.

Heran Bago fucked around with this message at May 27, 2008 around 06:04

CRIP EATIN BREAD
Jun 24, 2002

Hey stop worrying bout my acting bitch, and worry about your WACK ass music. In the mean time... Eat a hot bowl of Dicks! Ice T


Heran Bago posted:

Is there a linux equivalent of Norton Ghost? I really don't want to have to go through the driver issues and various set-ups again should I wipe the drive.

Doesn't Norton Ghost run from a CD? It should still work in this situation.

Heran Bago posted:

How can I make the directories whose names begin with a period normally visible?

Are you doing this from the GUI interface? Right click and hit "Show hidden files" and it should propagate across Nautilus (the GUI file browser) and all GTK apps.

Heran Bago posted:

How can I make the graphical file browser as dangerously free as windows'? I want to be able to open text files and edit/save them right from the GUI as that's what I use to locate a lot of things. I can only seem to do it with sudo from the terminal. Basically, I want the explorer-equivalent to have sudo powers.

This is a very, very bad idea, but either add a new menu item to run this command, or hit ALT-F2 (if you are running Gnome), type "gksudo nautilus" (no quotes, of course) and type your password.

Zuph
Jul 24, 2003
Zupht0r 6000 Turbo Type-R

Heran Bago posted:

Is there a linux equivalent of Norton Ghost? I really don't want to have to go through the driver issues and various set-ups again should I wipe the drive.

Oh come on, it was the last post on the previous page!

Zuph posted:

Does it have to be a ghost image?

The best Linux imaging utility out there is probably clonezilla: http://www.clonezilla.org/

It doesn't make ghost images, but it's functionally identical, and has a lot of other neat features that you'll probably never use.

tehk
Mar 10, 2006

[-4] Flaw: Heart Broken - Tehk is extremely lonely. The Gay Empire's ultimate weapon finds it hard to have time for love.

Heran Bago posted:

How can I make the graphical file browser as dangerously free as windows'? I want to be able to open text files and edit/save them right from the GUI as that's what I use to locate a lot of things. I can only seem to do it with sudo from the terminal. Basically, I want the explorer-equivalent to have sudo powers.
That would be a bad idea but if you must add a entry in your menu for 'gksudo nautilus'. The better solution is get some nautilus scripts like the 'Edit as root' one. What this will do is give you a right click option to edit a file as root(gksudo gedit).

edit: Someone has been working on getting policykit integration into nautilus to give you a unlock button like you see in the settings dialogs in the latest fedora or ubuntu, lets hope this is done in a few even releases. I think it really depends on GIO/GVFS and their policy kit support which I have not looked into.

edit: Here is an example edit as root script
~/.gnome2/nautilus-scripts/edit_as_root
code:
#!/bin/sh
gksudo gedit $NAUTILUS_SCRIPT_SELECTED_URIS
Note that you will need to right click on that file and enter its properties. Then check "Allow executing [...]"

tehk fucked around with this message at May 27, 2008 around 16:42

Heran Bago
Aug 18, 2006





Your Japanese Dad posted:

Are you doing this from the GUI interface? Right click and hit "Show hidden files" and it should propagate across Nautilus (the GUI file browser) and all GTK apps.
Thanks. How about from the terminal with 'dir' or 'ls'?

Zuph posted:

Oh come on, it was the last post on the previous page!
Oops. Well thanks.

tehk posted:

The better solution is get some nautilus scripts like the 'Edit as root' one.
Perfect!

tehk
Mar 10, 2006

[-4] Flaw: Heart Broken - Tehk is extremely lonely. The Gay Empire's ultimate weapon finds it hard to have time for love.

Heran Bago posted:

Thanks. How about from the terminal with 'dir' or 'ls'?

Oops. Well thanks.

Perfect!

Control-h shows hidden files, or the checkbox in the view menu

edit: Missed the first question: In the terminal you can do 'ls -a'. You can the read manual page with 'man ls' or the help with 'ls --help'

tehk fucked around with this message at May 27, 2008 around 17:06

Heran Bago
Aug 18, 2006





Scripts in Nautilus aren't appearing for me. Neither with the right-click menu nor the file menu, not even as root. I've been googling and can't figure out why it isn't there. I installed scripts (nautilus-script-collection) and nautilus-script-manager seems to be fine.

On top of that I can't turn off the wallpaper/background in Nautilus. Just the whole desktop which takes icons with it.There are other background managers but it seems insistent on hogging it. I might have to compile my own, but first I have to round up the libs like eel that aren't in the repositories.


Guess I'll try other file managers. =/

tehk
Mar 10, 2006

[-4] Flaw: Heart Broken - Tehk is extremely lonely. The Gay Empire's ultimate weapon finds it hard to have time for love.

Heran Bago posted:

Scripts in Nautilus aren't appearing for me. Neither with the right-click menu nor the file menu, not even as root. I've been googling and can't figure out why it isn't there. I installed scripts (nautilus-script-collection) and nautilus-script-manager seems to be fine.
Blah I am not sure abut scripts any more but there is a better solution that I just remembered.

sudo apt-get install nautilus-actions

Anyway you can also use nautilus-actions and nautilus-actions-config t do cool things.

Here is how I would do it:


That will give you a right click menu entry when you click on a file. You can mess around with it ad make cool things

Heran Bago
Aug 18, 2006





tehk posted:

Blah I am not sure abut scripts any more but there is a better solution that I just remembered.

That's much better.

I figured out that nautilus-script-collection didn't actually install any scripts. At least, not where it's supposed to.


What I really need to get used to is the directory structure. It's a mystery to me if I should look for program data in usr, bin, sys, etc. They all sound so good.

Heran Bago fucked around with this message at May 28, 2008 around 01:15

deong
Jun 13, 2001

I'll see you in heck!


Heran Bago posted:

That's much better.

I figured out that nautilus-script-collection didn't actually install any scripts. At least, not where it's supposed to.


What I really need to get used to is the directory structure. It's a mystery to me if I should look for program data in usr, bin, sys, etc. They all sound so good.

Which works wonders for this
code:
~$ which ls
/bin/ls
But generally, it does not matter since most should be in your path:
~$ $PATH
bash: /usr/local/sbin:/usr/local/bin:/usr/sbin:/usr/bin:/sbin:/bin:/usr/games:

tehk
Mar 10, 2006

[-4] Flaw: Heart Broken - Tehk is extremely lonely. The Gay Empire's ultimate weapon finds it hard to have time for love.

deong posted:

But generally, it does not matter since most should be in your path:

He is speaking about "program data" by which I assume he means configuration files, libraries, executables, and general data files.

My tip would be looking up the file system hierarchy.

rugbert
Mar 26, 2003
yea, fuck you

How do I remove buttons from say the application menu? I uninstalled Wine but the menu selection didnt go with it.

While Im at it, how do I create icon (launchers right?) for some command line only apps? And set them to prompt for root password if needed?

tehk
Mar 10, 2006

[-4] Flaw: Heart Broken - Tehk is extremely lonely. The Gay Empire's ultimate weapon finds it hard to have time for love.

General answer is to right click your menu and choose 'Edit Menu'

rugbert posted:

How do I remove buttons from say the application menu? I uninstalled Wine but the menu selection didnt go with it.
However to really delete wine launchers delete them from ~/.local/share/applications/wine/

rugbert posted:

While Im at it, how do I create icon (launchers right?) for some command line only apps? And set them to prompt for root password if needed?

I am not sure what your asking exactly. In the 'Edit Menu' thing you can add entries with the 'Application in terminal' type chosen.

rugbert
Mar 26, 2003
yea, fuck you

tehk posted:

General answer is to right click your menu and choose 'Edit Menu'

However to really delete wine launchers delete them from ~/.local/share/applications/wine/


I am not sure what your asking exactly. In the 'Edit Menu' thing you can add entries with the 'Application in terminal' type chosen.

sweet thanks (tho I cant find the path mentioned). Should those wine launchers be working? I just clicked wine notepad and it opens notepad... are those not part of the wine package?

tehk
Mar 10, 2006

[-4] Flaw: Heart Broken - Tehk is extremely lonely. The Gay Empire's ultimate weapon finds it hard to have time for love.

rugbert posted:

sweet thanks (tho I cant find the path mentioned). Should those wine launchers be working? I just clicked wine notepad and it opens notepad... are those not part of the wine package?

Make sure you have wine removed. Try to run 'sudo aptitude purge wine'. Is that the only entry? If so then the ~/.local/share/applications/wine/ directory should be empty since notepad comes with wine.

GringoGrande
Jul 27, 2001
Nah...

Heran Bago posted:

What I really need to get used to is the directory structure. It's a mystery to me if I should look for program data in usr, bin, sys, etc. They all sound so good.


If you are on a debian based distro, to see what files a package contains, you can always use 'dpkg -L <package>' which gives the full path of all the files installed. This is handy in alot of ways, especially in the beginning when you are unsure of the directory structure and what is supposed to be where.

For instance, you just installed a new package and you want to know what executable files it contained, you could do 'dpkg -L <package> | grep /usr/bin'

bootleg robot
Dec 8, 2004



Is there a linux equivalent to windirstat for Windows?

waffle iron
Jan 16, 2004


bootleg robot posted:

Is there a linux equivalent to windirstat for Windows?
I'm pretty sure that windirstat was a wholesale clone of KDirStat. Under GNOME there is an implementation called "Disk Usage Analyzer".

bootleg robot
Dec 8, 2004



waffle iron posted:

I'm pretty sure that windirstat was a wholesale clone of KDirStat. Under GNOME there is an implementation called "Disk Usage Analyzer".

Ahh, really? All of this linux stuff is still new to me. I assume KDirStat comes from KDE, right? I run Gnome on this laptop so I'll check out Disk Usage Analyzer. Thanks!

jegHegy
Mar 15, 2006

iŧ Kë3Ł, cħ gøÐ i- <Ecl8

bootleg robot posted:

Ahh, really? All of this linux stuff is still new to me. I assume KDirStat comes from KDE, right? I run Gnome on this laptop so I'll check out Disk Usage Analyzer. Thanks!

It's actually called Baobab if you need the name. Not sure it's a default GNOME app or just on Ubuntu.

iceslice
May 20, 2005


bootleg robot posted:

Is there a linux equivalent to windirstat for Windows?

"df" is a quick way CLI way to get the basics.

Excavation
May 18, 2004

FEED ME CRAYONS

iceslice posted:

"df" is a quick way CLI way to get the basics.

Don't forget the -h.

Saukkis
May 16, 2003



iceslice posted:

"df" is a quick way CLI way to get the basics.
And 'du' is the more advanced version.

bitprophet
Jul 22, 2004



Saukkis posted:

And 'du' is the slower, more resource-intensive version.

Fixed that for ya IOW, for those not familiar, 'df' reads some cached metadata about filesystem usage to give you totals for each partition or disk, so it runs instantly, but can't tell you stuff like "how much space does my movies folder take up".

'du', on the other hand, actually adds everything up in realtime, so it can take a really long time to run if you point it at e.g. a mostly-full dozens-or-hundreds-of-gigs partition, but is capable of more direct measurements like aforementioned movies folder.

I don't know the internals of du but I imagine its runtime is actually based on number of files, versus total disk space, so the movies folder may not be the best example - if I'm right, a folder with a few dozen 1 GB files would be du'd pretty quickly.

Obsolete
Jun 1, 2000


I've converted my old desktop PC into an Ubuntu file server that I've thrown in my closet, and I was wondering if there was an easier/better way to administer the files.

Right now, I've got a 20gb home partition, and then two 400gb drives that I'm using to store media on. Every time I want to copy or moves files to or from these drives, I need to use sudo, because I'm not the owner (root is) of the drive. I've since chown'd both drives to be me, and used chmod to make all files 777. However, every time a new file gets added to the drive(s), it makes the owner root. I don't want to have to sudo every single time I want to copy/move/delete something, and I don't exactly feel especially comfortable with having everything chmodded to 777. Is there an easier way to maintain this system?

Harokey
Jun 12, 2003

Memory is RAM! Oh dear!

Obsolete posted:

I've converted my old desktop PC into an Ubuntu file server that I've thrown in my closet, and I was wondering if there was an easier/better way to administer the files.

Right now, I've got a 20gb home partition, and then two 400gb drives that I'm using to store media on. Every time I want to copy or moves files to or from these drives, I need to use sudo, because I'm not the owner (root is) of the drive. I've since chown'd both drives to be me, and used chmod to make all files 777. However, every time a new file gets added to the drive(s), it makes the owner root. I don't want to have to sudo every single time I want to copy/move/delete something, and I don't exactly feel especially comfortable with having everything chmodded to 777. Is there an easier way to maintain this system?

What are you using to copy the files over to the drive?

Obsolete
Jun 1, 2000


Harokey posted:

What are you using to copy the files over to the drive?

Just cp commands. 99% of the time, I access the computer via SSH, so it's mostly just copying files from my laptop/other computers to one of those 400gb drives. rTorrent also downloads files to one of the drives. Even though I've logged in via SSH as myself, the main user, it places everything as root. It doesn't bother me enough to be ripping my hair out or anything, but it just doesn't feel "safe" to be constantly resetting permissions and ownership to 777.

Mr. Eric Praline
Aug 13, 2004
I didn't like the others, they were all too flat.


bitprophet posted:

I don't know the internals of du but I imagine its runtime is actually based on number of files, versus total disk space, so the movies folder may not be the best example - if I'm right, a folder with a few dozen 1 GB files would be du'd pretty quickly.
du just scans a directory for linked inodes, and then reads the header info for those inodes.

Mr. Eric Praline
Aug 13, 2004
I didn't like the others, they were all too flat.


Obsolete posted:

Just cp commands. 99% of the time, I access the computer via SSH, so it's mostly just copying files from my laptop/other computers to one of those 400gb drives. rTorrent also downloads files to one of the drives. Even though I've logged in via SSH as myself, the main user, it places everything as root. It doesn't bother me enough to be ripping my hair out or anything, but it just doesn't feel "safe" to be constantly resetting permissions and ownership to 777.
That doesn't sound right. If you're copying as a non-root user, the newly copied files should be owned by the person copying. Are you maybe using su without a - (dash) somewhere?

Rather than 777, remount the drives with "acl" as one of the options, and look up the commands for getfacl and setfacl. You can set NT-like permissions, and have fine-grained control over your files and directories.

One caveat for the ACLs is that tar won't save them, so restoring backups will lose then. (Look for an app called "star" to work around that)

Obsolete
Jun 1, 2000


chryst posted:

That doesn't sound right. If you're copying as a non-root user, the newly copied files should be owned by the person copying. Are you maybe using su without a - (dash) somewhere?

Rather than 777, remount the drives with "acl" as one of the options, and look up the commands for getfacl and setfacl. You can set NT-like permissions, and have fine-grained control over your files and directories.

One caveat for the ACLs is that tar won't save them, so restoring backups will lose then. (Look for an app called "star" to work around that)

Even when I download files with wget (without using sudo) when I'm logged in via SSH, the file defaults to being owned by root. I've gotten pretty used to the situation by now, as bizarre as it is, and I nearly always use a sudo command, but that just doesn't sound like that's the way it should be working. If it matters, my home partition, and the two mounted 400gb drives are all formatted as ext3, so there's no weird NTFS gibberish going on.

I've never used sudo with a dash before. I don't think I've ever even seen that before? I don't use "su," I always use "sudo." Any ideas? Thanks!

covener
Jan 10, 2004

You know, for kids!

Obsolete posted:

Even when I download files with wget (without using sudo) when I'm logged in via SSH, the file defaults to being owned by root.

Downloading to a root-owned and setuid or setgid directory?


code:
$ ls -ld x
drw[b]s[/b]r-xr-x 2 root covener 48 2008-05-29 20:09 x
edit: code tag isn't monospaced -- emphasis on the 's' in the modes

covener fucked around with this message at May 30, 2008 around 00:13

Obsolete
Jun 1, 2000


Nope. I get that when I download to my home directory, when I'm logged in as me. My two other drives are also chowned to me, and it happens there, too.

Edit: I haven't checked the setuid, I'll check that out.

Obsolete fucked around with this message at May 30, 2008 around 00:32

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

rugbert
Mar 26, 2003
yea, fuck you

I have a wireless mouse from kengisngton thats EXTREMELY sensitive, but the mouse applet doesnt affect it at all. any thoughts?

also - sun's virtualbox's seamless setup for XP is awesome as gently caress

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • Post
  • Reply
«496 »