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Martytoof
Feb 25, 2003



Awesome.

Awesome to
the MAX.




Apparently there is a rather large surplus of goaltenders, both ice and roller, that call SAS their home.

It's an amazingly fun position to play, and knowing you're the last line of defense really brings the game home. For better or for worse you're in it. When you make that amazing save, that's all you. When you give up that horrible three-mile-an-hour-floater, that was all you too bub.

Anyway, there's a surplus of goaltending information in SAS and we run the range from absolute beginners to the guys the beginners hope to be one day. If you've got any questions, feel free to ask.

Some good links of note are:

http://www.goaliestore.com/board -- Probably the highest traffic goalie forum. Moderate signal to noise ratio.
http://www.goalieboard.com -- I think this is where people go when they start to hate GSBB.
http://www.goaliemonkey.com http://www.goalieheaven.com -- A few pretty good stores for gear. I'm sure this list will grow once others post.

And since all us goalies tend to be gear whores, feel free to ask us about our expensive toys.

And since I can't resist, here's me showing off my horrible stick discipline. For my sake, I hope I was adjusting the stick or something. I dunno.



Edit:

Corey Wogtech has some good tips if you're looking for some basics:

Part 1, Part 2, Part 3

Zip! posted:

Some light reading for you guys on the importance of fluid intake;

http://englandhockey.co.uk/page.asp...earch=hydration

Martytoof fucked around with this message at Mar 30, 2014 around 19:55

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T-Bone
Sep 14, 2004

It always depends on the weather. When the weather is good, the team plays better.

Goalies from Massachusetts approve this message.

80085
Mar 19, 2001

Dos a cero!


What is your favorite type of defensemen to have on your team? A good stickhandling one, an offensive-minded one or a stay-at-home one? Do you prefer your d-men to try and block the shot or just get the hell out of your way so you could see the shot?

I've never had a friend that played goalie so I've always been curious as to what they think about defensemen. I played defense a lot when I played hockey and I always tried my best to not screen my own goalie as I thought that was a big no-no especially at the lower levels.

D C
Jun 19, 2004


Boys from Brazil LA.


80085 posted:

What is your favorite type of defensemen to have on your team? A good stickhandling one, an offensive-minded one or a stay-at-home one? Do you prefer your d-men to try and block the shot or just get the hell out of your way so you could see the shot?

I've never had a friend that played goalie so I've always been curious as to what they think about defensemen. I played defense a lot when I played hockey and I always tried my best to not screen my own goalie as I thought that was a big no-no especially at the lower levels.

I'm going to guess they want a defensemen that can handle the puck that puts defense before offense.

Clear out the net, let the goalie see the shots from the point.

PenguinManAmato
Nov 18, 2004

THERE CAN ONLY BE ONE

I have a thing with my defensemen that's pretty easy to learn.

I don't care if you're a puckhandler or a stay at home, just keep your positioning well and stand up your man (don't be a moving screen, fags), don't let your guy inside on you, and don't let him go outside-in on you. On a 2 on 1, play the pass and make sure the shooter doesn't cut back, let me handle the rest. On the power play, force guys outside and keep cross-ice passes down and let them hammer all day from outside. In general, if I am screened I will yell "SIGHT" and you should try and get inside of the puck so I can see, if I am not screened but trying to get the shooter to take a weak, lovely, low percentage shot, I will yell "SCREEN," ignore this and continue what you are doing.

PS I think right now Grims will take the mask until his comes back from the painter and then send it on to player-helmet dude. hit me with your addy so I can send 'er on.

UnmaskedGremlin
May 28, 2002

I hear there's gonna be cake!


My favorite all time D-man was this guy, Dave I think his name was. He played on my roller team for a few years (we were a team thrown together that ended up winning a couple championships), and he was fantastic. He was a solid stay at home guy, but scored a handful of goals every season too. He seemingly was always in the right spot, and he played on my right side, which has normally been my weaker side. He was more of a stay at home Dman than anything though. Man he was great.

Anyways, I don't mind when anyone blocks a shot, but all I ask is them is to make sure you're going to block it, or get enough of it that it's not going to come at me on an unexpected deflection. If not, just give me an open lane. Sticking a skate or stick out usually made things worse than better, IMO.

T-Bone
Sep 14, 2004

It always depends on the weather. When the weather is good, the team plays better.

That's an impossible question to answer. A physical defenseman in front of the net, a skating defenseman on the backcheck, a rushing defenseman when you're dropping the puck off behind the net, etc, etc. A lot of it is just comfort, if you know what someone is going to do, even if its not always the best decision, you can react accordingly.

If someone's going to block a shot, I'd rather it be a forward - #1 they tend to get a larger part of their body in front of the shot (at least the good ones, where as even good d-men tend to be preoccupied with front of the net coverage and end up sticking a skate or stick out), and #2 they're going to be higher up in the play, allowing me greater time to readjust if they gently caress up their block and tip it on goal.

T-Bone fucked around with this message at Feb 1, 2008 around 02:51

D C
Jun 19, 2004


Boys from Brazil LA.


T-Bone posted:

That's an impossible question to answer. A physical defenseman in front of the net, a skating defenseman on the backcheck, a rushing defenseman when you're dropping the puck off behind the net, etc, etc.

I'm taking offers.

Martytoof
Feb 25, 2003



Awesome.

Awesome to
the MAX.




Here's why I try to tell my D before each game:

- Go for the pass not the shot, on a 2 on 1.
- If the shot is off the ice and is on-net, please don't try to bat it down.
- Listen to me, I will tell you when you're screening me.
- Other than that, anything you can do to block the puck is much appreciated

I play with guys just coming out of Beginner leagues, so they're not always that on top of it. When I get a puck deflected behind me I think typically the defensemen feel worse about it than I do. I just remind them not to bat it down next time.

The only thing I really wish a lot of defensemen would do is listen more when they're in the offensive zone. I've been burned on a lot of 1-0 or 2-0 rushes because the defensemen get tunnel vision and don't hear me screaming about the forward that's drifting behind them looking for a home run pass. But I've been in that situation as well so I know it's not always easy to listen in two directions at once. So to answer your question in a roundabout way, I prefer a defenseman who is offensively minded but remembers to look backwards once in a while. Again, this will probably vary with every goalie you ask.

Rick Grimes
Oct 12, 2005

We Are The Walking Dead

The D in front of me is pretty solid, save for one. He never skates back, won't block shots, and will constantly sit right in front of me, effectively screening me from the play. The best was the game he showed up pretty wasted. At one point, on a scramble in front of the net, he fell down with the puck at his feet. As I go to cover, he pushes it with his skate, right on to the stick of a forward from the other team. Right in the net.

Otherwise, we lost our best defensive forward for 2 games. He's not the best at scoring, but makes up for it elsewhere. Now, at Epic Center, like most roller leagues I'd assume, is no checking. With about 3 mins left in the first half, we're up 5-2, and he'd been hit into the boards at least 5 times now with no call. In a play behind the other net, he's hit again, and dropped to the ground. Finally, the ref is calling a delayed penalty. But, Tim had had enough. First he trips the guy that hit him, then gets up and gives him a cross check to the side of the head. Shattered the kids visor, and was tossed. Was it dirty? Of course it was, but it never would have gotten that far if the refs call one of the hits earlier in the game.

redscare
Aug 14, 2003


Back when I played (up until the end of high school), my big thing with my defense was STAY THE gently caress OUT OF MY WAY. Big thing #2 was get THEM the gently caress out of the way. I never liked it when they'd try to block a shot because that often meant deflection or some kind of trainwreck. Get in their way, make them take a bad shot or make a bad pass, and cut off said passing lanes. That's what I always liked.

Someday I'll start playing again. If only it wasnt so drat expensive.

Aniki
Mar 21, 2001

Wouldn't fit...

When I play inline, I want more of a stay at home defensemen, since my team gives up a lot of breakaways and it is nice to have someone there to play the pass so that I can focus on the shooter and clear loose pucks in front of the net. If we he can block a few shots along the way and not constantly screen me, then that's a bonus. We had one guy on my last team that could do that, but when he was off the "ice", our team concept of defense was non-existant and everyone pretty much just chased the puck, which led to me being bombarded with breakaways all game.

When I play ice and we can actually have two men dedicated to defense, then I'm a bit more open about what I want from my defensemen. Clearing loose pucks is still a priority, but if they want to be a little more involved in offense, then that is fine with me since breakaways are rarer and slower developing in ice hockey. I will admit that if the defensemen is more involved in the offense, then he needs to be able to backcheck and at least try to stop the breaking shooter from getting off a clean shot.

Aniki
Mar 21, 2001

Wouldn't fit...

Do you guys have any advice on learning to track the puck off of your pads? I generally do a good job of stopping the first shot, but I struggle finding the puck after I made the initial save. I know that part of the problem is that I try to rely on feel too much, so I'll have times where I made the initial save and thought that I had control of the puck only to have someone pluck the puck off of my pads and into the net. I know that I need to get better at not losing track of the puck after it hits my body/pads, but are there any tips or even drills that I could do to help improve my awareness of the puck after making the initial save?

crusader donkey
Oct 10, 2007

Hungry For The Cup (But Settling For Nachos)

PenguinManAmato posted:

PS I think right now Grims will take the mask until his comes back from the painter and then send it on to player-helmet dude. hit me with your addy so I can send 'er on.

You're the coolest guy on the internet, PMA. Grimes, send me an email or message on AIM when you're ready to pass it on.

As for defense, I get disappointed when my defense blocks shots unless it's a tight game because I like to see as many shots as I can. If we're losing 6-0, which happens pretty frequently with my team, what's the point of blocking a shot and possibly getting hurt anyway? In roller, I think the ideal defenseman is a fast skater who can pass the puck. Of course I have none of those on my team

Question for serious roller hockey goalies: What do your average stats look like? Sv% and GAA especially. I feel like I'm pretty good and get comments from refs and opposing players, but my stats still seem pretty mediocre in my eyes. I think it's because I face a lot of really quality scoring chances. I also have nothing to compare to so i don't know what's normal.

T-Bone
Sep 14, 2004

It always depends on the weather. When the weather is good, the team plays better.

Aniki posted:

Do you guys have any advice on learning to track the puck off of your pads? I generally do a good job of stopping the first shot, but I struggle finding the puck after I made the initial save. I know that part of the problem is that I try to rely on feel too much, so I'll have times where I made the initial save and thought that I had control of the puck only to have someone pluck the puck off of my pads and into the net. I know that I need to get better at not losing track of the puck after it hits my body/pads, but are there any tips or even drills that I could do to help improve my awareness of the puck after making the initial save?

One of my high school goalies has this problem, and it seems to somewhat be a symptom of extreme reliance on the butterfly (basically he's loathe to get out of it after the initial save, even if he's not quite sure where the puck is).

To help counter this, I run a good five-ten minutes of scramble drills with him every practice - where the first shooter fires a low shot from the slot, and the second shooter comes from the side boards and plays the rebound until it is covered, in the corner, or in the net.

Secondly and more importantly, on just about every drill I run with him I'll stop it if he isn't looking pucks into his equipment. I don't care how comfortable you are with your pads or gloves, if you're not looking the puck all the way into your save its going to hurt you eventually.

UnmaskedGremlin
May 28, 2002

I hear there's gonna be cake!


crusader donkey posted:

Question for serious roller hockey goalies: What do your average stats look like? Sv% and GAA especially. I feel like I'm pretty good and get comments from refs and opposing players, but my stats still seem pretty mediocre in my eyes. I think it's because I face a lot of really quality scoring chances. I also have nothing to compare to so i don't know what's normal.

I haven't played in a while, but I think I was around a 4.5 to 5 GAA and probably around .850 save percentage last I played I think. I used to see like 35-40 shots a game usually. I was never a superstar, but got the job done. But I always felt that you needed to score at least 5 goals to win in roller anyways...at least at the low rec-type levels I was playing at most recently.

EDIT: I used to get comments from refs and opponents and stuff, but I think it used to be because I used to make a lot of flashy, low probability saves, but I'd be guaranteed a soft goal or two a game. Breakaways, 2 on 1s or 2-0's, side to side, etc. I was unstoppable, but put a slapshot from the point on me? Off my glove and in. Or this one, which I was guaranteed to do a couple times a season, I go out to play a puck in the corner or something, flub it, or mis-shoot it, and put it right on an opponent's stick for the easy goal. Last game I played when we got knocked out of the playoffs (which was a year or so ago) I gave up a late goal that put them up by two, that was like that.

UnmaskedGremlin fucked around with this message at Feb 1, 2008 around 15:42

sba
Jul 9, 2001

The struggle is real.

Lost to the team in our league that's 16-0 last night. But in the handshake line I got a lot of glowing praise, so that always feels nice.

"You were good, nice game"
"You didn't have much help"

One guy on the other team even headbutted my mask.

I've been told I play a lot like Lundqvist.

UnmaskedGremlin
May 28, 2002

I hear there's gonna be cake!


sba posted:

I've been told I play a lot like Lundqvist.

Do you close your glove when you make a glove save or catch the puck? Because he doesn't, and it drives me nuts.

titanium
Mar 11, 2004

NONE SHALL PASS!


Aniki posted:

Do you guys have any advice on learning to track the puck off of your pads? I generally do a good job of stopping the first shot, but I struggle finding the puck after I made the initial save. I know that part of the problem is that I try to rely on feel too much, so I'll have times where I made the initial save and thought that I had control of the puck only to have someone pluck the puck off of my pads and into the net. I know that I need to get better at not losing track of the puck after it hits my body/pads, but are there any tips or even drills that I could do to help improve my awareness of the puck after making the initial save?

Be sure to just practice keeping your eye on the puck during warm-ups or practice. Another thing you could do is suggest that the drills you do allow for the player to make rebound shots so that you dont get in a "the first save was good enough" mindset. It should become instinct to either cover or divert the puck from the crease after some practice.

Regarding communication with my defense (besides what has already been said) I really hammer the importance of stopping cross slot passes with the more casual group I tend for. I'll take a shallow angle shot any day over a cross slot one-timer 1' from the crease. A lack of trust in your defensemen can lead to you cheating away from that shallow angle shooter and make you look like an idiot because you had to pay too much attention to what’s going on behind or to the side of you.

I lucked out and made a friend with someone I met on goaliestore.com that got me in with a younger NHL/AHL/MN Gopher hockey alumni group. This has done a lot of great things for my game, these guys don’t try to shoot for open spots they pick open spots to shoot. Any bad habits you've had get fixed fast or they're going to find a new goalie. Recognizing why you've been scored on is something you must do every time. I have the mentality that there’s no save a physically fit goalie can’t make.

Here’s a list of things I think about before every game

1. Square to the puck. Shoulders and toes square to the puck. This is the number one thing Warren Strelow emphasized at his camps, there’s no reason you shouldn’t be able to make the first save if you’re squared up and on your angles.

2. Angles. Don’t get pushed back into the net or you’re going to let the shooter see to much twine.

3. Patience. Don’t make the first move you should react to the shot not the shooter trying to make a fool out of you

4. Observe the environment. You need to know where your defensemen are covering and where the next shot may be coming from after a quick pass.


There’s a lot more to be said on the topic sorry for rambling. I’m just a longtime goalie that loves the sport and enjoys helping others

JungleMan
Apr 6, 2004



Are goalies all insane or just most?
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WRc5Qm_oNeU

sba
Jul 9, 2001

The struggle is real.

UnmaskedGremlin posted:

Do you close your glove when you make a glove save or catch the puck? Because he doesn't, and it drives me nuts.

He uses a REALLY stiff palm, so stiff that the glove doesn't close, he cradles the puck in the pocket like a lacrosse stick.

I don't do this, my glove is actually really light and perfectly broken in, I don't think I'll ever replace it because it's so comfortable.

ElwoodCuse
Jan 11, 2004

we're puttin' the band back together

JungleMan posted:

Are goalies all insane or just most?

My question is who is MORE insane, goalies or left-handed pitchers?

Aniki
Mar 21, 2001

Wouldn't fit...

T-Bone posted:

One of my high school goalies has this problem, and it seems to somewhat be a symptom of extreme reliance on the butterfly (basically he's loathe to get out of it after the initial save, even if he's not quite sure where the puck is).

To help counter this, I run a good five-ten minutes of scramble drills with him every practice - where the first shooter fires a low shot from the slot, and the second shooter comes from the side boards and plays the rebound until it is covered, in the corner, or in the net.

Secondly and more importantly, on just about every drill I run with him I'll stop it if he isn't looking pucks into his equipment. I don't care how comfortable you are with your pads or gloves, if you're not looking the puck all the way into your save its going to hurt you eventually.

My friends and I always play rebounds when we drill, so I think that we are taking the right approach in that regard, but I think big issue is that I just don't watch the puck hit me all of the time. It is a terrible habit and it is something that can easily lead to a great save being nullified by a garbage goal. I've gotten better at tracking the puck off of the stick and now I need to follow the puck into my body/gloves so that I don't lose sight of rebounds and actually know when I'm covering the puck and not just hoping that I somehow pinned it underneath my body.

titanium posted:

Be sure to just practice keeping your eye on the puck during warm-ups or practice. Another thing you could do is suggest that the drills you do allow for the player to make rebound shots so that you dont get in a "the first save was good enough" mindset. It should become instinct to either cover or divert the puck from the crease after some practice.

We try to do a lot of drills where they start off by shooting the puck off of my leg pads and we play the rebounds. I do well when I start standing up, but I really want to do a similar drill where I start out in a butterfly and work on tracking the puck and rebound control from that position. That way it at least puts me into the situation where I'm struggling and I'm forced to work on tracking the puck and playing rebounds from that position. I think that if I can get this issue sorted, then I'll be a much better goaltender, since I know that relying on feel and peripheral vision is a very risky and ineffective way to play net.

T-Bone
Sep 14, 2004

It always depends on the weather. When the weather is good, the team plays better.

Aniki posted:

I've gotten better at tracking the puck off of the stick and now I need to follow the puck into my body/gloves so that I don't lose sight of rebounds and actually know when I'm covering the puck and not just hoping that I somehow pinned it underneath my body.

I've found that rapid fire and warmup drills actually help to reinforce this bad habit. If your goalie is trying to get in position for the next shot rather than worrying about the initial save he starts waving at high shots and gets casual with his rebound control.

I always try to get coaches away from these kind of drills when I'm helping out at another team's practice. There are better ways to condition your goalie.

p.s: the horseshoe is the most worthless loving drill in existence, both for goalies and players

double p.s: My high school team qualified for states last night and we're on a six game winning streak, I credit a lot of this to my starting goalie's loving amazing rebound control

T-Bone fucked around with this message at Feb 1, 2008 around 16:52

crusader donkey
Oct 10, 2007

Hungry For The Cup (But Settling For Nachos)

UnmaskedGremlin posted:

EDIT: I used to get comments from refs and opponents and stuff, but I think it used to be because I used to make a lot of flashy, low probability saves, but I'd be guaranteed a soft goal or two a game. Breakaways, 2 on 1s or 2-0's, side to side, etc. I was unstoppable, but put a slapshot from the point on me? Off my glove and in. Or this one, which I was guaranteed to do a couple times a season, I go out to play a puck in the corner or something, flub it, or mis-shoot it, and put it right on an opponent's stick for the easy goal. Last game I played when we got knocked out of the playoffs (which was a year or so ago) I gave up a late goal that put them up by two, that was like that.

Yeah, I tend to let in a softy even now and then, especially when playing late games. Playing a hockey game at 10pm really doesn't go well when you get up for work every day at 4:30am. I was really happy with my play this past season and my sv% was only .76 and my gaa was around 5.7. Granted it's a step up from two summers ago when the team went 0-13 and I had a 10.2 gaa and .615 sv%. I went 4-8 this past year, and we beat the third place team in the playoffs

UnmaskedGremlin posted:

Do you close your glove when you make a glove save or catch the puck? Because he doesn't, and it drives me nuts.

What up, I don't close my glove when I catch


edit: Jesus, I was just looking at stats from that 0-13 season. We lost by more than 5 every game but two (8-4 and 7-5). We never scored more than 5 goals (that happened 3 times) and allowed less than 9 only twice (see above). We didn't score till the third game of the season and when we did, the bench emptied in celebration.

crusader donkey fucked around with this message at Feb 1, 2008 around 17:15

sba
Jul 9, 2001

The struggle is real.

Aniki posted:

I just don't watch the puck hit me all of the time. It is a terrible habit and it is something that can easily lead to a great save being nullified by a garbage goal. I've gotten better at tracking the puck off of the stick and now I need to follow the puck into my body/gloves so that I don't lose sight of rebounds and actually know when I'm covering the puck and not just hoping that I somehow pinned it underneath my body.


Sincerely,

Ray Emery

crusader donkey
Oct 10, 2007

Hungry For The Cup (But Settling For Nachos)

I'm going to be in the market for a new stick soon, can I get any suggestions? I'm currently using a CCM (Tacks, I believe) that's about 6 years old and a quick search leads me to believe they don't make it anymore. It's light as hell and after finding my current backups too heavy for my comfort, I'm looking for something similar. Nothing that's going to break my bank. I think I paid ~$30 for this one and it lasted me this long.

crusader donkey fucked around with this message at Feb 1, 2008 around 17:33

|||||||
Aug 19, 2004

I'm not Chemmy

I got suckered into playing net for 3 or 4 pickup games wearing pads out of the 1970s with road hockey gear and elbow pads. No one else wears equipment so the puck doesn't go too high or too hard. I'm actually starting to like it, this is weird.

Moe_Rahn
Jun 1, 2006

I got a question
why they hatin' on me?
I ain't did nothin' to 'em
but count this money
and put my team on
got my whole clique stunnin'
boy wassup
yeeeeeaaaaaahhhh

ElwoodCuse posted:

My question is who is MORE insane, goalies or left-handed pitchers?
I can't think of any goalies who were referred to as "the Mad <nationality>" the way that Al Hrabosky is the Mad Hungarian, so LHPs win automatically.

Der Shovel
Dec 26, 2003

Keep on dancing, Moomin

Martytoof posted:

And since I can't resist, here's me showing off my horrible stick discipline. For my sake, I hope I was adjusting the stick or something. I dunno.

That is horrible. Your stick should be cracking the shin of the closest opposing player!

I used to play hockey (in goal, naturally) but had to give it up due to crippling lack of funds. I play floorball these days, which is in many ways even more fun to goaltend at than hockey, but still... every time I do get a chance to play (subbing for a sick friend or something), it makes me want to go rob a bank and start playing again.

UnmaskedGremlin
May 28, 2002

I hear there's gonna be cake!


sba posted:

He uses a REALLY stiff palm, so stiff that the glove doesn't close, he cradles the puck in the pocket like a lacrosse stick.

I don't do this, my glove is actually really light and perfectly broken in, I don't think I'll ever replace it because it's so comfortable.

I know and I hate it.

My glove is the same way. I love the way its broken it, but it's beat to hell from playing on a painted cement surface for a lot of its life.

T-Bone
Sep 14, 2004

It always depends on the weather. When the weather is good, the team plays better.

You see a lot of pure butterfly goalies that don't close their gloves to catch the puck. I tend to think its because they think their glove is a physical extension of their chest area (where just about every puck should theoretically hit you if you play the style correctly).

Butterfly goalies keep their arms more tucked into their chest (for stabbing it against their upper body on chest shots, and for more coverage of the dreaded armpit hole), which results in less catching and more blocking. Also, this sometimes develops in them a bad tendency to let their gloves stay parallel with, or even in back of their chest, which makes it nearly impossible to catch a puck (think a t-rex with a catching glove).

Then again, I'm more worried about goalies who routinely try to make exact baseball style one pad Martin Brodeur glove saves (low percentage as gently caress) than goalies who get a bigger area of their chest/arm square to the puck and just try to block it.

T-Bone fucked around with this message at Feb 1, 2008 around 19:04

trilljester
Dec 7, 2004

"I have no idea what you guys are talking about. I'll have to see the video or something. Someone show me the video."


As a forward who plays a lot like Holmström, I humbly request you drat goalies stop whacking me with your stick when I'm outside the crease. Thank you.

My good friend who got me actually playing hockey is doing the goalie thing now for our beer league team. He's got all the gear, however the last couple of weeks his LCL on his right knee is acting up. Is that common with you folks?

ElwoodCuse
Jan 11, 2004

we're puttin' the band back together

Der Shovel posted:

rob a bank and start playing again

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LhMb1M5OycA

D C
Jun 19, 2004


Boys from Brazil LA.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2ywv_JCyolU

UnmaskedGremlin
May 28, 2002

I hear there's gonna be cake!


trilljester posted:

As a forward who plays a lot like Holmström, I humbly request you drat goalies stop whacking me with your stick when I'm outside the crease. Thank you.

Absolutely not.

Martytoof
Feb 25, 2003



Awesome.

Awesome to
the MAX.




||||||| posted:

I got suckered into playing net for 3 or 4 pickup games wearing pads out of the 1970s with road hockey gear and elbow pads. No one else wears equipment so the puck doesn't go too high or too hard. I'm actually starting to like it, this is weird.

One of us! One of us! One of us!

Der Shovel posted:

That is horrible. Your stick should be cracking the shin of the closest opposing player!

I don't really like to leave the crease to do it, but so help me I will!

Actually, one of my favourite things to do late in pickup when nobody is really trying anymore is to just leave the crease and start playing with the forwards. It's a great way to burn off that last 10 minutes of energy, and is great for a laugh!

Martytoof fucked around with this message at Feb 1, 2008 around 19:27

sba
Jul 9, 2001

The struggle is real.

trilljester posted:

As a forward who plays a lot like Holmström, I humbly request you drat goalies stop whacking me with your stick when I'm outside the crease. Thank you.

GET THE gently caress AWAY FROM US.

trilljester
Dec 7, 2004

"I have no idea what you guys are talking about. I'll have to see the video or something. Someone show me the video."


UnmaskedGremlin posted:

Absolutely not.

Penalty, UnmaskedGremlin, 2 minutes for interference.


Penalty, sba, 2 minutes for Unsportsmanlike Conduct.

trilljester fucked around with this message at Feb 1, 2008 around 20:03

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Rick Grimes
Oct 12, 2005

We Are The Walking Dead

Remind me why I hate Great Skate again. I'm in the market for some new pads. Currently, I'm wearing some hand me down 32" Mission Motion Lites, when I need to be wearing around a 36" pad. After talking with PMA a bit over AIM, I was looking at the Bauer Supreme SR Pads. I play only roller, so they'd be fine for me.

Then, it gets complicated. The gift card I have?
"Can't use it on our website, you need one of our E-Certificates"
Ok, so I can just come in and get it from the store then?
"You could, but it's $249 on the site only. In store, they're $329. Wait, it's clearance? Sorry, you can only order it from the site."

So unless I want some Rbk X-Pulse pads, as that seems to be what they stock exclusively, I'm SOL on using the gift card. Fantastic!

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