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Toast of Change
Nov 30, 2007
Once you pull the lever, you can never return...

Books I am lifting information/recipes from:
Taste of Home Magazine's Slow Cooker Classics
Rival Crock Pot slow cooker recipe card collection
Smart Crockery cooking, by Carol Heding Munson
The Gourmet Slow Cooker, by Lynn Alley

This is, as you might have guessed, the thread where we talk about Slow Cooking. I'm always honestly amazed when I get into a cooking discussion and people know very little about cooking with a Crock Pot. Knowledge always tends to vary, so I'm writing the basic information first, and will go into detail as the thread moves on.

What the hell is a crock pot and why should I cook with one?

Slow cookers, or crock pots, have been around for a very long time. They came into style for a bit in the 70s, and opinions always vary as to what good they are. This thread is very biased in saying that crock pots are awesome.

They're low-temperature heating elements, usually with a low setting of 200 degrees (f) and a high setting of 300 degrees (f). They come in several shapes, usually round, elliptical, and rectangular. You can get them with metal and ceramic bowls, removable or non-removable. My advice is to get one with a removable bowl for easy cleanup and storage of leftovers. They're also very large, 3-6 quarts in general.

They also contain a metric fuckton of advantages. They're energy efficient, taking up no more of your precious electricity than if you were to leave a lamp on for a while. For summer cooking, your kitchen won't heat up, leaving you nice and cool and your food nice and warm. And if you're the type to forget that something is on the stove, no need to worry. Cooking times can vary, and an extra half-hour won't kill your dish.

And despite the name, it doesn't take that long to prepare your food. You chop, pour, and on occasion sautee, and then dump it all in the pot and set it up. If you aren't a morning person, you can prepare an 8-hour (or however long you sleep) recipe before you hit the hay and have a delicious, no-effort breakfast in the morning. Or conversely, you can prepare your ingredients and head off to work knowing that when you get home, you'll have something hot and delicious that you can eat immediately. Slow cookers, due to long amounts of time and heat and large amounts of sauce are also ideal for taming the toughest of meats. Actually, it's better to start with a tough cut so you don't overcook your meat.

Okay, so what kind do I buy?

My current brand of choice is Rival Smartcookers. I have a 6-quart elliptical with a ceramic removable bowl and a glass lid, and it's pretty drat awesome. I can't give you much on other brands, but I must advise once again to get a removable bowl. Seriously, this will save you so much trouble come cleanup time. There's various advantages to your different bowl materials too.

Both ceramic and metal bowls are oven-safe, but your ceramic won't stand up to a broiler and you can't put your metal in the microwave. Ceramic bowls also aren't stove-safe, so you'd have to use a skillet to sautee your meats beforehand. Once you have one, it's probably going to work for you. Have fun experimenting with it, as any hurdles you encounter short of "HALP! My slow cooker starts an electrical fire every time it turns on!" or demonic possessions can most likely be overcome.

Now that I have this crazy thing in my kitchen, what do I do with it?
Well, there's a lot of things you ca-OH poo poo RECIPES!

I'm really scared this looks hard I'm no good in the kitchen, give me something that I couldn't possibly screw up.

Shekfester posted:

THE EASIEST CROCK POT RECIPE IN DA WOILD:

1- Take some boneless chicken breasts. As many as you want.
2- Put 'em in the pot.
3- Dump a jar of delicious salsa (or picante) onto them. They should just barely cover the breasts. Breasts (snicker).
4- Turn on pot. Wait for 6-8 hours.
5- Using a couple of forks, shred the meat
6- Add cilantro and a dollop of sour cream or a bunch of cheese unless your wife is nagging you about South Beach.
7- Nom!

-
Want variety? Go for it. I've added onions to zest it, served avacado on the side to balance it, and even threw a can of beer in there once to see what would happen (too runny). I usually make this on a weekday because the smell when you get home from work is heavenly, and I can literally put this together in less than 2 minutes in the AM.

Black Beans compliment the dish. Red potatoes (cooked separately) also make this complete (but again, 'South Beach'...)

EDIT: (I feel the compulsion to announce that I graduated from one of the top colleges in the country, since I just read this and realized how trashy the whole recipe sounds. It's healthy as hell and easy as pie if you do it straight. And tasty, tasty, tasty!)

Holy crap that was easy. Next you're going to tell me that I can make good BBQ with this crock pot. Oh wait--

http://www.goonswithspoons.com/Pulled_pork
Every time a slow cooker thread appears on GWS, this recipe crops up. Without fail. I'm befuddled as to why it hasn't been entered yet.
This recipe is crock-pot nirvana. It is nearly foolproof and is quite delicious. Do it Friday/Saturday night before football and you've got a gameday treat.
People tend to discard the released liquid at the bottom of the crock pot. I say this is a mistake. It easily becomes a wonderful sauce to the pork you just made. Take an additional 20 minutes and try the "advanced" recipe below.
Ingredients

- 5 lb of boston butt/pork shoulder
- 1 onion, peeled and quartered
- 1/3 cup apple cider vinegar
- ~1 cup dark brown sugar
- Worcestershire Sauce
- Salt & Pepper

Optional Ingredients

- 1/2 cup ketchup
- 1 tablespoon liquid smoke
- Garlic Powder
- Cayenne Pepper
- 1.5 tbsp cornstarch

BASIC PULLED PORK
1. Take a ~5lb pork shoulder and coat it with brown sugar. Place the quartered onion in the crock pot, place shoulder on top, and 1/3 cup of apple cider vinegar over top it. Dump in copious amounts of Worcestershire sauce, maybe 1/4 of a cup.
2. Cook on low for 8 hours. Flip it over half way thru if you remember, but this isn't critical.
3. Shred the meat with a fork. Toss any bone, fat, or gristle encountered during the shredding. Salt and pepper to taste.

ADVANCED PULLED PORK
1. Do all of the above. Set aside the shredded pork
2. Take the juice at the bottom of the pot, ladle off the fat, and put it in a sauce pan. Discard the onion. Heat over medium till it simmers.
3. Add 1/2 cup ketchup and 1 tbsp liquid smoke. Stir/whisk till combined.
4. take 1.5 tablespoons of cornstarch, and mix well with 1 cup cold water (DO NOT ADD DIRECTLY TO HOT JUICE OR IT WILL GET CLUMPY) Whisk into saucepan.
5. Let it simmer till you like the consistency. Now it's time to season. Salt and pepper to taste. With no salt it will taste like blandness. Add garlic powder and cayenne pepper to taste (~1/2 teaspoon each). Don't salt it till you like the consistency or it will be too salty after it reduces/thickens. Pour the sauce over the shredded and seasoned pork, mix it all up.

Okay, okay, I've got the main event down. How about soups?
From the Taste of Home Slow Cooker Classics:
Mexican Chicken Soup:
Cook time 3-4 hours

1 1/2 lbs boneless skinless chicken breasts, cubed
2 tsp Canola oil
1/2 cup water
2-3 Tbsp Taco seasoning
1 32 oz can v8 or other vegetable juice
1 16 oz jar of salsa
1 15 oz can black beans, rinsed and drained
1 10 oz package frozen corn, thawed
Sour cream
Cheddar cheese, grated
Fresh cilantro, chopped

In a large nonstick skillet, sautee chicken in oil until no longer pink. Add the water and taco seasoning, simmer until chicken is well-coated. Transfer to your slow cooker, add everything but the sour cream, cilantro, and cheese. Cover and cook on low for 3-4 hours or until heated through, serve garnished with a dollop of sour cream, chopped cilantro, and cheese. Serves 6.

I literally just finished eating this soup, and it's pretty drat awesome. What else can we make with a slow cooker? What's that you say?

Sides?
From Taste of Home Slow Cooker Classics:
Lemon Red Potatoes:
Cook time 2.5-3 hours

1 1/2 lbs medium red potatoes
1/4 cup water
1/4 cup butter, melted
1 tbsp lemon juice
3 tbsp fresh parsley
1 tbsp fresh chives
salt and pepper to taste

Cut a strip of peel from around the middle of each potato. Place potatoes and water in slow cooker. Cover and cook on high for 2-5 to 3 hours, do not overcook. Drain and return to cooker, now set on "keep warm". Combine the rest of the ingredients well and pour over the potatoes, season with salt and pepper. Serves 6.

Well, that was fun. I mean, you still have to use your stove to cook Vegetables, right? Right?

From The Gourmet Slow Cooker:
Baked Eggplant
Cook time 2 hours on high OR 5 hours on low

1/2 cup olive oil
3 eggplants, peeled and cut into cubes
3 cloves garlic, pressed
1 lemon's juice
salt to taste

Garnish:
extra virgin olive oil, drizzled
1/4 cup fresh parsley
1/4 cup coarsely chopped fresh mint leaves
4 oz feta cheese, crumbled (1 scant cup)

pour 1/4 cup olive oil into the slow cooker and rotate to coat the bottom. Add the eggplant and remaining 1/4 cup oil and toss. Cover and cook for specified time, until the eggplant is quite mushy. Stir once or twice when cooking.

Add the garlic, lemon juice, and salt, stir well to break up any large chunks. Transfer to bowl and garnish as you see fit. Serves 4 to 6.

Wow, that's pretty drat awesome. Well we know Desserts are- Oh that's just loving ridiculous.

From the Rival Crock Pot slow cooker recipe card collection:
Baked Fudge Pudding Cake
Cook time 3-4 hours

nonstick cooking spray
6 tbsp unsweetened cocoa powder
1/4 cup all-purpose flour
dash of salt
4 eggs
1 1/3 cups sugar
1 cup (2 sticks) unsalted butter, melted
1 tsp vanilla
grated peel of 1 orange
1/2 cup whipping cream
chopped toasted pecans and whipped topping to garnish

Spray slow cooker with nonstick spray, preheat on low. Combine cocoa, flour, and salt in a bowl and set aside. In a large bowl, beat the eggs with an electric mixer on medium until thickened, and gradually add sugar. beat about 5 minutes or until very thick and pale yellow. Mix in butter, vanilla, orange peel. Stir in the cocoa mixture, and then add cream until the whole mess is fully blended. Pour batter into the slow cooker. before placing the lid on the slow cooker, cover the opening with a paper towel to collect condensation. Make sure the paper towel doesn't touch the mixture. Larger slow cookers may need 2 connected paper towels. Place the lid on over the paper towels and cook 3-4 hours on low. Do NOT cook on high. sprinkle with pecans and serve with a dollop of whipped cream. Refrigerate leftovers. Serves 6-8.


So there you go, goons! Ask some questions, post some comments, share some recipes. The thread's all your!

Mod Edit: Added the salsa chicken and pulled pork recipes to the OP.

Somebody fucked around with this message at Jul 19, 2010 around 16:07

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Rorschach
Jul 9, 2007

He is hitting some excellent guitar notes right now. Aww yeah Teodor that third guitar note you played just now was perfect dogg. Maybe play it again a little later alright.


I've got a crock pot and was looking to make me some pulled pork sandwiches.

Any suggestions for cooking times, prep, sauces, seasonings, etc?

Kiri koli
Jun 20, 2005
Also, I can kill you with my brain.

I love crock pots. They make everything smell good for hours. I'm definitely going to try that soup recipe. Been wanting some good soup for a while...

I would definitely recommend getting an elliptical one over a round one. I was given a round one as a gift and it's awkward to use, especially if you want to have any kind of meat with bone in it.

I have two favorite recipes, one simple as can be and one more complicated but delicious!

"Borrowed" from About.com...

Italian Beef:

3 1/2 to 4 pounds beef roast, sirloin tip or rump roast
12 ounces (jar) Italian Giardiniera, drained, less if you want it less spicy
12 ounces (jar) pepperoncini peppers
1 envelope Italian salad dressing (zesty Italian)
10 ounce can condensed beef broth

Place beef roast in a 3 1/2 to 5-quart slow cooker. Combine Giardiniera, pepperoncini peppers, dry salad dressing mix, and condensed beef broth.
Add all mixture to crockpot. Cover and cook on LOW for 12 to 14 hours, until meat is very tender.

I get the spiciest Giardiniera I can find and cut up the pepperoncinis a bit since they seem to give up a little more flavor that way.

"Borrowed" from foodnetwork.com...

Chinese Slow-Cooked Pork Shoulder:

3 pounds trimmed pork shoulder
1 teaspoon Chinese five-spice powder
1 teaspoon kosher salt
3 cups chicken broth
1 cup dark soy sauce
1/4 cup packed dark brown sugar
2 tablespoons toasted sesame oil
1/2 teaspoon crushed red pepper
4 scallions, cut into 2-inch pieces
1 garlic head, halved
1 (2-inch) knob unpeeled fresh ginger, thinly sliced
8 dried shiitake mushrooms, optional
Hot cooked Chinese egg noodles, for serving

Rub the pork all over with the five-spice powder and salt. Add the chicken broth, soy sauce, brown sugar, sesame oil, and red pepper to the slow cooker. Stir to dissolve the sugar. Add the scallions, garlic, ginger, the mushrooms, if using, and the meat, turning it a few times to coat. Cover the cooker, set it on HIGH, and cook for 4 hours. Set the cooker on LOW and cook until the meat is very tender, at least another 2 hours (6 hours total).

Transfer the pork to a platter, cover lightly, and let rest 15 minutes. Meanwhile, pour the cooking liquid into a measuring cup and skim off and discard the vegetables and fat that rise to the surface. Slice the meat and serve warm or at room temperature with noodles and the sauce on the side.

I don't think I've ever actually bought pork shoulder so I just substitute in country style ribs and I pre-roast them in the oven for about half an hour to get them browned and render some of the fat off. This recipe is extremely good, but also very salty. I love salt, but if you don't, definitely use low sodium broth and soy sauce. The chinese five-spice blends very well with the rest of the flavors over the cooking time. Definitely one of my favorite recipes.

Toast of Change
Nov 30, 2007
Once you pull the lever, you can never return...

Rorschach posted:

I've got a crock pot and was looking to make me some pulled pork sandwiches.

Any suggestions for cooking times, prep, sauces, seasonings, etc?

Last time I made pulled pork, I used about 3 lbs of boneless shoulder roast. All I did was pour a bottle of homemade barbecue sauce over it and add chopped onion, several halved chili piquins, and some honey to taste. My cooking time was on low for about 8 or 9 hours. I set it up at 4 am and then slept for a couple of hours and then by lunchtime my crock pot had turned it into awesome.

Beyond that, it's great on sourdough bread with some 'slaw to top. It's not Barbecued, but it's got flavor enough to taste like it.

Toast of Change fucked around with this message at Feb 18, 2008 around 05:49

chizad
Jul 9, 2001

'Cus we find ourselves in the same old mess
Singin' drunken lullabies

Rorschach posted:

I've got a crock pot and was looking to make me some pulled pork sandwiches.

Any suggestions for cooking times, prep, sauces, seasonings, etc?

This is the standard crock pot pulled pork recipe that's been circulating GWS for ages. I don't remember who first posted it here, but apparently it comes from someone on the Good Eats fan page forums. I've made it a few times, and while it's obviously not as good as barbecued pulled pork it's still damned tasty.

Take a Boston butt and place it in your crock pot. Pour just enough Wostershire sauce over the pork to cover the surface of the meat plus cover the bottom of the crock pot. Pack a layer of brown sugar all over the surface of the meat. Put the lid on your crockpot and cook on low for 8-ish hours. Once it's done remove it from the crockpot, discard whatever fat failed to render off and then pull by hand or shred with a pair of forks. Salt heavily; I believe the original recipe uses the phrase "enough salt to give your cardiologist a heart attack".

That's the basic recipe, and from there you can experiment with dry-rubbing the pork before it goes in the crockpot or adding other seasonings in with the Wostershire/brown sugar.

Toast
Dec 7, 2002

GoonsWithSpoons.com Generalissimo


chizad posted:

That's the basic recipe, and from there you can experiment with dry-rubbing the pork before it goes in the crockpot or adding other seasonings in with the Wostershire/brown sugar.


Yeah, that's the way I do mine, I also add some apple cider vinegar and/or some apple juice. Lots of salt as mentioned, big many chunks of kosher/sea salt.

Lady Bug
Apr 23, 2006


Lately, I've been using mine to make chicken stock. Throw a carcass from a roasted chicken in there, maybe a chopped carrot, celery, or quartered onion depending on what I have, some thyme springs, a bay leaf or two, and set to low before I sleep. Then the next morning, the house smells all deliciously chickeny and I have beautiful golden chicken stock that's not only crystal clear but required virtually no effort on my part.

After reading Ruhlman's Elements of Cooking, he says the best temperature for cooking stocks is lower than a simmer so hey I may be onto something here with the crockpot! Though he says to add the aromatics and vegetables during the last hour but screw that I need my beauty sleep. I just add everything together at once and I haven't had a problem of dissolved carrots or anything like that.

Then here is where I get really cheap because I hate putting hot stuff in the fridge (I think it's really wasteful). Since it's about 40 degrees outside, I take the crockpot and put it on my backporch (don't do this if you live in the forest or in Miami). Come back after work and my stock is chilled and the fat has congealed on top. Skim and freeze.

I haven't tried this with beef stock yet but that's next on the list. And duck confit.

hisss
Mar 31, 2006


Lady Bug posted:

Lately, I've been using mine to make chicken stock.


I will have to try this for sure.

devoir
Nov 16, 2007


Are there any major slowcooking recipe websites that are recommended? I was actually going to make a thread last week as I intended to by one. I got distracted, however, and have not yet purchased, so this thread is very welcome.

Especially interested in breakfast stuff and creative ways to do meat and vegetables for dinner while away working.

Devil Wears Wings
Jul 17, 2006

Deals in Pac, not opinion.

I slow-cooked about 3/4 of my latest batch of "seventeen-and-a-half-alarm" chili in a crock pot overnight, and it turned out amazing. A rough recipe:

3 lbs. ground meat (I used 2/3 85% ground beef and 1/3 ground lamb)
2 cans black beans, mashed
1 28-oz. can Cento crushed tomatoes (It's very important that it be this specific brand)
1 12-oz. bottle home-brewed abbey ale
1 large red onion, chopped
1 medium yellow onion, chopped
3 shallots, finely chopped
About 8 cloves of garlic, minced
4 habaneros, very finely chopped
2 green jalapenos, finely chopped
2 red jalapenos, finely chopped
7 Tbsp. chili powder (I used a special extra-hot mixture from my local spice store)
4 Tbsp. oregano
1 Tbsp. cumin
Salt & pepper
1 Tbsp. liquid smoke

Brown your meat in a bit of canola oil; leave all of the juices and fat in. Add your beans, tomatoes, and ale (bonus points if there's yeast in the bottle; swirl and pour it), and stir thoroughly on low heat. Leave that to reduce for a bit. In a separate pan, brown your onions, shallots, and garlic in a tiny bit of oil; add those to your main pot. Now add your chili peppers and spices. Stir thoroughly and leave to reduce for an hour or two. Now, transfer as much as you can to a crock pot and freeze the rest; leave for at least 12 hours on Low.

I don't pretend that this recipe is very authentic, but I think it does capture the best things about authentic Texas-style chili and the "tomato/bean"-style chili in one. Cento crushed tomatoes are very finely crushed, so the tomato essence still offsets some of the spice, and the bean paste (which cooks up with the tomatoes and beer into a thick, delicious gravy) counters a bit of the heaviness of the meat. And, of course, there's nothing but meat, onion, and gravy in the final product.

It's also very, VERY spicy, though. As in, it'll make your eyes water as much as any good vindaloo. Feel free to use milder chili powder and/or omit the habaneros if you want.

Enjoy!

NosmoKing
Nov 12, 2004

I have a rifle and a frying pan and I know how to use them

http://www.goonswithspoons.com/White_Chicken_Chili

Must pimp my own recipe. It makes drat good white chicken chili (even if I didn't place in the ICSA competition)

A can (or two) of coke, a shitload of cheap chicken parts (think the $0.49 a pound chicken leg quarters you can find sometimes) and some salt and you have the makings of pulled chicken. Jam chicken in pot with minimal space between parts. Pour in coke, toss in salt (about a teaspoon) and perhaps some mustard or soy sauce as well.

Cook until it disintegrates on contact.

Drain off gunky liquid, throw out skin and bones, shred meat.

heavy liquid
Jan 3, 2008

Build a man a fire, and he'll be warm for a day. Set a man on fire, and he'll be warm for the rest of his life.

I love my slow cooker. I cooked up a tasty Beef Burgundy using a recipe from America's Test Kitchen.

8 oz. bacon chopped
4 lbs stew beef (chuck preferably)
1 large onion chopped fine
2 carrots chopped fine
8 garlic cloves minced
2 teaspoons chopped fresh thyme
4 tbs. tomato paste
2 1/2 cups Pinot Noir or Burgundy wine
1 1/2 cups low-sodium chicken broth
1/3 cup soy sauce
3 or 4 bay leaves
3 tbs. Minute Tapioca
3 tbs. minced fresh parsley
2 cups pearl onions
10 oz white mushrooms, quartered

First, get all of your prep work done. Chop the onions, garlic, parsley, and thyme.

Cook the bacon in a large skillet on medium-high until crisp. Set aside on paper towel, and chop it after it's cooled. Set aside half of the bacon fat in a bowl, and keep the other half in the pan.

Dry the beef with paper towels, and season with salt and pepper. Place half of the beef in the skillet with the half of bacon fat and cook it over medium-high until all of the sides are brown. You can cook all of the meat, but only half is really needed for flavor. When done, place the beef in the slow cooker.

Add the reserved bacon fat to the now empty skillet, and heat over medium-high. Add onion, carrots and 1/4 teaspoon salt. Cook until they begin to brown, and then add garlic and thyme, and cook for about 30 more seconds. Then add the tomato paste, and stir together for about another minute. Then transfer this to the slow cooker.

Add 1 1/2 cups wine, 1 1/2 cups chicken broth and 1/3 cups soy sauce to an empty skillet. Heat until it simmers. Let simmer for one minute and then transfer it to the slow cooker.
All of the above can be done the night before. Just make sure you keep all the liquids and items separate. This is what I did. Before I left to work, I put it all in the slow cooker, and went to work. Stir in bay leaves and Minute Tapioca, and set on low heat. Cook for nine hours.

After it's cooked, place 1/2 cup water and 3 tbs of butter into a skillet along with your pearl onions. Cover and simmer for about 5 minutes until they're tender. Uncover and increase heat until liquid is almost evaporated. Add the mushrooms with 1/4 teaspoon salt, and cook until browned and glazed. Stir this into the slow cooker.

Stir in your chopped bacon. Bring remaining 1 cup of wine to a boil in the skillet over high heat and then simmer until it's reduced by half (about 5 minutes). Stir the wine and parsley into the slow cooker, and you're done!

lichen
May 13, 2004


I have recently bit doing a bit of cooking (and experimenting) from a book called All About Braising by Molly Stevens. I'm sure most of you are aware that braising is essentially cooking something (frequently meats, sometimes leeks, potatos, shallots, etc.) partially submerged in some sort of liquid in a covered vessel. This allows the steam to condense on the lid and then drip back down effectively basting the food.

Molly's book focuses mostly on using cast iron pans, dutch ovens, and the ever so popular LeCreuset. I prefer the use of a heavy dutch over myself, as well as putting a layer of parchment paper between the lid of the oven and the meat to reduce the space in the pot and the distance which the condensed liquid has to drip back onto the meat (hopefully getting more of the liquid back on to the meat).

I have done a good amount of experimenting with slow braises from this book, including some delicious BBQ rib sandwiches. One of the few slow braises that I have done almost exactly to the recipe is the porter braised beef short ribs with a rosemary and maple glaze.



I don't know the exact recipe at the moment, but it was fairly straight forward. Heat up the oven to about 300, and stick the dutch oven on the range to get it nice and hot. After salting and peppering the short ribs braise them for about 2 minutes on all sides. Remember not to overcrowd the pan, and don't touch them for the full amount of time. This should brown them nicely and add flavor. After all the ribs have been browned, set them aside, and sautee some shallots and garlic, then add a coarsely chopped carrot, and about 1lg sweet onion. Then deglaze the pan with some porter, add beef stock (make sure if you're using store bought that you find something with the least amount of sodium as possible). Cover with parchment, punch it down a little in the middle, stick on the lid, then trim the parchment around the sides. Throw this in a 275-300 degree oven and wait at least 15 minutes. Take a peek and ensure that it's simmering gently. If the heat is too high it's going to cook too fast and your meat won't become tender. It will probably be ready at around 3 hours. At this point I basted on a melted glaze of rosemary, brown sugar, and maple syrup and stuck it under the broiler for a few minutes. You might want to scoop out the aromatics with a slotted spoon as this point, but that's up to you. I know the colors in the veggies aren't the greatest looking, but I was really just concerned with how the meat was going to come out.

I was very happy with the result, but it was a bit salty from reducing the sauce from a store-bought stock. I can't wait to try this method with a nice pork belly for some good pork sandwiches.

Bubbacub
Apr 17, 2001



Does anyone have any good crock pot recipes that work for cooking times around 14 hours?

Jesus Louise
Jan 4, 2007

They're coming to get you, Barbara.

Wonderful thread. I got a craving for red beans and rice last week, but I didn't want to have to stand over the stove for several hours to make them. So I soaked some beans overnight, threw them in a crock pot with onions and spices early the next morning, and let it do its thing. (I don't know if it was high or low heat, my crock pot is one of those cheap, small ones with only OFF and ON settings.)

After work, all I had to do was steam some rice and fry up some smoked sausage to throw in the mix, and I had dinner in half an hour. Instead of the 3-4 hours it would have taken if I'd done the whole thing stove-top.

Now I'm looking around my kitchen for anything else I can throw in there.

jerkstore77
Dec 26, 2003

Future of the franchise

I made an Italian Pot Roast today in my crockpot.

1 pot roast (I used chuck)
1 chopped onion
2 chopped carrots
1 chopped celery
3 cloves minced garlic
1 cups red wine
1 cup beef broth
1 tsp. dried sage
1 tbsp. rosemary
2 tbsp parsley
1/4 tsp pepper
salt
2 tbsp. tomato paste
1 large can crushed tomatoes

Mix the sage, rosemary, garlic, and parsley with a tablespoon of olive oil. Cut a few slits in the roast and use half of this seasoning mixture to stuff the slits. Brown the roast in a pan with some olive oil and sprinkle some salt over it and set it aside. Add, the onion, carrot, and celery to the pan and cook for about 5 minutes. Then add the tomato paste, 1/2 cup of the red wine, and the rest of the herb mixture. Stir and bring to a boil until moist of the wine has boiled away. Add the rest of the wine and the beef broth. Boil until half the liquid remains. Just before taking off the heat, add the crushed tomatoes and stir.

Place the sauce and the roast in the crockpot and cook for 8 hours on low. It was pretty drat good. The sauce goes great over rice or mashed potatoes or polenta.

New Weave Wendy
Mar 11, 2007


NosmoKing posted:

http://www.goonswithspoons.com/White_Chicken_Chili

Must pimp my own recipe. It makes drat good white chicken chili (even if I didn't place in the ICSA competition)


I have to second this. I made it a couple of weeks ago when I was looking to christen my new slow cooker and it was amazing.

gourami
Jan 2, 2007

Terrorizing Winters for centuries.

I received a slowcooker for Christmas and really haven't done much with it, so I'm glad to have found this thread. That white chicken chili sounds awesome.

I tried out this recipe for Slow Cooker Barbeque Ribs with fantastic results:
http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/Slow-C...ibs/Detail.aspx

Happiness Commando
Feb 1, 2002


In my experience, short and wide crockpots tend to make a more watery dish and tall and narrow ones make a thicker, more stew-y dish. Have you guys found this to be the case also?

Also, turning the heat to high for the first hour and then lowering it often makes things tastier in a way that I can't describe.

Moms Stuffing
Jun 2, 2005

the little green one

Why is it that when I put any amount of onion in the crock pot, everything comes out tasting overwhelmingly of onions? Should I sweat any onions I add beforehand? I usually add them raw and I usually regret it.

I just generally suck at slow cooker stuff and all my food seems to come out too watery. The only thing I can make somewhat successfully in it is polenta or grits.

spatula
Nov 6, 2004


I'm making the goon pulled pork recipe (brown sugar + Worcestershire) for the third time today, and it's been a big hit with my boyfriend/roommates/friends. I'd recommend it to anybody. It's so easy and delicious and cheap!

I have plans for making chili and lasagna in there soon, and I'll check back here to let you all know how it goes.

Here's a great livejournal community (livejournal, I know, I know) for crock pot recipes and general discussion that I recently found:
http://community.livejournal.com/what_a_crock

Devil Wears Wings
Jul 17, 2006

Deals in Pac, not opinion.

Google Embryo posted:

Why is it that when I put any amount of onion in the crock pot, everything comes out tasting overwhelmingly of onions? Should I sweat any onions I add beforehand? I usually add them raw and I usually regret it.

I just generally suck at slow cooker stuff and all my food seems to come out too watery. The only thing I can make somewhat successfully in it is polenta or grits.

It's always a good idea to sweat your onions before adding them to anything that doesn't specifically require them to be raw. Doing so removes the harsher, "oniony" flavors, which prevents them from leaking out into whatever it is you're cooking.

Also, how watery are your dishes before you put them in? It's generally a good idea to let something reduce for a little while in a stove-top pot before slow-cooking, unless you're specifically making something with a lot of liquid (like a soup).

mongol
Oct 11, 2005

Ronald Reagan? The actor!?

Google Embryo posted:

Why is it that when I put any amount of onion in the crock pot, everything comes out tasting overwhelmingly of onions? Should I sweat any onions I add beforehand? I usually add them raw and I usually regret it.

I just generally suck at slow cooker stuff and all my food seems to come out too watery. The only thing I can make somewhat successfully in it is polenta or grits.

The only thing I add raw onions to is a saute pan. I would definately sweat your onions to kill some of the sulfer taste.

Moms Stuffing
Jun 2, 2005

the little green one

Yeah it eventually dawned on me that I just might want to sweat my onions to take the edge off. What ticks me off is my ex's mom and my own mother make wonderful things in their slow cookers and they don't have to cook anything beforehand. What gives! I think I'm cursed. Why can they just throw stuff together and it comes out ok and I do the same thing and it comes out like rear end.

Polenta in a crock pot though, omg.

Aurand
Sep 7, 2006
Lurkz0r

chizad posted:

This is the standard crock pot pulled pork recipe that's been circulating GWS for ages. I don't remember who first posted it here, but apparently it comes from someone on the Good Eats fan page forums. I've made it a few times, and while it's obviously not as good as barbecued pulled pork it's still damned tasty.

Take a Boston butt and place it in your crock pot. Pour just enough Wostershire sauce over the pork to cover the surface of the meat plus cover the bottom of the crock pot. Pack a layer of brown sugar all over the surface of the meat. Put the lid on your crockpot and cook on low for 8-ish hours. Once it's done remove it from the crockpot, discard whatever fat failed to render off and then pull by hand or shred with a pair of forks. Salt heavily; I believe the original recipe uses the phrase "enough salt to give your cardiologist a heart attack".

That's the basic recipe, and from there you can experiment with dry-rubbing the pork before it goes in the crockpot or adding other seasonings in with the Wostershire/brown sugar.

I'm going to make this tomorrow. Whats the best way to get rid of the excess fat that will probably build up?

Zratha
Nov 28, 2004

It's nice to see you

chizad posted:

This is the standard crock pot pulled pork recipe that's been circulating GWS for ages. I don't remember who first posted it here, but apparently it comes from someone on the Good Eats fan page forums. I've made it a few times, and while it's obviously not as good as barbecued pulled pork it's still damned tasty.

Take a Boston butt and place it in your crock pot. Pour just enough Wostershire sauce over the pork to cover the surface of the meat

When you say just enough to cover the surface of the meat, do you mean enough so that the surface is submerged, or just that there is some splashed on it?

chizad
Jul 9, 2001

'Cus we find ourselves in the same old mess
Singin' drunken lullabies

Aurand posted:

I'm going to make this tomorrow. Whats the best way to get rid of the excess fat that will probably build up?

A lot of it melts during cooking. The hunks of fat that are left I've always been able to just pull off the meat.

Zratha posted:

When you say just enough to cover the surface of the meat, do you mean enough so that the surface is submerged, or just that there is some splashed on it?

Just that that is some splashed on it. Basically, just splash it with Worchestershire until the bottom of the crock pot is just covered. Make sense?

Aurand
Sep 7, 2006
Lurkz0r

chizad posted:

A lot of it melts during cooking. The hunks of fat that are left I've always been able to just pull off the meat.

Is there anything else I can do to remove some of the excess greasiness that I'm thinking is going to be there as the result of fat melting? Or do I just pour off the liquid and remove the fat that way?

Crusty Nutsack
Apr 21, 2005



Aurand posted:

Is there anything else I can do to remove some of the excess greasiness that I'm thinking is going to be there as the result of fat melting? Or do I just pour off the liquid and remove the fat that way?

You pull the hunk of meat out of the liquid to shred it. The meat itself doesn't end up very greasy at all. I just discard all the liquid/fat.

Aurand
Sep 7, 2006
Lurkz0r

shakerpenguin posted:

You pull the hunk of meat out of the liquid to shred it. The meat itself doesn't end up very greasy at all. I just discard all the liquid/fat.

thanks, I can't wait for this to get done

Lixer
Dec 3, 2005

What does Depeche Mode mean? I like kinky sex with a scoop of ice cream

How do I know if my crock pot is the proper temperature? Many times I've had things burn onto the side of the crock and I had thought that things aren't supposed to burn in there.

Also, the meat comes up to a safe temperature at least an hour before the low end of the cooking time. Is this normal and it is supposed to continue cooking for another hour, or is my crock pot too hot?

Zratha
Nov 28, 2004

It's nice to see you

chizad posted:

Just that that is some splashed on it. Basically, just splash it with Worchestershire until the bottom of the crock pot is just covered. Make sense?

Perfect thanks!
(Also Hi! I didn't realize who I had quoted)

mezz
Aug 12, 2004

oh polly

Well my girlfriend told me she wouldn't be surprised to find me in bed with my dutch oven one day and yeah I love that thing.

A classic dish from where I come from is the Flemish stew. It's really simple and everybody loves it!

Ingredients (serves 4 or so)
700 g. beef, cubed
300 g. pork, cubed
(optional) a bit of liver!
obviously you don't really need high quality meat

1 l. of belgian (style) brown beer, I used to make it with westmalle, here in Montreal I use Trois Pistoles. Don't use a bitter because it will suck!!!
3+ big onions (I like to use different kinds, like 1 red one, 2 yellow ones and a bunch of diced silver onions)
2 bay leafs
a bunch of thyme and a few sprigs of rosemary
garlic

Chop up the onions roughly, or make rings or space marines, just don't make them too small.
Do the same with garlic.
Splash some olive oil in your dutch oven, put it on the fire and let the onions and the garlic simmer for a few minutes until they soften.
Add the meat (not the liver if you're using it) and mash it around until the meat has changed color on all sides.
Fill with beer until the meat is covered, add the liver, bay leaves, thyme and rosemary and put it in the oven for 4 to 5 hours on 130C. Check every hour (don't forget to taste) and refill with beer if necessary. Try to avoid to add beer in the last hour of cooking.

As a side dish you serve mashed potatoes and witlof!
This vegetable seems to be rather unknown here in North America and it got me quite a few aahs and oohs

The best way to prepare witlof (serve 2 per person) is to cook it in salted water until it starts coloring (it should take 10-15 minutes). Drain them and heat a pot with some olive oil or butter, add the witlof. Season with a lot of pepper, a bit of salt and add a tablespoon of good quality honey.
Cook until all the juice is gone and the witlof starts to caramelize.

Aurand
Sep 7, 2006
Lurkz0r

Aurand posted:

thanks, I can't wait for this to get done

holy gently caress so good!!!

ChuckHead
Jun 24, 2004

2000 years Assholes.

Lady Bug posted:

Lately, I've been using mine to make chicken stock.

Weird, I just made my first beef stock in a crock pot. I've been making stock for 20 years, but I've always made stock in a "stock pot".

I guess for most people this seams obvious, 20 years. Oh, it was good and maybe a little easier.

queenpopsicle
Mar 29, 2005

Scaramouche, Scaramouche, will you do the Fandango?


I love my Crock Pot, but I hate washing dishes, and I'm sure the rest of you do too, so let me give you a little tip. Buy those Reynolds Slow Cooker liners. You get 5 of them in a box for about $2.50, and it's totally worth the price. It's pretty much like a big baggie, and you put it in your crock pot before you add any of your ingredients. I'm not usually one to shill products, but it does make your life so much easier.

aeflux
Apr 17, 2002



Does anyone have access to the archived slow cooker thread? I had an amazing recipe in there for white chicken chili w/ beans but since I don't have archives I can't get to it. Help!

There's also a bunch of great recipes in there too - lots of pork shoulder variations since that meant basically falls apart after being in there for a day.

Zelmel
Sep 17, 2004

O brain new world, that has such ganglia in't!


aeflux posted:

Does anyone have access to the archived slow cooker thread? I had an amazing recipe in there for white chicken chili w/ beans but since I don't have archives I can't get to it. Help!

There's also a bunch of great recipes in there too - lots of pork shoulder variations since that meant basically falls apart after being in there for a day.

Was it this recipe by NosmoKing?
http://www.goonswithspoons.com/White_Chicken_Chili

DiscoKid
May 25, 2004

by Fistgrrl


Aurand posted:

holy gently caress so good!!!

If you ever feel adventurous, you can do the same thing to drat near any cut of pork.

But here's where it gets cool.

Use a mix of 1/2 Worcestershire sauce and molasses.
Right before you pack the brown sugar on, sprinkle chili powder on the meat, then pack it.
Add a few (I do mean a few. Two to four) small sprigs of cilantro.

Shred.

Use in tacos and burritos.

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OnceIWasAnOstrich
Jul 22, 2006



I have a rival crockpot that...I have unfortunately never used. I live in a dorm room and a lot of recipes require a lot of cooking beforehand, all I have is a small electric skillet, a blender, and a microwave. Any suggestions for basically full meal-in-a-pot dishes that I could make with only that limited amount of accessories.

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