Search Amazon.com:
Register a SA Forums Account here!
JOINING THE SA FORUMS WILL REMOVE THIS BIG AD, THE ANNOYING UNDERLINED ADS, AND STUPID INTERSTITIAL ADS!!!

You can: log in, read the tech support FAQ, or request your lost password. This dumb message (and those ads) will appear on every screen until you register! Get rid of this crap by registering your own SA Forums Account and joining roughly 150,000 Goons, for the one-time price of $9.95! We charge money because it costs us $3,400 per month for bandwidth bills alone, and since we don't believe in shoving popup ads to our registered users, we try to make the money back through forum registrations.
«256 »
  • Post
  • Reply
Combat Pretzel
Jun 23, 2004

No, seriously... what kurds?!

ZFS takes anything that has character device like semantics. Including files.

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

Shit Copter
Oct 13, 2004
what a P.O.S.

H110Hawk posted:

zpool stuff
Thanks. Upgrading in the future is one concern of mine though. Would I absolutely need another 5 disks in order to upgrade/expand, or could I add say 3 to another pool? How exactly does the expansion process go? Would I need to have two seperate arrays, or could I add the other disks to the same array - but on a seperate pool?

Also does anyone know how Solaris is with VMWare server? I'm interested in virtualizing a Windows dev environment on this file server as well. I know it's braineddead easy to setup in CentOS or Debian, but I haven't been able to find any specific info for Solaris.

Combat Pretzel
Jun 23, 2004

No, seriously... what kurds?!

poo poo Copter posted:

Thanks. Upgrading in the future is one concern of mine though. Would I absolutely need another 5 disks in order to upgrade/expand, or could I add say 3 to another pool? How exactly does the expansion process go? Would I need to have two seperate arrays, or could I add the other disks to the same array - but on a seperate pool?
To expand a pool, you throw additional vdevs into it. How the vdevs are made up isn't important. They can be files, single disks, RAID-Z arrays or mirrors (latter two are considered single vdevs). Two RAID_Z's in a pool don't need to match in size or amount of disks, either. Not does the type of vdevs need to. You can mix mirrors with RAID-Z's in a pool. If there are multiple vdevs (e.g. two RAID-Z arrays), ZFS spreads the writes across them, influenced by metrics like available write bandwidth and available free space.

poo poo Copter posted:

Also does anyone know how Solaris is with VMWare server? I'm interested in virtualizing a Windows dev environment on this file server as well. I know it's braineddead easy to setup in CentOS or Debian, but I haven't been able to find any specific info for Solaris.
To use Solaris as virtualization host, your option are either using a Nevada build (Solaris Express any recent edition, OpenSolaris 2008.05) as Dom0 on Xen, or use VirtualBox 1.6. I figure VirtualBox would be the better option for you. It also comes with guest drivers for Windows, speeding things up quite a bit, plus seamless mode to merge the Windows desktop into your Solaris desktop. There's no VMware for Solaris (yet?)

Combat Pretzel fucked around with this message at May 13, 2008 around 18:50

Shit Copter
Oct 13, 2004
what a P.O.S.

Toiletbrush posted:

To expand a pool, you throw additional vdevs into it. How the vdevs are made up isn't important. They can be files, single disks, RAID-Z arrays or mirrors (latter two are considered single vdevs). Two RAID_Z's in a pool don't need to match in size or amount of disks, either. Not does the type of vdevs need to. You can mix mirrors with RAID-Z's in a pool. If there are multiple vdevs (e.g. two RAID-Z arrays), ZFS spreads the writes across them, influenced by metrics like available write bandwidth and available free space.
Thanks for the reply.

So am I correct in assuming that if I have multiple vdevs in the same pool, that they could be accessible as a single large volume?

quote:

To use Solaris as virtualization host, your option are either using a Nevada build (Solaris Express any recent edition, OpenSolaris 2008.05) as Dom0 on Xen, or use VirtualBox 1.6. I figure VirtualBox would be the better option for you. It also comes with guest drivers for Windows, speeding things up quite a bit, plus seamless mode to merge the Windows desktop into your Solaris desktop. There's no VMware for Solaris (yet?)
Hmm, it sounds like I will have to give VirtualBox a shot.

Combat Pretzel
Jun 23, 2004

No, seriously... what kurds?!

poo poo Copter posted:

So am I correct in assuming that if I have multiple vdevs in the same pool, that they could be accessible as a single large volume?
Yep, that's the idea. The vdevs are kind of concatenated (actually striped dynamically) and create the storage pool where ZFS filesystems draw from. These ZFS filesystems are really lightweight and more of an abstraction, mostly to specify different data policies (like different checksum algorithm, compression, NFS sharing, record size, etc.), so don't be afraid to use the zfs create command. ZFS filesystems aren't sized, they only draw from the pool what they need and give back what's freed.

poo poo Copter posted:

Hmm, it sounds like I will have to give VirtualBox a shot.
Works well enough here to run Windows Server 2003 stable.

If you've time to fiddle, you should consider using a ZFS ZVOL, though. More efficient that a regular file on ZFS as VM container. Goes something like this, creating a 10GB thin provisioned virtual disk in the ZFS pool (as superuser or using pfexec if your account has the root role):

zfs create -s -V 10G pool/windows
ls -l /dev/zvol/rdsk/pool/windows (results probably in something like used in the next line)
chown youraccount /devices/pseudo/zfs0@1:a,raw (what the ls -l gave you)

You need to change the ownership on the symlink target. Adjust permissions as needed, if necessary. Then as regular user:

VBoxManage internalcommands createrawvmdk -filename foo.vmdk -rawdisk /dev/zvol/pool/windows

The ZVOL should then show up as available disk in the GUI.

Combat Pretzel fucked around with this message at May 13, 2008 around 19:13

H110Hawk
Dec 28, 2006
Can't install Windows?
BUY APPLE


poo poo Copter posted:

Thanks. Upgrading in the future is one concern of mine though. Would I absolutely need another 5 disks in order to upgrade/expand, or could I add say 3 to another pool? How exactly does the expansion process go?

Addendum to everything Toiletbrush said, I was very specific in my wording for a reason. You can add more raidz's, mirrors, etc, but you start burning space faster/slower than your original. You cannot expand parity based vdev's (raidz(2)). And please don't be afraid of the zfs create or zfs snapshot command. It's really fun! (Caveat, beware nfsv3 can't see past zfs boundries.)

code:
# zfs list -t filesystem | wc
      79     395    6863
# zfs list | wc
     211    1055   17130
# zfs list | tail
pool/homie/backups/capone/418229               97.0K  35.6T  97.0K  /pool/homie/backups/capone/418229
pool/homie/backups/capone/418229@200805131600      0      -  97.0K  -
pool/homie/backups/capone/418239               58.1M  35.6T  58.1M  /pool/homie/backups/capone/418239
pool/homie/backups/capone/418239@200805131600      0      -  58.1M  -
pool/homie/backups/capone/418242               59.3G  35.6T  59.3G  /pool/homie/backups/capone/418242
pool/homie/backups/capone/418242@200805131600   458K      -  10.2G  -

Migishu
Oct 22, 2005

I'll eat your fucking eyeballs if you're not careful



Just installed 1.05 for DNS-323, nice that it has bittorrent now, but still unable to connect to Xbox 360

HPL
Aug 28, 2002

Worst case scenario.

Migishu posted:

Just installed 1.05 for DNS-323, nice that it has bittorrent now, but still unable to connect to Xbox 360

I think you need to install Twonky for that. The bad part is that it's a pay program. The good part is that it's very easy to install.

Nick VTX
May 16, 2002


Thanks for the heads up, just noticed the 1.05 firmware is final now on Dlink's site. Did you have any problem updating the firmware (i.e. did you backup the DNS-323 like they say)?

Migishu posted:

Just installed 1.05 for DNS-323, nice that it has bittorrent now, but still unable to connect to Xbox 360

HPL
Aug 28, 2002

Worst case scenario.

ncix.com has the DNS-323 on sale for $145.99 this week. You really can't go wrong at that price.

kri kri
Jul 18, 2007



Anyone running a unRaid server? I am thiking of switching over from WHS since my performance is terrible.

stephenm00
Jun 28, 2006


kri kri posted:

Anyone running a unRaid server? I am thiking of switching over from WHS since my performance is terrible.

I just finished my build today. I am transferring all my media from my readynas to the unraid. I will let you know how it goes.

EC
Jul 10, 2001

The Legend


stephenm00 posted:

I just finished my build today. I am transferring all my media from my readynas to the unraid. I will let you know how it goes.

Keep us updated, I'm in the same situation as kri kri.

kri kri
Jul 18, 2007



I need some help thinking through things. Currently I am running WHS on my old desktop box. 6 hard drives, etc. Performance ranges from decent to terrible. I like that I can run sabnzbd and everything else easily.

I would like however to go a little greener (as my new company has me thinking about these things) and I am weighing the decision to either get new 'greener' parts and switch to Unraid, or should I get some d-link dns-323s. I usually have my desktop running, so I could still run the apps I want and just have the network storage.

Thoughts?

HPL
Aug 28, 2002

Worst case scenario.

kri kri posted:

I would like however to go a little greener (as my new company has me thinking about these things) and I am weighing the decision to either get new 'greener' parts and switch to Unraid, or should I get some d-link dns-323s. I usually have my desktop running, so I could still run the apps I want and just have the network storage.

Thoughts?

The DNS-323 is cheap, quiet, works fairly well and is quite hackable if you're so inclined. 1TB hard drives are starting to get reasonable in price, so it's not a stretch to get a DNS-323 and a couple of 1TB drives. D-Link seems to be responsive to the community and has a representative posting on the hack forum providing support and gathering feedback.

Wiki: http://wiki.dns323.info/
Forum: http://forum.dsmg600.info/

kri kri
Jul 18, 2007



HPL posted:

The DNS-323 is cheap, quiet, works fairly well and is quite hackable if you're so inclined. 1TB hard drives are starting to get reasonable in price, so it's not a stretch to get a DNS-323 and a couple of 1TB drives. D-Link seems to be responsive to the community and has a representative posting on the hack forum providing support and gathering feedback.

Wiki: http://wiki.dns323.info/
Forum: http://forum.dsmg600.info/

Is there any way to use combine multiple dlinks and use them just as 1 logical drive?

Migishu
Oct 22, 2005

I'll eat your fucking eyeballs if you're not careful



HPL posted:

I think you need to install Twonky for that. The bad part is that it's a pay program. The good part is that it's very easy to install.

What I heard was that with Twonky, as long as you restart the DNS-323 every few weeks or so and that you haven't set up the date function on it, it'll reset the timer.

Nick VTX posted:

Thanks for the heads up, just noticed the 1.05 firmware is final now on Dlink's site. Did you have any problem updating the firmware (i.e. did you backup the DNS-323 like they say)?

I had no problems updating the firmware. Didn't back up or anything. Just uploaded and it worked fine after its reboot.

HPL posted:

ncix.com has the DNS-323 on sale for $145.99 this week. You really can't go wrong at that price.

That's a great price. I got mine for just over $200 with a 500gb drive a few months back. It's definitely worth the price.

kri kri posted:

Is there any way to use combine multiple dlinks and use them just as 1 logical drive?

I'm not sure if the JBOD feature will allow you to do that or not unfortunately.

HPL
Aug 28, 2002

Worst case scenario.

Migishu posted:

I'm not sure if the JBOD feature will allow you to do that or not unfortunately.

I'm pretty sure it does because I recall doing the setup wizard, seeing the JBOD option and description and thinking "Nah, I don't want that".

kri kri
Jul 18, 2007



HPL posted:

I'm pretty sure it does because I recall doing the setup wizard, seeing the JBOD option and description and thinking "Nah, I don't want that".

How is yours set up now? I would like to have 1 logical drive rather then multiple if I could get away with it.

EC
Jul 10, 2001

The Legend


HPL posted:

I'm pretty sure it does because I recall doing the setup wizard, seeing the JBOD option and description and thinking "Nah, I don't want that".

And does JBOD store the files in a manner that if one drive fails, you only lose the data on that one drive?

HPL
Aug 28, 2002

Worst case scenario.

kri kri posted:

How is yours set up now? I would like to have 1 logical drive rather then multiple if I could get away with it.

I like to have it where the drives are setup up on their own. Not a huge fan of spanning and striping.

stephenm00
Jun 28, 2006


EC posted:

Keep us updated, I'm in the same situation as kri kri.

I just finished transferring all my files over. On initial impressions, i noticed the read speed is MUCH faster then the infrant (dont use write so much, mainly for streaming tv). The only problem I had setting it up was with my USB drive. For some reason unraid would not boot with my 5 dollar kingston. I tried another one and it booted up with no problems. I am surprised at how easy it was to set up and use. One of the biggest deciding factors for me was user shares. I can report that they work great. I only went for the free version ( 3 x 750GB drives) to test. I would upgrade with no hesitations. If you only need a massive file server with no extra features (torrent client, ect...although they are working on this since it is based on a linux)it is great. Let me know if you have any other questions.

EDIT: also i highly recommend you check out their forums. There is a lot of information over there. I lurked on their forums for a few months before I bought all the hardware. That might explain why I was so surprised by how simple it was.

stephenm00 fucked around with this message at May 16, 2008 around 19:39

angelfoodcakez
Mar 22, 2003
crank dat robocop

I've been tasked with putting a central network backup system in a rather odd environment. It's a small office with ~15 computers that need to have a single folder (My Docs) backed up on a regular basis. The NAS device would also serve as a central file server for a handful of video files that need to referenced infrequently. The 15 are made of an odd mix of desktops and laptops, most on the 100mbps LAN, and some on wireless. The laptops are in and out of the office as the owners travel.

I've been reading this thread and various reviews on smallnetbuilder and have narrowed it down to the dlink dns-323 and the zyxel something 220. in that price range, most devices are roughly similar it seems, where they differ is in the client software provided for backups.

being that the network itself is a huge mess, the less traffic we have on it the better, meaning incremental backups/rsync would be best. is this a standard feature available in most client software? I would also want automatic daily backups with the option to do it manually when someone returns from out of town.

am I asking for something sane here? is anyone intimately familiar with the client software provided? are client alternatives like a 3rd party backup software or msbackup feasible?

edit: i found I can get a netgear readynas locally for ~120 more than a comparably set up dns 323. is the price jump worth it in the long run?

angelfoodcakez fucked around with this message at May 17, 2008 around 21:05

univbee
Jun 3, 2004

Let's maintain dazzling beer indefinitely.


I had a really annoying Windows Home Server not-booting-and-not-telling-me-why situation, and even booting from the Vista DVD or Home Server DVD never got me anywhere. Turns out one of my hard drives was royally hosed and not responding properly to I/O commands. Just putting this out there in case anyone else runs into the same sort of problem. And sorry Sasquatch for not noticing this thread earlier

redeyes
Sep 14, 2002
I LOVE THE WHITE STRIPES!

univbee posted:

I had a really annoying Windows Home Server not-booting-and-not-telling-me-why situation, and even booting from the Vista DVD or Home Server DVD never got me anywhere. Turns out one of my hard drives was royally hosed and not responding properly to I/O commands. Just putting this out there in case anyone else runs into the same sort of problem. And sorry Sasquatch for not noticing this thread earlier

I was going to reply to that thread but I had the same type of situation. Turns out WHS uses your boot hard drive almost constantly and can kill drives if they are already going south. I had the exact same thing happen to a 500GB WD drive only a week after building my WHS box.

usualhandle
Dec 29, 2007
Nothing special about this handle.


univbee posted:

I had a really annoying Windows Home Server not-booting-and-not-telling-me-why situation, and even booting from the Vista DVD or Home Server DVD never got me anywhere. Turns out one of my hard drives was royally hosed and not responding properly to I/O commands. Just putting this out there in case anyone else runs into the same sort of problem. And sorry Sasquatch for not noticing this thread earlier

I read your other thread. Since you are looking at alternate solutions, I tend to recommend linux-based software raid to home or small business users. The md driver is stable, functional, full featured, and fast. I currently have a raid 5 array with a hot spare set up, and it's not given me any problems yet (over two years now). Part of the reason I push md over hardware raid controllers is that devices that constitute an md-based array can be removed from the old system if it fails and be reinstalled and initialized apart from any particular raid controller, while also offering many of the features that high end dedicated raid cards offer. This makes it a good match for the home user who may not want to spend the premium on a high quality controller and spare.

If you are interested in pursuing this sort of solution it may be possible to construct a small array out of drives empty of data and then add devices to the array as you extract your data from them.

that one guy
Jun 3, 2005


Couple of questions -

If I get the D-Link DNS-323, can I use it as an FTP server to serve up pictures, etc. that I would link to on my website?

Would I be able to use it to serve up files to myself (like media files to another computer? and possibly use it as the storage place for files I would serve to the HTPC I keep thinking about but never putting together)?

Using that same device, would I be able to put in various HDDs of different capacities? If I make two of them linked up for RAID do they have to be identical drives?

teamdest
Jul 1, 2007


that one guy posted:

If I get the D-Link DNS-323, can I use it as an FTP server to serve up pictures, etc. that I would link to on my website?

no, the files would exist on your LOCAL network, and unless you have a good ISP, and proper routing set up, you can't normally just host over port 80/21 from a home. Also, it's really not a good idea to expose a fileserver to the internet without a really good reason.

that one guy posted:

Would I be able to use it to serve up files to myself (like media files to another computer? and possibly use it as the storage place for files I would serve to the HTPC I keep thinking about but never putting together)?

yes, provided the hypothetical media server is on your local network, you could map the D-Link as a network drive or just connect to it over the network (via samba) and watch whatever files are stored on it.

that one guy posted:

Using that same device, would I be able to put in various HDDs of different capacities? If I make two of them linked up for RAID do they have to be identical drives?

depends on the type of array you create. a RAID-1 will just build to the size of the smaller drive. a RAID-0 (don't do this, seriously) will most likely require 2 same-sized drives. I don't know exactly what a DNS-323 is capable of doing in regards to arrays.

insularis
Sep 21, 2002



Another pretty happy unRAID experience:

I used an old Intel 845 board with a Pentium 4, 512MB of memory, and a built-in Intel network adapter. A couple of caveats about the install ... the new beta of unRAID didn't detect my network at all, but I just needed to edit one very simple config file to give the box an IP address on the correct submask.

The other odd thing with my motherboard is that it would not boot from the USB flash drive using the recommended "syslinux x:", but did fine with "syslinux -ma x:"

After you boot into it, you have a command-line login. You login as root, with no password for the first time, and then access the machine's interface from another PC on the network. All the controls are through a web browser on a remote machine.

And spartan controls they are, though it's more than enough to get the job done. I was able to get my random junker hard drives assigned (the largest as parity, the others as part of the array) and building the array in about 3 minutes. It's really simple.

I almost didn't try unRAID, because I'd gotten hooked on pooled storage with an LVM/ZFS setup or RAID pooling, but the user shares accomplish the same thing. You can set the individual drives to not be shown as shares to the world, and only your predefined user shares will show up on the network. You don't have much granular control over the pool, however. It was a case of: Disk 1 and 3 are part of share, "Editing" and Disk 2 and 5 are part of share, "Imaging". Perhaps you can get a little more modular with partitioning.

It uses ReiserFS 3.6 as the file system under Slackware, (political/social issues aside) which I wouldn't be a 100% on if it weren't a RAID system to start with. I do like the fact that the system can be pulled apart and resurrected on most other Linux systems if needed. No proprietary RAID setup that can't be read any other way, like those SOHO boxes that have their own special brand of storage.

There is a user-level security interface for shares, but it's disabled in the "Basic" (freeware) version, which is a shame, but then again, you don't really have to demo GID/UID to know how it's going to work if you had it.

After I built my array with 5 old, semi-junker drives ranging from 20GB to 300GB, I damaged it in a few ways to see how it would handle it. I yanked out the smallest one, rebuilt, yanked out the largest, rebuilt, yanked out two (couldn't start array, but OS lets you know what the issue is), hard-powered the system a few times as a simulated power outage, and reset things and looked at the file system. Everything worked flawlessly, and as long as you only lose one drive at a time, you'll stay up and running. Read/write speed is much higher than a little US Robotics 8700 NAS box I've set up at the office, but tops out on my machine at about 40MB/sec, so it's a good deal slower than ZFS on the same hardware. Of course, I haven't wired my house for Ethernet yet, so most things end up flowing over wireless or short, loose runs of CAT-5, so speed isn't a big concern. The USR box would stutter when asked to write new data and read something medium-sized (800MB), but the unRAID box doesn't.

What I liked:

Much easier than ZFS/LVM management for me.
Simple interface, simple shares
Works as expected
Drives aren't locked into proprietary file system or RAID setup
Disasters are easy to fix, diagnostics are well displayed
User security and user shares (Plus/Pro version for security)
Very simple to add or remove parts of the array.
Latest beta is supporting more network cards and hardware than before.
Configurable caching and spin-down for all drives/shares in the system.
Config files on the flash drive are really, really simple.

What I didn't like:

Costs about $75 for the "Pro" version to support up to 16 drives and to provide security, and that's permanently locked to one particular USB flash drive. Choose wisely.
Middle of the road for speed. ZFS is faster, SOHO boxes are slower.
Instructions on the web site are sparse. You'll have to read through the forums to find some answers. The instruction manual is good, but incomplete.
1 drive failure is all that you can sustain before needing to replace hardware, regardless of the size of your array.

I'm keeping mine as part of my network. I like the setup, I like the simplicity, and it's serious speed overkill when attached to a non-GigE network. I bought the Pro version, and this is what I'm going to slap all of my smaller, older drives in as they get pulled out of current systems. We already have quite a bit of network storage in the house, but this fills a niche for me to recycle older, smaller drives that would otherwise never be used in a system or an array.

I have a feeling that I'll probably do a custom build for the box to make it as power-efficient as possible, though. 16 drives at an average of 10 watts each, plus the power supply loss, motherboard, and CPU consumptions ... I'm guessing this box will use about 300 watts in its current incarnation if it were fully populated. I probably won't fill it with really small drives, as I don't feel like paying for an extra 20GB every month in electricity when the same money would pay for 500GB or a terabyte.

angelfoodcakez
Mar 22, 2003
crank dat robocop

What is everyone using in terms of software to backup their data to their nas devices, or is that outside the scope of this thread?

I'm looking at various rsync solutions for windows to get user's documents and Outlook PST files backed up over a rickety network. Anyone have a favorite solution (cwrsync, deltabackup, nasbackup, sync2nas, etc)?

stephenm00
Jun 28, 2006


Just to compare speeds. I am getting 80 Mb/s + read speed on my unraid box. Also I built my box fairly power efficient: 35W conroe L, 80+ power supply and with 3 drives fully spun up I use about 61W of power.

that one guy
Jun 3, 2005


teamdest posted:

helpful things
Thanks! I'm going to be picking one of these up pretty soon, I think.

kri kri
Jul 18, 2007



stephenm00 posted:

Just to compare speeds. I am getting 80 Mb/s + read speed on my unraid box. Also I built my box fairly power efficient: 35W conroe L, 80+ power supply and with 3 drives fully spun up I use about 61W of power.

Thanks a lot for sharing. Can you post the links of your components? I think that would help quite a bit, you could also get Teamdest to post a link in the OP.

stephenm00
Jun 28, 2006


I chose the components for the following reasons.

Case: COOLER MASTER Centurion 590 RC-590-KKN1-GP Black SECC / ABS ATX Mid Tower Computer Case - Retail

Cheap and can easily fit 12 hard drives (more if you get creative).

Video Card : BIOSTAR V6202EL63 GeForce 6200LE 64MB 32-bit GDDR2 PCI Express x16 Low Profile Ready Video Card - Retail

Cheapest I could find.

Power Supply: PC Power & Cooling S610EPS 610W Continuous @ 40C EPS12V Power Supply - Retail

Great Brand, 80+, 600Watt, and has a single 12V rail so it can handle multiple drives spinning up.

Processor: Intel Celeron 440 Conroe-L 2.0GHz LGA 775 35W Single-Core Processor Model BX80557440 - Retail

UnRaid does not use a lot of processing power. I picked this because it is future proof (for a file server) and because it only uses 35W (almost half of any core porcessor).

Ram: Crucial Ballistix 2GB (2 x 1GB) 240-Pin DDR2 SDRAM DDR2 800 (PC2 6400) Dual Channel Kit Desktop Memory Model BL2KIT12864AA804 - Retail

2GB because it was dirt cheap.

Mobo: Abit AB9 pro (newegg seemed to stop carrying this, despite me ordering it a week or so ago). I chose this because it has great support with unraid (beta 6). All that is required is that you update the bios. Also this mobo offers 9 SATA ports, many of which support sata port replication. The mobo also has Dual Gigabit Lan is on the PCI-E Bus.

stephenm00 fucked around with this message at May 19, 2008 around 21:49

kbar
Aug 9, 2002



I have a bunch of dumb questions.

I have an Antec case with four 3.5" bays, and I just bought four Samsung Spinpoint F1 750GB drives in hopes of doing a RAID-5 array. The trouble is that I want to run my OS off of something that isn't part of the array, and since I'm out of drive slots, I need to get creative. I'm using an old ASRock motherboard and an Athlon64 3400+ as the guts for this experiment, and I have a PCI slot to burn. Should I be looking at a PCI eSATA card and an external drive? (If so, any Newegg recommendations?) Or is there a better way to get a small OS drive in there? I wouldn't be opposed to some kind of CompactFlash or similar solution, I just don't really know what I should be looking at. I guess I could do a USB 2.0 external drive, but that poo poo would probably be pretty slow for my OS, right?

Also, I want to go hardware RAID for my RAID-5 setup. I need a PCI SATA card, too. Is there a good PCI card that does RAID-5 and also has 4+ SATA slots on it? I am crossing my fingers that something like this exists.

Next up, what kind of power supply should I be looking at? I want it to be as small/efficient as possible for four harddrives and my CPU, because I'm going to leave this machine running 24/7.

Lastly, (and I feel dumb asking this), but my drives were "bulk" and conveniently shipped without SATA cables or power connectors. Can I buy a cheap 4-pack of these somewhere or what?

Thanks so much!

kbar fucked around with this message at May 25, 2008 around 01:56

Evilkiksass
Jun 30, 2007
I am literally Bowbles IRL

DO A KEGSTAND BRAH


What OS do you plan to install? If some *nix then a cf card will work fine.
Hardware Raid 5 can be a bit pricey, why do you need hardware versus using *nix soft raid? Go to your local brick and mortar shop and get the sata cables there for 1 buck each, or bug your techie friend (I have 30-40 of these things lying around). You could probably run what you described off a 250-300 watt power supply though I don't recommend it. I would say try and get the 80+ efficient quiet corsair one (400 watt I believe is their lowest model). Great, quiet, reliable psu.

Syano
Jul 13, 2005


I have been toying around with the idea of adding a clariion cx3 array to our environment as there are several factors leading me to believe its time for a SAN. Documentation says this thing will do RAID 10 with only 2 disks. Call me a peon, but how can it do that? I'm having a tough time understanding exactly.

Evilkiksass
Jun 30, 2007
I am literally Bowbles IRL

DO A KEGSTAND BRAH


Partition each drive into 2 and then stripe across 2 disks and then mirror that across to the other halfs. Basically it is useless.

plastickiwi
Dec 19, 2001

Tickled purple

I doubt this will be of any use to you, but steer clear of the LaCie Ethernet Disk Mini if you're looking for a small desktop NAS.

On paper, the EDMini looks like a good deal. It's reasonably inexpensive, comes in a cool aluminum case, features gigabit Ethernet and USB connectivity, and runs on an embedded Linux. It supports pretty much every standard around, including SMB, AFS, Bonjour, FTP, HTTP, UPnP, etc., and can even share additional drives connected by USB. It streams media with a built-in Twonky server which works handsomely with my PS3 and other front ends.

Unfortunately, the loving thing disappears from the network at the drop of a hat and requires a hard reset before it comes skulking back. It will often show up as a UPnP media server in Windows without also appearing as a standard file server, and remains inaccessible as the latter until (you guessed it) a hard reset. Sometimes it remembers its manners after being reset from the web administration page, while at others it stops responding to web requests altogether, apparently from pure spite.

Checking the Internet reveals that some people have these problems and some don't. Some can fix them with a firmware update while some can't. No one seems to be able to distinguish the reason for this.

I love the cheap little bastard when it's working 90% of the time and want to strangle someone at LaCie the other 10%.

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

HPL
Aug 28, 2002

Worst case scenario.

From the DNS-323 wiki forums: To access the 1.05 BT screen, go to:

http://x.x.x.x/web/bt/fe01.html

Lord knows why it doesn't require a password or anything, and the screen is far better than the default D-Link one which is one of the least screen space-efficient things I've seen.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • Post
  • Reply
«256 »