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StarkingBarfish
Jun 25, 2006

Novus Ordo Seclorum


Hi everybody, I'm StarkingBarfish and I am working on one of the experiments of the Large Hadron Collider.




There have been a whole heap of threads here recently about the LHC mostly containing the same questions, jokes and misconceptions. At this stage I reckon it is a good idea to make a megathread to keep it all in one place. I'll update this thread with information as I get it, and will answer any questions people have if I can. I'm sure there are one or two other physics goons here who can help me out in this too.


I'll lay a few ground rules first if I can, and offer a disclaimer: I'd like to keep this thread free of trolling and physics penis-waving if at all possible. I'm an experimental particle physicist rather than a theorist, so I want to avoid heavily theoretical discussions where I can- if people want to discuss theory A/T is probably a better place for it. I encourage theorists to correct me and others where we are wrong, but pedantism will detract from helping non-physics goons understanding.

I'll start by giving a brief FAQ based on the more common questions/misconceptions I've heard so far.

What is the LHC?

The Large Hadron Collider is a particle accelerator situated at the European Organisation for Nuclear Research (CERN). It is not an experiment, more of a laboratory- many different experiments will be performed with it. The LHC is a pair of enormous rings called beampipes, 27km in circumference, into which we inject protons, and speed them up to ridiculously high speeds- almost the speed of light.



Protons are nothing special, they make up a significant portion of the contents of our bodies, and all the material we see around us. Contained within the nucleus of atoms alongside neutrons, they are about 1000 times heavier than the electron. The protons we inject into the LHC are like the blast from a shotgun, rather than a stream of single protons, we inject 'bunches', containing 100,000,000,000 protons in a beam the thickness of a human hair. There are 2808 of these bunches in the machine at any instant, and they will travel around the rings in opposite directions completing a lap of the machine 11000 times per second.





The LHC itself isn't much to look at. It consists of a lot (1232) of shiny blue tubes about the diameter of a car tyre attached end to end around the ring, situated 100m or so beneath the borders of France and Switzerland. These are the superconducting dipoles, which is a fancy name for what is essentially a big magnet. Inside these blue tubes are the beampipes, sitting side by side and surrounded by liquid helium and superconductor. The superconductor needs to be kept cold to operate, and holds an enormous electric current creating a strong magnetic field. This field is what holds our protons inside the accelerator. As the protons travel around the ring they get flung outwards like a kid on a playground roundabout. The magnets provide the nudge needed to stop the protons flying out from the ring in a straight line and burning a hole in the side of the beampipe.

At four different locations on the LHC are 'interaction points' where we bend these two beams together much like the crossovers you see on toy car racetracks. At these interaction points the two beams collide smashing individual protons together unleashing vast amounts of energy in a very small space. This is where we hope to witness some things humankind has never before seen....

The Experiments of the LHC

There are four main experiments, one at each interaction point. These are the real beasts which everyone has probably seen photos of by now. What the hell though, I'll throw in some more.

ATLAS




ATLAS is A Large Toroidal LHC ApparatuS, and is truly a monster of a machine. The biggest of the big experiments, she is as heavy as 100 jumbo jets, and fills a cavern capable of housing Notre Dame cathedral.


CMS




CMS is the Compact Muon Solenoid... compact? I think not. It is the heaviest of the experiments at over 12500 tonnes. This is mostly because it has to generate a large magnetic field deep within the detector- the superconducting magnets use an iron return yoke made from the hulls of old russian battleships (no joke!).

LHCb




LHCb is the boringly named Large Hadron Collider beauty experiment. This is the one I work on, and the ugliest of the bunch. I don't know who the hell chose the vomit yellow and green coloring, but the detector itself is beautiful to work with. She's the smallest of the experiments, both in terms of material and researchers, but she's also the most precise, capable of measuring with far higher accuracy than the others.

ALICE





ALICE is A Large Ion Collider Experiment. Rather than looking at protons, ALICE is going balls-to-the-wall and looking at lead ion collisions. This is the equivalent of slamming two elephants together at a few hundred miles an hour and trying to understand the mess, in comparison to the protons used in the other experiments.


So what are the experiments looking for?

The four experiments are each looking at very different things: ATLAS and CMS are 'general purpose' detectors, and are concentrating on looking for the Higgs boson (more on this later), but also looking for signs of new physics and lower resolution studies of the things LHCb and ALICE are looking at. The LHC was primarily designed to find the Higgs, so the two detectors add some redundancy- if one doesn't find it, the other can still do so.

LHCb is trying to tell us why we're made of matter. Sounds like a stupid question, right? Actually it is a bit of a head-scratcher. The Big Bang is now favored as the model of the creation of the universe. It predicts very well a number of phenomena we can measure accurately enough to tell us it's right. It gets it wrong somewhere important though, and that is that our models tell us matter and antimatter were made in equal amounts at the dawn of the universe. We can measure how much antimatter exists now, and it is several billion times less than the amount of matter in the universe. The thing is, this shouldn't make sense- if the same amounts of matter and antimatter were made, and they mixed with each other, they'd annihilate again leaving nothing behind. The fact that there was less antimatter than matter is the reason we exist today, but we don't know why. The LHCb will give us a deeper insight into this.

ALICE is trying to simulate conditions immediately after the big bang, slamming heavy lead ions into each other and releasing so much energy in such a confined space that the temperatures soar to those many thousand times hotter than our sun. Immediately after the Big Bang, all the matter in the universe was crammed into a spot a lot smaller than a pinhead, and the conditions there are like something that we cannot find in our universe today. Strange states of matter are thought to have existed at these temperatures, and ALICE will probe them for a better understanding of the formation of the universe we see today.


So how do you detect all these crazy particles? What does it 'look' like?

At the interaction points within the detectors, our protons slam together turning into pure energy. Einstein's great equation tells us that energy = matter, so if we have enough energy, particles can be made from it. What particles are made depends upon how heavy they are. These new particles, most of which we have seen before, are usually unstable and decay into even more particles. The direction they shoot off in, their mass, speed, charge, and what they decay into make a 'signature' telling us what the particle was.

The big detectors are actually made up of thousands of smaller detectors, much like a digital camera is made up of a few thousand light sensors. In fact, much of the technology in a digital camera is similar to the silicon detectors most of these experiments use. Light is after all just a bunch of photons, a particle we measure all the time in these interactions we study. Different subdetectors measure different things- calorimeters measure energy, trackers measure the path a particle takes as it flies through, and vertex locators tell us where the particle was born.

Putting together all this information is a tricky task- in your digital camera each pixel gets read out and saved to the camera memory to make an image a few MB in size. Our detectors do the same. We take a picture and each subdetector that saw something gets read out to disk forming an 'event'. This event can be a terabyte in size, and we take a picture 40 million times a second. This would be impossible to store, but much like going through your camera and deleting the crap shots, we have what is called a 'trigger'. The trigger is a whole bunch of computers that look at the event to see if anything interesting happened. Most of the time the photos are just noise- things we have seen before and have told the trigger computers to ignore. Once in a while however, we'll see something interesting. This gets sent along the tunnel from the experiment to CERN's computing centre where it is reconstructed.

Reconstruction is turning the event that we have captured into physics. Basically the event consists of a load of information from the electronics like 'This subdetector saw this voltage in this sensor, This other subdetector saw two hits in these two locations'. Reconstruction turns that into 'a Kaon was spat out of here at almost the speed of light, it flew along for 1.47 nanoseconds and then decayed into two pions'. It is here that we get the pretty pictures:


This is a simulated higgs event in the CMS detector. The different coloured lines are different particle tracks, while the white squares are energy deposits in the calorimeters. The reason the tracks are 'curly' is because the inside of the detector is a strong magnetic field. The particles bend in this field, and how much they bend tells us what type of particle they are.

By capturing many, many events like this, we can form an idea of what is going on- what particles are decaying into what other particles, and how often. If we measure an absence of energy, we know something is happening that we can't detect. This is one of the fingerprints we are looking for, signs of new particles we have yet to observe....


So will the LHC Kill us all? Is it dangerous?


No.

The LHC is going to produce things physicists have never before seen, but in a lot of cases we hope it will produce things we've predicted. Recently a number of somewhat unsavoury attention whores have misled the media and general public with a campaign based on the possibility that we may produce something truly dangerous. There have been numerous arguments against these 'doomsday scenarios', all from physicists a good deal smarter than me. Here is my take on the subject though:

It was originally considered that the LHC may produce micro black holes. These would be black holes smaller than atoms. Of course, knowing that a black hole is not something you want to get too close to, this drew a lot of scaremongering. The truth is that black holes must be produced at a certain size before they are capable of growing on their own by attracting more matter. That size was estimated in a recent paper to be larger than the mass of our sun. Anything smaller and they just sit there evaporating until they are no more. The smaller the hole, the faster the evaporation. We expected anything the LHC could have produced to live for a few femtoseconds before disappearing. As it turns out, another recent paper provides convincing proof that black holes are not likely to be produced at the LHC at all....

There are other supposed dangers, namely magnetic monopoles and strangelets. In both cases the theory on which these exotic forms of matter have been based is a little crackpotish, and numerous conterarguments have been put forward. To paraphrase Prof. Frank Close of Oxford University's High Energy Physics dept, "The LHC isn't going to end the world. If it does, you can sue me."

When will the LHC start?

This morning, CERN made official a start date that has been bouncing around the detector caverns for a while now- 10th Sept. 2008. This is the inauguration day, and it is expected that a couple of protons will be ceremonially thrown around the rings, but not collided. The first collisions are hoped to come in October. There is now an official countdown on the CERN Website, NOT lhccountdown.com. That site is run by a /b/tard. Get the real countdown here



Why did it take so drat long to build and start?


The LHC is absolute state-of-the-art. When it was designed in the late 80's through to the 90's people actually used moore's law to work out how much computing power would be available for the experiment come runtime. That is how far-thinking they were at the time. There have been one or two minor technical glitches along the way, but the thing that really takes time and which can still shaft us is the cooldown of the dipole magnets. These are pumped full of liquid helium and cooled to 2 kelvin- colder than space! It takes several months to reach this temperature, and if anything goes wrong it means another 2 months while it is cooled again. Each sector of the LHC on this image is now blue, indicating cooled status. This has been going on for a year now.



That's it for now, I'll add more to this as time allows, and I'll try and explain more about what we're looking for and why in a post tomorrow. I'll also try to answer any questions you may have, and keep you updated with the status of the LHC as time progresses. It is a very busy time for everyone involved in the LHC for obvious reasons, but it is also an amazing time to be involved in this piece of scientific history.

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ayekappy
Aug 22, 2004

Brie Cheesin'

Well at least you have some credentials for creating another LHC thread!

Cheesemaster200
Feb 11, 2004

Guard of the Citadel

How the hell is this thing powered? Are there generating stations on site? Whats its total power consumption once it comes online?

prawnsy
Jun 27, 2008


I have a stupid question! Is it possible to somehow fall into this thing? And if you did when it was doing it's thing, would it just wreck you? Or is the place relatively safe for the people working on it?

I guess what I want to know it, I know it won't destroy the world, but is this thing capable of somehow loving up some poor scientists?

prawnsy
Jun 27, 2008


Cheesemaster200 posted:

How the hell is this thing powered? Are there generating stations on site? Whats its total power consumption once it comes online?


This was my other question! I just imagine them starting this thing and the whole country(ies) going pitch black, hah.

Undaine
Jun 5, 2002

All done running...

What would happen if you peed on it while it was running?

jerkstore77
Dec 26, 2003

Future of the franchise

Have you designated a member of your team as the chief negotiator for when the Combine forces arrive?

StarkingBarfish
Jun 25, 2006

Novus Ordo Seclorum


Cheesemaster200 posted:

How the hell is this thing powered? Are there generating stations on site? Whats its total power consumption once it comes online?

A great first question!

The entire complex is powered courtesy of the French. They generate the majority of their electricity using nuclear power, and the thing about nuclear reactors is that they are 'always on'. If you use 100MW of power and it puts out 400MW, the rest usually goes to waste. In the summer people tend to use less electricity (Europe isn't as A/C heavy as the US, but we still heat in the winter) so France doesn't use all their power- we only run the LHC in the summer months, and shut it down for maintenance in winter.

I don't have an exact figure for power consumption, I'll have to look that one up. It is a pretty scary figure though if I recall correctly.

eggyolk
Nov 8, 2007

NO FAT CHICKS
WOOOOOOOOO!
(so lonely)


Very insightful, thanks for sharing.

Mogador
Nov 3, 2007



Thanks for all the info StarkingBarfish! Marking this thread.

You should really have "Science. It works, Bitches" as a custom title

Poise
Jul 28, 2006


What do you do in the experiment, and what is your education

BrooklynBruiser
Aug 20, 2006


I never thought I'd actually be happy to see another LHC thread. Consider this subscribed, this is really interesting.

StarkingBarfish
Jun 25, 2006

Novus Ordo Seclorum


prawnsy posted:

I have a stupid question! Is it possible to somehow fall into this thing? And if you did when it was doing it's thing, would it just wreck you? Or is the place relatively safe for the people working on it?

I guess what I want to know it, I know it won't destroy the world, but is this thing capable of somehow loving up some poor scientists?

You see the top photo in my post, the yellow door I'm standing in front of? That is a safety door- If it is open, the accelerator shuts off. When we work on the experiment we need to take a key from a whole rack of about 50 keyholes in the wall nearby. This is the only way to open the door, and while the key is removed, there is no beam. This ensures no-one is down there during the running of the detector.

The thing is though, while the accelerator is running, it spits out particles at such speeds they irradiate the stuff they hit. Usually after running the caverns are 'hot' for a while, and we need to wait for radiation levels to reach safe values. While working down there we carry dosimeters to monitor how much of a nuking we get.

The beam itself could spectacularly gently caress your poo poo up if you got in the way of it. It has happened before on russian accelerator I beleive, using a far less powerful beam. Surprisingly the guy survived it. With the LHC the only thing that'd survive would be a lingering aroma of evaporated geek.

ethanol
Jul 13, 2007

Eleven thousand dead birds
fly towards nothing because
they are dead
and cannot fly

StarkingBarfish posted:

You see the top photo in my post, the yellow door I'm standing in front of? That is a safety door- If it is open, the accelerator shuts off. When we work on the experiment we need to take a key from a whole rack of about 50 keyholes in the wall nearby. This is the only way to open the door, and while the key is removed, there is no beam. This ensures no-one is down there during the running of the detector.

The thing is though, while the accelerator is running, it spits out particles at such speeds they irradiate the stuff they hit. Usually after running the caverns are 'hot' for a while, and we need to wait for radiation levels to reach safe values. While working down there we carry dosimeters to monitor how much of a nuking we get.

The beam itself could spectacularly gently caress your poo poo up if you got in the way of it. It has happened before on russian accelerator I beleive, using a far less powerful beam. Surprisingly the guy survived it. With the LHC the only thing that'd survive would be a lingering aroma of evaporated geek.

What does this mean? What would happen if you put your hand in the beam? Be specific.

NoCleverName
Nov 16, 2006



What country are you originally from and do you have to live near the collider while you work with it?

How do you stop a beam? (Or remove it from the collider) Do you have somewhere that you let it out of the ring and it just blasts into something that can take the hit? I'm assuming if you just turn off the magnets it would blow a hole in the side of the tube.

SpeedyCow
Oct 8, 2001

I luv the itty bitty Phillies!
I luv the itty bitty Phillies!
I luv the itty bitty Phillies!

Great thread! I've spent the last few months reading Wikipedia and other stuff on the LHC and your post explains what it actually does better than what I've read.

StarkingBarfish posted:


The beam itself could spectacularly gently caress your poo poo up if you got in the way of it. It has happened before on russian accelerator I beleive, using a far less powerful beam. Surprisingly the guy survived it. With the LHC the only thing that'd survive would be a lingering aroma of evaporated geek.

So would you say it should be classified as a Federation Phaser or a Romulan Disruptor?

The Finn
Aug 27, 2004



Likes: Katanas, Corea, Entertainment Centre, Couch, Yellow, Bald, Power, Teen Panties

click my av for a fun surprise


idiot race's bald fail admin of the week winner 2013

Just a heads up,don't be retarded it. Don't ask stupid questions about black holes, Nostradamus, Gordon being needed in the test chamber etc. Serious science only, we've had enough dumb poo poo in the other 37 threads. THANKS

elpintogrande
Sep 3, 2000


ethanol posted:

What does this mean? What would happen if you put your hand in the beam? Be specific.

You ever see Tron, man? You'd be fighting with frisbees before your shoes stopped smoking.

Nausicaa
Jun 2, 2005

NEED GAMS BADLY


ethanol posted:

What does this mean? What would happen if you put your hand in the beam? Be specific.

No hand and a lethal dose of radiation?

Stupid_Sexy_Flander
Mar 14, 2007

Is a man not entitled to the haw of his maw?


How strong of a magnetic field should/does this thing put out? I am wondering if it is something along the lines of "Don't wear metal past this point" or "Holy poo poo some dude in Belgium just lost his fillings". I am not a particularly brilliant scientist but I have played half life and half life 2, so I think I am qualified to think "If it can create black holes, then it's gotta be one hell of a magnetic field".

Just finished watching T3, so please forgive the retardation of the question. Always loved particle accelerators.

Any chance someone put a warning sign about resonance cascades somewhere along the 15km of pipe?

The Artificial Kid
Feb 22, 2002
Plibble


StarkingBarfish posted:

There are other supposed dangers, namely magnetic monopoles and strangelets. In both cases the theory on which these exotic forms of matter have been based is a little crackpotish, and numerous conterarguments have been put forward. To paraphrase Prof. Frank Close of Oxford University's High Energy Physics dept, "The LHC isn't going to end the world. If it does, you can sue me."
Now I'm not saying the LHC is dangerous. I expect it's safe. But that is a dick argument. Just because nobody will be around to know or sue if it goes wrong, doesn't mean it's an unimportant question. It's like he's being a juvenile solipsist, and taking it upon himself to be that way on behalf of all of us instead of doing his level best to clarify the issue for people who don't have ten years of physics education.


Edit - Also your head always reminds me of Karl Pilkington.

Also when do we get fusion?

Edit edit - Wait, an actual question about your experiment. Why do all the other experiments have a tubular structure like they're designed to receive a beam, and the LHCb have that messy rectilinear structure? What is the equivalent on LHCb of those big "shoot a proton in me" holes in the other experiments?

The Artificial Kid fucked around with this message at Aug 7, 2008 around 22:35

StarkingBarfish
Jun 25, 2006

Novus Ordo Seclorum


HarryLerman posted:

What do you do in the experiment, and what is your education

Another good one- at this rate I won't need to post my own follow-ups, as this was one I was planning on writing up too.

I'm essentially a bitch. A Gordon-Freeman in Half-life 1, if you will.

I Just graduated from an MPhys (hons) at the university of Edinburgh, and I've started my PhD as of May. For the last 3 years I've been spending my summers working on the LHCb experiment- 2 years ago at Edinburgh calibrating and testing photon sensors for the RICH which is a subdetector of the LHCb, Last year at CERN studying the effects of Cherenkov gasses in the same detector, and this year writing a paper on the sensitivity of the LHCb to a certain decay.

I started at undergraduate level, mainly because I knew I wanted to do this since I started my degree. I wandered into one of my supervisors offices and asked for a studentship. Since then, I've been sweating blood for them and loving every minute. It paid off, as the PhD interview basically was a formality.

Throughout the PhD I will most likely be working on characterising the Hybrid Photon Detectors of the LHCb, analysing data as it comes in, and working on the upgrade of the detector in later years.

Hot Dog Hotline
Jul 24, 2004

Hello? Hello?

So if this started construction in the 80s, what's being constructed now that's going to kick rear end 30 years from now?

ReV VAdAUL
Oct 3, 2004

I'm WILD about
WILDMAN


Thanks for posting this, I have a semi-serious question, are there any likely everyday applications the results from these experiments will have? I imagine that if so its only very indirectly but I love the idea of something along the lines of "our washing machines are now 30% more effective thanks to LHC research!"

ethanol
Jul 13, 2007

Eleven thousand dead birds
fly towards nothing because
they are dead
and cannot fly

elpintogrande posted:

You ever see Tron, man? You'd be fighting with frisbees before your shoes stopped smoking.

You've put your hand in front of a shotgun blast of protons haven't you elpintogrande?

lapse
Jun 27, 2004



I imagine that the entire machine has to be almost exactly perfectly round for the beam to not smash into the outer wall of the solenoid thingy. (maybe that's wrong?) How do injection points and collision points work so that the beam can be shifted without smashing into the wall of the machine?

Bonk
Aug 4, 2002

Douche Baggins

A few for you:

What's the attitude like among the staff operating it? Do people just drop a lot of sci-fi pop culture jokes, or is everyone military-serious?

Assuming you understand the results of this thing, what do you use it for after that? Does it have any theoretical applications or is it strictly to observe the matter's behavior?

StarkingBarfish
Jun 25, 2006

Novus Ordo Seclorum


NoCleverName posted:

What country are you originally from and do you have to live near the collider while you work with it?

How do you stop a beam? (Or remove it from the collider) Do you have somewhere that you let it out of the ring and it just blasts into something that can take the hit? I'm assuming if you just turn off the magnets it would blow a hole in the side of the tube.

I'm Irish, born in Belfast. I study in Edinburgh, Scotland though, and I'll be spending at least a year living 'on site'- usually in the small town of Meyrin which is right on top of the detector.

Stopping the beam is pretty cool- There are 'beam dumps', one for each beam, sitting on a junction off the ring. These are massive blocks of carbon surrounded in concrete and cooled with water. In case of an emergency, battery powered 'kicker' magnets kick the beam out of the ring and along to the beam dumps. The energy released as the beam slams into the carbon is enough to raise it to several hundred degrees, and the beam must be moved in an 'e' shape around the block to stop it from burning one place only.

Phy
Jun 27, 2008

ZWAP ZWAP ZWAP


This is why one pays ten bucks to post on an internet forum.

So what's the likelihood that the Higgs is at a higher energy level than the LHC is capable of producing, and what would it mean for particle physics if it was?

I guess tying into that is, what's the difference between being an experimental particle physicist and a theoretical?

ymgve
Jan 2, 2004




NoCleverName posted:

How do you stop a beam? (Or remove it from the collider) Do you have somewhere that you let it out of the ring and it just blasts into something that can take the hit? I'm assuming if you just turn off the magnets it would blow a hole in the side of the tube.

They have a really nifty solution for this, some huge blocks of concrete that they can steer the beam into. StarkingBarfish, could you dig up the details?

narby
Oct 27, 2002


Just looking at the pictures of the construction and the sheer complexity of everything blows my mind. What happens if a component deep inside one of the detectors fails?

I can't begin to fathom the amount of planning involved in building something that complicated, holy poo poo.

Skub
Jul 25, 2008

by Fragmaster


narby posted:

Just looking at the pictures of the construction and the sheer complexity of everything blows my mind.

I hated physics, but this is just straight up awe-inspiring. I feel proud to be alive to see this.

SpeedyCow
Oct 8, 2001

I luv the itty bitty Phillies!
I luv the itty bitty Phillies!
I luv the itty bitty Phillies!

StarkingBarfish posted:


Stopping the beam is pretty cool- There are 'beam dumps', one for each beam, sitting on a junction off the ring. These are massive blocks of carbon surrounded in concrete and cooled with water. In case of an emergency, battery powered 'kicker' magnets kick the beam out of the ring and along to the beam dumps. The energy released as the beam slams into the carbon is enough to raise it to several hundred degrees, and the beam must be moved in an 'e' shape around the block to stop it from burning one place only.

That is great! How do you move a beam so powerful in an "E" shape though? Do you move the tube it's traveling through, or do the magnets control it?

Edoraz
Nov 20, 2007

Takin ova da world


StarkingBarfish posted:

Stopping the beam is pretty cool- There are 'beam dumps', one for each beam, sitting on a junction off the ring. These are massive blocks of carbon surrounded in concrete and cooled with water. In case of an emergency, battery powered 'kicker' magnets kick the beam out of the ring and along to the beam dumps. The energy released as the beam slams into the carbon is enough to raise it to several hundred degrees, and the beam must be moved in an 'e' shape around the block to stop it from burning one place only.

Mind showing us where these awesome "beam dumps" are on the last diagram you showed us. Thanks in advance if you do. Awesome thread, much more informative then Wikipedia.

StarkingBarfish
Jun 25, 2006

Novus Ordo Seclorum


Stupid_Sexy_Flander posted:

How strong of a magnetic field should/does this thing put out? I am wondering if it is something along the lines of "Don't wear metal past this point" or "Holy poo poo some dude in Belgium just lost his fillings". I am not a particularly brilliant scientist but I have played half life and half life 2, so I think I am qualified to think "If it can create black holes, then it's gotta be one hell of a magnetic field".

Just finished watching T3, so please forgive the retardation of the question. Always loved particle accelerators.

Any chance someone put a warning sign about resonance cascades somewhere along the 15km of pipe?

The magnetic fields involved are enormous, we're talking several tesla, on par with and stronger than most MRI machines in hospitals. The thing is, in the LHC this is confined to the blue beampipe which acts as a cage (They hosed that up in T3, the field outside the pipe is not that high). The experiments however, generate large fields in open spaces. There is a story that the CMS detector held a large residual field even after shut-down, and it tugs at belt buckles as you work on it.

As for resonance cascades- someone put up a big red 'black hole abort' button in the CMS cavern....

Kaiho
Dec 2, 2004



Excellent, well-written and thoughtful thread. Thanks for starting it. I'm glad you write with a clarity of expression suitable for us not versed in physics, and am equally glad you told the neckbearding theoretical physicists to stay the gently caress away.

My question relates to the papers you mentioned on black holes. Any chance you could give us the references? I probably wouldn't be able to understand a word but would still like to take a look. Also, any other relevant papers you may have come across would definitely be appreciated.

ethanol
Jul 13, 2007

Eleven thousand dead birds
fly towards nothing because
they are dead
and cannot fly

What's the average income of the people working on this?

Total Meatlove
Jan 28, 2007


Rangers died, shoujo Hitler cried ;_;


ethanol posted:

What's the average income of the people working on this?

Anything less than 50,000 is too small for what is the coolest machine on the planet.

genesplicer
Oct 19, 2002

FORUMS SENIOR CITIZEN Ask me about:
joining the AARP; Social Security; prostate exams; why rock music is too loud; wearing orthopedic shoes and prescription pant

So, what would be the absolute best case scenario for the LHC experimentation?

And what would be the absolute worst case scenario for the LHC (I don't mean world destruction, I mean actual test results)

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ymgve
Jan 2, 2004




ReV VAdAUL posted:

Thanks for posting this, I have a semi-serious question, are there any likely everyday applications the results from these experiments will have? I imagine that if so its only very indirectly but I love the idea of something along the lines of "our washing machines are now 30% more effective thanks to LHC research!"

Someone else on another site asked a similar question - and got a few good answers

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