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Grayly Squirrel
Apr 10, 2008



Figured I'd post an update. It makes me feel better to write this down.

Chemo day three:

So apparently I'm really really allergic to etoposide, one of the main components of my BEP regime. It causes hives and swelling in fantastic fashion. Onc suspects its related to my psoriasis. The hives start at my psoriasis hot spots, and then spread. He said, with auto-immune issues, its anyone's guess. We found a solution that worked yesterday. If we spread the etoposide over four hours instead of two, with constant re-dosing of bennadryl and steroids, all I get is all over rash and itching. No hives, no dangerous swelling. It sucks, but I can live with it.

I've also found out that I suck at chess right now. I My roommate comes with me to my treatments. I usually beat him at chess. He's been wiping the floor with me.

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Thunderlips
Oct 25, 2002


Grayly Squirrel posted:

Figured I'd post an update. It makes me feel better to write this down.

Chemo day three:

So apparently I'm really really allergic to etoposide, one of the main components of my BEP regime. It causes hives and swelling in fantastic fashion. Onc suspects its related to my psoriasis. The hives start at my psoriasis hot spots, and then spread. He said, with auto-immune issues, its anyone's guess. We found a solution that worked yesterday. If we spread the etoposide over four hours instead of two, with constant re-dosing of bennadryl and steroids, all I get is all over rash and itching. No hives, no dangerous swelling. It sucks, but I can live with it.

I've also found out that I suck at chess right now. I My roommate comes with me to my treatments. I usually beat him at chess. He's been wiping the floor with me.

Cisplatin knocked the poo poo out of me, so to deal with all those allergic reactions on top of it, you have my sympathies. My hardest days were like the 5th-7th days after each Cisplatin dose. I'm following your progress and sending all my positive vibes your way. Stay strong.

OneThousandMonkeys
Oct 9, 2005

The Strangest Vengeance Ever Planned

Grayly Squirrel posted:

Figured I'd post an update. It makes me feel better to write this down.

Chemo day three:

So apparently I'm really really allergic to etoposide, one of the main components of my BEP regime. It causes hives and swelling in fantastic fashion. Onc suspects its related to my psoriasis. The hives start at my psoriasis hot spots, and then spread. He said, with auto-immune issues, its anyone's guess. We found a solution that worked yesterday. If we spread the etoposide over four hours instead of two, with constant re-dosing of bennadryl and steroids, all I get is all over rash and itching. No hives, no dangerous swelling. It sucks, but I can live with it.

I've also found out that I suck at chess right now. I My roommate comes with me to my treatments. I usually beat him at chess. He's been wiping the floor with me.

Since being re-diagnosed I have become terrible at Words with Friends. There have been several occasions where they have had to slow down my injection rates for chemo, since dumping into my body at normal speed causes uncomfortable side effects.

Chickalicious
Apr 13, 2005

We are the ones we've been waiting for.

I just got this text from my uncle.

"I talked with the Dr. after they took her to the treatment room today. Best case 2 years if the cancer responds well to the chemo. After the first round of treatments, the cancer will start to grow again after about 6 months. Maintenance treatments do not effect outcomes. The recurring growth will not respond as well to a second round of treatment. If the cancer doesn't respond well to this first round, he said we will be talking months and weeks."

gently caress the world.

adventure in the sandbox
Nov 24, 2005

Things change



Matt got the all-clear for the 6 month follow-up. There is some lung scarring but currently 0 cancer so I am over the moon happy. The doctor (a new one every time because they all want to talk to him) said that they may make a case study about him.


Grayly Squirrel posted:

Onc suspects its related to my psoriasis.

Matt also has psoriasis, luckily he wasn't having any funky reactions to chemo. BEP knocked it right out so he didn't have to deal with itching and that crap. But now its back and seems to have spread :/ Sending positive thoughts.



Chickalicious posted:

gently caress the world.

Positive thoughts to you too

DrSnakeLaser
Sep 6, 2011


So my Dad had a bit of a cough last November after his flu jab, it started causing him back pain after picking up a cold and about 3 weeks ago finally had an X-ray after being given cough medicine when it hadn't cleared after a month.

The X-ray picked up some shadows on his lung so he's had two brachioscopy's to get samples. Everyone in the family is dancing around saying its cancer in case that makes it more real or something, but my mum has finally said the hospital has given us a list of treatment options and implied that the test is really more to confirm what stage it is.

So now its waiting for results. This is going to be a horrible week.

Rose Wreck
Jun 15, 2012


Chickalicious posted:

gently caress the world.

gently caress cancer.

I am so very sorry.

[e: The only time I really noticed any cognitive changes were with severe anemia. I went from "man, there sure are a lot of words on this page" immediately before a blood transfusion to "I am reading an interesting book on British WWII politics!" immediately after.]

Nannypea
Feb 20, 2006

Faster, you naughty little monkey!

Chickalicious posted:

gently caress the world.

gently caress CANCER!

Waiting is the hardest part. No matter what you find out, you will have imagined 1000 times worse. Praying for the best outcome.




*my Husband, letís call him Reggie cause thatís not his real name


Our wait seems like itís taken forever. I guess Iím counting all the time he didnít want to discuss it. The first appointment at Duke was with the Head of the Urology Department whoís a surgeon. He scheduled another PSA test, a bone scan, a prostascint scan, and the meeting with the Oncologist. Thatís what weíve been doing the past 2 weeks or so. After all the testing was complete, we finally meet met with the Oncologist a couple days ago. His PSA was still high but both the bone and prostascint scan were clear! Iíve never been so happy in all my life. Neither scan showed the current mass but it has been detected by numerous Doctors.

Resident informs us that heíll need 7.5 weeks of radiation, daily, M-F. Cool beans, we can do that. Got it covered. Then the Oncologist comes in and tells us heís part of a study since the early 90ís where they combined both hormone and radiation therapy. This has increased the patientís life span by 10-15 years, they canít say for sure because the people are still alive. They are currently writing up the study paperwork to have it submitted. Once it is, this will be the norm for recurrent prostate cancer patients. It involves one shot to stop the hormones for 4-6 months. After the shot is given, wait 8 weeks to be given/start radiation therapy.

The Oncologist then asked when Reggie wanted to start. Reggie asked how long did it take to get the shot, etc and was told he could do it right now. A stick in the butt and it would hurt. I was looking at Reggie, giving him that DO IT NOW look. Reggie told him heíd have to think about it. Seems heís thinking about all the bad things hormone therapy does and I donít care because itís one freaking shot that last 4-6 months, not a life time. It appears he is going to both the hormone and radiation, heís just trying to fit it into his schedule.

HELLO! Is it just me or isnít killing cancer the most important thing in your life? Who cares if youíre going to miss a couple conference and not make that money? That you will miss the Vegas show and I canít come with you? drat itís hard being on this side of the coin. I guess there were never any choices in my therapy. It was more of a do this and live a few more years or donít & die PDQ . Amazingly, Iíve been very patient and supportive. Iíve let him know that itís his body & decision. Iíll support whatever he choices to do. So thatís where we are. Heís pretty sure heís going to do both, start in a couple weeks, so that he can do the Vegas show but miss the one after. Heíll be getting radiation all through turkey hunting season and he might not be able to hunt which heís not happy about. And Iím hanging trying not to thinking about until he tells me when heís doing what. UGH!!!!

I hope Iím not a stressed the gently caress out as he was going to see the oncologist as when I get my MRI. If I am just start giving me ativan days ahead so I wonít be.

Now going back to the ignoring everything & anything concerning cancer until he gives me an answer.

Dick Trauma
Nov 30, 2007

My dick is fine. Thanks for asking.


Cancer (and any serious disease) demands alot of the patient. Sometimes you give up one thing after the other, and dealing with a recurrence can be a back breaker. You think "Christos, what the gently caress else do I have to deal with?"

Maybe he's feeling a little buried by this new round of treatment he has to go through and needs some time to absorb it. Sometimes the only power a patient has is to say "NO" to something, even if it's something he needs.

Bollock Monkey
Jan 21, 2007
The Almighty

I'm not sure if this is the right place to ask this, but I'd like some input from internet strangers. I've followed this thread for a long time and you guys seem nice and pretty well-informed.

Both my mum and my maternal grandmother died of cancer. Both had breast cancer, and in my mum's case she had chemo and a mastectomy, was thought to be clear and then had secondaries a few years later that killed her. Obligatory 'gently caress cancer!' here.

I've been batting the idea around in my head for a while now about looking into genetic counselling. I'm rather conflicted, though - if I have the BRCA gene, then it still isn't a certainty that I'll get breast cancer, and at the moment I work on the assumption that it's very likely that I will get it given my family history. So I don't know what good knowing would really do, but on the other hand I figure that if I can find out then I may as well.

I'm really not sure. Does anyone have thoughts?

Ariamaki
Jun 30, 2011

"I'm the most powerful
search engine in the world!"
-- The GoogleProg


Bollock Monkey posted:

I'm not sure if this is the right place to ask this, but I'd like some input from internet strangers. I've followed this thread for a long time and you guys seem nice and pretty well-informed.

Both my mum and my maternal grandmother died of cancer. Both had breast cancer, and in my mum's case she had chemo and a mastectomy, was thought to be clear and then had secondaries a few years later that killed her. Obligatory 'gently caress cancer!' here.

I've been batting the idea around in my head for a while now about looking into genetic counselling. I'm rather conflicted, though - if I have the BRCA gene, then it still isn't a certainty that I'll get breast cancer, and at the moment I work on the assumption that it's very likely that I will get it given my family history. So I don't know what good knowing would really do, but on the other hand I figure that if I can find out then I may as well.

I'm really not sure. Does anyone have thoughts?

I don't know about doing a genetic session for it, but with a family history like that... It would probably be no different from doing regular checkups.
So for safety's sake, do both. Go in for the session, because informed is better than not. And if it comes back false, still get tested specifically on a yearly basis at least- There's no such thing as finding out too early. If the test comes back positive, it's basically just confirming something you are already near sure of.

Bollock Monkey
Jan 21, 2007
The Almighty

Ariamaki posted:

I don't know about doing a genetic session for it, but with a family history like that... It would probably be no different from doing regular checkups.
So for safety's sake, do both. Go in for the session, because informed is better than not. And if it comes back false, still get tested specifically on a yearly basis at least- There's no such thing as finding out too early. If the test comes back positive, it's basically just confirming something you are already near sure of.

I'm in the UK so I don't really get to just pick and choose when to get tested for things. I'm not sure how it works, but I did wonder if having the genetic counselling would mean that I was perhaps offered mammograms early? I need to find out more about that side of things, I guess.

Rose Wreck
Jun 15, 2012


Bollock Monkey posted:

I'm really not sure. Does anyone have thoughts?

Get it. If you don't have kids now and aren't sure if you want them or not, it will be good to know if you're a carrier. If you do have kids but don't have the gene, they'll know they won't need to be tested.

Also what other people said.

Lady Demelza
Dec 29, 2009


Bollock Monkey posted:

I'm in the UK so I don't really get to just pick and choose when to get tested for things. I'm not sure how it works, but I did wonder if having the genetic counselling would mean that I was perhaps offered mammograms early? I need to find out more about that side of things, I guess.

There's a 50/50 chance of inheriting the BRCA mutations if your mother had one of them, but it could be that two generations of women were just unlucky enough to get breast cancer. BRCA mutations don't just increase the risk of breast cancer; they also increase the risk of ovarian, colon and pancreatic cancer. Do these cancers run in your family, including male relatives (except ovarian, obviously!)?

If the test is positive, then yes, you will probably be offered check-ups earlier. You will also probably find it harder to be approved for things like mortgages and life insurance, because it will be assumed you'll be unable to met future financial obligations.

I'm not saying "don't do it", and all of this will be covered in-depth by the genetic counsellor, but there's more to it than a simple blood test. The Macmillan Cancer Support website has useful info.

Tibor
Apr 29, 2009


On the topic of breast cancer, my great uncle recently died of it. I'm a 23 year old woman with no other history of breast cancer. Is there any genetic risk in my case? I mean I always assumed I was lucky enough to not have a family history but I'd not really considered the implications of my great uncle having it until just now.

Lady Demelza
Dec 29, 2009


Tibor posted:

On the topic of breast cancer, my great uncle recently died of it. I'm a 23 year old woman with no other history of breast cancer. Is there any genetic risk in my case? I mean I always assumed I was lucky enough to not have a family history but I'd not really considered the implications of my great uncle having it until just now.

I'm sorry about your great-uncle.

IANAD but it sounds unlikely that there's a genetic risk to you with just one relative having breast cancer. There's usually a much, much stronger family trait of cancer, particularly amongst relatively young adults.

Even if he was a carrier, you're fairly genetically distant (your last shared relative would be your great-grandparent, right?). If there're no other cases in your immediate family, then it's really unlikely you've got a genetic risk.

xarg
Sep 17, 2008


Bollock Monkey posted:

Both my mum and my maternal grandmother died of cancer. Both had breast cancer, and in my mum's case she had chemo and a mastectomy, was thought to be clear and then had secondaries a few years later that killed her. Obligatory 'gently caress cancer!' here.

I've been batting the idea around in my head for a while now about looking into genetic counselling. I'm rather conflicted, though - if I have the BRCA gene, then it still isn't a certainty that I'll get breast cancer, and at the moment I work on the assumption that it's very likely that I will get it given my family history. So I don't know what good knowing would really do, but on the other hand I figure that if I can find out then I may as well.

I'm really not sure. Does anyone have thoughts?
How old were they? If they were under 50 then it's probably worth getting genetic counselling (and possibly genetic testing afterwards). If they were both reasonably old then the risk is much lower that it was due to the BRCA mutation. With or without the mutation, depending on their age at diagnosis this may or may not put you into the "high risk" category, which would involve earlier and more regular screening with mammograms (and ultrasound when <35).

Tibor posted:

On the topic of breast cancer, my great uncle recently died of it. I'm a 23 year old woman with no other history of breast cancer. Is there any genetic risk in my case? I mean I always assumed I was lucky enough to not have a family history but I'd not really considered the implications of my great uncle having it until just now.
While male breast cancer raises a bit of a red flag, a great uncle is too distant a relation to be particularly worried about it. If it was your father then you'd look at getting tested.

As others have mentioned, make sure you get genetic counselling before getting tested. If you're found to have a cancer causing mutation you're legally obliged to divulge that information to any insurance companies so it's quite a double edged sword. At the least, you could take out health/life insurance before the testing and then cancel it if you're not found to have a high risk, but I admittedly don't really know that much about this course of action. But yeah, don't just go order a DNA test off the internet.

dsh
Aug 1, 2003


I'm an oncology resident, just wanted to chime in and say thanks for giving me some insight into the patient/family aspects of what we do.

Tibor
Apr 29, 2009


Lady Demelza posted:

I'm sorry about your great-uncle.

IANAD but it sounds unlikely that there's a genetic risk to you with just one relative having breast cancer. There's usually a much, much stronger family trait of cancer, particularly amongst relatively young adults.

Even if he was a carrier, you're fairly genetically distant (your last shared relative would be your great-grandparent, right?). If there're no other cases in your immediate family, then it's really unlikely you've got a genetic risk.

Nah it was my grandmother's brother. Thanks for the reassurance though, I'll just keep it in the back of my mind for now and hope nobody else in my family (or the world, for that matter) gets it.

Bollock Monkey
Jan 21, 2007
The Almighty

xarg posted:

How old were they? If they were under 50 then it's probably worth getting genetic counselling (and possibly genetic testing afterwards). If they were both reasonably old then the risk is much lower that it was due to the BRCA mutation. With or without the mutation, depending on their age at diagnosis this may or may not put you into the "high risk" category, which would involve earlier and more regular screening with mammograms (and ultrasound when <35).

As others have mentioned, make sure you get genetic counselling before getting tested. If you're found to have a cancer causing mutation you're legally obliged to divulge that information to any insurance companies so it's quite a double edged sword. At the least, you could take out health/life insurance before the testing and then cancel it if you're not found to have a high risk, but I admittedly don't really know that much about this course of action. But yeah, don't just go order a DNA test off the internet.

Lady Demelza posted:

There's a 50/50 chance of inheriting the BRCA mutations if your mother had one of them, but it could be that two generations of women were just unlucky enough to get breast cancer. BRCA mutations don't just increase the risk of breast cancer; they also increase the risk of ovarian, colon and pancreatic cancer. Do these cancers run in your family, including male relatives (except ovarian, obviously!)?

If the test is positive, then yes, you will probably be offered check-ups earlier. You will also probably find it harder to be approved for things like mortgages and life insurance, because it will be assumed you'll be unable to met future financial obligations.

I'm not saying "don't do it", and all of this will be covered in-depth by the genetic counsellor, but there's more to it than a simple blood test. The Macmillan Cancer Support website has useful info.
My mum was in her 30s and I think my nanna was in her late fifties at the time of diagnosis, and I don't think there are any other cancers that have cropped up multiple times. The insurance/mortgage stuff is definitely food for thought. I'm only 22 so hadn't even considered that side of things. That alone is enough for me to be a lot less keen on the idea. I don't want to gently caress my future over something that I don't have much control over!

keyvin
Sep 9, 2003

My flesh and blood lives. No matter what.

My mom is starting radiation tomorrow for her breast cancer. I am hoping that she doesn't get too sick from her treatments, but she has one every day this week. Just wanted to pop in and tell everyone dealing with cancer in any way to stay strong.

Lady Demelza posted:

There's a 50/50 chance of inheriting the BRCA mutations if your mother had one of them, but it could be that two generations of women were just unlucky enough to get breast cancer. BRCA mutations don't just increase the risk of breast cancer; they also increase the risk of ovarian, colon and pancreatic cancer. Do these cancers run in your family, including male relatives (except ovarian, obviously!)?

If the test is positive, then yes, you will probably be offered check-ups earlier. You will also probably find it harder to be approved for things like mortgages and life insurance, because it will be assumed you'll be unable to met future financial obligations.

I'm not saying "don't do it", and all of this will be covered in-depth by the genetic counsellor, but there's more to it than a simple blood test. The Macmillan Cancer Support website has useful info.

I can understand life insurance, but banks are allowed to access your health records in the UK?

Candycanes
Apr 6, 2007


keyvin posted:

My mom is starting radiation tomorrow for her breast cancer. I am hoping that she doesn't get too sick from her treatments, but she has one every day this week.
Mammycanes had the same thing last year - lumpectomy and radiation, one treatment a day for six weeks. She didn't get too sick, but was absolutely exhausted towards the end and was starting to have some skin issues around the area.

Unfortunately she's got to go through it all again starting with surgery this week, they found another very small tumour on the other side at her 1 year mammogram just before Christmas. Surgery on Wednesday...

xarg
Sep 17, 2008


Bollock Monkey posted:

My mum was in her 30s and I think my nanna was in her late fifties at the time of diagnosis, and I don't think there are any other cancers that have cropped up multiple times. The insurance/mortgage stuff is definitely food for thought. I'm only 22 so hadn't even considered that side of things. That alone is enough for me to be a lot less keen on the idea. I don't want to gently caress my future over something that I don't have much control over!
30s is quite young for breast cancer. Talk to your doctor about it and try to get some genetic counselling done to understand whether it's something you'd want to go through with or not.

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Nannypea
Feb 20, 2006

Faster, you naughty little monkey!

New Thread Time!

All new posts should be posted here: http://forums.somethingawful.com/sh...hreadid=3529607

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