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Ziir
Nov 20, 2004

by Ozmaugh


Fasheem posted:

That is way way more than the sources I've found online say you can work. Do you have a source? It is incredibly hard to find information about this, and there's a lot of conflicting information. (Probably because different parts of Germany have different rules, and they've been changing a lot in the last couple years.) But, the sites I've seen ALL say you can work 90 days a year only during vacation as a (foreign) student, or sometimes ten hours a week during school time with special permission.

http://www.study-in-germany.de/english/1.120.322.html
http://www.studienkredit.de/studium.../student-loans/ (EU students can work 20 hours)

http://www.international.rwth-aache...aubnis/?lang=en

quote:

International students may take up work in the private sector during the semester or the semester break for up to three months without having obtained a work permit. Students thus may take up full time work for 90 days or part-time positions (up to 4 hours per day) for 180 days. This regulation is also stated on the residence permit.

In term-time, students are allowed to take up jobs with working hours of up to 19 hours a week. During the semester break, students may work full-time but only for a maximum of 13 consecutive weeks. To give an example: A student takes up a job at a restaurant. He is to work for 16 hours per week. According to the above stated regulation, the student is allowed to work for 45 weeks of the year. The student's employer is advised to register the number of working days of the student in order to avoid difficulties with the Immigration Office.

I guess you're right. There's something about working only 90 days total full time/180 days part time. The example they give makes no sense when I actually do the math.

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Hummer Driving Faggot
Sep 23, 2004


IS THAT A STUPID NEWBIE AVATAR? FUCK NO, YOU'RE GETTING A PENTAR

SKILCRAFT KREW Reppin' Quality Blind Made Products

I was in Stuttgart last week and noticed something I had noticed late last year in Kaiserslautern.

German women are incredibly attractive.

And not just some of them, but most of them. If I was in any public place I would see at least one stunning woman every five minutes or so. The kind of woman you see maybe one of a day in the USA.

Also, they were either by themselves or with one other woman (as a friend). They were rarely walking with a guy or boyfriend.

Third, they looked really sad or depressed. They didn't look around much and weren't smiling.

The only conclusion I've come up with is that because the Nazis killed all the undesirables all that's left is super hot women.

Can you shed some light on why the women are so gorgeous?

Hummer Driving Faggot fucked around with this message at Apr 25, 2010 around 10:46

elbkaida
Jan 13, 2008
Look!

Hummer Driving enjoyable human being posted:

The only conclusion I've come up with is that because the Nazis killed all the undesirables all that's left is super hot women.




For students trying to find work with little German needed: look for student jobs at your university (Studentische Hilfskraft, Wissenschaftliche Hilfskraft or similar). The people offering this most likely speak English and you often do not require much specialist knowledge. If you can find one of those in a institute where you want to do your thesis it is also good for networking.

Chief Penguin
Jun 18, 2007


Hummer Driving enjoyable human being posted:

I was in Stuttgart last week and noticed something I had noticed late last year in Kaiserslautern.

German women are incredibly attractive.

And not just some of them, but most of them. If I was in any public place I would see at least one stunning woman every five minutes or so. The kind of woman you see maybe one of a day in the USA.

Also, they were either by themselves or with one other woman (as a friend). They were rarely walking with a guy or boyfriend.

Third, they looked really sad or depressed. They didn't look around much and weren't smiling.

The only conclusion I've come up with is that because the Nazis killed all the undesirables all that's left is super hot women.

Can you shed some light on why the women are so gorgeous?

I was in Trier for half a year and I was decidedly unimpressed. I must've just been at the wrong place.

Unagi
Jan 27, 2007


PISSmaster


Tricolor posted:

As far as East Germany goes, what sort of things one can engage in around May-June? I'm talking about something apart from the typical tourist attractions. (If it makes any difference, I'm interested in Leipzig)

I'm in the same boat wondering about festivals and attractions.

I'll be studying abroad for a few weeks this summer in Marburg, but I have 3 weeks of free time and plan on traveling around as much as possible. I'll be arriving in Frankfurt at the end of May and am wondering if there are any specific festivals or events going on around that time? Don't really care where, as long as its accessabl by train/bus.

Ziir
Nov 20, 2004

by Ozmaugh


Might as well ask, what's Oktoberfest like? I just realized that Oktoberfest starts sometime in September, and I'll have moved to Germany by then. I might head on over to Munich to experience it for a few day cause why the gently caress not?

supersteve
Jan 16, 2007

Atari Bigby - UNIVERSITY OF JAH RASTAFARI

What's the best company to get a sim card from? I'm hoping to get something that includes 3g data and will mostly be texting.

vanDeet
Oct 23, 2008

by Fistgrrl


Hummer Driving enjoyable human being posted:

I was in Stuttgart last week and noticed something I had noticed late last year in Kaiserslautern.

German women are incredibly attractive.
...
Can you shed some light on why the women are so gorgeous?

Hmm, I have to ask, have you been in other countries besides Germany and US?

Because, while Germany certainly has their share of "hot women" (just like any other country), the average German woman is certainly not. At least, if you ask most people. Maybe you have a weird taste

elwood
Mar 28, 2001



supersteve posted:

What's the best company to get a sim card from? I'm hoping to get something that includes 3g data and will mostly be texting.


That depends on how long you will be staying in germany (because of those drat 2 year contracts) and how much data you need. I use blau.de for my iphone. Pay as you go, 10 € for 1 gb data a month, 9 Cents for calls and 9 cents for texting.

supersteve
Jan 16, 2007

Atari Bigby - UNIVERSITY OF JAH RASTAFARI

That sounds perfect, thanks.

Ziir
Nov 20, 2004

by Ozmaugh


Is there something similar but with a couple hundred minutes?

Gold and a Pager
Oct 9, 2004

I was like tree huggin' ass bitch please!


supersteve posted:

What's the best company to get a sim card from? I'm hoping to get something that includes 3g data and will mostly be texting.

This is what a German goon (Troubadour) posted in the "Inspect your Gadgets" forum when I asked this question:

There's a couple options for you as far as prepay/postpay goes. For talking and messaging, blau.de gives you (IMHO) the best options, with about 10 cents per minute voice to any mobile or land line, as well as 100MB/month for 2.99 and 1GB/month for 9.99. They are on the worst data network though, with most cities limited to about 400kbps. Also, you can go as low as 7.5 cents/min or SMS with companies like DiscoTel, but they have worse data options I think.

If you want a faster data plan, the providers with the fastest data network are, in order:
1. Vodafone
2. T-Mobile
3. O2
4. E-Plus (which blau uses)

That's also the order of how much each costs, usually. If you need fast internet, there's a postpay plan from O2 that gives you 200 minutes to any network, 200 SMS and internet flat (data usage over 200MB is limited to GPRS speeds) for 20 EUR/month.

One thing for Americans to keep in mind is that incoming calls don't cost minutes or money, but calling to and from cell phones usually costs more than calling a land line. Also, there's 4 different cell networks; calling within your network (e.g. Vodafone to Vodafone) usually costs the same as calling a land line.

Gold and a Pager fucked around with this message at Apr 27, 2010 around 18:58

Nazi Zombies
Mar 18, 2009



Hummer Driving enjoyable human being posted:

I was in Stuttgart last week and noticed something I had noticed late last year in Kaiserslautern.

German women are incredibly attractive.


I thought they were mainly average.

I've been living here the last 7 years though, so I might just be used to it.

Hungry Gerbil
Jun 6, 2009

by angerbot


Ziir posted:

Might as well ask, what's Oktoberfest like? I just realized that Oktoberfest starts sometime in September, and I'll have moved to Germany by then. I might head on over to Munich to experience it for a few day cause why the gently caress not?

Oktoberfest is like they tell you in the tourist brochures. Exactly like that.

Anmitzcuaca
Nov 23, 2005



Gold and a Pager posted:

One thing for Americans to keep in mind is that incoming calls don't cost minutes or money


Wait, incoming calls cost you money in America? That's just bizarre.

Liface
Jun 17, 2001

by T. Finn


Ziir posted:

I'm just going to do this. Does it cost anything to transfer money between your BoA and online savings account? I think I'll still open a Sparkasse account with €500 or something though because I'm probably going to be playing poker while I'm out there.

Edit: With SmartyPig, it says there needs to be a monthly contribution of $10 unless my savings goal has been met. So can I dump say $9500 into an account and set up a savings goal of $10,000 within 1 month, and next month dump another $500 to meet it and then stop paying the monthly contributions and instead just rack up interest?

Yep, that's the best way to do it. It doesn't cost anything to transfer between Bank of America and Smartypig.

Hummer Driving enjoyable human being posted:

I was in Stuttgart last week and noticed something I had noticed late last year in Kaiserslautern.

German women are incredibly attractive.

And not just some of them, but most of them. If I was in any public place I would see at least one stunning woman every five minutes or so. The kind of woman you see maybe one of a day in the USA.

Also, they were either by themselves or with one other woman (as a friend). They were rarely walking with a guy or boyfriend.

Third, they looked really sad or depressed. They didn't look around much and weren't smiling.

The only conclusion I've come up with is that because the Nazis killed all the undesirables all that's left is super hot women.

Can you shed some light on why the women are so gorgeous?

I didn't see much difference in attractiveness between German and American women. I think it's more of the fact that European women are just more attractive in general because of their outlook.

Ziir posted:

Might as well ask, what's Oktoberfest like? I just realized that Oktoberfest starts sometime in September, and I'll have moved to Germany by then. I might head on over to Munich to experience it for a few day cause why the gently caress not?

Oktoberfest is basically a great place if you're looking to pay out the rear end for beer, food, and housing and get drunk with a bunch of Australians. I recommend going to Cannstatter Wasen, which is like Oktoberfest, but a bit smaller, and it's in Stuttgart, so there's barely any tourists.

Nazi Zombies
Mar 18, 2009



Liface posted:

Yep, that's the best way to do it. It doesn't cost anything to transfer between Bank of America and Smartypig.


I didn't see much difference in attractiveness between German and American women. I think it's more of the fact that European women are just more attractive in general because of their outlook.


Oktoberfest is basically a great place

Should be called Septemberfest, due to when it takes place.

owDAWG
May 18, 2008


This is my first time to Germany and I will be spending a couple months in Heidelberg working. I was wondering what kind of non-touristy things I can do to keep me busy while I am here. Also I wouldn't mind if you know of a good crash course in German, pointing at things and waving my arms around has only gotten me so far.

Liface
Jun 17, 2001

by T. Finn


owDAWG posted:

This is my first time to Germany and I will be spending a couple months in Heidelberg working. I was wondering what kind of non-touristy things I can do to keep me busy while I am here. Also I wouldn't mind if you know of a good crash course in German, pointing at things and waving my arms around has only gotten me so far.

For a crash course I'd start working through LiveMocha, inputting all learned vocabulary words into Anki and trying to keep your Anki queue under 30. Then try to read or watch a couple Deutsche Welle videos every day (http://www.dw-world.de/dw/0,,2547,00.html), also inputting all unknown vocabulary words into Anki and studying them.

polyfractal
Dec 20, 2004

Unwind my riddle.

OneArmedScissor posted:

There is no way you could make it off 700 euros a month living in Munich.
Good luck finding a decent apartment or a shared flat in a decent location for 300 euros a month.
I got extremely lucky and found a WG for 330 a month. It was an amazing location, but it took me 3 months to find it and the people I was living with weren't that cool, though.

Regardless, expect to be paying 350-400 (student prices) or 500+ for anything to write home for an apartment, 60 euros a month for a month long public transportation pass, and then you gotta pay for food. Food isn't cheap in Munich either. Also, if you live in Munich, you're gonna be drinking beer and beer is a fairly high priced commodity.

If you want to do anything in Munich other than eat, sleep, study, and drink water, then I'd suggest budgeting it at at least 1,500 euros a month.

Question about an earlier post in this thread. I'm an American considering a job offer in Germany (Research Technician for a neuroscience lab, located at the Max Planck Institute in Martinsreid). Wikipedia tells me that Martinsreid is like a suburb of Munich? Can I expect similar rent prices as Munich?

Basically I'm curious how much money I should be looking for in a salary that will let me live comfortably and do more than just work/eat/sleep. I'm perfectly used to being a broke-rear end college student so I have no problems living in a small apartment and eating cheap food (I love to cook!). But I'd really like to travel some while I'm in Germany. If I can't afford traveling/having fun I might as well be living at the poverty line in the States instead of Germany.

My friend tells me I can probably expect 1200-1400 euro a month. Would this be sufficient? My friend also tells me to get a "stipendium" so I don't have to pay taxes. What is this?


Liface posted:

For a crash course I'd start working through LiveMocha, inputting all learned vocabulary words into Anki and trying to keep your Anki queue under 30. Then try to read or watch a couple Deutsche Welle videos every day (http://www.dw-world.de/dw/0,,2547,00.html), also inputting all unknown vocabulary words into Anki and studying them.

Thanks for these! I just got a copy of Rosetta Stone and am going to start studying my rear end off

Liface
Jun 17, 2001

by T. Finn


Rosetta Stone is the worst. If you can still return it, I would do so immediately and replace with LiveMocha. But if you can't you might as well use it, just supplement with as many additional materials as possible.

polyfractal
Dec 20, 2004

Unwind my riddle.

Liface posted:

Rosetta Stone is the worst. If you can still return it, I would do so immediately and replace with LiveMocha. But if you can't you might as well use it, just supplement with as many additional materials as possible.

Good to know, thanks. I actually got Rosetta Stone free from a friend (who is trying to learn Russian with it). I'll focus on LiveMocha instead

Hungry Gerbil
Jun 6, 2009

by angerbot


I've done an internship at the Max-Planck-Institut in Martinsried. It's a nice place with nice people. (They have to work very hard though.) And they have a soccer field!

Martinsried is right next to Munich. Rent will only be slightly/unnoticably lower than in the city. Expect to pay from 400 to 500 € for an apartment. If you're lucky you can get one for 300 €. The money you'll earn as a research technician will be fine for a single person household. Even us poor Phd students at the university can do okay with around 1000 €. You cannot support another person with this money though.

Stipendium = scholarship
They are hard to get. You have to either be very poor or very, very good. There are other scholarships, but they give you like enough money for buying one book. And there are ones for specific purposes.

Hungry Gerbil fucked around with this message at May 5, 2010 around 18:37

polyfractal
Dec 20, 2004

Unwind my riddle.

Hungry Gerbil posted:

I've done an internship at the Max-Planck-Institut in Martinsried. It's a nice place with nice people. (They have to work very hard though.) And they have a soccer field!

Martinsried is right next to Munich. Rent will only be slightly/unnoticably lower than in the city. Expect to pay from 400 to 500 € for an apartment. If you're lucky you can get one for 300 €. The money you'll earn as a research technician will be fine for a single person household. Even us poor Phd students at the university can do okay with around 1000 €. You cannot support another person with this money though.

Stipendium = scholarship
They are hard to get. You have to either be very poor or very, very good. There are other scholarships, but they give you like enough money for buying one book. And there are ones for specific purposes.

Thanks for the hard numbers on rent. I'll be supporting just myself and have no problem living like a poor PhD student. Regarding the Stipendium, I doubt I'll be either poor enough or good enough to get one (else I would have gotten into grad school! heh). Can technicians even get scholarships?

Soccer field is a huge plus. I'll need to find an intramural team to play on (Edit: Hurr I bet you meant a professional soccer field, which is still awesome)


More questions: How does healthcare work for foreigns? Do I need to take out an insurance plan or is it all covered under the national healthcare?

polyfractal fucked around with this message at May 5, 2010 around 18:48

elbkaida
Jan 13, 2008
Look!

polyfractal posted:

Question about an earlier post in this thread. I'm an American considering a job offer in Germany (Research Technician for a neuroscience lab, located at the Max Planck Institute in Martinsreid). Wikipedia tells me that Martinsreid is like a suburb of Munich? Can I expect similar rent prices as Munich?

Basically I'm curious how much money I should be looking for in a salary that will let me live comfortably and do more than just work/eat/sleep. I'm perfectly used to being a broke-rear end college student so I have no problems living in a small apartment and eating cheap food (I love to cook!). But I'd really like to travel some while I'm in Germany. If I can't afford traveling/having fun I might as well be living at the poverty line in the States instead of Germany.

My friend tells me I can probably expect 1200-1400 euro a month. Would this be sufficient? My friend also tells me to get a "stipendium" so I don't have to pay taxes. What is this?


I think MPI follows the tariff of the public service which means as a college graduate with master's degree you will be put into a salary group that gives you about 3000€/month so at least 1800 or so after tax (unless it is a 75% position or something like that). Bachelors will get a bit less, should still be OK to live and travel on (hope 26 days of leave is enough for that).


Edit: You have to get German healthcare, it is included in the taxes that are deducted from your pay.

Hungry Gerbil
Jun 6, 2009

by angerbot


BTW If you like movies, polyfractal:
http://www.cinema-muenchen.de/englisch/home_frame.htm

They show all movies in English.

Ziir
Nov 20, 2004

by Ozmaugh


polyfractal posted:

More questions: How does healthcare work for foreigns? Do I need to take out an insurance plan or is it all covered under the national healthcare?

You'll have to get German healthcare like elbkaida says. I'm moving to Germany too, but I'll be a graduate student so I'll get the student rate of about €55/month. You'll have to pay more of course unless you can convince them you're a student.

Sereri
Sep 30, 2008

awwwrigami



Oh hey, another Germany thread. Didn't see this one.

To address the dubbing stuff that was mentioned on the first few pages - it's ... difficult.

Most tv-shows produced here are garbage and because of that we import stuff from other countries. However people want to watch TV in their native language. So we sometimes get adaptations where it makes sense like "Wer wird Millionär" (Who Wants to be a Millionaire) or "Deutschland sucht den Superstar" (American Idol).
The drama stuff though gets dubbed like 99% of the time. There are a few reasons for that. For example it's cheaper to pay a few people to dub the voices than to pay for actual actors, equipment and a studio. Also, as we are a smaller nation, (good) actors will be harder to find. You'll notice this in the other 1% where foreign shows get re-shot/copied, usually with terrible results. This can happen when the budget of the copied show was low to begin with.
The dubbing is normally not that bad if you haven't seen the original. Sure, one or two jokes get lost but hey, language still isn't universal.

The thing is though, most countries do it. The only ones not doing this are either so small that it wouldn't be economically viable to find decent voice actors, or English speaking countries and again there is reason behind it. Few of the stuff made in other countries is good enough to compete with your programs, usually because your budgets are higher. Of course a few things do actually reach you but those are so few that they get either subbed (Der Untergang,Pan's Labyrinth, etc) or remade. And you remake a lot of stuff. Hell, you even remake English stuff because your citizens could be startled by those disgusting accents.

So I guess there isn't a reason we have them but rather a reason you don't. It's because you throw more money at it. So don't give us poo poo about it but be glad about your situation.

I guess we really need a :germany: emot, maybe we can have a crying autobahn in front of our flag

Liface
Jun 17, 2001

by T. Finn


Sereri posted:

Oh hey, another Germany thread. Didn't see this one.

To address the dubbing stuff that was mentioned on the first few pages - it's ... difficult.

Most tv-shows produced here are garbage and because of that we import stuff from other countries. However people want to watch TV in their native language. So we sometimes get adaptations where it makes sense like "Wer wird Millionär" (Who Wants to be a Millionaire) or "Deutschland sucht den Superstar" (American Idol).
The drama stuff though gets dubbed like 99% of the time. There are a few reasons for that. For example it's cheaper to pay a few people to dub the voices than to pay for actual actors, equipment and a studio. Also, as we are a smaller nation, (good) actors will be harder to find. You'll notice this in the other 1% where foreign shows get re-shot/copied, usually with terrible results. This can happen when the budget of the copied show was low to begin with.
The dubbing is normally not that bad if you haven't seen the original. Sure, one or two jokes get lost but hey, language still isn't universal.

The thing is though, most countries do it. The only ones not doing this are either so small that it wouldn't be economically viable to find decent voice actors, or English speaking countries and again there is reason behind it. Few of the stuff made in other countries is good enough to compete with your programs, usually because your budgets are higher. Of course a few things do actually reach you but those are so few that they get either subbed (Der Untergang,Pan's Labyrinth, etc) or remade. And you remake a lot of stuff. Hell, you even remake English stuff because your citizens could be startled by those disgusting accents.

So I guess there isn't a reason we have them but rather a reason you don't. It's because you throw more money at it. So don't give us poo poo about it but be glad about your situation.

I guess we really need a :germany: emot, maybe we can have a crying autobahn in front of our flag

That's actually not true that most countries dub. The only ones I can think of offhand are France, Spain, and possibly Italy. Every other country I can think of shows things in O-Ton with subtitles. In my experience, English proficiency among the general populations suffers in countries that dub television shows compared to those that don't.

If, as of today, all shows/movies in Germany were switched to subtitles only, I'm sure there would be complaining for a while, but then people would get used to it and the next generation would definitely prefer it. But it won't happen. The synchronization industry seems to have some sort of a lobby and people are unwilling to change.

elbkaida
Jan 13, 2008
Look!

Liface posted:

In my experience, English proficiency among the general populations suffers in countries that dub television shows compared to those that don't.

So? Maybe people would rather watch movies and TV in German and easily understand all the subtilities instead of becoming a bit more proficient in English.

In Russia I have seen some hilarious dubbing, where one or two persons do an entire film. When Jodie Foster speaks in a deep man voice, I suddenly start to like the idea of subtitles, though.

Previously on GBS
Jul 13, 2007


Liface posted:

That's actually not true that most countries dub. The only ones I can think of offhand are France, Spain, and possibly Italy.
Not true. Almost all countries where the local language has a sufficiently high number of native speakers use dubbing or voice-overs (Germany, Austria, Switzerland, Italy, Spain, Czech Republic, Slovakia, Poland, Russia...).

Sereri
Sep 30, 2008

awwwrigami



Liface posted:

The synchronization industry seems to have some sort of a lobby and people are unwilling to change.

The lobby is the people themselves. Imagine watching every, and here it really seems like around 90%-95%, movie in Spanish with subs. Really?
Also subtitled movies are the worst. Dubbed movies are ok, movies in original language are great. With subtitles however I find myself reading them and almost ignoring what is said. Thank god the cinemas around here stopped showing them and go for the original versions entirely. Now the only things I see tagged 'OmU' are Turkish films.

vvvv fair enough

Sereri fucked around with this message at May 9, 2010 around 13:56

Zwille
Aug 18, 2006

* For the Ghost Who Walks Funny


Yeah, gently caress the deaf people, because who needs subtitles?

In all seriousness, I hate comments like those, and people who complain about subtitles are directly responsible for theaters avoiding subtitled screenings and thus add to the feeling of exclusion that deaf people experience.

Please tell all of your friends who think like you why it's a really stupid idea to complain about subtitles. It's like complaining about having to wait for passengers on wheelchairs entering public transport, or about getting out of the way of blind people.

It used to be that you could watch Jurassic loving Park 2 or Farrely Brothers stuff with subtitles, but now all we get are documentaries about drunk dairy farmers from Outer Mongolia.

Liface
Jun 17, 2001

by T. Finn


elbkaida posted:

So? Maybe people would rather watch movies and TV in German and easily understand all the subtilities instead of becoming a bit more proficient in English.

In Russia I have seen some hilarious dubbing, where one or two persons do an entire film. When Jodie Foster speaks in a deep man voice, I suddenly start to like the idea of subtitles, though.

That's the problem, though - with dubbing the subtleties are lost anyway. With original language and subtitles, you can at least match the two up (even if you don't know the original language very well) and sort of figure out what the original joke or meaning was. For example, one that I remember from Total Recall was a dude saying "I have a lock" (like he was locked onto the target). It was dubbed as "Ich habe ein Schloß"... literally "I have a lock (for my bike).

And I also find it kind of annoying that the same voice actors are used over and over so they all end up sounding the same.

Now, on the other hand, there are some really good German sychronizations. MST3000 and Wayne's World come to mind. Well, also almost any animated film as well, but then you don't have the problem with the lips not matching to what they're saying.

I suppose it just comes down to personal preference. I can follow subtitles as well as what is said just fine. And the average German can't speak English well enough to 100% follow an O-ton film, so I think subtitles are a good compromise between dubbing and original language.

polyfractal
Dec 20, 2004

Unwind my riddle.

Liface posted:

Rosetta Stone is the worst. If you can still return it, I would do so immediately and replace with LiveMocha. But if you can't you might as well use it, just supplement with as many additional materials as possible.

Question on how LiveMocha works. I worked through the first full lesson, started the second and realized it won't let me progress anymore. I have to earn 300 "Teacher Points" by reviewing other submissions first, right? Then it will open up the next lesson and the process repeats?

brylcreem
Oct 29, 2007


polyfractal posted:

Question on how LiveMocha works. I worked through the first full lesson, started the second and realized it won't let me progress anymore. I have to earn 300 "Teacher Points" by reviewing other submissions first, right? Then it will open up the next lesson and the process repeats?

LiveMocha is a piece of poo poo. They lure you in by writing "free" all over, and then they want money anyway. gently caress'em.

Ziir
Nov 20, 2004

by Ozmaugh


Liface posted:

Oktoberfest is basically a great place if you're looking to pay out the rear end for beer, food, and housing and get drunk with a bunch of Australians. I recommend going to Cannstatter Wasen, which is like Oktoberfest, but a bit smaller, and it's in Stuttgart, so there's barely any tourists.

Can you tell me more about Cannstatter Wasen? I'd like to go to Oktoberfest just to experience it, even if it is full of tourists, but there's always next year too. It might work out better that I go to Cannstatter Wasen after living in Germany for a year though, since I should be nearly fluent with the language then.

Liface
Jun 17, 2001

by T. Finn


brylcreem posted:

LiveMocha is a piece of poo poo. They lure you in by writing "free" all over, and then they want money anyway. gently caress'em.

I'm pretty sure every service exists to make money.

Ziir posted:

Can you tell me more about Cannstatter Wasen? I'd like to go to Oktoberfest just to experience it, even if it is full of tourists, but there's always next year too. It might work out better that I go to Cannstatter Wasen after living in Germany for a year though, since I should be nearly fluent with the language then.

It's basically just Oktoberfest but smaller, almost no tourists, and it's in Stuttgart. Takes place a couple weeks before Oktoberfest if I remember correctly.

brylcreem
Oct 29, 2007


Liface posted:

I'm pretty sure every service exists to make money.
Sure, but they don't have to be quite so much bait-and-switch about it.

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fezball
Nov 8, 2009


Liface posted:

It's basically just Oktoberfest but smaller, almost no tourists, and it's in Stuttgart. Takes place a couple weeks before Oktoberfest if I remember correctly.

There's actually two festivals at Cannstatter Wasen each year - the Volksfest (which is the bigger one) in late September/early October and the Frühlingsfest in late April/early May. They're set up pretty much the same way, the Volksfest just has a little more of everything.

When compared to the Octoberfest, the Wasen fairs are a little more focused on the rides and less on the huge festival tents - which is not to say that there aren't plenty of beer tents, but Munich definitely got the edge when it comes to the folksy part.

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