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barkingclam
Jun 20, 2007


Paragon8 posted:

It's actually quite interesting. Wasn't Dickens or something the Tom Clancy of Victorian times? Broad populist literature? Same with Shakespeare.

Maybe, if you want to essentially ignore the social context of Dickens work.

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Paragon8
Feb 19, 2007



barkingclam posted:

Maybe, if you want to essentially ignore the social context of Dickens work.

Comparing somebody's popularity with something else doesn't mean you're comparing the quality of the work.

As Mcustic pointed out it's hard to evaluate what will be seen as classics down the road, especially from our generation!

DrGonzo90
Sep 13, 2010


Paragon8 posted:

It's actually quite interesting. Wasn't Dickens or something the Tom Clancy of Victorian times? Broad populist literature? Same with Shakespeare.

Harry Potter, Twilight, Shopaholic etc. are probably going to tell future generations more about our culture than what we consider high level literature today. (I still argue that the first Shopaholic is actually pretty good)

I agree that some of our popular fiction is going to survive, but there's a difference between popular fiction and lovely fiction that happens to be popular. There were a ton of contemporaries of Dickens or Shakespeare or Dumas that were very popular that didn't survive because they weren't as well-written. I think Harry Potter will stand up fairly well and Twilight is going to disappear completely.

I hope.

Paragon8
Feb 19, 2007



It's probably worth studying in 50 years why Stephanie Meyer has made more money than all the authors born before 1940 put together.

Conduit for Sale!
Apr 17, 2007



Paragon8 posted:

It's probably worth studying in 50 years why Stephanie Meyer has made more money than all the authors born before 1940 put together.

So she's made $100?

MoaM
Dec 1, 2009

Destiny.

DrGonzo90 posted:

I hope.

Twilight has fantastical, self-flagellant notions of relationships/sexuality that will probably be looked at in the same vein as Madame Bovary's self-destructive freedom.

Yes, I'm defending Twilight; whatchu gonna do?

Conduit for Sale!
Apr 17, 2007



MoaM posted:

Twilight has fantastical, self-flagellant notions of relationships/sexuality that will probably be looked at in the same vein as Madame Bovary's self-destructive freedom.

By dumb people, sure.

Casimir Radon
Aug 1, 2008



MoaM posted:

Twilight has fantastical, self-flagellant notions of relationships/sexuality that will probably be looked at in the same vein as Madame Bovary's self-destructive freedom.

Yes, I'm defending Twilight; whatchu gonna do?
Twilight is loving backwards, here and now.

H.P. Shivcraft
Mar 17, 2008

STAY UNRULY, YOU HEARTLESS MONSTERS!


The thing about Bovary is that it's an intentional sendup of a "romantic" outlook on life. The point is that Emma B. ain't ever getting to Paris, but Bella never has to leave Forks. Ever. And it's supposed to be a good thing!

I've drawn this comparison on the forums before, but I think Twilight stands a better chance at being something like Samuel Richardson's Pamela or Clarissa in that the work is simultaneously commercially popular and reviled, and it demonstrates a completely idiosyncratic and wild view of human (sexual) relations that, I think, will be an interesting thing for culture studies folks in ~100 years.

barkingclam
Jun 20, 2007


If it becomes our generation's Pamela, I really hope it means we're going to get a Joseph Andrews, too.

Rush_shirt
Apr 24, 2007



Is there a decent sci-fi series (or single book) with multiple well-developed fictional religions?

(sci-fi noob)

Rush_shirt fucked around with this message at Feb 16, 2012 around 00:05

H.P. Shivcraft
Mar 17, 2008

STAY UNRULY, YOU HEARTLESS MONSTERS!


thegloaming posted:

Is there a decent sci-fi series (or single book) with multiple well-developed fictional religions?

(sci-fi noob)

My gut here tells me Dune but it really comes down to how you're defining "multiple" and "well-developed." Other people might have a better sense for what you want, as I'm a bit out of the loop genre-wise at the moment. (Thinking more recently, Stephenson's Anathem has some of this going on, too. And if you want to be liberal with your definition of 'religion' then his book The Diamond Age is so incredibly about this kind of thing.)

And if you're a sci-fi noob and you want to read about sci-fi in religion and you haven't read Dune then you probably should because it's pretty fundamental for the genre in that respect.

mcustic
Feb 24, 2007

Congratulations on not getting fit in 2011!

thegloaming posted:

Is there a decent sci-fi series (or single book) with multiple well-developed fictional religions?

(sci-fi noob)

Hyperion by Dan Simmons. Religions, cults, mystical orders, popes all the way through the four books in the series.

Rush_shirt
Apr 24, 2007



Thanks for the recommendations, H.P. Shivcraft and mcustic. It turns out I have a copy of Dune and I managed to snag the third book in the Simmons series off the "up for grabs" shelf at my work. I'll assume I should to start with first though, unless someone says otherwise.

Zola
Jul 22, 2005

What do you mean "impossible"? You're so
cruel, Roger Smith...

I am looking for a word/phrase that is buried, I believe, in the Dresden thread.

It describes the "scope creep" or "inflation" that occurs in a series when the hero just keeps getting gooder and gooder and the bad guys get badder and badder.

Anyone know?

Eliza
Feb 20, 2011


Zola posted:

I am looking for a word/phrase that is buried, I believe, in the Dresden thread.

It describes the "scope creep" or "inflation" that occurs in a series when the hero just keeps getting gooder and gooder and the bad guys get badder and badder.

Anyone know?

Not having read the thread, do you mean "escalation"?

Zola
Jul 22, 2005

What do you mean "impossible"? You're so
cruel, Roger Smith...

Eliza posted:

Not having read the thread, do you mean "escalation"?

No, although that word also describes it well.

Clocks
Oct 2, 2007

JUNKOS


I really don't know where to ask this question, so sorry if this is the wrong place. If it is, please let me know where I should go instead

I'm thinking of getting my mom an e-reader for her birthday. I was hoping someone could weigh in on them, since I know next to nothing about them:

- my mom loves reading books and has mentioned wanting to try out an e-reader before. however she really likes the feel of books/flipping pages, but I guess there's no harm in getting her one anyway
- she uses glasses when reading. I have no eyesight problems so I have no idea how these e-readers jive with that and how comfortable it would be to read from one
- preferably there would be easy access to foreign-language books? specifically russian. It's kind of pointless if not since she doesn't read english books that often

If anyone can give their recommendations or point me to somewhere that would make this decision easier, thanks!

Flaggy
Jul 6, 2007



Ph'nglui mglw'nafh Cthulhu R'lyeh wgah'nagl fhtagn

Clocks posted:

I really don't know where to ask this question, so sorry if this is the wrong place. If it is, please let me know where I should go instead

I'm thinking of getting my mom an e-reader for her birthday. I was hoping someone could weigh in on them, since I know next to nothing about them:

- my mom loves reading books and has mentioned wanting to try out an e-reader before. however she really likes the feel of books/flipping pages, but I guess there's no harm in getting her one anyway
- she uses glasses when reading. I have no eyesight problems so I have no idea how these e-readers jive with that and how comfortable it would be to read from one
- preferably there would be easy access to foreign-language books? specifically russian. It's kind of pointless if not since she doesn't read english books that often

If anyone can give their recommendations or point me to somewhere that would make this decision easier, thanks!

http://forums.somethingawful.com/sh...hreadid=3366619
That there is the e-reader megathread in Inspect Your Gadgets. Its a treasure trove of info. Personally, I love my Kindle. The e-ink is incredible and you can read it indoors and outdoors with ease. You can also adjust the font size so its bigger or smaller for her eyes.

Flaggy
Jul 6, 2007



Ph'nglui mglw'nafh Cthulhu R'lyeh wgah'nagl fhtagn

http://forums.somethingawful.com/sh...hreadid=3327487

Here is the thread for the Book Barns own e-reader thread. Another great resource when deciding what to get.

Clocks
Oct 2, 2007

JUNKOS


Oh man, I kind of just skimmed down IYG to see if there was anything like that but I guess I missed the thread. In hindsight I probably should have just searched for "e-reader" or something but I figured a forum based on reading books would be able to help. I'll go read through the threads now. Thank you!

Popular Human
Jul 17, 2005

and if it's a lie, terrorists made me say it

I've noticed that in the last couple of weeks we've had three or four threads goons have created to promote their own self-published novels. Does anybody think that a goon self-publishing thread where anyone can post links/freebies of their own work would be a good idea, or would that be better relegated to Creative Convention?

barkingclam
Jun 20, 2007


The NYRB is having a big sale with their classics series. Some good stuff you can get for under ten bucks: Stephen Leacock's Nonsense Novels, Vasily Grossman's Everything Flows, Der Nister's The Family Mashber, William Gresham's Nightmare Alley. There's a bunch of cool stuff to choose from!

Cactus Jack
Nov 16, 2005

BANG! BANG!

barkingclam posted:

The NYRB is having a big sale with their classics series. Some good stuff you can get for under ten bucks: Stephen Leacock's Nonsense Novels, Vasily Grossman's Everything Flows, Der Nister's The Family Mashber, William Gresham's Nightmare Alley. There's a bunch of cool stuff to choose from!

The lack of The Long Ships on this sale list makes me sad.

Chamberk
Jan 11, 2004

when there is nothing left to burn you have to set yourself on fire


Cactus Jack posted:

The lack of The Long Ships on this sale list makes me sad.

I want that one, looks badass as hell. I still need to track down a NYRB copy of The Siege of Krishnapur...

clessness
Apr 12, 2010


Alright book barn, I have an English major type of question. What's the history of the concept of mind control in literature? As a fan of 19th century horror, I'm always interested in where some of the concepts that came to make up horror originated, and it occurred to me that the idea of mind control, or otherwise losing one's free will, is one i don't know much about.

TFNC
May 8, 2007

^^^^Capitalism^^^^

clessness posted:

Alright book barn, I have an English major type of question. What's the history of the concept of mind control in literature? As a fan of 19th century horror, I'm always interested in where some of the concepts that came to make up horror originated, and it occurred to me that the idea of mind control, or otherwise losing one's free will, is one i don't know much about.

Wieland by Charles Brockden Brown was published in the U.S. in 1798 and is about a "biloquist" (I.e. a ventriloquist) who uses his gift to project disembodied voices into this sort of enclaved family's lives and drives them insane. The complication of the plot is whether or not the family can really be held accountable for what they do. It's not mind control as we think of it today, but I could see it as a forerunner to the idea. Poe was down on Charles Brockden Brown.

It reads like it was written in 1798, though, be advised.

Southern Vulcan
Apr 5, 2007
A colorful mix of Boomshine and Logic

Hi all, I'm wondering if you all can help me with something. I'm looking for an out of print book and so far google, eBay, and the rest haven't been helpful. It's called "The Other Side of Peace" basically, it's just a collection of Israeli/Palestinian propaganda posters. I don't know the ISBN number and I can't even find a single mention of it on the web. Any idea where to look next?


EDIT: ignore this I found it and feel like an idiot because I had the title wrong...

Southern Vulcan fucked around with this message at Feb 27, 2012 around 03:33

Ridonkulous
Jan 11, 2006

I gotta take a leak. When I get back, we're doing body shots.


Southern Vulcan posted:

Hi all, I'm wondering if you all can help me with something. I'm looking for an out of print book and so far google, eBay, and the rest haven't been helpful. It's called "The Other Side of Peace" basically, it's just a collection of Israeli/Palestinian propaganda posters. I don't know the ISBN number and I can't even find a single mention of it on the web. Any idea where to look next?


EDIT: ignore this I found it and feel like an idiot because I had the title wrong...

What was the right title?

Buffalo squeeze
Dec 19, 2010

Oh noble brogy. Overflowing with meaty wisdom and secret sauce.


I need some help finding a book and I hope you guys can help. The book was recommended to me 10+ years ago, it was a post-apocalyptic novel and the only thing that stuck in my head all these years was that it took place in a city and that one of the different groups of survivors was trying to kill themselves through exhaustion. Running and and screaming and waving their arms til they die.

Ring any bells?

TFNC
May 8, 2007

^^^^Capitalism^^^^

I believe you're thinking of In the Country of Last Things by Paul Auster, though I haven't read it.

Conduit for Sale!
Apr 17, 2007



I'm mad at this book: http://www.amazon.com/His-Dark-Mate...31177198&sr=8-1. It has that amazing cover and then I get it and the spine is the same red and black Everyman's Library puts on all their books (except the ones they put black and white on). Would it really have been that hard to make the spine the same colors as the cover?

And guess what colors it is without the dust jacket.

I like Everyman's Library's editions but I honestly don't want to buy any more because they all look the drat same on their spines.

barkingclam
Jun 20, 2007


I dunno, I kind of like stuff that has the same spines: the old Vintage Contemporaries series, those Penguins with the color bar on top, etc.

Poutling
Dec 26, 2005

spacebunny to the rescue

barkingclam posted:

I dunno, I kind of like stuff that has the same spines: the old Vintage Contemporaries series, those Penguins with the color bar on top, etc.


I completely agree, I love the old Vintage Contemporaries, so beautifully done. Pantheon also released a Modern Writers series that had similar spines that looked so good together on the bookshelf.

Buffalo squeeze
Dec 19, 2010

Oh noble brogy. Overflowing with meaty wisdom and secret sauce.


TFNC posted:

I believe you're thinking of In the Country of Last Things by Paul Auster, though I haven't read it.

This might well be it, I'll have to check it out. Thanks man!

facebook jihad
Dec 18, 2007

all my words trip as they leave my lips
I've come to set things straight
she needs an excuse to end things and
become the things you hate


So, I'm finally getting around to reading The Shack by Wm. Paul Young at my mom's suggestion over Christmas. I'm not a very religious guy, but my mom is and I figured I'd do this to humor her. I have no problem with Christian literature if you're a fan of it, but why do they have to be so blunt with their references? I'm 30 pages in and there have already been five or more references to "the story about Jesus" or "his wife is a strong believer, but I have my doubts", or "Papa is her nickname for God".

I don't read much Christian literature, but what I have read is always like this. Is there any popular Christian literature that is a bit more subtle with its undertones, or does it all assume we are morons/10 year olds and hit you with the religion like a lead pipe over and over again? Any critically acclaimed Christian literature out there?

e: Holy poo poo, some critic compared this book to Pilgrim's Progress. No loving way.

facebook jihad fucked around with this message at Mar 11, 2012 around 20:06

Stupid_Sexy_Flander
Mar 14, 2007

Is a man not entitled to the haw of his maw?


It's pretty hard to find any type of christian lit that doesn't beat you about the head and shoulders with faith and parable kinda stuff.

I dug the Remy Chandler series though. It's an urban fantasy where the main character is an angel (not fallen, more like.. quit). It's a decent read, doesn't really come off as preachy, and the stories are kinda interesting. Only 4 books i think.

I really enjoyed Saint by Mark Bailey. It's on kindle now for 99 cents, but I bought the paperback years ago. It's pretty nifty.

Smudgie Buggler
Feb 27, 2005

If men were actuated by self-interest the whole human race would cooperate.


Can anybody link me to the purchase page of what they know to be the Peavar and Volokhonsky translation of War and Peace for the Kindle? I can't find a Kindle edition of the book that I can be certain is that particular translation.

TIA

TFNC
May 8, 2007

^^^^Capitalism^^^^

It looks like the only Kindle version of the P&V translation isn't going to be available until March 28.

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Doom Goon
Sep 18, 2008


crankdatbatman posted:

I don't read much Christian literature, but what I have read is always like this. Is there any popular Christian literature that is a bit more subtle with its undertones, or does it all assume we are morons/10 year olds and hit you with the religion like a lead pipe over and over again? Any critically acclaimed Christian literature out there?
East of Eden? Something by C. S. Lewis? The Father Brown series or something else by Chesterton? Dostoyevsky (Tolstoy for more... mysticism?)? A Christmas Carol? Really I'm just spit-balling here and wanted to post this even though I don't really think it applies. Wikipedia has some listings if you want to look into it.

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