Search Amazon.com:
Register a SA Forums Account here!
JOINING THE SA FORUMS WILL REMOVE THIS BIG AD, THE ANNOYING UNDERLINED ADS, AND STUPID INTERSTITIAL ADS!!!

You can: log in, read the tech support FAQ, or request your lost password. This dumb message (and those ads) will appear on every screen until you register! Get rid of this crap by registering your own SA Forums Account and joining roughly 150,000 Goons, for the one-time price of $9.95! We charge money because it costs us $3,400 per month for bandwidth bills alone, and since we don't believe in shoving popup ads to our registered users, we try to make the money back through forum registrations.
«39 »
  • Post
  • Reply
MonkeyFit
May 13, 2009


I ship out in October. I had to get an academic waiver cause I screwed up back in high school and failed a math class through my own stupid mistakes. Also I haven't been in a class room in the last 5 years. But everything has gone through and now i just attend DEP meetings until I go now. Still have no idea whether I want to volunteer for subs or not.

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

genderstomper58
Jan 9, 2005


MonkeyFit posted:

I ship out in October. I had to get an academic waiver cause I screwed up back in high school and failed a math class through my own stupid mistakes. Also I haven't been in a class room in the last 5 years. But everything has gone through and now i just attend DEP meetings until I go now. Still have no idea whether I want to volunteer for subs or not.

You have plenty of time to decide, they even still give you back sub pay if you volunteer in power school(this is what I did). Really simple process so don't do it until you're sure and you've talked to some of your instructors or whatever

KetTarma
Jul 24, 2003

Suffer not the lobbyist to live.


Volunteering for submarines is kind of like selecting "Insane" difficulty instead of "Hard"

At least you get a point multiplier for helping make top score (submarine pay)

See, nerd jokes in a nuke thread.

Also, instructors are supposed to encourage people to volunteer for submarine duty to make it easier for the detailers so they can send you to any open spot instead of just surface spots. Also, specifically not supposed to badtalk subs vs surface. Just saying.

Ryand-Smith
Feb 19, 2008

If a recruiter asks you to become a nuclear sailor.. you say no


Question, how much math+science do I need to know, I know as of now Calculus and Calculus based Physics, but would I need to say grab a book on AC/DC circuits and analysis, anything like that?

genderstomper58
Jan 9, 2005


Ryand-Smith posted:

Question, how much math+science do I need to know, I know as of now Calculus and Calculus based Physics, but would I need to say grab a book on AC/DC circuits and analysis, anything like that?

You overestimate how smart nuke students actually are, algebra is pretty much it. The content itself isn't hard, but the amount of poo poo you have to learn is.

Manawski
Oct 20, 2003

HOW DO I MADE PUDDING

Don't waste your time.

If you've taken the courses required to get into the program, that is sufficient.

Everything else that you need to know, they will teach you, and I can guarantee that what they teach you most likely won't jive with anything you have read out of a book.

Not UNIX
Mar 29, 2005
It was stupid speculation when the WSJ reported it, and it's stupid speculation now. It's never going to happen.

Ryand-Smith posted:

Question, how much math+science do I need to know, I know as of now Calculus and Calculus based Physics, but would I need to say grab a book on AC/DC circuits and analysis, anything like that?
If you know fractions, you're already in the top 50% with respect to math.

Cerekk
Sep 24, 2004

Oh my god, JC!

The fact that he references a requirement to take Calc and calc-based Physics says to me he is talking about the officer route.

Manawski is still correct if that's the case. If you go in to the officer pipeline without algebra being second-nature to you, you will be at a severe disadvantage though.

Ferretts
Dec 16, 2009



So I have orders to a Bangor boat due for refueling next year. I've spoken to returnee staff who've been through similar and the consensus seemed to be "You will want to kill yourself."

My SE, knowing my interests are more in engineering than operations, thought that I might actually benefit more from the shipyard.

My sponsor on the boat mentioned there might be room in another boat's wardroom should I put in for a transfer.

I'm a soon to qualify (plant willing) MARF EOOW student, and I'd appreciate any info/guidance anyone has related to 2+yrs of refueling shipyard duty (bonus points for Bremerton).

Giudecca
May 14, 2006

i'm so glad i'm better than you are.


Northrop Grumman shipyard in Newport News is a fantastic environment with lots of great things to do within walking distance. Very low crime rate, no litter, no one ever asks for change. I love the area. Have a great time.

e: Whoops, your refueling, unlike a carrier, doesn't have to be in Newport News. Lucky.

Giudecca fucked around with this message at Feb 17, 2011 around 01:21

grover
Jan 23, 2002

PEW PEW PEW







Giudecca posted:

Northrop Grumman shipyard in Newport News is a fantastic environment with lots of great things to do within walking distance. Very low crime rate, no litter, no one ever asks for change. I love the area. Have a great time.
Every single word in this post is objectively true.

Third World Reggin
May 19, 2008



Rename thread to Navy nuclear propulsion: no don't do this.

Nibbles the Shark
Feb 23, 2009

IRONKNUCKLE PERMABANNED! READ HERE

Ryand-Smith posted:

Question, how much math+science do I need to know, I know as of now Calculus and Calculus based Physics, but would I need to say grab a book on AC/DC circuits and analysis, anything like that?

For enlisted power school: an instructor told me about a student he taught who didn't understand why you could put numbers and letters together. She passed. I'm told the math isn't the hard part.

For officer power school, be very good at algebra and at least okay at physics/calculus. Math is tedious, but math is not the hard part. No point in studying anything ahead of time; for example you cover everything bout DC circuits in like, a week, tops.

Less than a week til I get out of power school, Charleston prototype mid-March. So motivated.

DarkSol
May 18, 2006

Gee, I wish we had one of them doomsday machines.

Giudecca posted:

Northrop Grumman shipyard in Newport News is a fantastic environment with lots of great things to do within walking distance. Very low crime rate, no litter, no one ever asks for change. I love the area. Have a great time.

e: Whoops, your refueling, unlike a carrier, doesn't have to be in Newport News. Lucky.

Heck, you could always come work at the shipyard when you get out. It's awesome!

Giudecca
May 14, 2006

i'm so glad i'm better than you are.


I didn't mind it that much.

What I did mind is that I had a legitimate problem with anxiety and was de-nuked, then grouped together and forced to work with:

a. other people who were de-nuked: a lot of people who I suspect were feeding our psychologist a load of bullshit
b. people on restriction

I saw what happened when people got de-nuked. You get stuck with really menial bitch work all the time and you face a huge social stigma of "going sad". This stigma exists for a reason, because a lot of people really do this, but I feel bad for you if you get de-nuked without really trying.

Slippery
May 16, 2004



Giudecca posted:

I saw what happened when people got de-nuked. You get stuck with really menial bitch work all the time and you face a huge social stigma of "going sad". This stigma exists for a reason, because a lot of people really do this, but I feel bad for you if you get de-nuked without really trying.

Out of curiosity, what does "going sad" mean in that context, like, faking it on purpose to get out of the nuke world?

Giudecca
May 14, 2006

i'm so glad i'm better than you are.


Yes, people usually fake depression or say they want to kill themselves. There's a zero tolerance policy. Also taking any kind of psychotropic medication, especially anti-depressants, will get you de-nuked. You also won't get any more of whatever bonus, but if you re-upped to eight years and don't get an administrative separation you still have to stay in for the full eight. Without the bonus.

Also, conventional EM's, MM's, and ET's do not make rate very quickly, especially MM's, so it's wise to try and re-rate. If you're an EM or an ET, I guess a conventional one of those isn't probably so bad.

A common thing, unfortunately, is for people to go to a civilian psychologist or psychiatrist and get prescribed an anti-depressant, then take it. This is because civilian psychs hand out SSRIs like candy. If you do that you'll pretty much be hated.

I didn't do this - in fact I went to a Navy psychologist, and it wasn't really of my own accord. She, my LCPO (leading Chief Petty Officer) and myself tried to get things worked out by not putting me on meds and me going to group CBT for panic attacks, but since I had a panic attack in front of other people and was sent to medical, well, that de-nuked me whether or not I took any medicine. So I went ahead and tried an SSRI for awhile. Mehhh.

Slippery
May 16, 2004



Giudecca posted:

Yes, people usually fake depression or say they want to kill themselves. There's a zero tolerance policy. Also taking any kind of psychotropic medication, especially anti-depressants, will get you de-nuked. You also won't get any more of whatever bonus, but if you re-upped to eight years and don't get an administrative separation you still have to stay in for the full eight. Without the bonus.

Oh, I see. Man, guess I'm glad I never had the chance to be a nuke, holy cow.

quote:

I didn't do this - in fact I went to a Navy psychologist, and it wasn't really of my own accord. She, my LCPO (leading Chief Petty Officer) and myself tried to get things worked out by not putting me on meds and me going to group CBT for panic attacks, but since I had a panic attack in front of other people and was sent to medical, well, that de-nuked me whether or not I took any medicine. So I went ahead and tried an SSRI for awhile. Mehhh.

Well at least it sounds like it was the right thing to do and that the meds helped, so that's good news right? Better than hating every minute of every day at least, I assume.

Static Dynamics
Feb 7, 2004

We need technology for tomorrow's battlefield, like the laser that sets mile-wide skull-shaped fires.

I can field questions for the perspective nuke officers in this lovely thread. Feel free to send me a PM if you imagine this to be your future:

Majored in Physics at a state university, applied and got in, went to OCS, commissioned. Then went to Charleston for Power School and Prototype, learned the joys of nuclear power for a year. Went to Groton, CT for SOBC for three months to learn what a sonar screen looks like, reported to a fast boat here in Pearl Harbor, HI last year and went on a 6 month deployment. Finally got my dolphins two weeks ago. Now we're going into shipyard.

If you send me a PM, I'll let you know what life is like as a JO. In my free time. Between getting home from 14 hour workdays and passing out on my couch. If I'm not on duty. Yes, submarines.

KetTarma
Jul 24, 2003

Suffer not the lobbyist to live.


In case you guys have missed me, I've been at work a lot lately. Today is either day 8 or day 14 of my workweek (if you dont count a day of special liberty to go move out of my old apartment) with a short day being 10 hours.

Yes, nuclear shore duty.

Third World Reggin
May 19, 2008



Is the sub still on fire?

MonkeyFit
May 13, 2009


People who have served on boomer,s fast attack, and carriers, can you please take me through a typical day/deployment in the life of a nuke on your particular ship type?

How long are shifts?

How many ports do you stop in? (boomers are obviously exempt)

What kind of shore leave do you get?

What is shore duty comprised of and what is it like?

I know my coordinator was on a carrier so I've been getting some answers from him but I'd also like to hear from other people.

belt
May 12, 2001



On an aircraft carrier.

MonkeyFit posted:

How long are shifts?

On my carrier we had a 5/25 watch rotation. Which meant that you stood about 5 hours of watch a day. Other than that there was cleaning stations in the morning for an hour where all the non-quals cleaned our spaces. Maintenance was usually done when flight ops was over (usually on the 10-2 or 2-7 watch) and for the most part that didn't take more than a couple hours.

quote:

How many ports do you stop in? (boomers are obviously exempt)

We averaged about a port a month. So on a 6 month deployment probably about 6 or 7.

quote:

What kind of shore leave do you get?

I don't really understand what you want to know here, if you wouldn't mind expanding.

quote:

What is shore duty comprised of and what is it like?

Most shore duty for nukes is either served at A-school/Power school or at one of the prototypes. Some people manage to get recruiting or duty on a sub tender somewhere but those are less common. As for what it's like I was lucky enough to never find out.

genderstomper58
Jan 9, 2005


Subs are 6 hours of watch per 18 hrs...plus maintenance, training, quals, drills, cleaning. You won't get your own rack on a fast boat often until you're an e-7

We hit like 6 ports in 6 months but a lot of it is maintenance because unlike a carrier we can't do major maintenance at sea(we pulled into hawaii once for 4 days and i got 3 hours off)

Shore duty is same as belt said, but to go to the cake duty(a school/power school) you basically have to be fuckin super sailor and it doesnt happen often

Dont even think about fretting shore duty because the sea duty is hard enough

KetTarma
Jul 24, 2003

Suffer not the lobbyist to live.


I will chime in to say that shore duty at prototype is considerably more difficult than sea duty and you pretty much get volunteered to go to prototype if they don't have good manning when you're up for orders (they never have good manning)

genderstomper58
Jan 9, 2005


KetTarma posted:

I will chime in to say that shore duty at prototype is considerably more difficult than sea duty

Didn't you spend your entire sea duty on a carrier in the yards
(basically im saying youre full of poo poo)

genderstomper58 fucked around with this message at Mar 5, 2011 around 12:30

Third World Reggin
May 19, 2008



I'll be agreeing with Ket. Prototype is poo poo.

genderstomper58
Jan 9, 2005


Sorry I can't imagine anything gayer than being underwater 8 months a year

Third World Reggin
May 19, 2008



Try having a shore duty with twice the amounts of rules you had while at sea. Also you work sea going sub hours, not sure duty hours. And you are on shore. Plus you are still on a sub. Now put in a bunch of students you are responsible for. Now make that sub one of the oldest in the fleet that catches fire.

genderstomper58
Jan 9, 2005


Goondolences bro

*goes home every day*

belt
May 12, 2001



moker posted:

Didn't you spend your entire sea duty on a carrier in the yards
(basically im saying youre full of poo poo)

Coming from the same carrier as him in the same RCOH, I can say that the shipyards was MUCH more difficult and painful than being deployed on that carrier.

genderstomper58
Jan 9, 2005


belt posted:

Coming from the same carrier as him in the same RCOH, I can say that the shipyards was MUCH more difficult and painful than being deployed on that carrier.

Because its easy?(I've been deployed on both)

KetTarma
Jul 24, 2003

Suffer not the lobbyist to live.


Nukes arguing about who has it worse itt.

Moker, most sub guys I work with are happy when they go back out to the fleet and most will say that day to day life was easier on the sub. Take that for what you will.

Also, you are totally full of poo poo if you think RCOH is a more desirable duty when compared to a regular sea-going carrier. gently caress the yards.

belt
May 12, 2001



Carriers definitely have it easier, but that's why volunteering for sub duty and crying about how easy the carrier nukes have it is retarded.

But yeah, gently caress RCOH.

MonkeyFit
May 13, 2009


belt posted:

I don't really understand what you want to know here, if you wouldn't mind expanding.

When you guys pull into port do you actually get to go ashore and see the world or are you pretty much stuck on ship all the time?

Giudecca
May 14, 2006

i'm so glad i'm better than you are.


One day we were in port for three days. Brazil. I got to go out for two days. The other time I was in port for four days. Peru. I got to go out for three days. Reactor doesn't have it as bad as some other departments. If you're a CS (Culinary Specialist) or you're TAD (temporarily assigned duty) to Security, well, port calls suck rear end for you.

belt
May 12, 2001



Yeah, we were usually in 3 section during port calls (on duty 1 day, off the next two), and pulled in anywhere from 3-5 days. Depending on which port it was we might have to come back to the ship for the night but for most ports we could stay overnight in town if we didn't have duty the next day.

Ryand-Smith
Feb 19, 2008

If a recruiter asks you to become a nuclear sailor.. you say no


I'm bumping this thread to ask the fine gentlemen of this thread, re, meltdowns, I know we don't have them, but apparently Japan is undergoing one, and can any of you explain what happened/how it happened/potentials to how it could be prevented etc? More or less your observations/knowledge on this sort of thing.

grover
Jan 23, 2002

PEW PEW PEW







Ryand-Smith posted:

I'm bumping this thread to ask the fine gentlemen of this thread, re, meltdowns, I know we don't have them, but apparently Japan is undergoing one, and can any of you explain what happened/how it happened/potentials to how it could be prevented etc? More or less your observations/knowledge on this sort of thing.
Fukushima Daiichi I is a boiling water reactor (BWR), which is a little bit different from pressurized water reactor (PWR) naval reactors and most of the reactors in the US (TMI is PWR), but BWR and PWR both work on the same operating principals, just at different pressures.

There's no Chernobyl-esque meltdown, that's for sure. If the core ever did melt, the nuclear reaction would instantly halt because it's been designed to require neutron moderators in the cooling water, and the absence of those moderators will cause it to lose criticality. A partial melt-down is the worst-case scenario (and would cause an economic loss of the plant from the cost of the repair), but rather moot as the plant has already been damaged beyond economic repair by the tsunami and saltwater.

There was an initial supposed japanese-to-english mistranslation stating that there was a meltdown and a pipe burst at reactor 1, but the Japanese Prime Minister quickly clarified that there was no meltdown and the coolant system was intact. An increase in levels of cesium and iodine in the building are pretty good indications of damage to the core and a leak in the primary system, though; unsurprising, considering pressures were about 2.1x the design limit after loss of cooling water prevented removal of waste heat. This leak released high-pressure steam into the secondary containment building, which is hardened to withstand significantly increased pressures from such a release.

It's not clear yet from reports whether this was a pure steam explosion, from pressures exceeding the capacity of the secondary containment building, or from hydrogen gas released when zirconium alloyed into the the core is exposed during a melt-down and reacts with the oxygen in the cooling water.


The radiation levels are far exaggerated in the press; the refinery fires released far more radiation into the atmosphere from trace radioactive elements in the oil than the hydrogen/steam explosion did. If I'm not mistaken, most of the radiation flux in steam from a BWR is N16, which has a half-life measured in seconds and would only release measurable radiation for a minute or so after leaving the reactor vessel. The Cesium and Iodine isotopes released in a core explosion would be more dangerous, but only VERY small amounts of these have so far been detected- hence why reports are that only a tiny % of the core is suspected to have melted in the "meltdown" scenario.


grover posted:

To combat people's fear of radiation and lack of basis for comparison for the danger between different levels of radiation, I created an initiative to calculate radiation exposure, and, in every radiation thread, present the radiation numbers in terms of SWWs, the exposure you get from natural radiation in the human body while spooning with your wife for an 8 hour night.

The human body contains 13.8Bq (0.37nCi), mostly from K40 (gamma) and C14 (beta). I'll try to do some rough calcs. Even spooning naked, C14's beta won't be much of a risk so I decided to run the calcs for K40 alone. Someone saved me the work, though! The equivilent dose of radiation from the human body is 40 mrem/yr- about 1/3 the natural background radiation we recieve every year, and 1/6 total radiation we recieve. How that compared to other radiation sources is readily noted at this link.

Calcs:
code:
Human Body Radiation: 40mrem/year
Time spent spooning: 8 hours/night (1/3t)
Percent exposure: appx 25% of circumference
1 SWW (Spooning with Wife) = 40 * 1/3 * 1/4 = 2.5mrem/year
  • Spooning with wife 8 hours a night for a year: 1 SWW (baseline)
  • Annual US average background radiation = 144 SWW
  • Radiation you get from natural radioisotopes in your own body (like the carbon-14 used in carbon dating): 16 SWW
  • 1 Dental X-Ray = 4 SWW
  • 1 Mammogram = 28 SWW
  • EPA unreasonably tight 15mrem radiation limit for Yucca Mountain = 6 SWW, BECAUSE 7 SWW WILL KILL YOU!!!! ATOMZZZ!!!! oh, wait...
  • Chaining yourself to the fence of a nuclear plant for 1 year to protest ATOMZ by self-sacrificing yourself: 0.1 SWW
  • Amount of radiation the tank commander of a DU-armored M1A2 tank recieves per hour, despite being literally surrounded by tons upon tons of depleted uranium: 0.000004 SWWs
  • Annual Bikini Atoll background radiation = 116 SWW for the most highly irradiated place on earth. Yeah, that's right: no radon, so it's actually below the US average, and perfectly safe to visit and live. Just don't eat too much locally grown food, as there's a lot of Cs137 in the soil.
  • Eating nothing but locally grown Bikini Island food: 1.6 SWW per day.

    Worth noting:
  • A single dose of roughly 40,000SWWs is the lower limit of toxicity to humans if received at once
  • 400,000SWWs is almost invariably fatal. Protip: limit your spooning to just a few wives at once.

Peak hourly radiation levels at Fukushima I immediately after the explosion were reported as 101.5 mrem/hr. Roughly equivalent to spooning with your wife every night for a month, and less than you'd get from normal background radiation over the course of a year. Considering these were peak levels right at the plant and the gasses dissipated quickly, it's highly unlikely to hurt anyone.

grover fucked around with this message at Mar 13, 2011 around 14:25

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

KetTarma
Jul 24, 2003

Suffer not the lobbyist to live.


Well, Grover said it way better than I was going to.

100mRem/hour is pretty tame. You wouldnt want to hang out there for longer than you had to but it's nothing scary.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • Post
  • Reply
«39 »