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Morning Bell
Feb 23, 2006
Lift More. Eat More.

The Mystery Date posted:

https://soundcloud.com/someguybrian/mack-the-knife

If anybody would like to see what a difference 4 years and some effort can make, check out the first reply to this thread on page 1.

Holy poo poo, sounds grand, and like a completely different singer. What was your practice regime like over the four years?

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The Mystery Date
Aug 2, 2005
STRAGHT FOOL IN A GAY POOL (MUPPETS ROCK)

Morning Bell posted:

Holy poo poo, sounds grand, and like a completely different singer. What was your practice regime like over the four years?

Thanks! I never really had anything formal laid out. I find the most important thing is to keep mindful whenever I sing, recognize mistakes, and do the best I can to correct them and improve. I'm sure things would have gone a lot faster if I'd had some sort of instruction, but it's rewarding to accumulate knowledge on my own and figure things out.

Special thanks to Triple Tech, whose advice nudged me in the right direction when I didn't know what the hell I was doing.

Greggster
Aug 14, 2010


The Mystery Date posted:

Thanks! I never really had anything formal laid out. I find the most important thing is to keep mindful whenever I sing, recognize mistakes, and do the best I can to correct them and improve. I'm sure things would have gone a lot faster if I'd had some sort of instruction, but it's rewarding to accumulate knowledge on my own and figure things out.

Special thanks to Triple Tech, whose advice nudged me in the right direction when I didn't know what the hell I was doing.

I'd love to learn what you've learned in these four years, could you perhaps take time to write out your own training regime, and all that stuff?

The Mystery Date
Aug 2, 2005
STRAGHT FOOL IN A GAY POOL (MUPPETS ROCK)

I hate to disappoint, but all I've really done is sing a lot and focus on improving. It certainly helped to know another instrument first so I had a decent sense of pitch, and recording myself has been important to actually get an idea of what I sound like, no matter how miserable it was at first. If you're looking for pointers, I'm probably not the one to give them, but you can check out Triple Tech's advice to me in the first few pages to get some basic fundamentals (I'd just be reiterating his points and he did an excellent job of articulating them). The key is practice, practice, practice (i.e. singing a lot). I didn't sing a ton of scales or anything, mostly just various songs at home, in the car, in the shower, etc. Realize that each vocal cord is associated with around 6 different muscles (some are shared between them), which need to be harnessed and mastered to have control, so just knowing isn't going to cut it; it takes doing over and over and over.

Sperglord Firecock
Feb 20, 2011

THE RUNES NEVER SPOKE OF THIS

Okay no seriously, I need some serious help.

Back a few years, I was the lead singer of an 80's hair metal cover band, and plus, a lead in some community musical production, no biggie, etc.

Back then, I could sing stuff like Journey, the rest of that, without much of a problem, but since joining the Navy and the rest of that, I can still SING the stuff, it's just that my vocal chords wear out and start hurting WAY faster than they used to do, and now, I rarely even do any high-flying songs like, say, Bon Jovi (AKA: The songs that I really love doing) without my voice cracking, barely being able to hit the notes, and my internal "GODDAMMIT YOU ARE poo poo GO INTO A CORNER" instincts starting up.

I'd really like to get back into hitting those awesome high notes and such, and I don't know if it's just lack of practice that's making my voice die or if I am doing something wrong with preparation or somesuch.

Advice?

Edit: Although on the upside, I can apparently do a loving amazing job at Bruce Springsteen's Born To Run. Protip: It requires you to have both a whole shitload of energy and to have that edge of desperation in your voice.

Sperglord Firecock fucked around with this message at Jul 13, 2014 around 05:41

Godsped
Jan 20, 2013


Sperglord Firecock posted:

Okay no seriously, I need some serious help.

Back a few years, I was the lead singer of an 80's hair metal cover band, and plus, a lead in some community musical production, no biggie, etc.

Back then, I could sing stuff like Journey, the rest of that, without much of a problem, but since joining the Navy and the rest of that, I can still SING the stuff, it's just that my vocal chords wear out and start hurting WAY faster than they used to do, and now, I rarely even do any high-flying songs like, say, Bon Jovi (AKA: The songs that I really love doing) without my voice cracking, barely being able to hit the notes, and my internal "GODDAMMIT YOU ARE poo poo GO INTO A CORNER" instincts starting up.

I'd really like to get back into hitting those awesome high notes and such, and I don't know if it's just lack of practice that's making my voice die or if I am doing something wrong with preparation or somesuch.

Advice?

Cracking is good as long as there's something after the crack; cracking into nothing is not healthy. It's probably just an out of practice thing. If it's been a few months, let alone years, it'll take time to get back.

Hulk Krogan
Mar 25, 2005



Boz0r posted:

Are there any baritone hair metal/80ies metal singers besides David Coverdale?

Not quite metal but Ian Astbury from the Cult, maybe? I guess Paul Di'anno would qualify as a baritone too.

Sperglord Firecock
Feb 20, 2011

THE RUNES NEVER SPOKE OF THIS

Well, ironically, I wrote a song in the style of hair metal/80's metal during one of our deployments called Flesh Torpedo, that's probably better sung in a Baritone.

90% of it is just straight sexual innuendo.

It compares fat chicks to carriers and skinny chicks to frigates.

Fooz
Sep 26, 2010




I'm just selfishly barging into this thread so:

Hi, I hate hearing my voice so I rarely sing but I have to bite the bullet every now and then and try it out.

https://soundcloud.com/foozmuz/chandelier-vox-demo

Any pointers on how to be better? I have very small lungs so that's an issue.

Fooz
Sep 26, 2010




Hm well I can't seem to get anyone in the world to Give me feedback, so I guess I'm on my own. I can sort of tell what's wrong, a dull or deadened timbre quality in some parts, or just a nasal sound, but I'm not sure about how to improve it.

Fooz fucked around with this message at Jul 21, 2014 around 16:56

Sogol
Apr 11, 2013

Galileo's Finger

Fooz posted:

Hm well I can't seem to get anyone in the world to Give me feedback, so I guess I'm on my own. I can sort of tell what's wrong, a dull or deadened timbre quality in some parts, or just a nasal sound, but I'm not sure about how to improve it.

Heh. I liked it and liked some of the things you did in the mix. Small lungs isn't really a thing for the most part. Breath on the other hand is. Your voice sounds very aspirated to me. That is, I think you are using more air to produce the sound than is needed. Part of this has to do with how your vocal chords come together at the beginning of sound and then how you manage contact.

There is nothing wrong with your sound. Learning to manage your breath (breathing exercises, diaphragm control, etc.) and learning to manage the way your chords come together to produce sound will handle things about being able to sustain notes without dropping off, crescendo during a note or phrase, etc.

There may be stuff about musicianship as well. You make some choices where you seem to gliss or slide from one note to another. Do you know you are doing that? Is it an intentional choice? If so why do make it when you make it? For instance, if you wanted some connection there a little run might do. You also don't have to hold out everything for what you think is full value. Some silence in the song gives you a chance to breath, but also give your listener a chance to breath.

The Mack the Knife guy above seems interesting to me. His sound production is very intentional it seems. He is going for a certain sound and then has paid attention to that over several years. When asked how he was learning he basically said 'by paying attention to what I am doing'.

You could think about singing as the physical sound production, musicianship and storytelling/expression. All three are integrated and not really separate, but you can work on them to some extent as if they were.

Oh. And you are on your own.

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Fooz
Sep 26, 2010




Thanks, that is all very valuable. I'm going to work on breathing exercises for sure. The vocal chord stuff will be a little tougher. About the small lungs, I was born with a disorder of the ribcage, so my chest is pretty small for someone of my size. I defiantly have not put focus into making good musical choices, since I'm just focusing on the sound and trying to get an ok take in that regard. I know the glissando always sounds much crummier than I think it will.

I read somewhere (maybe here) that it's better to sing by feel than self-monitoring, and I think I've been relying way to much on self-monitoring as I sing, which is holding my breath control back.

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