Search Amazon.com:
Register a SA Forums Account here!
JOINING THE SA FORUMS WILL REMOVE THIS BIG AD, THE ANNOYING UNDERLINED ADS, AND STUPID INTERSTITIAL ADS!!!

You can: log in, read the tech support FAQ, or request your lost password. This dumb message (and those ads) will appear on every screen until you register! Get rid of this crap by registering your own SA Forums Account and joining roughly 150,000 Goons, for the one-time price of $9.95! We charge money because it costs us $3,400 per month for bandwidth bills alone, and since we don't believe in shoving popup ads to our registered users, we try to make the money back through forum registrations.
«25 »
  • Post
  • Reply
REALTHEWILL
Jul 21, 2016


Someitmes if your trying to record your vocals and you can't clearly hear yourself, (your wearing headphones or the instrumental is loud), a nice trick I discovered is singing through a guitar amp to amplify your voice. It helps being able to actually hear yourself over the music when your record. Another trick is to try and put less effort into each individual note, instead of pushing out as hard as you possibly can straining yourself in the process, which is bad sounding and bad for you.

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

Vorenus
Jul 14, 2013


I've just recently had two lessons through a Taylor Robinson instructor. She's fully certified and sings opera and all that, however she doesn't play any instruments that can act as accompaniment. Both lessons have mostly been her awkwardly poking at a keyboard while I try to sing along to a song, after which she tells me that I'm failing at proper breathing, enunciation, and projecting. I'm trying to keep in mind that maybe I'm just taking constructive criticism too personally, but there's very little positive construction and I feel like she knows the material but not how to teach it. As an example, rather than saying, "Okay, you need to work on X and Y, so let's do this exercise right now or try this as different way" or whatever it's just "You're doing XYZ wrong, let's try again, that was a little better now go home and read this book for a week".

Obviously you all can only read off of what I'm posting, but what are good/bad things to look for in an instructor?

Hawkgirl
Jun 20, 2003

Jesus Died for Your Songs

From what you're saying it sounds like you are correct, you've found a person who can walk the walk but they don't know pedagogy at all. You are right to think you deserve a better teacher than that.

I would note that I don't think the lack of instrument proficiency is really the issue; I've had voice teachers as a kid that could barely pluck at the piano but did a really great job teaching me how to sing properly all the same.

Even if your teacher really is just a little harsher than what you're looking for, he or she should still be able to accurately assess your reaction to their instructions and change to make their instruction more palatable to you. If you haven't been direct yet and said, "I don't feel like I'm learning much when you tell me I'm wrong. Can you give me some advice on how to get better at [whatever thing she dissed you on]?" I would at least give her the benefit of the doubt and do that. But if she can't adapt to you after that, or worse makes you feel lovely for bringing it up in the first place, you should totally let her go. Has she given you any exercises at all on breathing or singing? Did she really tell you to read a book for a week, and not to practice doing something?

I don't know what Taylor Robinson is (a music store maybe?) but it's absolutely ok to shop around private teachers until you find someone you feel like you can learn from.

massive spider
Dec 6, 2006

sets off a "weirdly specific fetish artwork" vibe

REALTHEWILL posted:

Someitmes if your trying to record your vocals and you can't clearly hear yourself, (your wearing headphones or the instrumental is loud), a nice trick I discovered is singing through a guitar amp to amplify your voice. It helps being able to actually hear yourself over the music when your record. Another trick is to try and put less effort into each individual note, instead of pushing out as hard as you possibly can straining yourself in the process, which is bad sounding and bad for you.

Guitar amps are designed to push guitar frequencies, you could sing through them but youd be better off with a monitor which is designed for that. Or just turning down the instrumental track and turning up the monitoring track or putting some reverb on the vocal to hear it reflected back at you.

Southern Heel
Jul 2, 2004



When I played singstar way back now in the day it had a pitch line which matched the vocal melody. Is there a free version of that I can use with a regular mic? Sounds silly but I'm just trying to find my feet with real songs instead of bellowing in the shower.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • Post
  • Reply
«25 »