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Alfred P. Pseudonym
May 29, 2006

And when you gaze long into an abyss, the abyss goes 8-8


Power of Pecota, you get A Fistful of Dollars. It's the weakest of the Dollars trilogy in my opinion, but it's still great.

Schindler's List was pretty draining. Spielberg is great at making the audience feel what he wants them to feel. It wasn't a subtle film, but the subject matter isn't subtle. The arcs of Goeth and Schindler alongside one another were fantastic.

The List:

NEW 1. Vertigo: Apparently this is the greatest movie of all time now.

2. Rain Man: I've caught bits and pieces of this on TV but I've never actually seen the whole thing.

3. First Blood: I consider myself an action fan, yet I've never seen a Rambo movie. This needs to change.

4. Superman: Superman was never really an interesting character to me, but this is culturally significant enough that I guess I need to see it.

5. Shane: Another essential western.

6. Casino: I've heard this is basically Goodfellas but with a casino.

7. The Deer Hunter: I've seen most of the big Vietnam movies, but not this one. All I know is that there's Russian Roulette in this.

8. The King's Speech: I borrowed this from the library a few weeks ago but the DVD was scratched and gave out halfway through. I liked what I did see, though.

9. The Sting: I don't really know what this is about, but I've heard nothing but good things about it. Also, I don't think I've seen any Paul Newman movie besides Cars and Road to Perdition.

10. Spartacus: One of the few Kubrick films I haven't seen.

Watched: Goodfellas, Rear Window, Rashomon, The Searchers, Lawrence of Arabia, American Psycho, The Usual Suspects, L.A. Confidential, Unforgiven, Once Upon a Time in America, Blue Velvet, Schindler's List

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CopywrightMMXI
Jun 1, 2011


Just as a heads up, if anyone has Kurosawa films on their lists, and is dependent on libraries for their movies, Turner Classic Movies is showing a marathon of his movies on THursday.

Ratedargh
Feb 20, 2011

"You look cute G," Jey said as he wrapped his arms around my waist getting a good grip on the khaki shorts I decided to wear, he was looking deep into my eyes sheesh he stay having my heart pound. But in a good way


Alfred P. Pseudonym posted:

NEW 1. Vertigo: Apparently this is the greatest movie of all time now.

I know you just added it but I can't help picking it. I don't think it's the best ever, and it might not be my favorite Hitchcock, but I do love it. I hope you do too.

Man, The King of Comedy was unnerving. The character of Rupert Pupkin has a great deal of nuance that doesn't become entirely apparent until close to the end. He seems like your garden variety, overly obsessed and enthusiastic fan. Each scene peels back the layer of psychoses until we see him for what he is: a sad, lonely man who was repeatedly abused his whole life, both physically and emotionally. His lust for attention led him down an insane path that somehow works in his benefit. Infamy, fame...who cares?

Great performances, especially from De Niro and Bernhard and well thought out commentary on obsession with celebrity and how disposable fame is.

LIST O SHAME:

1920s - The Kid (1921) - Chaplin has, so far, not let me down.

1930s - Young Mr. Lincoln (1939) - I've been intrigued about this one for some time but never got around to it.

1940s - Foreign Correspondent (1940) - More Hitchcock please!

1950s - Mr. Hulot's Holiday (1953) - Not a big fan of slapstick. I liked Mr. Bean a bit when I was a kid, isn't Hulot an inspiration for him?

1960s - Onibaba (1964) - Japanese folk horror, I presume. Let's do this!

1970s - The Last Detail (1973) - Never cared until I read about it, and Hal Ashby, in Easy Riders Raging Bulls.

1980s - Reds (1981) - Great cast...and I'm a sucker for journalism-centric movies but this is so long.

1990s - The Straight Story (1999) - Seems like it will be David Lynch's weirdest movie based on what I'm used to from him.

2000s - Carlos (2010) - Will watch this 5+ hour beast in segments.

Bonus/IMDB List - It Happened One Night (1934)


SHAME BE GONE:Wild Strawberries, Sunset Blvd., The Adventures of Baron Munchausen, Our Man in Havana, Breathless, Phenomena, Withnail & I, 12 Angry Men, The Cranes Are Flying, Fitzcarraldo, Amadeus, Paths of Glory, Blow Out, Cronos, Hausu, City Lights, Easy Rider, The Lives of Others, Salo, In the Bedroom, The Killing of a Chinese Bookie, Cars, Brand Upon the Brain!, The Great Dictator, Double Indemnity, Point Blank, Cool Hand Luke, 127 Hours, Black Narcissus, Lawrence of Arabia, The Sting, A Woman is a Woman, Life of Brian, Last Picture Show, The Company of Wolves, Tree of Life, Life is Beautiful, Young Frankenstein, Cinema Paradiso, Some Like it Hot, Shotgun Stories, Singin' in the Rain, Precious, Sympathy for Mr. Vengeance, The Rules of the Game, Frost/Nixon, All About Eve, Bronson, The Searchers, Bicycle Thieves, American Graffiti, A Christmas Story, The Phantom Carriage, The Changeling, Repulsion, Kagemusha, Irreversible, The Virgin Spring, The Red Shoes, Deconstructing Harry, Metropolis, Che, The Island of Lost Souls, Revanche, Black Moon, Stalker, Manhattan Murder Mystery, Badlands, The Long Goodbye, Crimes and Misdemeanors, The Apartment, All About My Mother, Tokyo Story, Chungking Express, This is Spinal Tap, On the Waterfront, Grave of the Fireflies, Rebecca, The Sweet Hereafter, Peeping Tom, Drunken Angel, Duck Soup, Key Largo, Witness for the Prosecution, The Lady From Shanghai, Haxan: Witchcraft Through the Ages, Safety Last!, King Kong, Anatomy of a Murder, In a Lonely Place, Safe, Bad Day at Black Rock, The General, The Magnificent Ambersons, Five Easy Pieces, Porco Rosso, Mystery Train, Rififi, The King of Comedy(TOTAL: 99)

owsley
Feb 23, 2011


CopywrightMMXI posted:

Just as a heads up, if anyone has Kurosawa films on their lists, and is dependent on libraries for their movies, Turner Classic Movies is showing a marathon of his movies on THursday.

Thanks for the heads up. I wish TCM would do stuff like this more often.

escape artist
Sep 24, 2005

"Slow train coming"

"Slow quality poster coming to the threads about the shows I like."

"No, really, jokes aside, post more in The TV IV because you make good points and don't suck."


Ratedargh posted:


1990s - The Straight Story (1999) - Seems like it will be David Lynch's weirdest movie based on what I'm used to from him.


This is the movie that redeemed Lynch in the eyes' of critics, and allowed him to make his greatest work-- Mulholland Drive. So watch this, for your 100th film.


Just watched: M

It was a good one, and is officially the oldest movie I have ever watched-- released in 1931. This was Fritz Lang's first "talkie", and you can see the silent film influence throughout the film.

The movie is a meditation on many modern issues, including the insanity defense, vigilante justice, civil liberty and more. Also the ineptitude that seems to be systemic in the police department. The police become tyrannical, just like the child murderer, by stripping everyone of their liberties and treating everyone like a suspect. The mob becomes involved and are actually the ones that do find the killer, because of their unorthodox and perhaps illegal methods of surveillance.

I also can't help but wonder if there is a Scarlet Letter parallel here, branding the murderer with the letter M.


I enjoyed this one very much, and can see why it is rated so highly. While the story lacked any particularly interesting character, the story itself was great, as was the cinematography. Amazing how a film that is over 80 years old illustrates issues that still plague us today, and this film was undoubtedly an influence on many future films.


The Big Chill - I've always wanted to see this, one of my favorite albums takes a few clips from the dialogue, so even as a 15 year old it interested me. Just have never gotten around to it. Also, wanted to put something more recent on my list, since no one is ever going to pick Boonmee. (Is it weird that I'm 25, and very rarely like movies that have been made in my lifetime?)

*NEW* Chinatown - One of Nicholson's finest, and always ranked among the top movies ever. I need to see it.

Dr. Zhivago - The length of the movie has indefinitely postponed my viewing of it.

Ikiru - Another Kurosawa film, this one, from the description, seems to be much different thematically than all the other ones I have watched. So far, I have seen four of his films, and loved four. I see no reason this won't be another five for five; if the trend continues, it will be thirty one for thirty one.

Koyaanisqatsi - Heard very little about it, except that it is critically acclaimed. The name of the film always intrigued me, but not enough to actually watch it.

Mother - Need to watch some more from South Korea. Only have seen Oldboy and Memories of Murder, but they were both great.

Once Upon a Time in America - The runtime is the only thing that is preventing me from watching this. De Niro in an organized crime movie? This is probably the only one I haven't seen.

Peeping Tom - A classic serial killer movie that I intended to watch, but I got burnt out out serial killer movies after a recent marathon, and moved on to critically acclaimed Japanese films.

Uncle Boonmee Who Can Recall His Past Lives - Supposedly one of the best movies of the decade, this 2010 release from Thailand has been a mainstay on my queue, but is always moved down in favor of other films.

The Wild Bunch - Not a huge fan of Westerns, but I am a huge Deadwood fan, so that's sort of paradoxical. Go figure. I'm keeping this as my Western slot, since there are at least a half a dozen classic Westerns I need to see, just because they have become such a part of the cinematic canon.

I've decided to join Criticker, which I have been dyslexically referring to as "Crickiter" for a while, to find new film recommendations. It's going to take a while for it to get a feel for what I like. I've rated about 15 films, and it's recommending me poo poo like Scarface and The Dark Knight. Anybody wanna be Criticker pals with me?
One thing I don't like is the "10 tiers" thing they have. I rate one film 95 and one film 93-- they should be on the same tier. Alas, it's still a nifty site.


Un-shamed: 12 Angry Men, Citizen Kane, Fargo, The Fly, M, North By Northwest, Seven Samurai, Sunset Blvd. (8 films)

escape artist fucked around with this message at Aug 7, 2012 around 18:24

TrixRabbi
Aug 20, 2010

It is a classic symbol of racism in America. This is where the white man has taken the black man and put him between two buns. And then dumped ketchup on him.


escape artist posted:

Peeping Tom - A classic serial killer movie that I intended to watch, but I got burnt out out serial killer movies after a recent marathon, and moved on to critically acclaimed Japanese films.

Chinatown is tempting, but Peeping Tom needs more love in general. It's a good companion piece to Psycho as well, since they both came out the same year.

So Some Like It Hot was pretty good. I've yet to see a Wilder film I didn't enjoy, and while I agree it's not his best (nor is it the funniest movie of all time), it's still drat good and a lot of fun. It managed to get some laughs out of me at times, and the finale is perfect.

I also watched Divorce Italian Style since it was becoming clear no one was going to ever pick it, and it was surprisingly fantastic. I'm glad I bought it because it's a great and pretty funny take down of chauvinism. I definitely recommend this to everyone here.

My List:

Buffalo '66 - From what I've read about Vincent Gallo he seems like a bit of an rear end. But I've never seen a film by him and maybe he'll impress me.

Cul-De-Sac - I can never not be reminded that he's a rapist, but dammit, Polanski knows how to make a film. This one sounds pretty good.

Marat/Sade - I've never heard of this until just recently, but it sounds really good and Criticker thinks I'll like it. (Added 5/3/2012)

To Kill A Mockingbird - Didn't read the book in school either. (Added 7/2/2012)

Rio Bravo - John Wayne's not my favorite but I've heard only good things so I'll give it a shot. (Added 7/7/2012)

The Birth Of A Nation - This is going to piss me off, isn't it? (Added 7/23/2012)

A Woman Under The Influence - Is this a good place to start with Cassavetes? I've never seen any of his films. (Added 7/23/2012)

Lawrence Of Arabia - Probably the weakest of all the common weak reasons: It's really long. (Added 7/27/2012)

His Girl Friday - Is Cary Grant going to Cary Grant it up in this? (Added 8/7/2012)

An American Werewolf In London - I've been meaning to watch this for years. (Added 8/7/2012)

Watched: Harold and Maude; The Third Man; Inland Empire; Godzilla; Big Trouble In Little China; Y Tu Mamá También; Marathon Man; Hunger; A Woman Is A Woman; Black Narcissus; A Hard Day's Night; Scarface; Le Doulos; On The Waterfront; Rocky; 3 Women; Airplane!; Duck Soup; Clash of the Titans; Singin' In The Rain; The Cow; Straw Dogs; Stop Making Sense; Bad Timing; Once Upon A Time In America; Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade; Robocop; Shane; WALL·E; The 36th Chamber Of Shaolin; The Man Who Fell To Earth; Mr. Smith Goes To Washington; Divorce Italian Style; Some Like It Hot

escape artist
Sep 24, 2005

"Slow train coming"

"Slow quality poster coming to the threads about the shows I like."

"No, really, jokes aside, post more in The TV IV because you make good points and don't suck."


TrixRabbi posted:


To Kill A Mockingbird - Didn't read the book in school either. (Added 7/2/2012)


It's a good story, and one of the few films that do justice to the book. You definitely need to see it.

Just watched: Peeping Tom A suspenseful film, of the slow burning type... Pretty good, not fantastic, but definitely worth watching. I may have seen every serial killer movie worth watching, now. Wanted to turn it off about 1/3 of the way through, but I am glad I stuck with it because it really ramped up in intensity at the end.

Also watched, because I was bored, and because I knew no one would ever pick it: Uncle Boonmee Who Can Recall His Past Lives
Uhhh, this is something more to be experienced than to try and be explained. It was like watching a Thai Lynch film. Don't know if I'd recommend it, but I enjoyed it.


The Big Chill - I've always wanted to see this, one of my favorite albums takes a few clips from the dialogue, so even as a 15 year old it interested me. Just have never gotten around to it. Also, wanted to put something more recent on my list, since no one is ever going to pick Boonmee. (Is it weird that I'm 25, and very rarely like movies that have been made in my lifetime?)

Chinatown - One of Nicholson's finest, and always ranked among the top movies ever. I need to see it.

Dr. Zhivago - The length of the movie has indefinitely postponed my viewing of it.

Ikiru - Another Kurosawa film, this one, from the description, seems to be much different thematically than all the other ones I have watched. So far, I have seen four of his films, and loved four. I see no reason this won't be another five for five; if the trend continues, it will be thirty one for thirty one.

Koyaanisqatsi - Heard very little about it, except that it is critically acclaimed. The name of the film always intrigued me, but not enough to actually watch it.

Mother - Need to watch some more from South Korea. Only have seen Oldboy and Memories of Murder, but they were both great.

Once Upon a Time in America - The runtime is the only thing that is preventing me from watching this. De Niro in an organized crime movie? This is probably the only one I haven't seen.

*NEW*The Seventh Seal Literally have not seen anything by Bergman. Time to rectify that. If this is not a good place to start, you can recommend Wild Strawberries in its place.

The Wild Bunch - Not a huge fan of Westerns, but I am a huge Deadwood fan, so that's sort of paradoxical. Go figure. I'm keeping this as my Western slot, since there are at least a half a dozen classic Westerns I need to see, just because they have become such a part of the cinematic canon.

*NEW*Zelig I've only seen a couple of Woody Allen films, so I think I might give him a slot on my list for a few films. You may recommend Crimes and Misdemeanors or Manhattan in place of Zelig, but eventually I will watch them all.

Anybody wanna be Criticker pals with me?


Un-shamed: 12 Angry Men, Citizen Kane, Fargo, The Fly, M, North By Northwest, Peeping Tom, Seven Samurai, Sunset Blvd, Uncle Boonmee Who Can Recall His Past Lives (10 films)

Electronico6
Feb 25, 2011



escape artist posted:

Ikiru - Another Kurosawa film, this one, from the description, seems to be much different thematically than all the other ones I have watched. So far, I have seen four of his films, and loved four. I see no reason this won't be another five for five; if the trend continues, it will be thirty one for thirty one.

Only thirty. Those Who Make Tomorrow was disowned by Kurosawa and I don't think it's even possible to watch it nowadays.


Koyaanisqatsi was alright I guess. Expertly photography and editing, but it didn't really capture my attention or took my breath away as other visual essays, like Werner Herzog's Lessons of Darkness. Also gently caress Philip Glass. Seriously.


SHAME Part III:

Vivre Sa Vie Haven't been impressed with the little I seen so far from Godard.

The Killer More John Woo Bullet Ballet.

Steamboat Bill, Jr. Quickly becoming a Buster Keaton convert.

The Trouble with Harry is that he's dead! Hilarity ensues.

Star Trek V: The Final Frontier God needs a spaceship or something

Young Mr. Lincoln Will Lincoln hunt some vampire assholes in this one too?

Anatomy of a Murder Murder!!

The Last Picture Show A young Jeff Bridges.

Dancer in the Dark Lars von Trier

Caché(Hidden) Another from the pile of films I own but can't remember why.

Have watched so far 20 movies: Star Trek III: The Search for Spock, Fallen Angels, The Shop Around the Corner, La Strada, Little Dieter Needs to Fly, Rescue Dawn, All About My Mother, Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home, The Long Goodbye, Vampyr, Mon Oncle, The Exterminating Angel, Jules et Jim, Sorcerer, The Darjeeling Limited, Close-up, Arsenic and Old Lace, The Host, Zelig, Koyaanisqatsi

escape artist
Sep 24, 2005

"Slow train coming"

"Slow quality poster coming to the threads about the shows I like."

"No, really, jokes aside, post more in The TV IV because you make good points and don't suck."


Electronico6 posted:

Only thirty. Those Who Make Tomorrow was disowned by Kurosawa and I don't think it's even possible to watch it nowadays.


Good choice, because I was literally going to watch that movie this afternoon anyway. I thought today was the Kurosawa day on TCM, and was disappointed, so I needed my fix.

Ratedargh
Feb 20, 2011

"You look cute G," Jey said as he wrapped his arms around my waist getting a good grip on the khaki shorts I decided to wear, he was looking deep into my eyes sheesh he stay having my heart pound. But in a good way


escape artist posted:

Anybody wanna be Criticker pals with me?

Boom, yes! What might be your username? In fact here's a link to the goon thread of criticker:

http://forums.somethingawful.com/sh...hreadid=3402606

escape artist
Sep 24, 2005

"Slow train coming"

"Slow quality poster coming to the threads about the shows I like."

"No, really, jokes aside, post more in The TV IV because you make good points and don't suck."


Ratedargh posted:

Boom, yes! What might be your username? In fact here's a link to the goon thread of criticker:

http://forums.somethingawful.com/sh...hreadid=3402606

Sweet. My name is taumpytears (Tom Peters). I'm sending you a request.


I have to rate some terrible movies, because at this point, Criticker thinks I will like every movie ever made.

You're my Kumpel, now. Whatever that means. I've only rated 39 movies, but you've rated 29 of my 39. I'm updating my list and am close to 60 now.

Also, I don't want to just add any random goon. I want to add my buddies from this thread, where we are the crème de la crème.


We totally agree on 14:

Godfather, The
Seven Samurai
Godfather: Part II, The
Silence of the Lambs, The
Goodfellas
Blue Velvet
Rashomon
Citizen Kane
Sanjuro
Casino
Cape Fear
Scarface
Godfather: Part III, The
Bully

And totally disagree on 9.

escape artist fucked around with this message at Aug 8, 2012 around 16:26

escape artist
Sep 24, 2005

"Slow train coming"

"Slow quality poster coming to the threads about the shows I like."

"No, really, jokes aside, post more in The TV IV because you make good points and don't suck."


Electronico6, you get Young Mr. Lincoln, because it's the only one on your list I've heard of and want to see. I was going to roll two dice to pick your movie, but I didn't. I reserve the right to do that in the future though, since you have the most obscure list, such that I rarely have any insight on what to pick!

Just watched: Ikiru (To Live)
Wow. Beautiful. Poignant. Inspirational. The first Kurosawa film I watched that took place in modern times, rather than in a feudal Japan. Great and creative narrative structure the third act with the flash forward and then the final 5 months of Watanabe's life in many flashbacks. Loved the discussion that ensued after the deputy mayor and his cronies left the wake. Great story. Did not know this was based on a Leo Tolstoy short story-- Kurosawa is the master of adapting classic literature to film. This is right up there with Seven Samurai as my favorite. I can't choose between the two. Electronico6 always picks Kurosawa when he gets the chance, but with drat good reason.

List:
The Big Chill - I've always wanted to see this, one of my favorite albums takes a few clips from the dialogue, so even as a 15 year old it interested me. Just have never gotten around to it. Also, wanted to put something more recent on my list, since no one is ever going to pick Boonmee. (Is it weird that I'm 25, and very rarely like movies that have been made in my lifetime?)

Chinatown - One of Nicholson's finest, and always ranked among the top movies ever. I need to see it.

Dr. Zhivago - The length of the movie has indefinitely postponed my viewing of it.

Koyaanisqatsi - Heard very little about it, except that it is critically acclaimed. The name of the film always intrigued me, but not enough to actually watch it.

Mother - Need to watch some more from South Korea. Only have seen Oldboy and Memories of Murder, but they were both great.

*NEW*Notorious Hitchcock and Cary Grant? Yes please.

Once Upon a Time in America - The runtime is the only thing that is preventing me from watching this. De Niro in an organized crime movie? This is probably the only one I haven't seen.

The Seventh Seal Literally have not seen anything by Bergman. Time to rectify that. If this is not a good place to start, you can recommend Wild Strawberries in its place.

The Wild Bunch - Not a huge fan of Westerns, but I am a huge Deadwood fan, so that's sort of paradoxical. Go figure. I'm keeping this as my Western slot, since there are at least a half a dozen classic Westerns I need to see, just because they have become such a part of the cinematic canon.

Zelig I've only seen a couple of Woody Allen films, so I think I might give him a slot on my list for a few films.


I think I broke Criticker today. I watched 4 films in the past 24 hours, and rated 70 or so to start my recommendation list. Now it won't load.



Un-shamed: 12 Angry Men, Citizen Kane, Fargo, The Fly, Ikiru, M, North By Northwest, Peeping Tom, Seven Samurai, Sunset Blvd, Uncle Boonmee Who Can Recall His Past Lives (11 films)

escape artist fucked around with this message at Aug 8, 2012 around 21:17

Chili
Jan 23, 2004

Look the part, be the part, motherfucker.


*BONUS POST*

I'm going away on vacation but I won't have access to internet while I'm out. Accordingly, I'd like to get some movies in but won't have the means of new recommendations. Can I get 1 recommendation out of the next 4 posters, no need to have watched your current assignment, you just get the pure fun part of recommending. If you see this post, quote your recommendation and I'll put it on my list of movies to purchase before the vacation, thanks!

1. Hanna

This just looks like a big bowl of awesome. I've only heard good things about it and I'm super excited for this.

2. Mad Max

It recently came up in another thread that I hadn't seen any of these. That's a problem, apparently.

3. On the Waterfront

Need to know why he could've been a contender.

4. Rope

Token Hitchcock movie for list, though I really want to see it anyway.

5. Enter the Dragon

Yeah, I haven't seen any Bruce Lee yet either, the shame apparently has no end.

6. Roman Holiday

Loved what I saw of this. Hepburn is cute as hell and this really just seems like a barrel of fun.

7. Badlands

Haven't seen any Malick yet, and the trailer for the Tree of Life looked really god drat good. I'd like to be exposed to something of his before I check out Tree of Life.

8. Serpico

Kind of lovely that I consider myself a Pacino man and I haven't seen this yet.

9. Sunset Blvd

I loved The Apartment, I'm sure this film is quite different, but I know it's supposed to be great, so I'm up for it.

10. Magnificent 7

Yeah, just recommend this drat thing to me. The Great Escape and Seven Samurai are two of my favorite movies, I'm so stupid for having not seen this.

Chili fucked around with this message at Aug 9, 2012 around 01:16

TychoCelchuuu
Jan 2, 2012

This space for Rent.

I've been on a huge "no movie" kick for a while, so no Lawrence of Arabia yet.

Chili posted:

7. Badlands

This is a movie to watch. Although your whole list is pretty great.

Alfred P. Pseudonym
May 29, 2006

And when you gaze long into an abyss, the abyss goes 8-8


Chili posted:

2. Mad Max

It recently came up in another thread that I hadn't seen any of these. That's a problem, apparently.

The first Mad Max is not my favorite, but it's worth it to get to The Road Warrior, so watch it.

theknorks
Oct 15, 2008


Chili posted:

8. Serpico

Kind of lovely that I consider myself a Pacino man and I haven't seen this yet.

This one gets my vote. Pacino's performance in this isn't as big as his performance in, say, Dog Day Afternoon - but it's still an important movie to see.

Also, I'll be joining up this thread soon with a list of my own.

Magic Hate Ball
May 6, 2007

Oh magic hate ball, is death really the answer?


Chili posted:

4. Rope

Token Hitchcock movie for list, though I really want to see it anyway.

This one's really fun and I think you'll enjoy it. The "one-shot" gimmick is a little clunky (not to mention patently untrue, every other reel ends with a non-hidden cut so it's really a series of twenty-minute apparently-unbroken takes) but I'd gladly place it with the best of his works. Just to save you a lot of trouble his cameo is a neon sign in the background in the shape of his caricature.

Power of Pecota
Aug 3, 2007

It is not that bad, there is hope, there is charity, there is compassion blah blah blah Charles Dickens three ghosts visit Scrooge and he wakes up to life blah blah blah


E: Should have previewed!

(Sidenote: I'm a moron and watched For a Few Dollars More instead of A Fistful of Dollars and just realized I went out of sequence when I came to update my list. Hopefully it's not that important to go in order in the grand scheme of things)

Alfred P. Pseudonym
May 29, 2006

And when you gaze long into an abyss, the abyss goes 8-8


Power of Pecota posted:

E: Should have previewed!

(Sidenote: I'm a moron and watched For a Few Dollars More instead of A Fistful of Dollars and just realized I went out of sequence when I came to update my list. Hopefully it's not that important to go in order in the grand scheme of things)

They don't have continuity between them as far as I can tell so you'll be fine.

TychoCelchuuu
Jan 2, 2012

This space for Rent.

Power of Pecota posted:

E: Should have previewed!

(Sidenote: I'm a moron and watched For a Few Dollars More instead of A Fistful of Dollars and just realized I went out of sequence when I came to update my list. Hopefully it's not that important to go in order in the grand scheme of things)
Not only is there no continuity between them, but Lee Van Cleef plays two completely different characters in For a Few Dollars More and The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly, so that's almost like negative continuity. Or something. It confused the gently caress out of me for 10 seconds while I tried to figure out why Clint Eastwood didn't recognize the dude from the last movie until I realized they were different people.

TrixRabbi
Aug 20, 2010

It is a classic symbol of racism in America. This is where the white man has taken the black man and put him between two buns. And then dumped ketchup on him.


It's often argued whether Eastwood is even playing the same character in each of the movies. (The mannerisms are all there, but they all have different names). It's also argued that the films are actually in sequence backwards. Notice Eastwood's clothing in each movie.

Alfred P. Pseudonym
May 29, 2006

And when you gaze long into an abyss, the abyss goes 8-8


escape artist, you get Once Upon a Time in America. It's the only one on your list I've seen. I wasn't a huge fan, but maybe you will be.

Vertigo was great, though there were some sections that I felt dragged just a bit. Greatest movie of all time? Probably not. But it was an interesting plot and a great performance from Stewart. I especially liked the dream sequence.

The List:

NEW 1. Oklahoma!: I am not big on musicals at all but I live in Oklahoma and have been told that it is some kind of crime against humanity that I haven't seen this.

2. Rain Man: I've caught bits and pieces of this on TV but I've never actually seen the whole thing.

3. First Blood: I consider myself an action fan, yet I've never seen a Rambo movie. This needs to change.

4. Superman: Superman was never really an interesting character to me, but this is culturally significant enough that I guess I need to see it.

5. Shane: Another essential western.

6. Casino: I've heard this is basically Goodfellas but with a casino.

7. The Deer Hunter: I've seen most of the big Vietnam movies, but not this one. All I know is that there's Russian Roulette in this.

8. The King's Speech: I borrowed this from the library a few weeks ago but the DVD was scratched and gave out halfway through. I liked what I did see, though.

9. The Sting: I don't really know what this is about, but I've heard nothing but good things about it. Also, I don't think I've seen any Paul Newman movie besides Cars and Road to Perdition.

10. Spartacus: One of the few Kubrick films I haven't seen.

Watched: Goodfellas, Rear Window, Rashomon, The Searchers, Lawrence of Arabia, American Psycho, The Usual Suspects, L.A. Confidential, Unforgiven, Once Upon a Time in America, Blue Velvet, Schindler's List, Vertigo

Zogo
Jul 29, 2003



Alfred P. Pseudonym posted:

3. First Blood: I consider myself an action fan, yet I've never seen a Rambo movie. This needs to change.

Watch this one.


I've barely watched any films in the last month. Thunderstorms knocked electricity out twice, PC problems, cracked Netflix discs, bad cold, out of town. My movie watching has been has been rife and fraught with obstacles.


Memories of Murder - This was pretty good for the most part. Some of the subject matter and scenes were creepy (all the fruit stuff just as one example) but anytime it got too dark there was a little humor added that gave the film an offbeat and hard to classify tone.

The detectives weren't very likeable but their general incompetence and idiocy put a humorous spin on a subject that's hard to make humorous (police brutality).

I'm not sure if a more resolved ending or seeing an actual villain captured could've made this film any better. I didn't have any issues with leaving it unresolved however. I believe approximately half the murders in the US go unsolved (not sure about South Korean stats) so it definitely had a sense of realism.


also watched:

The Artist - This was kind of a dud and it didn't do much for me. I had a strange feeling throughout the entire film. All the actors (individually) came across completely fine and the film looks great too. However the story and the way it was structured was plodding and very predictable. Truly a chore to get through.

I've seen enough of this "old hollywood" vs. "new hollywood" dynamic on film before (and done much better than this).


IMDb list:

#84 The Intouchables - I think I've seen it mentioned a few times on here. 6/16/12

new Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix - I've been entertained with the four previous films. Now that Voldemort has appeared I think the pace of the series will pick up. 8/9/12

new #229 The Sweet Life AKA La Dolce Vita - I know this one is revered by many for nearing perfection. 8/9/12

#245 The Samurai AKA Le Samouraï - I remember seeing the DVD cover somewhere. A man adjusting a hat. 4/27/12

#246 Elite Squad: The Enemy Within - The first one was very violent and aimless. Almost nihilistic but still with a veneer of perverted justice that may appeal to an authoritarian. I just hope this one doesn't have more broom rapings. 6/16/12

Academy Award for Best Picture:

1963 Tom Jones - He has some catchy songs: She's a Lady, Sex Bomb, What's New Pussycat?, It's Not Unusual. 6/16/12

1961 West Side Story - I saw a lot of this in a music class a long, long time ago. 7/17/12

Procrastination list:

#10 Monkey Shines - I remember walking into a video store and seeing the VHS cover for this film and being very intrigued. Of course I was too young to rent it and forgot about it until running across the trailer on youtube recently. 4/9/12

#16 The Road Warrior - I have seen Mad Max and it's an old favorite. I've also watched part 3 and it was pretty good for the third installment of a film series. Haven't seen part 2 entirely for some reason. 7/10/12

#17 Barren Lives AKA Vidas Secas - I recommended this for someone at some point. 7/17/12

escape artist posted:

I was going to roll two dice to pick your movie, but I didn't.

I have a decahedron die that I use for those occasions.

Power of Pecota posted:

(Sidenote: I'm a moron and watched For a Few Dollars More instead of A Fistful of Dollars and just realized I went out of sequence when I came to update my list.

Zogo fucked around with this message at Aug 10, 2012 around 02:14

TychoCelchuuu
Jan 2, 2012

This space for Rent.

You can watch The Road Warrior. I think that is maybe the most exciting action movie I've ever seen. The brutality and downbeat nature of the post-apocalyptic setting gives it an edge that something like Indiana Jones can't quite capture. That's not to say I like it more, but the action kept me on the edge of my seat more than anything I can remember seeing.

Just finished watching Lawrence of Arabia. I'm sleepy and don't think I have much to write, although I might come back and give extra thoughts later. Right now, though, all I can really say is that it was very pretty and had some wonderful performances, which is of course what everyone says. But hey, that's why it's a classic, yes?

1) The Lady Vanishes (1938) - But where does she vanish to? Of Hitchcock I think I've only seen Rear Window!

2) Union Station (1950) - It has William Holden, right? So I should probably also check it out.

3) Rififi (1955) - I hear that this is a very good noir film.

4) The Man Who Knew Too Much (1956) - How can anyone know too much?! That's ridiculous.

5) Last Year at Marienbad (1961) - I know nothing of this film.

6) (1963) - I have never seen a Fellini film.

7) Aguirre, the Wrath of God (1972) - I heard that Herzog went nuts making this film, or that he was already nuts but it manifested itself particularly strongly.

8) Nostalghia (1983) - Let's get some Tarkovsky up in this list.

9) Crimes and Misdemeanors (1989) - Woody Allen!

10) Waltz with Bashir (2008) - I've heard good stuff.

Deshamed: In a Lonely Place (98), The Seventh Seal (97), Full Metal Jacket (96), Seven Samurai (95), Heathers (94), Lawrence of Arabia (93), Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind (92), Schindler's List (91), The Long Goodbye (91), Once Upon a Time in the West (90), City of God (89), Badlands (89), Videodrome (88), The Exterminating Angel (87), 99 River Street (87), Goodfellas (87), M (86), High Fidelity (86), A History of Violence (86), The Treasure of the Sierra Madre (84), The Social Network (83), The Last King of Scotland (82), City Lights (82), Slacker (82), Breakfast at Tiffany's (81), The Man Who Fell to Earth (79), Raising Arizona (77), Boyz n the Hood (76)

escape artist
Sep 24, 2005

"Slow train coming"

"Slow quality poster coming to the threads about the shows I like."

"No, really, jokes aside, post more in The TV IV because you make good points and don't suck."


Zogo posted:


I'm not sure if a more resolved ending or seeing an actual villain captured could've made this film any better. I didn't have any issues with leaving it unresolved however. I believe approximately half the murders in the US go unsolved (not sure about South Korean stats) so it definitely had a sense of realism.



I have a decahedron die that I use for those occasions.

The reason no villain was captured is because this story is based on the first serial killer to ever hit South Korea. In reality, the villain was never caught.


Really?

I would just make 12 a re-roll, with 2-11 being assigned to the movies. That's probably not a perfect (probability-wise) way to do it, though.

Alfred P. Pseudonym posted:

escape artist, you get Once Upon a Time in America. It's the only one on your list I've seen. I wasn't a huge fan, but maybe you will be.



I've been dreading this one because of its run-time. 3 hours, 39 minutes.

I've been reading about it, and apparently there's an even longer cut that is going to be released in the future. Maybe I'll just break it up like I'm watching 3 or 4 episodes of Boardwalk Empire.

escape artist fucked around with this message at Aug 10, 2012 around 09:27

RandallODim
Dec 30, 2010

He presumably spends
his time traveling the world, annihilating any rapper foolish enough to challenge him


TychoCelchuuu posted:

7) Aguirre, the Wrath of God (1972) - I heard that Herzog went nuts making this film, or that he was already nuts but it manifested itself particularly strongly.

Haven't watched Aguirre myself, but a friend loves it, so you get it as the only thing on the list I really know enough to recommend.

2001... gently caress man. That was amazing. I got to see the bluray in a small theater environment too, which was definitely the best way to watch it short of waiting until I could see it on film somewhere. Officially one of my favorite films.

Lists!

La Strada (1954) - Two friends of mine saw it a while back, and have been pestering me to get around to watching it after I bought the DVD. Haven't watched any Fellini before, so going in kinda blind.

The Shawshank Redemption (1994) - I've just never gotten around to it, and isn't that the point of this thread?

Vertigo (1958) - I haven't watched an awful lot of Hitchcock, but I've liked what I've watched, so I'm looking forward to more.

Solaris (1972) - I saw one scene from this forever ago and have wanted to see it since. Finally got the DVD a couple months ago but just haven't gotten to watching it yet.

The Godfather: Part II (1974) - I've seen the first, though I'll probably watch it again with this. C'mon Pacino, prove you do more than just shout!

Sanjuro (1962) - I love Kurosawa, I love Mifune, and I loved Yojimbo. I feel it's a safe bet that I will love this.

12 Angry Men (1957) - I know that it's about a jury, and that they're very incensed about deciding the verdict.

The Rules of the Game (1939) - Wikipedia says it's a comedy about the French upper-class just before World War II. Sounds interesting.

The Seventh Seal (1957) - Never watched a Bergman, but I know how influential this is and I've been told I'll love it, so I'm putting it up here.

Robinson Crusoe On Mars (1964) - Blind bought the Criterion. Looks like it's gonna be beautiful, but don't know anything else other than monkey in a space suit.

Watched: 2001: A Space Odyssey

Electronico6
Feb 25, 2011



RandallODim posted:

Sanjuro (1962) - I love Kurosawa, I love Mifune, and I loved Yojimbo. I feel it's a safe bet that I will love this.

I'm ever so predictable.


John Ford's penchant for American Grand Myth wield's interesting results when mixed with history, such was the case of his vision of the gunfight at OK Corral in My Darling Clementine, and so it's here with the early life of Abraham Lincoln in Young Mr. Lincoln. It isn't historical accurate, and during the trial scenes in the second half it can get quite ridiculous, but in the middle of so much myth-building around Lincoln, there are small, almost, perfect moments where a very real and human sentiment breaks through all that myth, and for those brief moments it feels like authentic history, encapsulated perfectly in the borders of a frame. It's quite something.

In many other films about Big drat Important Historical People, there seems to be a fuss to make them "human", generally achieved by injecting a great deal of personal flaws, mainly self-doubt, to mind comes Scorsese's The Last Temptation of Christ with a Jesus trapped between holy status and sinful temptation, and the more recent and goofy Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter who has it's Lincoln conflicted about what he believes to be right and his darkly secret(that he's a vampire hunter ). in Ford's own film due to it's mythical nature we really don't get that, even though Lincoln has his own brief moments of doubt, instead it's once again those little touches and moments that give Lincoln(played brilliantly by Henry Fonda) a deeply human feel and sentiment. The awkward way he recites the speech early on, how he sits on the steps during the parade, his inability to choose between an apple pie or cherry pie, the poor dancing, and so on. In a sense, before he becomes the statuesque legendary silhouette of Abraham Lincoln at the end of the film, before he is that Big drat Important Historical Person, he is first simply an honest man.

Also I'm always fascinated by seeing ceilings in films prior to Citizen Kane. It's such a strange thing to notice, but considering all the importance it's attributed to Welles it's kinda funny.




SHAME Part III:

Vivre Sa Vie Haven't been impressed with the little I seen so far from Godard.

The Killer More John Woo Bullet Ballet.

Steamboat Bill, Jr. Quickly becoming a Buster Keaton convert.

The Trouble with Harry is that he's dead! Hilarity ensues.

Star Trek V: The Final Frontier God needs a spaceship or something

Anatomy of a Murder Murder!!

The Last Picture Show A young Jeff Bridges.

Dancer in the Dark Lars von Trier

Caché(Hidden) Another from the pile of films I own but can't remember why.

L'atalante The highest rated(17) on the TSPDT list that I haven't seen yet.

Have watched so far 21 movies: Star Trek III: The Search for Spock, Fallen Angels, The Shop Around the Corner, La Strada, Little Dieter Needs to Fly, Rescue Dawn, All About My Mother, Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home, The Long Goodbye, Vampyr, Mon Oncle, The Exterminating Angel, Jules et Jim, Sorcerer, The Darjeeling Limited, Close-up, Arsenic and Old Lace, The Host, Zelig, Koyaanisqatsi, Young Mr. Lincoln.

Kull the Conqueror
Apr 8, 2006

GOIN' WILD FOR THE NIGHT
FUCK BEIN' POLITE


Electronico6 posted:

Also I'm always fascinated by seeing ceilings in films prior to Citizen Kane. It's such a strange thing to notice, but considering all the importance it's attributed to Welles it's kinda funny.

I think Stagecoach is the film credited as the innovator for that.

penismightier
Dec 6, 2005

What the hell, I'll just eat some trash.



Ford's lighting and framing also had a huge impact on Welles. Those huge rooms with a lone figure crossing the z-axis, Welles as hell.

Magic Hate Ball
May 6, 2007

Oh magic hate ball, is death really the answer?


Any Welles fan should at least see How Green Was My Valley.

Jurgan
May 8, 2007


"Magic Hate Ball posted:

Any Welles fan should at least see How Green Was My Valley.

Ironic you'd say that, given how it infamously beat Kane at the Oscars.

Electronico- um, The Last Picture Show, I guess?

Wings of Desire was… a movie. I can’t really figure out what to think of it- it was very strange. There’s probably a cultural barrier that’s making it harder for me to appreciate. The characters were mostly good and interesting, but the movie was very slow. It especially ground to a halt when characters would give very long monologues about vaguely philosophical topics- the girl’s monologue at the very end was incomprehensible. I liked the weird meta-movie joke of Peter Falk playing himself as a fictional character, though I’m not sure why they did it that way (except I’ve heard Columbo was really big in Europe). I don’t know- the story was at the same time pretty simple and very deep. Angel wants to be human so he can appreciate life more- fine, but this concept was used to go really in depth with various cultural musings on the human condition, and I’m not sure how much I followed them. Also, I don’t think the “angels” were ever identified as such. They occupied a weird theologically neutral zone, as they were angels but there was no identified God, and I’m not sure what, if any, function they were intended to fulfill. So, I’m going to have to give a tepid recommendation, but it’s not for everyone and I don’t think I fully grasped what it was doing.

Rating: 3/4

49. Born on the Fourth of July- More for the "Vietnam slot." Like Vanilla Sky (which I liked), Cruise can't rely on his good looks here and has to act. I think he can pull it off.

61. A Streetcar Named Desire- The other big Marlon Brando. I have to remember that, unlike the Simpsons's version, this is not a musical.

63. Bonnie and Clyde- Popular culture portrays this as a light buddy comedy/ heist movie. Then, the other day I read Ebert's review, and it surprised me how dark it apparently was. Maybe it's not as shocking forty-five years later, but I'm curious.

65. Metropolis- The last major silent non-comedy I can think of (though I'm happy to take recommendations). Like I said, M was terrific, so let's have some more Fritz Lang.

66. Dr. Zhivago- For the historical epic slot, we move from sand to snow. Also, more WWI, this time from the Russian perspective, which I like even more.

67. Goldfinger- Another action franchise I've never seen. This is supposed to best exemplify the classic Bond movies, so I'll give it a try. I'm expecting goofy but fun. I like old Sean Connery, so let's see how young Sean Connery is.

69. Bridge on the River Kwai- My grand-father captured bridges on the Rhine during World War II. Let's see how Alec Guiness does.

70. Leon: The Professional- I really have no idea what this is, but apparently Gary Oldman is the villain. Sold.

71. Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind- Started watching this once, and I must have gotten bored or something, because I never got very far.

72. The Rapture- 1991 movie about the dark side of an already pretty dark heresy. This sounds right up my aisle.

Okay, tell me what I’m watching!

Shame relieved: The Godfather: 3.5/4, The Godfather Part II: 4/4, Taxi Driver: 4/4, Casablanca: 4/4, Duck Soup: 2/4, Pulp Fiction: 4/4, Barton Fink: 3.5/4, Annie Hall:3/4, Rashomon: 4/4, Blade Runner: 3.5/4, Chinatown: 4/4, Nashville: 3.5/4, Goodfellas: 4/4, The Seven Samurai: 4/4, Superman: 2/4, The Exorcist: 3/4, A Face in the Crowd: 3.5/4, The Seventh Seal: 2.5/4, Treasure of the Sierra Madre: 3.5/4, Apocalypse Now: 4/4, 2001: A Space Odyssey: 2.5/4, The Deer Hunter: 3/4, Schindler's List: 4/4, The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari: 3/4, Young Frankenstein: 3.5/4, Yojimbo: 3.5/4, Brazil: 3.5/4, Hamlet: 4/4, The Aviator: 4/4, Rocky: 3.5/4, Gandhi: 3.5/4, City Lights: 4/4, Battleship Potemkin: 3.5/4, Predator: 3/4, Easy Rider: 1.5/4, Platoon: 3.5/4, Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid: 4/4, Get Carter: 3.5/4, Full Metal Jacket: 4/4, My Dinner with Andre: 4/4, Lethal Weapon: 3/4, 3 Women: 4/4, Ikiru: 4/4, The Maltese Falcon: 2.5/4, Midnight Cowboy: 3/4, Gattaca: 4/4, Gone with the Wind: 3/4, Jaws: 4/4, The Bicycle Thief: 3/4, Sophie's Choice: 2/4, On the Waterfront: 4/4, North by Northwest: 3.5/4, Stagecoach: 3.5/4, E.T.: 2/4, Nosferatu: 4/4, Lawrence of Arabia: 4/4, Dirty Harry: 1/4, Vertigo: 3.5/4, Rebecca: 4/4, The Pink Panther: 3/4, Children of Men: 4/4, Wings of Desire: 3/4

Magic Hate Ball
May 6, 2007

Oh magic hate ball, is death really the answer?


Jurgan posted:

Ironic you'd say that, given how it infamously beat Kane at the Oscars.

That's why I suggested it. I still think Kane is the better film (there's more in Valley that has worn with age) but Valley is really, really good. David Bordwell's blog has an excellent entry detailing its qualities that pretty much everyone should read.

Also you should give Wings Of Desire another shot sometime, it seems like you were expecting a totally different film. In regards to whether the angels are "angels" or not, it doesn't really matter but I've always assumed they're "angels" because it's a cultural affixation (and it could be suggested that they're theologically neutral both due to the range of different faiths among humans and to widen the possible audience for the film). Also they do have a reason, and they discuss it in the film: to "assemble, testify, preserve" reality.

penismightier
Dec 6, 2005

What the hell, I'll just eat some trash.



How Green Was My Valley/Citizen Kane is a tougher choice than most people'll admit now. Kane is the better film, of course, but man How Green Was My Valley is IMPECCABLE.

Jurgan
May 8, 2007


Magic Hate Ball posted:

Also you should give Wings Of Desire another shot sometime, it seems like you were expecting a totally different film.

Not sure why you would say that. I liked the movie, it just didn't blow me away like I was hoping it would. I suppose it's possible that having seen the Hollywood remake first colored my expectations, but I knew it was very different, so I don't think so.

Power of Pecota
Aug 3, 2007

It is not that bad, there is hope, there is charity, there is compassion blah blah blah Charles Dickens three ghosts visit Scrooge and he wakes up to life blah blah blah


Jurgan, Metropolis is the most fun I've had watching a silent film, I think you're definitely going out with a bang there.

A Fistful of Dollars was really great, I'm really embarrassed about how long I've written off Clint Eastwood as an actor (without seeing anything he's been in) just because of the impression his movies were wish fulfillment for middle-aged white dads. He was electric in this, and in contrast to For a Few Dollars More (which I saw a few days ago and am totally blending reviews together) he didn't really have anyone to share the spotlight with. 've seen plenty of things with Morricone scores, from old giallo stuff to later American things, but the Leone westerns really elevate them to the next level. I love whatever the super-twangy instrument is that shows up in Mortimer's theme in For a Few Dollars more. It was neat seeing Klaus Kinski pop up in a minor role there, too.

1. Bringing Up Baby - After Charade (plus Arsenic and Old Lace before my first list) I want to remedy the fact that I really haven't seen that many non-Hitchcock Cary Grant movies.

2. Nashville - I didn't know enough about this to know it wasn't a musical, I don't know where I picked that up. Short Cuts was enjoyable and the intertwining stories dynamic's always a big plus, and this seems like a good next step in that direction. Plus, I'm visiting Nashville in like a week. I recently visited Nashville, and it was hot, full of boot stores, and generally unpleasant. Robert Altman can try redeeming it to me.

3. The Magnificent Ambersons - My Ambersons are thoroughly lacking in magnificence. All About Eve left me wanting to see more Anne Baxter, and something with a recognizable title and directed by Orson Welles seems like a great follow-up.

4. Alien: Resurrection - I've seen every other movie in the Jean-Pierre Jeunet catalogue (including shorts) and have just continually put this off because I think it's going to ruin his perfect record of movies I really really enjoy. I can't hide behind that forever.

5. Miller's Crossing ~*~Coenpletionism A~*~ - I thought this movie was Donnie Brasco for like five years. I have no idea what it's about beyond gangsters probably?

6. Intolerable Cruelty ~*~Coenpletionism B~*~ - My introduction to the Coen brothers came in theaters in their 2004 remake of The Ladykillers. I really liked the first half, but after that it just all fell apart for me. I kinda want to make sure this one's third so I've got the Coen catalogue bookended with their least critically successful movies.

7. Little Dieter Needs to Fly - Continuing the Herzog slot with a documentary. I've heard that I absolutely need to see this from an old friend who I spoke to last month who I highly trust about movies. Also, criticker had a weird period of recommending this and the Powell/Pressburger The Life and Times of Colonel Blimp whenever I would pull it up for a while.

8. Last Year at Marienbad - I've heard nothing but great things about this, and I'm really interested in how the premise works on screen.

9. Rififi - This comes really highly recommended among heist movies, and I'm unfamiliar with pretty much everyone involved in it.

10. The Decameron - Taking a brief breather from Leone and moving to a movie from a different Italian director I'm completely ignorant about that's scored by Ennio Morricone. Plus, the nine short stories format sounds really neat.

De-shamed (24): Charade, Persona, The Sting, Double Indemnity, All About Eve, Inland Empire, Celine and Julie Go Boating, The Graduate, Bottle Rocket, Gone with the Wind, Three Colors: Red, Raging Bull, One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest, Seven Samurai, Adam's Rib, Repulsion, Melancholia, Aguirre, The Wrath of God, Singin' In the Rain, O Brother, Where Art Thou?, Pan's Labyrinth, Notorious, A Fistful of Dollars

FUCK COREY PERRY
Apr 19, 2008

Corey Perry Asshole Chart
G:
ran
D: sacktapped
F: stomped on
face: punchable
cheapshots: NOT EN c'mon ref that was like a totes legit accident he hit his face off my elbow excuse me while I score four goals

Power of Pecota posted:

7. Little Dieter Needs to Fly - Continuing the Herzog slot with a documentary. I've heard that I absolutely need to see this from an old friend who I spoke to last month who I highly trust about movies. Also, criticker had a weird period of recommending this and the Powell/Pressburger The Life and Times of Colonel Blimp whenever I would pull it up for a while.

I have never heard of most of these movies, so I used a random number generator for you! It chose #7. Enjoy? Here's my list, basically going off of the IMDB top 250 and a few movies friends have told me to watch. As a note, I'm the kind of person where I love watching movies where I know absolutely nothing about the plot beforehand, as in not even liking to see a trailer beforehand.

Inception - Heard good things about it when it came out but have never gotten around to watching it. I enjoy everything I've seen by Nolan and I loved Gordon-Levitt in Brick. Main stuff has already been semi-spoiled for me by friends talking about it and pop-culture.

Goodfellas - All I know about this movie is Joe Pesci gets brutally murdered and that's enough to make me interested.

Seven Samurai - I know nothing about this film besides the fact it has samurai's and it's great.

City of God - Have heard fantastic things about it, it's set in Brazil I think? gently caress if I know anything else.

Once Upon a Time in the West - It's a good Western, I like Westerns.

Leon: The Professional - About a hitman, has a young Natalie Portman. Don't know anything else besides the fact it's apparently a classic.

Once Upon a Time in America - A friend told me to watch it like a week ago, I have literally not one clue what this movie is about but I trust his recommendation.

Citizen Kane - I have just never gotten around to watching this, but I know it has a titanic reputation.

I think that's a good list for now, I'll add more as I think of them.

Zogo
Jul 29, 2003



gently caress COREY PERRY posted:

Leon: The Professional - About a hitman, has a young Natalie Portman. Don't know anything else besides the fact it's apparently a classic.

Start here.


The Road Warrior - This was a completely worthy sequel to the original. A constant barrage of impressive action sequences interspersed with some humor. I also liked the use of showing a lot of the action through the vision of a telescope and binoculars from a high vantage point looking over the battlefield and siege.

I guess if I had one small criticism it would be the lack of a backstory concerning the villains. Who is Humungus? The villains still had a strong presence on the screen and will remain memorable however.


IMDb list:

#80 The Intouchables - I think I've seen it mentioned a few times on here. 6/16/12

Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix - I've been entertained with the four previous films. Now that Voldemort has appeared I think the pace of the series will pick up. 8/9/12

#236 The Sweet Life AKA La Dolce Vita - I know this one is revered by many for nearing perfection. 8/9/12

#245 The Samurai AKA Le Samouraï - I remember seeing the DVD cover somewhere. A man adjusting a hat. 4/27/12

#246 Elite Squad: The Enemy Within - The first one was very violent and aimless. Almost nihilistic but still with a veneer of perverted justice that may appeal to an authoritarian. I just hope this one doesn't have more broom rapings. 6/16/12

Academy Award for Best Picture:

1963 Tom Jones - He has some catchy songs: She's a Lady, Sex Bomb, What's New Pussycat?, It's Not Unusual. 6/16/12

1961 West Side Story - I saw a lot of this in a music class a long, long time ago. 7/17/12

Procrastination list:

#10 Monkey Shines - I remember walking into a video store and seeing the VHS cover for this film and being very intrigued. Of course I was too young to rent it and forgot about it until running across the trailer on youtube recently. 4/9/12

#17 Barren Lives AKA Vidas Secas - I recommended this for someone at some point. 7/17/12

new #18 Badlands - Thread favorite as it's been on dozens of other lists in here. 8/15/12

escape artist posted:

Really?

I would just make 12 a re-roll, with 2-11 being assigned to the movies. That's probably not a perfect (probability-wise) way to do it, though.

Yea, I have one of these http://www.amazon.com/GameScience-R...0/dp/B001GL2GOA
Your method works pretty well too.

escape artist
Sep 24, 2005

"Slow train coming"

"Slow quality poster coming to the threads about the shows I like."

"No, really, jokes aside, post more in The TV IV because you make good points and don't suck."


Mine gives higher probability to movies that are ranked #5-#7 though, so I'll just use a random number generator instead.

Also, Alfred, you and I now have beef. Once Upon a Time in America is so long and boring that I've been trying to watch it for days and I'm still less than 1/3 of the way through.

Alfred P. Pseudonym
May 29, 2006

And when you gaze long into an abyss, the abyss goes 8-8


escape artist posted:

Mine gives higher probability to movies that are ranked #5-#7 though, so I'll just use a random number generator instead.

Also, Alfred, you and I now have beef. Once Upon a Time in America is so long and boring that I've been trying to watch it for days and I'm still less than 1/3 of the way through.

It was the only one on your list that I had seen. Sorry. I didn't like it that much either.

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Magic Hate Ball
May 6, 2007

Oh magic hate ball, is death really the answer?


That was really weird, for a moment I thought I'd given escape artist Once Upon A Time and he was calling me by my real name for some reason.

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