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Adlai Stevenson
Mar 3, 2010

I've totally got this


Pick posted:

Edit: Oh, and we clearly see an owl forge and an owl metalsmith, so I don't see why you think they couldn't make helmets on it.

I want to see owls gripping hammers and tongs with their wing feathers

Citizen Insane posted:

Yeah, when a 50-foot Gregor Mendel bursts from a sea of tortured cat corpses, things in that film begin to get a little hosed up, and that's not even going into all the other weird poo poo that happens. Definitely worth at least one watch, though.

I gave it one watch and found a great deal to be interested in. I'm not watching it again though.

Pick posted:

ZenMaster: I'll say the same thing I always say about Wall-E: it's a really interesting film until the humans show up, at which point it becomes very mediocre... very... cluttered and disorganized.

I feel the opposite. While I overall liked the opening sequences and seeing Wall-E look after a dormant Eve, for me the movie took it up several notches when they boarded the interstellar cruise ship.

Pick posted:

I think Thumbelina takes strong hits for the frog with huge jugs.

Marry the mole

anaaki posted:

Anyone remember Ferngully? It wasn't as good as I remembered.

I still like it. Yeah, the message is about as blunt as a pie to the face. And sure, there's spastic Robin Williams and a mostly listless Christian Slater. But there's also Tone Loc trying to devour people and Tim Curry giving children nightmares.

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Adlai Stevenson
Mar 3, 2010

I've totally got this


Yoshifan823 posted:

That's how you know someone is beyond saving as an obnoxious anime fan, when they hate hate hate The Lion King because it's a "copy" of Kimba. Those people are just awful.

Even worse are the people who hate Atlantis (an underrated movie if there ever was one) because it's a "ripoff" of Nadia of Blue Water.

These people also tend to hold Bubblegum Crisis in high regard while ignoring Blade Runner.

I never saw Atlantis, though. Was it any good?

Adlai Stevenson
Mar 3, 2010

I've totally got this


I kinda liked Titan AE the one time I saw it. I'm a little afraid to revisit it because I like remembering it as a well-meaning failure rather than a complete failure.

Adlai Stevenson
Mar 3, 2010

I've totally got this


Mappo posted:

Hey, he did to An American Tail so give him a little slack.

Also All Dogs Go to Heaven was great when I was a kid. Kind of a kids Smokey in the Bandit.

I try and forget The Land Before Time because the little girl who played Ducky was killed by her abusive father shortly after the movie.

My family used to have all the Land Before Time hand puppets from Pizza Hut. And not to ruin another movie for you but that little girl who played Ducky was also the little girl in All Dogs Go to Heaven.

I liked all the 80's Bluth movies but Nimh was far and away my favorite. I need to get a copy of that film once I have money.

Adlai Stevenson
Mar 3, 2010

I've totally got this


Tartarus Sauce posted:

Let's play 'Spot the Oopsies!' http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rOk2Lug5fw4

(The song's catchy, though. Best part of the whole movie, by light years.)

This isn't, like, a DVD extra showing a test reel? This is what was actually sent out in the final product? Yeesh.

Adlai Stevenson
Mar 3, 2010

I've totally got this


Mr Glorious Sunbath posted:

I also saw Brother Bear not long ago, for the first time. I had reservations about it, as it was created during the late 90's/early 00's decline of Disney 2D. But, I decided to give it a chance after all this time. It started out promising for the first 15 minutes or so, but it ironically loses all steam once the guy actually turns into a bear. It reminded me of Tarzan, only to a worse extent (I think it must be all the loving Phil Collins music). Like Tarzan, the interesting part of the world is the stuff before the main conflict of the movie starts. I could watch a full movie of Tarzan vine-surfing, and the culture of Ice Age people and their totem stuff is interesting too (the character designs for the humans were fun to look at).

It wasn't as bad as Home on the Range, but it was close. The ending was the funniest part. Yo bro, I turned into a bear, but I like this little bear guy, so I'm gonna be a bear forever. I know it's hard, and I'll miss you aw gently caress it let's hang out all the time. Just you and me, bear bros. And the rest of the tribe are cool with it too. Awesome. Let's bear bro hug.

I happened to see Brother Bear and Finding Nemo within days of each other and I've gotta say I vastly prefer Brother Bear. Nemo's still good and I'll gladly watch it if it's on but I enjoyed just about every aspect of Brother Bear more.

Adlai Stevenson
Mar 3, 2010

I've totally got this


People who say it's Rand for kids are focusing too much on the "let superheroes be free!" aspect and not enough on the "we work best when we work together as equals" aspect. It acknowledges that some people are greatly talented and unique, but then turns around and states that those people do best when they excel for the sake of the group rather than for the individual. Consider Edna; even though she's living on her own in an estate built with the riches of her success her greatest joy in life is to design costumes for other people, and she revels in the opportunity to be a part of something greater.

It's all about complementary styles and abilities. The heroes shouldn't deny the talents they have to assuage the bruised ego of society. However they should also realize that they're much more capable when working together, setting aside individual glory, and sharing their talents with others.

Also, the government agent is a 100% good guy on behalf of a sympathetic and understanding government and that would never fly in a Randian universe.

Adlai Stevenson
Mar 3, 2010

I've totally got this


Tartarus Sauce posted:

That's a neat reading.

I think people could get into the same kind of debate over Ratatouille. Can everyone really cook, or NOT?

As someone who has quasi-Randian tendencies--but a much better sense of humor, and not as severe a personality disorder--I do appreciate how both Ratatouille and The Incredibles made a very deliberate point to eschew the same-old same-old "Everyone's special! You're special, just for being YOU! If you can dream it, you can be it!" clap-trap that you see in so many other children's movies. These are movies that acknowledge that people have different gifts and different interests.

I think that Ratatouille is rather clear that not everyone can cook. Look at Linguini and the chubby rat brother--they're clearly out of their element around food preparation and appreciation. But I think the film is another that can emphasize talent alongside teamwork: the kitchen has a clear leader and organization but there are still many people needed to work in harmony for it to produce quality food. It's okay not to be the best; you can still be work hard and contribute meaningfully. Linguini wasn't a chef, but he could still help and keep things flowing, and he's rewarded with a happy job and a relationship.

Adlai Stevenson
Mar 3, 2010

I've totally got this


Pick posted:

Rock & Rule: The first feature-length Canadian animated film, made by Nelvana. This movie has a style completely different than any other animated film with which I am familiar. The quality of the animation is good, but the story and the presentation is very strange. It's a cult favorite, though the movie was originally a flop. This film is also not designed for children, but instead for an older audience. It shows drug use, among other things. The villain is the most memorable aspect of this film.

I don't think Rock and Rule is a great film, but it's certainly a fun one, and definitely worth giving a try. The base story is very simple and straightforward but the film manages to put in a number of positive unique touches.

The Chipmunk Adventure was a childhood staple of mine and I love it unconditionally. The Chipmunks and Chipettes get roped into competing against one another in an around-the-world hot air balloon race by a wealthy brother and sister who were hanging out at the local malt shoppe for some reason. Bonus: Nancy Cartwright voices a young Egyptian prince looking to stock his harem.

Adlai Stevenson
Mar 3, 2010

I've totally got this


Behonkiss posted:

You're probably the only person I've ever heard who said something like that. To be fair, I haven't seen Brother Bear, but both my siblings who did hated it and the majority of reviews I saw were pretty similar. The other day, also, one of my animation teachers said Nemo was easily the worst Pixar film (Yes, worse than Cars), because Nemo's not an interesting character and you don't care as a result. He then went on to talk about how overrated Avatar (The cartoon, not the James Cameron or M. Night movies) is really overrated and Forest Gump is one of the worst movies ever, and I stopped listening.

I totally meant to reply to this earlier but I didn't.

My family and friends were all pretty kind to Brother Bear, but I'm still the only one who likes it more than Finding Nemo. I can see maybe when I have kids some day that Nemo will resonate with me more but right now it doesn't hit me deep. That's not to say I've ever stabbed someone's mother, but there's something about the basic turns of revenge and loss in Brother Bear that do something for me.

Pick posted:

VVVVVVVVVV Oh, don't get me wrong, Rock & Rule isn't amazing. However, it's unique and worth seeing if one is interested in film for that reason.

I didn't mean to imply that you thought it was wham-bang spectacular. But you're right, it really is unique, and in a good way. If anyone here hasn't seen it I'd recommend that they give it a roll of the dice. If nothing else it shows what Canadian animators will come up with when left to their own devices.

Adlai Stevenson
Mar 3, 2010

I've totally got this


Dimentia posted:

The Log Driver's Waltz - Cute little folk song about how the British Columbian log driver's natural balancing abilities must make him a good dancer.

It's Kate McGarrigle that sings on that one, not Anna, right? Such a nice song and a lovely voice to sing it.

Adlai Stevenson
Mar 3, 2010

I've totally got this


Jay Dub posted:

Speaking of Aardman Studios, what's the general consensus on them? The Wallace & Gromit shorts (and Curse of the Were-Rabbit), Chicken Run, Flushed Away, etc.

Does it make me a bad person that I prefer Curse of the Were-Rabbit to all of the W&G shorts? The short films are good, don't get me wrong, but I found the movie so much more charming, funnier, and flat out more entertaining in general. I love a good horror parody, so maybe that's why I liked it so much.

Curse of the Were-Rabbit is a fine film. I've only seen it once since it was in theaters and I need to change that.

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Adlai Stevenson
Mar 3, 2010

I've totally got this


I didn't think they had three Toy Story plots in them either, so I'm willing to wait and see with Monsters Inc. 2.

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