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FIRE CURES BIGOTS
Aug 26, 2002

by Y Kant Ozma Post


Before LF got moved to the "Retarded Thread for Assholes." Hiding from Goro posted a remarkable thread about the abysmal state of the criminal justice system. Given that the format of LF's new place is unmoderated and looks as though it is going to follow the FYAD model, I think that it is a shame for all of this great info to go to waste.

Offsite hosting for the thread:

Piell posted:

Right here

HidingFromGoro posted:

I periodically repost the news articles and some of my longer posts at the re-think america blog, also home to financial and economic articles by dm and Dante.

Old stuff:

New stuff:
  • In Pennsylvania, despite high unemployment, business are seeking to outsource more of their labor to inmates. The one good thing about this is that the bill would require the inmates to be paid "similar" wages as free folks, instead of the 17 to 42 cents an hour inmates usually make in PA.

  • In Colorado, prison system is "structured to promote failure."

  • In Massachussetts, a new policy is on its way to charge inmates rent during their stay, with additional fees for things like medications, haircuts, and GED testing. It's called the "Inmate Financial Responsibility Program."


    quote:

    "Look, having inmates come to prison and telling them that you don't need to worry about the costs associated with running the prison is, I don't think, a good message for them," Hodgson told the Boston Globe earlier this year.

  • From Califas: Financial Impact of Health Care for Prisoners Who Are Ill and Three Strikes

    quote:

    As California struggles to pay for social services for its poorest residents, it spends hundreds of millions of dollars a year on health care for a small group of sick inmates - in one case $1 million during a dying inmate's final year, according to a state audit released Tuesday.

    The state also spends billions of extra dollars on the longer sentences handed down under the state's "three strikes" law in part because those inmates age in prison and need health care, the report by State Auditor Elaine Howle found.
    ...

    he was struck by Howle's finding that the state spends about $132 million a year on overtime for prison guards who transport and guard ill inmates, many of whom are nonambulatory, because the state does not plan ahead for those costs.
    ...

    She estimated that the additional years imposed by the [three-strikes] law are costing California $19.2 billion over the duration of those inmates' incarceration.

  • In Indiana, if you have two or more family members in prison you want to visit, you have to pick one or the other; because you can't be on more than one inmate's visit list.

  • Georgia beats out Texas, Louisiana, and Cali to become the nations leader in criminal punishment. In Georgia, one in 13 people are behind bars, on probation, or on parole- more than double the national rate of 1 in 31.

    Not to be outdone by 3-strikes law, Zell Miller started 2 strikes and you're out laws in 1994- along with his "7 Deadly Sins" law. One strike for one of the 7 sins is 10 years, no parole; and the second is life with no parole. After the 10 years, ex-cons are released with $25, a bus ticket, and no post-release treatment or support. A 14-year old with a cap gun can be and is punished the same as an adult with a real gun.

    quote:

    “If you’re going to play like a man, you need to pay like a man,” the DA said.

    ...

    The trend held even among nonviolent offenders: the average inmate released last year on a drug possession charge spent 21 months locked up, compared with 10 months in 1990.

  • In Montana, another private prison scam.

  • Kicking the National Habit: The Legal and Policy Arguments for Abolishing Private Prison Contracts (pdf).

  • ACLU report shows LA Central Jail is still going strong with its 30-year history of severe overcrowding, violence, and brutality. For example, when one inmate complained about being denied showers for a few weeks, the guards broke his leg and wrecked his knee bad enough to require extensive surgery.

    quote:

    Men’s Central Jail is a modern-day medieval dungeon, a dank, windowless place where prisoners live in fear of retaliation and abuse apparently goes unchecked. The jail is not an appropriate facility for housing prisoners with mental illness, many of whom do not receive proper treatment for their mental illness... At the root of the many problems plaguing this toxic facility is overcrowding and the only solutions are to either reduce the jail population dramatically or close it.

  • Corrections Corporation of America says that despite critics & recession, business is booming.

    quote:

    Both "high recidivism" among felons and "inmate population growth following prior recessions" are highlighted as positives for the company in the 48-page report.

  • For-profit prison to be built in OK with a twist- it will be staffed and run entirely by "born again Christians."

  • Doing time on their own dime:

    quote:

    Hurley couldn't pay the fine because she had to pay the Georgia Department of Corrections $600 a month for room and board. Hurley spent nearly a year in prison - from a 120-day sentence -- due to her inability to pay the fine before the SCHR was able to get her released.

Somebody fucked around with this message at May 26, 2011 around 16:15

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FIRE CURES BIGOTS
Aug 26, 2002

by Y Kant Ozma Post


Some books:

Capitalist Punishment: Prison Privatization and Human Rights
Acres of Skin: Human Experiments at Holmesburg Prison
Gates of Injustice: The Crisis in America's Prisons
Prison Profiteers: Who Makes Money from Mass Incarceration
The Rich Get Richer and The Poor Get Prison
The Color of Justice: Race, Ethnicity, and Crime in America
America's Prisons: The Movement Toward Profit and Privatization
Lockdown America: Police and Prisons in the Age of Crisis
Golden Gulag: Prisons, Surplus, Crisis, and Opposition in Globalizing California ("A magnificent analysis of the political economy of super-incarceration and the slave plantations that California calls prisons.")
The Perpetual Prisoner Machine: How America Profits From Crime
Abolition Democracy: Beyond Prisons, Torture, and Empire
The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness
Texas Tough: The Rise of America's Prison Empire

and

Life Sentences: Rage and Survival Behind Bars
[/quote]

[quote]...required reading for all fifty United States governors and for all present and future Presidential and Vice-Presidential candidates...the most convincing argument I have read against our nationwide desire to deal with lawbreakers by 'locking 'em up and throwing away the key.'"

-- Russell Banks, The New York Times Book Review

"Life Sentences is an aberration. Out of the violence, madness and uselessness has come a work of uncommon and lasting value."

-- Colman McCarthy, Washington Post Book World

"Life Sentences is an extraordinary act of courage that should prick the conscience of every American. Rideau and Wikberg take readers inside the bowels of Angola...Within such a manmade hell, they become living proof that some can rise above the cesspool despite colossal odds."

-- Pete Earley, author of The Hothouse: Life Inside Leavenworth Prison -- Review

FIRE CURES BIGOTS
Aug 26, 2002

by Y Kant Ozma Post


Prison and jail employees are more out of control than ever. From state to state, north to south, east to west, sexual misconduct by guards and other staff members continues to weave its way through the fabric of our nation’s prisons. A common thread of surprise sex, debauchery and even sexual torture is present in detention facilities nationwide.

This time we bring you recent reports from 39 states, which constitute only a fraction of the tragic truth about surprise sex and sexual abuse by prison and jail workers. Indeed, it would easily be possible to publish a monthly magazine consisting of nothing but substantiated reports of the sexual assault of prisoners by their captors. It also illustrates the shortcomings of the PREA which contains no real enforcement mechanism to stop or deter sexual assaults, merely the collection of data self reported by the agencies holding the prisoners. But one result is we may now have slightly better data than we did before in a central location.[/quote]

[quote="HidingFromGoro"]
Arizona

Former prison guard Elsa Gutierrez, 33, was booked into the Yuma County Jail on October 1, 2008 after being charged with unlawful sexual conduct with a male prisoner. She had been employed at the Arizona State Prison Complex.

On November 7, 2008, Steve Edward Hiser was arrested and charged with six counts of sex crimes involving female prisoners. He was a maintenance worker at the Eddie Warrior Correctional Center when the incidents occurred; the charges include sexual battery, indecent exposure, forcible oral sodomy, sexual battery and surprise sex by instrumentation. Hiser posted a $15,000 bond; his case is still pending.

Arkansas

Former Arkansas DOC psychologist Anna Clark, 57, was convicted of third-degree sexual assault after being caught in the act of sexual intercourse with prisoner Dan Burns.
In a taped confession Clark admitted that she had sex several times with Burns, who was diagnosed as depressed and suicidal. She was sentenced in August 2007 to three years in prison and her conviction was upheld by the state Supreme Court on Sept. 25, 2008 [See: Clark v. State, 374 Ark. 292 (Ark. 2008)].

On January 16, 2009, Pulaski County sheriff’s deputy Willie Lee Owens was arrested for raping a female prisoner in a basement holding cell at the county courthouse. While Owens went to get a napkin so his victim could clean up, she wiped some of his semen on the inside of her bra and later gave it to investigators.

“The crime lab confirmed with scientific certainty that the swabs submitted by Dep. Owens and the samples taken from the bra were the same,” the arrest warrant stated.

California

In May 2008, Mark Susoeff, 45, was sentenced to 120 days in jail and three years probation for having oral sex with a female prisoner. Susoeff was a guard at the Leo Chesney Community Correctional Facility (LCCC) when the incident occurred. LCCC is a minimum-security prison run by Cornell Corrections.

Former San Luis Obispo County jail guard Steven Edward Irysh was sentenced to 45 days in jail and three years probation on October 31, 2007 for performing a sex act in front of a female prisoner. He had also been charged with indecent exposure, but that charge was dropped as part of a plea agreement. On January 11, 2008, the court allowed Irysh to begin serving his sentence in late February to accommodate his work schedule. He was also allowed to serve his jail time on weekends.

In September 2007, former Imperial County jail guard James Ray Morris pleaded no contest to having sex with female prisoners. One of his victims stated that Morris threatened to restrict her recreation time if she didn’t have sex, and that she contracted a sexually transmitted disease from him. Morris was sentenced on October 19, 2007 to 90 days in jail and three years probation.

Two prisoners have filed lawsuits against Imperial County claiming that jail guards, including Morris, pressured them into having sex. One guard, Corbin Dillon, allegedly coerced oral sex from a prisoner who was in an observation cell following a suicide attempt. [See: Fernandez v. Morris, U.S.D.C. (SD Cal.), Case No. 3:2008-cv-00601-H-CAB and Flores-Nunez v. Dillon, U.S.D.C. (SD Cal.), Case No. 3:08-cv-01881-W-CAB].

Colorado

Two female prisoners from Hawai’i, Christina Riley and Jacqueline Overturf, were being held at the Brush Correctional Facility, a private prison operated by GRW Corp., when they were sexually assaulted by prison guard Russell E. Rollison. They filed a lawsuit that was settled in January 2008; their attorney, Myles Breiner, described the confidential settlement as a “significant amount of money.” [See: Riley v. Rollison, U.S.D.C. (D. Colo.), Case No. 1:06-cv-01347-WYD-BNB].

The prisoners claimed they had been coerced by Rollison to perform a sex act, and alleged he had threatened them with disciplinary write-ups if they did not cooperate. One of the women saved Rollison’s semen and turned it over to DOC authorities.

Despite having evidence in the form of the guard’s semen, state officials called the incident a ploy by the women to get back to their home state of Hawai’i. Since the settlement, all Hawai’i prisoners at the Brush facility have been moved to the Otter Creek Correctional Center in Kentucky – where incidents of sexual abuse have continued (see below).

Rollison resigned and was charged with two counts of having felony sexual contact with a prisoner. The charges were later reduced when he pleaded guilty to menacing with a real or simulated weapon – a non-sex offense – and received probation.

Former prison Sgt. Leshawn Terrell, employed at the Denver Women’s Correctional Facility, was charged with having sexual relations with prisoner Amanda Hall. According to a subsequent lawsuit, Hall claimed that Terrell made her a “virtual sex slave” and coerced her continuously to have sex over a five-month period. Terrell sexually abused her to the point that she sustained a torn rectum that required surgery.

“She’s been assaulted in ways that are so inhumane and so offensive we can’t talk about them on TV,” stated Hall’s attorney, Mari Newman. “What I’ve learned after the [lawsuit] filing, I’ve got many many e-mails about other similar cases, and this is a problem systemwide in the Colorado Department of Corrections,” Newman said.

Hall’s federal lawsuit settled in December 2008 for $250,000 in damages and attorney fees; additionally, the DOC agreed to install more security cameras in the area where the sexual assaults took place. [See: Hall v. Colorado DOC, U.S.D.C. (D. Colo.), Case No. 1:08-cv-00999-DME-MEH].

On Oct. 28, 2008, Terrell pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor charge of unlawful sexual conduct. The judge found that he had preyed on female prisoners who were in a “unique and vulnerable position,” and imposed a sentence of 60 days in jail and five years probation, plus sex offender treatment and placement on the state’s sex offender registry.

A former secretary at the Federal Prison Camp in Florence (which houses the federal supermax) was sentenced to six months in prison and five years supervised release on January 29, 2009. Janine Sligar, who had worked for the Bureau of Prisons for 14 years, had a sexual relationship with prisoner Eric McClain that included oral sex and intercourse.

Connecticut

On August 22, 2008, former federal prison guard Michael Rudkin pleaded guilty to charges of having sex with a female prisoner and plotting with her to kill his wife.

According to prosecutors, Rudkin provided his incarcerated lover with a detailed layout of his home and agreed to pay $5,000 for the murder. He also asked her to wait until he could have a life insurance policy taken out on his wife.

The plot was discovered before his wife was harmed. Rudkin was sentenced to 15 years in prison on January 15, 2009; he had been employed at FCI Dansbury.

Florida

Former prison guard William A. Blanton was sentenced on May 22, 2008 to three years probation and eight months home detention after being convicted of engaging in a sexual act with a female prisoner.

Blanton and eight other employees at the Federal Correctional Complex in Coleman had been arrested on suspicion of smuggling and misconduct following a two-year investigation; he was the only guard charged with a sex-related offense.

On April 3, 2008, Wilfredo Vazquez pleaded guilty to sexual battery and “placing a woman in fear” during a forced sexual encounter. Vazquez, an Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) employee, drove a detainee to his home and forced her to have sex with him.

The victim was being held on charges of making a false claim about her U.S. citizenship and was slated to be deported. Vazquez was responsible for transporting her from the Krome Detention Center in West Miami Dade to the Broward Transitional Center in Pompano Beach. The woman reported the incident upon her arrival at Broward, and an investigation ensued.

Vazquez accepted a plea deal to avoid being charged with aggravated sexual assault. He was sentenced in August 2008 to seven years in prison and five years supervised release.

Shaun McFadden worked for TransCor, a private transportation company, when he was arrested at a motel for having sex with two prisoners. On March 21, 2008, McFadden and a co-worker transported two female prisoners from the Bradford County Jail to another facility. After dropping off his co-worker, McFadden returned and convinced jail officials that the prisoners needed to be taken to a local hospital for a physical examination.

McFadden then drove the women to a motel where the threesome had sex. But while he was in the shower, one of the prisoners went to a pay phone and called the police.
McFadden was arrested on charges of two counts of sexual misconduct.

The women said they had agreed to have sex with McFadden in exchange for alcohol and cigarettes. A TransCor official stated this was an isolated incident, and the company did not plan to change the way it operates. There have been at least 5 other incidents of surprise sex and sexual abuse involving TransCor guards [See: PLN, Sept. 2006, p.1].

On November 8, 2008, prison guard Geno Lewis Hawkins was arrested on charges of sexual battery involving a female prisoner. Hawkins was employed at the CCA-run Gadsden Correctional Facility; he was held without bond.

Georgia

Dewayne Wood, an 18-year veteran of the Warren County Sheriff’s Department, was charged with sexual assault of a person in custody, violation of oath by a public official, and violation of the Georgia Controlled Substances Act.

The charges stem from accusations made by a female prisoner Wood had transported on August 10, 2006. A search of Wood’s patrol vehicle yielded pornographic pictures, condoms, Viagra pills and diet pills.

Wood remained free on $10,000 bond until he pleaded guilty in October 2008. He was sentenced to two years incarceration plus 8 years probation.

Former prison guard Tashala C. Johnson-Ashley received 180 days in jail and 5 years probation after being convicted of sexual assault against a person in custody and violation of an oath by a public officer.

By her own admission, Johnson-Ashley met with a prisoner working as a trusty at the Bull Creek Golf Course on April 5, 2008 and had sex with him in her car.

On December 31, 2008, Twiggs County deputies Richard Merideth and James Kristopher Baker were arrested after they acknowledged they both had sex with jail prisoner Jennifer Lyles. Lyles reported them after one of the deputies failed to bring her some cigarettes.

Hawaii

In October 2008, Markell Milsap pleaded guilty to sexually assaulting a female prisoner at the Federal Detention Center in Hawaii. Milsap worked as an electrician at the prison; he reportedly pushed the woman against a wall, pulled down her pants and had sex with her.

The prisoner, identified only as Jane Doe, filed a lawsuit against Milsap and the federal government, which is pending. [See: Doe v. United States, U.S.D.C. (D. Hawaii), Case No. 1:08-cv-00517-SOM-BMK].

Milsap received a 10-month prison sentence on March 10, 2009, and the federal judge over his case described the sexual encounter, even if consensual, as “horribly wrong.”
Milsap will be required to register as a sex offender; his victim refused to testify against him.

Idaho

Tim Gilligan, a guard at a medium security men’s facility in Boise, was arrested on March 19, 2009 on a felony charge of having sexual contact with a female prisoner. While female prisoners are allowed to work at the men’s facility in administrative and cleaning positions, they do not have contact with male prisoners – presumably because they might be sexually assaulted. Apparently the same holds true for prison staff.

Illinois

In August 2007, former Jefferson County Justice Center guard Gary Lynch was arrested on charges of sexual assault and custodial misconduct. He was accused of forcing a female prisoner to have sexual intercourse and oral sex with him.

Lynch pleaded guilty to one charge of official misconduct in June 2008 in exchange for a sentence of 30 months probation and $1,500 in costs. He was also required to serve 90 days in jail and pay incarceration fees. Under the agreement, Lynch will spend the first 45 days of his probated sentence in jail and the last 45 days in jail. However, the last 45 days will be suspended if he stays out of trouble – which presumably means if he doesn’t sexually assault anyone else.

A Dwight Correctional Center prisoner referred to by the Chicago Tribune as Jane Doe was repeatedly forced to have sex with prison guards even though she had diminished lung capacity and was hooked up to an oxygen machine.

Doe filed a lawsuit on March 3, 2008, alleging that guards would come to her cell in the middle of the night and force her to have sex in the guards’ bathroom. Doe, who is afflicted with obstructive pulmonary lung disease, became pregnant from the rapes. She was an ex-beauty pageant winner, and apparently attractive enough that the guards did not care that she had to tote her oxygen tank with her to the bathroom where they would surprise sex her.

“You can’t fight them because they grip you from behind the neck,” she said. “You don’t know if they’re going to kill you.”

Doe tried to report the attacks on numerous occasions. But instead of help, a prison administrator threatened to have a year added to her sentence. She was placed in segregation and her letters to her attorney and the media were intercepted or blocked. She was sexually assaulted 29 times, both before and after she was put in segregation.

In January 2007, after she was released, Doe gave birth to a baby boy. Her lawsuit names the warden, assistant warden, two lieutenants and eight prison guards who allegedly participated in a “surprise sex squad.” [See: Doe v. Denning, U.S.D.C. (ND. Ill.), Case No. 1:08-cv-01265].

Joseph R. Cabell, a guard with the Peoria County Sheriff’s Dept., was arrested on February 3, 2009 on charges of official misconduct and custodial sexual misconduct.
Cabell was assigned to monitor a suicidal female prisoner who had been taken to a hospital; instead, he offered to help her make bail if she would give him oral sex.
Although she performed the sex act, Cabell was unsuccessful in obtaining her release. The prisoner then reported him.

Indiana

John Kelly, a civilian employee of the Bartholomew County Sheriff’s Department, was fired and arrested in August 2008 after it was learned he had an affair with a female prisoner. The charges against Kelly include sexual misconduct and official misconduct.

In January 2009, a manager at the Marion County Juvenile Detention Center was charged with felony counts of sexual misconduct and child seduction. Michael A. Jackson is accused of forcing a 16-year-old prisoner to perform oral sex on him; the incident occurred on Christmas Eve of last year.

Iowa

On January 18, 2008, former Dallas County jail administrator Deke Gliem was sentenced to eight years in prison for having sex with a prisoner, touching and kissing other prisoners, and watching them shower. He reportedly gave the prisoners telephone cards in exchange for sexual favors. Gliem’s misconduct was discovered during an investigation into $6,000 in missing telephone cards and $2,300 in missing cash at the jail.

Kansas

Eric A. Taylor was fired from his job as a guard at the Saline County Jail on July 14, 2008, and arrested on charges of inappropriately touching three female prisoners. He posted bond immediately. Taylor was found guilty on March 12, 2009 of three felony counts of unlawful sexual relations, and will be sentenced in late April.

Jennifer Stambaugh was a case manager with the Bureau of Prisons when she had an affair with a prisoner at the federal penitentiary at Leavenworth. Stambaugh lied to a federal investigator about the affair, claiming the two had never had a sexual relationship. She also denied that they had been in touch after his release from prison.

When the truth came out, Stambaugh came clean. In April 2008 she pleaded guilty to making a false statement to a Department of Justice investigator; she was sentenced on July 14, 2008 to six months house arrest, six months probation and a $3,000 fine.

Kentucky

An unnamed guard was fired and charged with a misdemeanor for forcibly demanding sex from a female prisoner at the CCA-operated Otter Creek Correctional Center, according to an October 2, 2008 news report. The woman saved evidence from the sexual assault.

The victim, a prisoner from Hawai’i, was subsequently placed in segregation for 50 days; prison officials claimed she was segregated due to an altercation with another prisoner, but that allegation was later dismissed. CCA changed its policy at the facility to require, “whenever possible,” a female guard to accompany male guards in the housing areas.

Louisiana

On February 19, 2009, Gary Dewayne Midkiff, a social worker at the Louisiana State Penitentiary, was arrested on one count of aggravated surprise sex. Midkiff was accused of using threats of violence to perform oral sex on a male prisoner; his victim said Midkiff threatened to make false accusations against him, which would result in a beating by prison guards. The prisoner provided DNA evidence and investigators found that four other prisoners had accused Midkiff of sexual misconduct. Midkiff refused to provide a DNA sample for comparison purposes.

Maine

Glen Works was indicted in July 2008, accused of failure to report a sexual assault by another guard. He was employed at the Maine Correctional Center (MCC). Works resigned his position a week before the charges were filed; he subsequently pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor charge and was fined.

Bradford Howard was the MCC guard that Works covered for; he was also indicted in July 2008, on charges involving sex with two prisoners. Howard, a military veteran, was later sentenced to three years with all but four months suspended.

Massachusetts

Former prison guard Stanford Norman, 35, was sentenced on January 3, 2008 to two to three years for having sex with a female prisoner. Norman had sex with the woman while he was employed at the Hampden County Correctional Center.

Another former Hampden County guard, Brian Murphy, received two years probation; he was charged with luring the prisoner to the facility’s medical unit so Norman could have sex with her.

Michigan

On August 21, 2008, former Livingston County Deputy Sheriff Randy Boos pleaded guilty to three counts of second-degree criminal sexual conduct. Boos was accused of “touching the breasts and genital areas” of three prisoners while transporting them from the county jail; he will serve between 43 months and 15 years in prison.

PLN has previously reported on the systemic sexual abuse of female prisoners by guards in the Michigan DOC, and the resultant multi-million dollar verdicts in lawsuits brought by the victimized prisoners. [See: PLN, Jan. 2006, p.12; Oct. 2008, p.42].

Mississippi

On January 25, 2008, U.S. Marshals arrested former Mississippi prison guard Jennifer Danielle Readus, who had fled to Texas after she was charged with having sex with a prisoner. Readus was employed at the Central Mississippi Corr. Facility when she allegedly had a sexual relationship with prisoner Zachariah Combs.

Montana

Four female employees of the Montana State Prison were placed on paid suspension in September 2008 after they were accused of having sex with prisoners. All four later resigned, and a fifth male employee was placed under investigation. The County Attorney determined there was insufficient evidence to warrant criminal charges.

According to prisoner Michael Murphy, one of the prison employees – a mental health worker – had sex with him over 30 times. The Montana DOC took the Associated Press to court after the AP requested records related to the sexual misconduct investigation; state officials said they needed a judge to weigh privacy interests versus the public’s right to know.

“Corrections officers and officials whose work involves interacting with inmates at the Montana State Prison hold positions of high public trust involving the safety and well-being of the public, and therefore have a reduced expectation of privacy when accused of wrongdoing involving their interaction with inmates,” stated David K.W. Wilson, Jr., who represents the Associated Press. The public records suit is still pending. [See: Montana DOC v. Associated Press, 1st Judicial District Court (MT), Cause No. CDV-2008-1091].

Nebraska

Former prison guards Becky Willison and Keri Ann Brandt were charged with delivering contraband into a correctional facility, felony criminal conspiracy-escape, and giving false information to a law enforcement officer after it was discovered they had sneaked saw blades into the North Central Correctional and Rehabilitation Center. Willison was also charged with felony sexual assault and tampering with physical evidence.

Officials believe the two women were part of a foiled escape attempt hatched after Willison began having a sexual relationship with one of the three prisoners involved.

Willison pleaded guilty and was sentenced on Feb. 19, 2008 to five years in prison on state charges. In June 2008 she received a consecutive four-year sentence on related federal charges; Brandt received the same state and federal sentences as part of a plea bargain.

Former jail guard Jason Keller avoided trial on March 3, 2008 when he pleaded no contest to sexually abusing a female prisoner at the Hall County Jail. As part of the plea agreement, the County Attorney’s office recommended probation and opined that Keller would not have to register as a sex offender.

Gary Fowler was a teacher at the Omaha Correctional Facility when he engaged in an illegal sexual encounter with a 47-year-old prisoner. He was sentenced on October 14, 2008 to two years probation.

Nevada

Nye County Deputy Sheriff Daryal Taylor was arrested on March 26, 2008 after a female prisoner accused him of sexual assault while he was transporting her. Investigators obtained information that corroborated the victim’s allegations, and determined that Taylor had used his position to obtain sex from the woman.

New Hampshire

Former prison chaplain Ralph Flodin, 70, was indicted in June 2007 on nine counts of aggravated felonious sexual assault against a 24-year-old female prisoner. Flodin had been the chaplain at the Strafford County House of Corrections for over ten years. He was convicted following a jury trial in May 2008, based largely on a videotaped confession in which he admitted to touching and kissing the victim.

He was sentenced to 2 to 10 years in prison plus a 12-month suspended sentence on Sept. 5, 2008. “Sadly, what we have here is another instance when someone within the jail community has used his or her authority to coerce sexual favors,” said County Attorney Tom Velardi.

On November 18, 2008, Douglas Tower, 63, pleaded guilty to raping three women living at a halfway house. Tower was supervisor of the Shea Farm halfway house in Concord; he told the women he would return them to prison or deny visits from their children unless they submitted to his sexual demands.

As part of the plea bargain, charges involving 8 more victims were dropped. At the time of his guilty plea Tower was already serving 21 to 40 years for sexually assaulting two other residents at the halfway house. He received additional sentences of 10-20 years in the plea deal, which were suspended. Thirty female prisoners and one prison employee sued the state due to sexual abuse or harassment by Tower; the suits were settled in March 2008 for $1.9 million.

New Jersey

Cape May County jail guard Thomas Koochembere was convicted on February 28, 2008 of official misconduct and criminal sexual contact for having sex with two prisoners. Evidence presented at trial included one of the prisoner’s underwear, which contained Koochembere’s DNA.

One of his victims testified that she did not scream for help because the guard had power over her. “That man holds my freedom in his hands,” she stated. Koochembere contended that the women had in fact raped him, and that his DNA was obtained by force when they threatened him with a pair of scissors – an alleged incident he did not report at the time.
“Why did he do it?” asked Assistant Prosecutor Matthew D. Weintraub. “He did it because he could.”

Koochembere received sentences of 3 and 5 years on May 8, 2008. A federal lawsuit was filed against the county by one of the prisoners, Demetria Marshall. [See: Marshall v. Koochembere, U.S.D.C. (D. NJ), Case No. 1:07-cv-03191].

On February 22, 2009, Morris County guard Lon Sainato allegedly pressured a male prisoner performing community service work into a sex act. Sainato was charged with sexual assault and official misconduct.

New Mexico

Cibola County Detention Center guard Deandra McNeill, 20, was fired on March 4, 2009 after jail officials determined she had a sexual relationship with a prisoner. She was arrested by the State Police later that month and charged with criminal sexual penetration.

In a 2008 report, the Bureau of Justice Statistics found that the Torrance County Detention Facility in Estancia, New Mexico had the highest rate of sexual victimization by staff members in a survey of over 280 jails nationwide. The facility is operated by CCA, and on Sept. 30, 2008, county and CCA officials appeared before the Review Panel on Prison surprise sex to discuss the jail’s excessively high rate of sexual abuse.

Interestingly, CCA’s general counsel, Gus Puryear, is a commissioner on the National Prison surprise sex Elimination Commission – but has missed half of the Commission’s eight public hearings. [See: PLN, March 2009, p.6]. Apparently CCA places little importance on the prevention of sexual abuse in the company’s for-profit facilities.

New York

In December 2006, Raymond “Mickey” Dunham, Jr., a major with the Berkshire County Sheriff’s Department, was indicted on four counts of having sexual relations with a prisoner. Dunham was one of two unit managers at the Berkshire County House of Corrections.

Dunham initially insisted he was innocent, but pleaded guilty to having sex with two prisoners; he was sentenced in May 2008 to a maximum of one year and one day in prison.

Three civilian jail workers were arrested in November and December 2008, and charged with multiple counts of having sex with prisoners at the Gouverneur Correctional Facility.
The employees, all women, were Laura E. Douglass, Lisa A. Vaughn and Rachel S. Patterson.

Over the course of two years Vaughn allegedly had sex with four male prisoners. She was charged with 16 counts of third-degree surprise sex, third-degree sexual assault and official misconduct. Douglass was charged with 11 counts of third-degree surprise sex, one count of criminal sexual act and one count of promoting prison contraband. One of the women would reportedly stand lookout while the other had sex.

Patterson was charged with three counts of third-degree criminal sexual act and official misconduct, two counts of second-degree sexual abuse and one count of petit larceny.

North Carolina

It will be hard for former Bertie Correctional Facility guard Tameka Mebane to deny she had sex with a prisoner at the maximum-security prison, as one allegedly got her pregnant. She was criminally charged in February 2009. “According to her, she was pregnant from the inmate. That’s what she told me,” stated Windsor Police Sgt. Rick Morris. “I’m only human,” Mebane remarked. “Everyone makes mistakes.”

Ohio

A dark cell turned into a dark day at trial for former Richland County jail guard James N. Campain. A former female prisoner testified that Campain turned out the lights in her cell and fondled her breasts, after which she sexually gratified him.

“He unzipped his pants, and I did what I did,” she stated. Campain later gave her cigarettes.

Campain’s misconduct was exposed when another female prisoner filed a grievance against him. She testified that while she worked in the kitchen Campain would rub up against her and ask to see her breasts. Campain was a 13-year veteran at the jail; he was charged with three counts of sexual battery, one count of gross sexual imposition and ten counts of dereliction of duty.

He was found guilty at trial in January 2008, sentenced to a total of nine years, and classified as a Tier III sex offender.

Oklahoma

Custer County Sheriff Mike Burgess resigned on April 16, 2008 after being accused of using female prisoners as sex slaves. Burgess, who had been sheriff since 1994, was charged with 35 felony counts including surprise sex, forcible oral sodomy and bribery by a public official.

The allegations were brought by 12 former prisoners who testified they were coerced into participating in a variety of sexual activities for the jail’s employees, including wet T-shirt contests.

Several women testified that Burgess, who was a member of a drug court panel, threatened to send them to prison if they didn’t have sex with him. Members of the panel decide who attends the rehab program and who is incarcerated.

Burgess was convicted of 13 felony charges in January 2009, and received a 79-year sentence in March. The jury had recommended 94 years. A lawsuit has been filed against the county by Burgess’ victims. [See: McGowan v. Burgess, U.S.D.C. (WD Okla.), Case No. 5:07-cv-01168-HE].

Joi Ilene Starr, a former secretary at the Joseph Harp Correctional Center, was charged with first-degree surprise sex on June 26, 2008. Starr admitted to a prison investigator that she had sex with a male prisoner the previous year. In July 2008, Katrina Lavern Hinds (aka Katrina Black), an employee at the Lexington Assessment and Reception Center, was charged with first-degree surprise sex for engaging in sex with a prisoner. Although both Hinds and Starr’s sexual encounters were consensual, they still face up to life in prison if convicted.

In April 2009, former Jackie Brannon Correctional Center guard Stacy Marie Smith was charged with sexual battery and surprise sex by instrumentation, involving a male prisoner. She was released on $10,000 bond.

Oregon

Cindy L. Roberts was a contract nurse at the Cowlitz County Jail when she allegedly had sex with a 27-year-old prisoner. She was arrested on May 31, 2008 and charged with introducing contraband into a jail and attempted custodial sexual misconduct.

Paul Golden, a landscaper at the Coffee Creek Correctional Facility, a women’s prison, was jailed in January 2009 on charges of sexual abuse, sexual misconduct and providing contraband to prisoners.

Pennsylvania

Sex and contraband charges resulted in guilty verdicts in a wide-ranging investigation involving staff at the Monroe County Correctional Facility. Six former guards and a kitchen worker were charged. Ex-guard Mark Gutshall pleaded guilty to institutional sexual assault on Dec. 17, 2007 and received a 3-23 month prison sentence; he has since been paroled. The other jail employees, who were charged with contraband-related offenses, received probation. [See: PLN, Dec. 2007, p.1].

On July 11, 2008, former prison worker Gregory A. Williams was found guilty of four counts of institutional sexual assault and one count of official oppression; he was acquitted of four other charges. Williams was a food service manager at the Cambridge Springs Correctional Institution when he engaged in oral sex with prisoners Melissa Torres and Helen McCandless-Weiss. He was sentenced to a minimum of four months in jail on October 8, 2008.

Northumberland County Prison guard Brandon Fraim resigned on December 10, 2008 after he was caught in an amorous embrace with a female prisoner. Fraim admitted the incident happened but said, “I just got caught up with flirting with young girls. They make it sound like there was sex, but it was just kissing.”

However, videos revealed that Fraim had been sneaking into the women prisoners’ quarters since last spring. Prison guard Gregg Cupp also resigned; both he and Fraim were charged in January 2009 with having sexual contact with prisoners. Deputy Warden John Conrad had shrugged off initial reports of the guards’ misconduct as “silly talk.”

On November 13, 2008, former prison guard Michael Waters received a 23-month sentence for having sexual encounters with a female prisoner at the Delaware County Prison. He began serving his sentence, at his former workplace, later that same month.

South Carolina

On April 3, 2008, former prison guard Lori Clawson Johnson was arrested on charges of sexual misconduct with a prisoner following an investigation by the State Law Enforcement Division and the Dept. of Corrections. Johnson was employed at the Tyger River Correctional Institution when the incidents occurred.

Tennessee

Jackson County Sheriff Kenneth Bean initially refused to step down after being charged with numerous counts of sexual contact involving at least 10 female jail prisoners. A six-month investigation revealed that Bean had coerced prisoners to have sex by threatening to plant evidence against them. He was also charged with failure to secure and maintain evidence.

“[Bean] offered and gave illegal drugs and favorable treatment to inmates in exchange for sexual favors,” said special prosecutor Alan Poindexter.

In September 2008, as part of a plea bargain, Sheriff Bean resigned and pleaded guilty to a charge of simple assault. Under the plea agreement he cannot run for sheriff again for six years. Additionally, three Jackson County deputies were convicted on charges involving sex with female prisoners.

On June 13, 2008, Kevin D. Vance, a former employee of the Montgomery County Sheriff’s Office, was arrested and charged with having sexual contact with a female prisoner. Vance had worked at the jail for over three years.

Montgomery County jail employee Santiago Alcantara had been fired for the same offense a month earlier. Both Vance and Alcantara pleaded guilty in October 2008, and each received two years pre-trial diversion and probation.

Thomas Baccus was a guard at the Henderson County Jail when he was suspended in March 2008, then fired for having a sexual relationship with a female prisoner. He was arrested last June and charged with felony sexual contact and official misconduct. Baccus had previously been terminated from the Turney Center Industrial Prison, a state facility, for having white supremacy propaganda on his MySpace webpage.

Former Shelby County jail guard Antonious Totten was charged with sexual contact with a female prisoner in March 2007. Totten was supervising several women on a work detail when he decided to hook up with one of them. The two reportedly had sex in a van in full view of the other prisoners, who remained silent because they did not want to lose their jobs. After one prisoner eventually came forward they all were called as witnesses.

Totten’s attorney, Blake Ballin, called the witnesses against his client “a parade of liars, thieves, cheats and forgers.” Nevertheless, Totten was convicted and sentenced to one year in jail. The sentence was suspended except for time he had to serve on weekends.

On November 18, 2008, Angel Harris appeared in court on felony charges of having sexual contact with a prisoner. Harris was employed at the CCA-run Silverdale Detention Center in Chattanooga at the time the incident took place.

Texas

On July 2, 2008, three female guards at the Liberty County Jail, Angelia Perales, Techa Fowler and Tynisha Pierre, were arrested for having sex with prisoners. The women were employees of Civigenics, a private company that runs the jail; they were charged with violation of the civil rights of a person in custody, a felony.

“This type of offense is taken very seriously. Not only is it a violation of law, policies and procedures, it puts the safety of all people in the correctional facility at risk. If they are at risk, then the public is subsequently at risk,” said Sheriff Greg Arthur.

Guards at the South Texas Detention Complex, an immigration detention facility, have been accused of rampant sexual abuse involving detainees. Former guards at the prison went on record with local news reporters, saying that sexual abuse of female prisoners had been going on for years. According to investigators, guards threatened detainees with deportation and lied by telling them they could help them stay in the country if they had sex with them. The facility is operated by the GEO Group (formerly Wackenhut Corrections).

One guard, Joseph Canales, was fired after he reportedly got a prisoner pregnant. But whistleblowers – several of whom were fired after reporting the sexual abuse – insisted that was only one of many pregnancies that resulted from rapist guards run amok at the detention facility. The allegations have been referred to the Office of the Inspector General (OIG).

David W. Morris was sentenced on June 2, 2008 to five years probation for having consensual sex with two female prisoners. He was caught on video sneaking into the women’s cells at the Jefferson County Jail. One of the prisoners was a former sheriff’s employee who had worked with Morris before she was incarcerated.

Lindsey Ann Russell lost her job as a Coryell County jail guard after she was arrested in September 2008 for improper sexual conduct with a prisoner. The following month another guard at the jail, Richard Samuel Linn, resigned after he was indicted on similar charges.

Last year’s sexual abuse scandal involving the Texas Youth Commission (TYC) has claimed yet another casualty. On August 11, 2008, former TYC guard Janice Marie Simpson was sentenced to four years deferred adjudication, probation, and a $500 fine for having sex with an 18-year-old prisoner at the Al Price Juvenile Correctional Facility.

A number of other TYC officials, including administrators Ray E. Brookins and John Paul Hernandez, were indicted on charges of sexually abusing juvenile offenders. [See: PLN, Feb. 2008, p.1]. Brookins’ trial has been delayed due to the arrest of his attorney, Scott M. Dolin, on undisclosed charges.

On February 27, 2009, six female guards at the Montague County Jail were indicted on charges of having sex with prisoners and bringing contraband into the facility. One of the guards, Shawna Marie Herr (aka Shawna Marie McCrary), pleaded guilty on March 23, 2009 and received five years probation and a $4,000 fine.

The former sheriff for Montague County, Bill Keating, faces a state charge involving sexual misconduct with a prisoner; he has already pleaded guilty to a federal charge of coercing a woman into having sex with him to avoid being jailed. Keating will be sentenced on May 1, 2009.

Utah

Carbon County drug court supervisor Melanie Madill pleaded guilty to one count of custodial sexual relations and three counts of evidence tampering on March 24, 2009. Madill was a jail guard over the county’s drug court when she had a sexual relationship with a prisoner and helped him and other prisoners pass drug tests. She has not yet been sentenced.

Virginia

Patrick Owen Gee was head of security at the Fluvanna Correctional Center for Women. He’s now serving time himself. Gee was convicted of four counts of carnal knowledge with a prisoner following a jury trial in October 2008. He entered Alford pleas to two other charges, and was sentenced on January 8, 2009 to 10 years in prison with five years suspended, plus two years of supervised probation.

Washington

In July 2007, current and former female prisoners joined together in a lawsuit against the Washington Dept. of Corrections. They accused prison officials of failing to protect them from sexual abuse by guards at the Washington Corrections Center for Women (WCCW).
The DOC promised major reforms in response to the class action suit; some of the changes include hiring more female guards, installing more surveillance cameras and having the State Patrol conduct an independent investigation. Seven male prison employees have been suspended.

The current and former WCCW prisoners are represented by Columbia Legal Services and the Public Interest Law Group; their lawsuit is still pending. [See: Doe v. Clarke, Thurston County Superior Court, Case No. 07-2-01513-0].

On November 14, 2008, Eddie Garbitt was sentenced to 1 year and 7 months after he pleaded guilty to three counts of custodial misconduct. Garbitt, a former WCCW supervisor and 15-year DOC veteran, had coerced three prisoners into having sex with him. He was originally charged with seven counts but four were dropped as part of a plea agreement.

A former mental health counselor at the King County juvenile detention center, Flo-Mari Crisostomo, began serving a six-month sentence on April 6, 2009 following her conviction on first-degree custodial sexual misconduct charges. She had sex with a 17-year-old prisoner and gave him candy and phone privileges. Her counseling license has since been revoked.

West Virginia

A guard at the Southern Regional Jail was arrested on October 21, 2008 for having sex with a prisoner. Stephen Gillespie was discovered by a supervisor, who literally caught him with his pants down; the 16-year veteran was released on $25,000 bond.

Wisconsin

In June 2008, Becky Bathke, a former Oshkosh Correctional Institution employee, was sentenced to 18 months in prison for having sex with two male prisoners. Bathke worked in the prison’s education department when she arranged sexual encounters with prisoners Ryan K. Rowe and Mark Prevatt.

On January 15, 2008, jail guard Nanette Vorath was charged with three counts of engaging in illegal behavior with prisoners. The FBI had recorded 78 phone conversations between Vorath and prisoners at the Waukesha County Jail; she reportedly had a sexual relationship with one prisoner, gave another prescription drugs and supplied a third with smuggled documents.

Vorath was an 11-year veteran. She pleaded guilty to felony misconduct charges and was sentenced to three years probation on January 8, 2009.

Brian Bohlmann, a doctor at the Stanley Correctional Institution, was charged in August 2008 with six counts of sexual assault for inappropriately touching prisoners during medical examinations. While examining one male prisoner for back problems, Bohlmann allegedly concentrated his attention on the patient’s genital and rectal area.

On September 30, 2008, Julie Alt, a sergeant at the Oak Hill Correctional Institution, was charged with second-degree sexual assault and one count of intimidation. Alt reportedly had sex with two prisoners while working at the prison.

Investigators obtained a confession from one prisoner, Darius Wade. That confession led to taped phone calls between Wade and Alt, which provided investigators with even more evidence. “I’m going to lose my job and I’m going to end up in, probably second-degree sexual assault,” Alt stated in one recorded conversation.

Paul Vick, Jr., a sergeant at the Milwaukee Secure Detention Facility, was charged on January 28, 2009 with 15 felonies related to sex involving three female prisoners. The charges include four counts of delivering illegal articles to a prisoner, five counts of second-degree sexual assault of a prisoner, one count of second-degree sexual assault by use of threat of force or violence, and five counts of misconduct in public office.

Full story.

FIRE CURES BIGOTS
Aug 26, 2002

by Y Kant Ozma Post


The story of Chris J (previously posted):

Chris J. got gang-raped in prison today. He needs surgery to fix his rectum, and probably other medical attention for the rest of his injuries but he's probably not going to get it. He knows this and is thinking about the pain his rectal scarring is going to cause him for the rest of his life. He laid in his bed for a little while covered in semen and his own blood thinking about AIDS. Since shower time has come and gone, he cleaned himself up with the water in the toilet, he also sat on it for a long time trying as hard as he could to evacuate all the semen out of him. His phone card was stolen as punishment for fighting back and he doesn't have any money in his account to call anyone on the outside, so he's just trying to deal with it on his own. Many inmates and guards are already making fun of him and discussing prices for having a go at him within his earshot. After TV time he's going to have to try and sleep in his cell with 2 other guys who ain't trying to hear his sob story and may even have been involved in his attack.

The pictures of his wife and kids were taken as punishment with promises to defecate or ejaculate on them while a different man was inside him as further punishment for fighting back. He's been clean for 9 months but that heroin would make all this pain go away for just a little while. Chris is more likely than not to go back to the heroin.

Chris will never be able to fully express the pain and rage caused by his surprise sex even to a professional; and he's definitely not getting insurance which covers the help he needs when he gets out. This psychological trauma will have a severe impact on his ability to have healthy relationships on the Outside- out in the World- and will likely lead to bad arguments with his wife resulting in domestic violence. The effects his mental state has on his kids will be profound and probably irreversible. They might grow up in the sort of state in which prison is a very real possibility. When they find out what happened to dad how will they react?

His pain and anger will manifest itself in all sorts of ways and he might go off on some taxpayer in a convenience store or seriously injure someone who cuts him off in traffic. When that happens Chris will go back to prison and there will be similar ripple effects on his victims. Even if that doesn't happen remember Chris uses heroin to suppress his pain and will likely be re-arrested on a drug charge or a property crime he did to get heroin money.

Since there are no secrets in prison when Chris returns it will already be known he is a bitch who likes it in the rear end, and he will have to become someone's sex slave. Staff will encourage this. Or he can stab somebody to try get a new rep. If he wins the knife fight & isn't killed outright, the person he kills has loved ones & family members who will become enraged at this, and the violence will continue.

What happened to Chris happened to 200 people today if you go by Alberto Gonzales' DOJ. If you go by HRW it happened to more than 400 people. This does not include juveniles in programs like Nihilanthic posts.

This is every day, every state. There are no exceptions. Going by HRW's numbers it's one Chris every four minutes.

You could be the next Chris, no matter how white you are- no matter how rich your family is. The Machine cares not. It must feed and It will feed.

And the Machine will never be satisfied.

The New Black
Oct 1, 2006

Had it, lost it.

Great thread, of course. I read the original one lurking LF. Some of the stuff in there (and now here) is almost beyond belief. The idea of having prisoners pay for their spell inside is a new one to me, even if it seems like the logical conclusion of the current prison system.

To my mind, all this is basically the inevitable result of running prisons for profit, and I can't see any way of improving it beyond nationalising all the prisons. The other trouble is that the default position of a huge number of Americans is 'If you can't do the time, don't do the crime' - can you imagine the response from the right if Obama tried to improve prison conditions? They literally think that the second you break the law you immediately waive any and all basic human rights. They almost seem to consider getting repeatedly anally raped to be part of the punishment (at least, this is my impression from US popular culture).

e: the report that cites high recidivism as a positive for the prison is a perfect example of why running prisons for profit is a terrible, terrible idea - it illustrates that privately run prisons, who make a profit on each prisoner they take in, have absolutely no incentive to reform inmates, and in fact benefit from forcing them deeper into a vicious cycle of crime and incarceration.

The New Black fucked around with this message at Jul 26, 2010 around 00:45

Rutibex
Sep 9, 2001

Forums Rutabaga


I am honestly disgusted by the American prison system. The people in the work programs are basically slaves, and everyone is just cool with that. I worked out the math once on exactly how many black people in America are involved in unfree labor and it ended up being something like 3/4ths of the number of slaves that where in America in 1860.

That's some real social progress right there.

Qublai Qhan
Dec 23, 2008


In Xanadu did Qublai Qhan
a stately taco eat,
when ALF the spacerat,
ran through to talk--
Of cabbages and kings
And whether pigs have wings.


Rutibex posted:

I am honestly disgusted by the American prison system. The people in the work programs are basically slaves, and everyone is just cool with that. I worked out the math once on exactly how many black people in America are involved in unfree labor and it ended up being something like 3/4ths of the number of slaves that where in America in 1860.

That's some real social progress right there.

I could always be wrong here, but I'm almost positive that mandatory convict labor is non-existent in the US. It's true that convicts are not paid particularly well for optional labor, and maybe there are reasons to pay better, but I think comparing it to slavery is probably going several steps too far.

nnnnghhhhgnnngh
Apr 6, 2009


this is from another thread but merits crossposting.

Hardcore Phonography posted:

Not sure if it's been posted already, but here's a write-up by The Nation about BP using convict labor to clean up the spill. It's a 3-page story and too long to quote.

http://www.thenation.com/article/37...idents-struggle

I wonder what sort of safety gear they get...?

Rutibex
Sep 9, 2001

Forums Rutabaga


Qublai Qhan posted:

I could always be wrong here, but I'm almost positive that mandatory convict labor is non-existent in the US. It's true that convicts are not paid particularly well for optional labor, and maybe there are reasons to pay better, but I think comparing it to slavery is probably going several steps too far.

It isn't "mandatory" but the system is set up in such a way as to coerce people into it. Do you think any free American would work for $0.50 an hour in a highly abusive environment? The choice is there for the same reason they are given a pittance for their work, to put a shiny veneer of "not slavery, really we pay them and everything!" over top of what clearly is.

I don't think you can call it "voluntary" when nothing about their situation is so. It's like making jay walking have a penalty of 100 years in prison, or eating a big pile of poo poo. Eating the poo poo isn't mandatory, but few will choose not to partake.

falcon2424
May 2, 2005



I'm glad that this was re-posted.

This podcast just did a good interview about a program that was using liberal arts instruction to improve prisoner outcomes. http://doubtreligion.blogspot.com/2...ehind-bars.html

Apparently, stoic philosophy is really popular among inmates.

Of course, it's not entirely 'good' news since the program was canceled for being too effective. But, still, it's a bit less soul-crushing than a lot of other stuff out there.

Barlow
Nov 26, 2007
Write, speak, avenge, for ancient sufferings feel

Are there any responsible organizations that are doing work to change the justice system? This is an issue that I would really like to do something about but other then write to Congress and the state I'm unsure how to go about it.

SpaceDrake
Dec 22, 2006

I have been through nightmares you wouldn't believe. I've seen the foulest deeds man can inflict upon man, and done the same and worse to people who didn't deserve a thing. While we were talking, while you sat there in your chair, I killed a man.

It's who I am. You'll just have to accept it.

Yes, post this thread again, post it one hundred more times, post it on every forum you know, never stop posting or talking about it until Angola (prison) is shut down, children aren't sent to adult prison, drug users aren't sent to prison, and Joe Arpaio and all who follow him are out on the street. This is the most important thread.

Barlow posted:

Are there any responsible organizations that are doing work to change the justice system? This is an issue that I would really like to do something about but other then write to Congress and the state I'm unsure how to go about it.

The SPLC does some work to try and make sure prison sentences are sane at least, but it's very difficult to do anything "about" it directly, especially in "red" states. People in such states are trained, practically from birth, to believe that criminals are the worst form of degenerates and that we don't simply kill them out of hand is a mercy. They're taught that criminals deserve what they get and more, and that The Machine is the only thing standing between the Citizen and Anarchy & Death.

It is going to be a long road to hoe, changing these preconceptions. Look at what happens in superliberal New England, and consider how bad the rest of the country is. We're talking about decades of work. It must happen, but it will not be easy.

Sylink
Apr 17, 2004


http://www.drugwarfacts.org/ is an excellent site for drug knowledge.

What is interesting is how sentencing for drug charges is, on average, only a year less than violent crimes.

You could probably surprise sex someone and get less time than some drug charges.

http://www.drugwarfacts.org/cms/node/63

Viva El Macho
May 9, 2009

by Ozmaugh


OP, you should add two books that were suggested in the LF books thread that are very relevant to the topic. Beyond Criminology and American Apartheid are two book necessary to understand where the whole structure comes from.

mew force shoelace
Dec 13, 2009

by Ozmaugh


Barlow posted:

Are there any responsible organizations that are doing work to change the justice system? This is an issue that I would really like to do something about but other then write to Congress and the state I'm unsure how to go about it.

I think this really is a case where people don't know about the situation. Lots of times people don't care or have differing opinions or whatever. In this case I think spreading the news is important because while lots of people have generally abhorrent ideas about "justice" very few people want this. So spreading the word is probably the best direct thing you can do at the moment.

FIRE CURES BIGOTS
Aug 26, 2002

by Y Kant Ozma Post


More from the original thread



Judas Chongo posted:

I was at a TCADP round table meeting like 2 months ago with the author of this article and this was part of the discussion along with changing the debate on the death penalty.

http://combatingglobalization.com/a...king_class.html





FIRE CURES BIGOTS
Aug 26, 2002

by Y Kant Ozma Post


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4H9CAdwGMiU


In the last five years, more juvenile offenders were killed in Texas than in the rest of the world combined. America continues to defend its right to execute children.

"They think we're beasts. And we deserve nothing else other than our execution," despairs Oswaldo. He's been on death row since he was 17, after accidentally killing a man during an armed robbery. "In 12 years, I haven't had a hug or a kiss." In Louisiana, Lawrence Jacob Jr is also fighting for his life. Like Oswaldo, he was only 17 when he was sentenced to death. "I'm not asking you to release me. I'm only asking you for the chance to rehabilitate," he reasons. Cerebral research proves that the brains of 17 year olds have not developed as much as adults. "Youths at that age are much too impulsive and don't have the control," explains one expert. But in America, that's no bar to their execution.

hiding from goro posted:

quote:

hiding from goro, i have a question.

as probably the only one in LF who has first-hand experience of either, how do you think the american corrections system stacks up with systems of chattel slavery, like that employed by the pre-civil war US or the roman empire? because the ways we use prisoners now and the way our prison industrial complex is staffed and grown have highly distressing parallels with the roman system of industrial slavery

Funny you should mention that, since the concept of private prisons and privatized inmate labor started as an end-run around slavery prohibitions after the Civil War.

When slavery was banned in 1865, there was a big shortage of cheap labor for the Reconstruction, so in 1868 they came up with a plan where you could stop by the prison and lease inmates for $1 to $4 per month ($13 to $55 per month in 2009 dollars) and work them as hard as you liked; until they either died from exhaustion, committed suicide, or cut off their own hands/feet in order to be sent back to the prison as defective.

Customers loved it- they were even cheaper than slaves and required less upkeep, since as the saying went "one dies, get another." This predictably caused an explosion in the prison population (tenfold in Georgia for example), and an increase in percentage of black inmates from 33% to 60% in the South. This practice went on until 1928 when Alabama finally let it end.

Slavery in the Third Millenium.

Forced Labor in the 19th Century South.

John DiIulio, Jr. The Duty to Govern 1990 posted:



“In the nineteenth century, Texas leased its penitentiary (which survives today as the Huntsville “Walls” unit) to private contractors. For a few dollars per month per convict, the contractors were allowed to sublease their charges to farmers, tanners, and other businessmen. It was not long before the inmates began to appear in poor clothing and without shoes. Worked mercilessly, most convicts died within seven years of their incarceration. Escapes and escape attempts were frequent. Conditions were so horrid that some inmates were driven to suicide while other maimed themselves to get out of work or as a pathetic form of protest.”

Texas was a pioneer in the leasing system, just like today where it's the biggest bastion of private prisons.


Ida Wells & Frederick Douglass mentioned the convict leasing system in their writings.

quote:

Frederick Douglass

The Convict Lease System and Lynch Law are twin infamies which flourish hand in hand in many of the United States. They are the two great outgrowths and results of the class legislation under which our people suffer to-day.

Here's a whole book about it:
One Dies, Get Another

HidingFromGoro posted:


Reaganomicon posted:

well surely privately-run prisons are better at some things right? because free market

meatball posted:

They better at keeping browns and poors in their walls



Actually, guards are 49% more likely to get assaulted in a private prison, and inmates are 65% more likely (pdf) - despite the fact that a state prison is 7 times more likely to house violent offenders than a private one is. Usually a private prison will try and keep everyone "doing the Thorazine shuffle" or stoned out of their gourds on Haldol (which has significant negative side effects even when properly prescribed/administered); the increased violence is largely due to substandard training and mismanagement.

The "cost savings" of a private prison (when they're not just outright lies) are further artificially inflated because private prisons have a say in who they admit, and tend not to take the more expensive inmates with medical or mental health costs. Also:

Cost-Saving or Cost-Shifting: The Fiscal Impact of Prison Privatization in Arizona posted:


But the research used to justify the expansion of the private prison program is methodologically flawed, outdated and, in one case, discredited by the researcher's financial ties to the private prison industry. And critical issues such as the implications of municipal bond financing of private expansion have never been addressed.

Justice Strategies found that no rigorous, independent evaluation had been made of Arizona's private prison program, nor had the cost-comparison figures reported by DOC been independently audited. Existing research failed to account for key factors such as population characteristics, facility design and proper allocation of costs.

Private prison companies also influence policy, through their lobbyist-puppets at ALEC, the American Legislative Exchange Council (also funded by Amway, Exxon, National Rifle Association, Philip Morris, and others). ALEC is/was instrumental in getting things like Truth in Sentencing and Three Strikes laws passed. Each year, they introduce between 800 and 3,100 pieces of legislation.

FIRE CURES BIGOTS
Aug 26, 2002

by Y Kant Ozma Post


HidingFromGoro posted:


This 12-year old boy is being tried as an adult in Indiana, charged with killing his allegedly abusive stepfather.

If convicted, he'll serve up to 65 years in prison. He's being held in adult jail along with his 15-year old co-defendant until the trial.



""Wawasee Middle School Parent Amanda Hyndman posted:


"At least [for] the 12 year old the adult charge is kind of strong but nowadays...if they can do the crime do the time."


HidingFromGoro posted:

In Iowa, black juveniles are arrested and incarcerated at a rate six times higher than whites, due to a system that the state euphemistically refers to as DMC or "Disproportionate Minority Contact."

In the government's own words- "both offending characteristics and racial bias appear to be contributing factors to African American overrepresentation in secure detention and in the juvenile justice system"

Again, in the government's own words:
• Overall arrests for Caucasian youth decreased during the report years.
• Arrests for African-American youth have increased nearly 60% in recent years.
o Arrests of African American youth for simple misdemeanors, assault (49% increase)
and disorderly conduct (213% increase), were the specific offenses that most directly
influenced the increase.
• African-American youth are arrested at a rate nearly six times higher than Caucasian
youth.

Fluoride Jones
Aug 24, 2009

You're lucky I care about lady pecs.

mew force shoelace posted:

I think this really is a case where people don't know about the situation. Lots of times people don't care or have differing opinions or whatever. In this case I think spreading the news is important because while lots of people have generally abhorrent ideas about "justice" very few people want this. So spreading the word is probably the best direct thing you can do at the moment.

The most depressing thing about word of mouth are the aforementioned abhorrent ideas. I've seriously tried to convince friends and family that the prison system is a nightmare, but it usually ends with something like, "Well it's not supposed to be rehabilitation," or the typical, "Why have sympathy for killers and rapists?" I find this kind of thing is also very common when talking about the death penalty. Great thread, btw. Thank you, Fire for saving all of this info.

mew force shoelace
Dec 13, 2009

by Ozmaugh


Fluoride Jones posted:

The most depressing thing about word of mouth are the aforementioned abhorrent ideas. I've seriously tried to convince friends and family that the prison system is a nightmare, but it usually ends with something like, "Well it's not supposed to be rehabilitation," or the typical, "Why have sympathy for killers and rapists?" I find this kind of thing is also very common when talking about the death penalty. Great thread, btw. Thank you, Fire for saving all of this info.

I think most people have limits, I think if many Americans got a magic wand to design our justice system however they wanted they'd make something terrible, but I think even then most people are simply and literally unaware how bad the system actually is (and are even proud to be unaware). I really feel if more people knew a lot of people would be angry even if their system would still be pretty inhumane.

edit: it's not true anymore, but I always had some great luck with 'America is the only country that allows executing retarded people....and children.... and retarded children" because if you could get a person to look and see it was true most people really would quickly back down on at least parts of their beliefs of our system being totally okay.

Oryx and Friends
Nov 5, 2009



Racial profiling in America fun - I was just riding my bike around right now and noticed a police officer driving around really slowly. I thought this interesting (note - I am white and thus would suffer no consequences from bothering this police officer) and decided to follow at a distance. He drove around a bit and then stopped in front of one house. The house just happened to be my Iranian friend's house! He was stopped outside for at least two minutes before I approached and asked what the officer was about. He said he was just patrolling and then drove away, though I'm not sure at all about this.

e - I actually am pretty sure what it was about, and the answer is anti-Islamic sentiment, which resulted in biased police focus upon a hated outgroup, which is the root of all the racist bias in the American justice system.

Oryx and Friends
Nov 5, 2009



Fluoride Jones posted:

The most depressing thing about word of mouth are the aforementioned abhorrent ideas. I've seriously tried to convince friends and family that the prison system is a nightmare, but it usually ends with something like, "Well it's not supposed to be rehabilitation," or the typical, "Why have sympathy for killers and rapists?" I find this kind of thing is also very common when talking about the death penalty. Great thread, btw. Thank you, Fire for saving all of this info.

Not much can infuriate me, but hearing people express the idea that certain people deserve to be anally raped is the most atrocious thing you will ever hear in public discourse.

Don't do the crime if you can't do the cruel and unusual punishment!

Ironic war criminal
Jan 8, 2008



Fire posted:

[/quote]

Is Indiana really holding that 12 year old in an adult prison?

Fluoride Jones
Aug 24, 2009

You're lucky I care about lady pecs.

mew force shoelace posted:

I think most people have limits, I think if many Americans got a magic wand to design our justice system however they wanted they'd make something terrible, but I think even then most people are simply and literally unaware how bad the system actually is (and are even proud to be unaware). I really feel if more people knew a lot of people would be angry even if their system would still be pretty inhumane.

edit: it's not true anymore, but I always had some great luck with 'America is the only country that allows executing retarded people....and children.... and retarded children" because if you could get a person to look and see it was true most people really would quickly back down on at least parts of their beliefs of our system being totally okay.

When it comes to executions, I usually try to convince people it's wrong and inhumane by describing what happens to the people that go through them, and by also mentioning the number of innocent people executed on death row. Even then, though, most people just don't even care because they don't want someone ruining their collective vengeance boner.

HELLO THERE
Mar 22, 2010



I'm curious: Is the US incarceration rate the highest ever recorded? How does it compare with, say, North Korea, or the Soviet Union during the height of the Gulag system?

The New Black
Oct 1, 2006

Had it, lost it.

Oryx and Friends posted:

Racial profiling in America fun - I was just riding my bike around right now and noticed a police officer driving around really slowly. I thought this interesting (note - I am white and thus would suffer no consequences from bothering this police officer) and decided to follow at a distance. He drove around a bit and then stopped in front of one house. The house just happened to be my Iranian friend's house! He was stopped outside for at least two minutes before I approached and asked what the officer was about. He said he was just patrolling and then drove away, though I'm not sure at all about this.

e - I actually am pretty sure what it was about, and the answer is anti-Islamic sentiment, which resulted in biased police focus upon a hated outgroup, which is the root of all the racist bias in the American justice system.

I think the truly appaling level of anti-Islamic sentiment in the US is really laid bare by a lot of those cartoons that were posted in the LF thread after the whole "NASA muslim outreach" thing. The government says it wants NASA to help with outreach to the Muslim world, and basically every conservative cartoonist made a cartoon showing Obama kissing the feet of a middle eastern suicide bomber. They literally believe that all Muslims are a) arabs and b) terrorists.

21stCentury
Jan 4, 2009

by angerbot


Thanks to the GBS Prison thread, I got interested in the whole Criminal Justice System issue. Since then, i often steer the conversation when i talk to my dad about the Criminal Justice System. We live in Canada, but it's no reason not to talk about America. Especially when every 2 week or so, there's something in the news that's great proof of how ridiculous punishment-based Criminal Justice is.

He was, sadly, nonplussed when I told him the implications of that new law refusing pardons to violent and sexual offenders.

Today, we went to see a movie (Piche: Entre Ciel et Terre), a biopic about an airline pilot who saved a whole 300 people through his quick thinking and nerves of steel. When he was a younger pilot, he did some drug trafficking and moved some pot from Jamaica to the US and got caught in Georgia, where he was sent to Prison.

The scenes in prison were sort of accurate, I guess. It allowed me to tell him about Prison gang and the real power they have, both inside and outside. It allowed me tell him about how prison surprise sex and race wars are implicitly condoned by the guards, the justice system and the American people.

When I gave him the statistics, the fact that 1% of Americans are behind bars, that 25% of people behind bars are Americans, that 1 in 31 adults are under the eye of the department of Corrections, he was quick to tell me how skeptical he was.

To him, it was impossible that America could have a recidivism rate around 50%, house 25% of the world's inmates and that the incarceration rates are growing, it made no sense to him that so many Americans were behind bars and he was quick to point that it was impossible, they'd run out of people to put behind bars.

I had to show him actual graphs and sources before he believed me.

Not sure if i completely changed his mind, when i talk to him about it, he usually gets a bit grumpy. i guess it's natural, he actually wrote letters to political prisoners, donated to Amnesty international, when he was younger. Like many others, he just turns around.

I think this thread and the ones before really did help change at least 2 minds, mine and my dad's. Keep it up.

Fluoride Jones
Aug 24, 2009

You're lucky I care about lady pecs.

HELLO THERE posted:

I'm curious: Is the US incarceration rate the highest ever recorded? How does it compare with, say, North Korea, or the Soviet Union during the height of the Gulag system?

Currently, the United States' incarceration rate the highest in the world at 748 per 100,000 (I couldn't find any figures on North Korea). According to this article, we surpassed the Soviet Union in incarceration in 1998.

HELLO THERE
Mar 22, 2010



Fluoride Jones posted:

Currently, the United States' incarceration rate the highest in the world at 748 per 100,000 (I couldn't find any figures on North Korea). According to this article, we surpassed the Soviet Union in incarceration in 1998.
Holy loving poo poo!

How much would it cost for us (or me) to rent a billboard on a major highway with that sentence on it?

21stCentury
Jan 4, 2009

by angerbot


Edit: Disregard this.

Y-Hat
Feb 10, 2007

I'll get you, I'll burn you, I'll crush you, I'll flush you down, down
The toilet where you'll spiral around, round
Awwww tick... tick tick tick


Thanks for this, Fire.

The only thing I've read about Angola prison is an article or radio piece about the inmates there (who are mostly black) do slave work on a golf course. As a younger person, I didn't give it much thought, but thinking back there are a lot of ridiculous racial undertones in a largely black prison population servicing a largely white clientele.

Oryx and Friends
Nov 5, 2009



The New Black posted:

I think the truly appaling level of anti-Islamic sentiment in the US is really laid bare by a lot of those cartoons that were posted in the LF thread after the whole "NASA muslim outreach" thing. The government says it wants NASA to help with outreach to the Muslim world, and basically every conservative cartoonist made a cartoon showing Obama kissing the feet of a middle eastern suicide bomber. They literally believe that all Muslims are a) arabs and b) terrorists.

Omg those are so appalling just considering them is painful. Yes, reaching out to the Muslim community means reaching out to terrorists exclusively. Imagine if Obama had instead wanted to reach out to Jews and then everyone made political cartoons about Nasa reaching out to greedy rich bankers.

Oryx and Friends
Nov 5, 2009



The funniest part of that interaction is the house he was outside was solely inhabited by the nicest 50 year old lady I have ever met in my life, as my friend is studying abroad at the moment.

Bip Roberts
Mar 29, 2005



Fluoride Jones posted:

According to this article, we surpassed the Soviet Union in incarceration in 1998.

I may not know much about the Soviet Union in 1998 but...

Edit: I read the article and it's "former", which is important.

Sylink
Apr 17, 2004


Lets not forget that prison serves as a means of disenfranchisement since people on probation or parole are often forbidden from voting except after undergoing some restorative process or other waiting period.

This was a huge loving deal in 2000 since Florida has about a million ex-cons and at the time all ex-cons were barred from voting. Gore would have probably won since the margin was only 500 votes had they not been permanently disenfranchised.

Florida has since changed their policy.

Oh and basically 13% of black men can't vote due to the prison system and about 5 million Americans total.

Y-Hat
Feb 10, 2007

I'll get you, I'll burn you, I'll crush you, I'll flush you down, down
The toilet where you'll spiral around, round
Awwww tick... tick tick tick


Oryx and Friends posted:

Omg those are so appalling just considering them is painful. Yes, reaching out to the Muslim community means reaching out to terrorists exclusively. Imagine if Obama had instead wanted to reach out to Jews and then everyone made political cartoons about Nasa reaching out to greedy rich bankers.
Let's not forget that the Republican Lenin, Ronald Reagan, talked about this exact same thing in the '80s.

Fluoride Jones
Aug 24, 2009

You're lucky I care about lady pecs.

Dusseldorf posted:

I may not know much about the Soviet Union in 1998 but...

Edit: I read the article and it's "former", which is important.

Well, yeah. But the point is that in 1998, the United States surpassed the former Soviet Union in terms of incarceration per 100,000 people, presumably at the USSR's height of incarcerating people. That was 12 years ago that we surpassed that statistic and the incarceration rate has only grown.

Shimrra Jamaane
Aug 9, 2007

Remind me to work out until I also am buff and have to keep a pillow in front of my okay I'll be honest this is like the 50th custom title I've done tonight and I'm just phoning it in now.

You know, I showed my moderate/conservative father the Joe Arpaio site because I was trying to convince him how hosed up and corrupt the police are in Arizona specifically. (we started with talking about the immigration law) He read through it and got back to my saying that he just doesn't believe it and thinks that "some of it may be true, some of it is sure exaggeration, and some of it are lies." His rational is that if someone was guilty of all that he would be punished by the law or at least be voted out. Since he hasn't, he honestly believes that the stories cannot be fully true. He also defended the need to have an apc for a sheriff county and gave the standard bullshit spiel about gangs outgunning the cops on the street or whatever. He was also suspicious of the guy whose house burned down because he caught a contradiction in the story about whether the apc was unmarked or not.

I didn't bother showing him the prison stuff since it is clear that my dad has the same problem that is rampant throughout this country: he believes in the infallibility of the system, and if something is grossly wrong then it wouldn't be allowed to continue. I mean, this is a man who, to this day, honest to god believes that we went into Iraq because our intelligence honestly pointed to there being WMDs in Saddam's control.

It's frustrating to say the least.

Sylink
Apr 17, 2004


I dont know how old your dad is, but guessing I still have no idea how people grow up through Vietnam, Nixon, and all the hosed up poo poo the CIA and Reagan did and actually believe the system "works".

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Bip Roberts
Mar 29, 2005



Shimrra Jamaane posted:

He was also suspicious of the guy whose house burned down because he caught a contradiction in the story about whether the apc was unmarked or not.

How would an unmarked APC even work?

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