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benito
Sep 28, 2004

And I don't blab
any drab gab--
I chatter hep patter

This thread is great--I'd gotten bored with some of the podcasts I was listening to, so these suggestions come at the perfect time. I'm burning through a bunch of the Doug Loves Movies shows and it's weirdly compelling.

I've been listening to the various Kevin Smith-related podcasts since the beginning. Smodcast has gotten weird, with fewer interesting stories and more whining about his weight and giggling over Fleshlights. Tell 'Em Steve Dave is more entertaining for me, because it's a new set of stories and the guys good-naturedly fight with each other and give each other crap. Kevin comes across as so pitiful nowadays that it would seem cruel if his friends were ragging on him, so that back and forth is mostly gone. That one episode where his wife was consoling him after getting kicked off the Southwest flight was just really uncomfortable and sad.

Here's one out of left field... The Vinyl Cafe with Stuart McLean. Just recently available on iTunes as a podcast. I've often described it to people as a Canadian version of A Prairie Home Companion, except McLean isn't as preachy and bitter as Keillor has become. The format is similar, with music, reading letters from listeners, and a portion where McLean tells a story, usually based around a fictional family headed by Morley and Dave, who used to be a roadie for bands in the 70s and 80s and now runs a tiny record shop.

This is more folksy and family-friendly than most of the podcasts listed here, and there's some Canada-specific humor, but if you're curious I'd suggest checking out one of the funniest stories McLean ever told: Dave Cooks the Turkey (about 30 minutes long, but it's worth it)

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benito
Sep 28, 2004

And I don't blab
any drab gab--
I chatter hep patter

Re: Adam Carolla

A PRIZED MULE! posted:

I used to listen to him, and he's funny, but either he needs to scale back the podcast a little or someone needs to remind him not to say the same thing EVERY SHOW.

I really enjoy the podcast, but I think he and his team could benefit either from some judicious editing or a producer to keep things in line. I'm not talking about content or language, but there's little things like guests having their cell phones turned off or having their mikes on and tested before they start speaking.

The show is creeping up to 2 hours per day, and while he gets some fascinating guests that part of the show keeps shrinking. I tend to listen to it while I'm cooking dinner, eating, and cleaning up the kitchen, so it's more of a habit than anything else, but I think it could be a really tight and well-produced 3-4 hours per week rather than the sloppier 7.5 hours per week that it's become. The intros and outros for various segments are too long. The occasional sound effects tend to distract everyone. The Isaac Hayes soundboard interviews drag on and on and are better suited to a Morning Zoo radio show than a podcast.

Also: listening to a bunch of these comedy podcasts, and all the "inside baseball" combined with occasional performance material among the standups has made me realize that Dr. Katz is really the prototype for much of what we're listening to, and it featured many of the same folks we're talking about.

benito
Sep 28, 2004

And I don't blab
any drab gab--
I chatter hep patter

Strange Matter posted:

The hour long interview format got on my nerves because Adam's attention span is too short and he ends up spinning off into rants about his loathesome politics. He always griped about being confined by the radio format, but honestly without some structure, he's virtually unlistenable.

I think it's moving into the worst of both worlds right now. There's a lot of filler that just seems designed to waste time, like the Isaac Hayes fake conversations and the increasingly lackluster news segments. If the rants and politics bother you, those are present in full force. Also, keep in mind that it's creeping up to 2 hours a day--no commercials, no music, and no producer or boss to keep Adam's ego in check.

He's a talented guy and I really enjoyed the podcast over the past year, but here in the past two months it seems to be getting harder and harder to listen to. Especially with all the wacky sound effects that keep interrupting people and, incidentally, just make the show longer.

benito
Sep 28, 2004

And I don't blab
any drab gab--
I chatter hep patter

Borrego posted:

And for my fellow goons who listen to Tell 'em Steve Dave an hour long argument between Bryan and Walter. As an avid listener it was pretty hard to listen to. They patched things up by the end and started doing commentary on what they thought was their worst live show in Houston.

Don't forget Walt's plan for combating movie piracy: the movie studios get to destroy pirates' computers via the internet with an electromagnetic pulse. It's really his best solution for society's problems since he suggested pairing up child molesters with midgets.

When you start worrying about the sanity of the hosts, is it time to stop listening?

Thanks to this thread I discovered The Nerdist, which is incredible. You know how Chris Hardwick talks about his dad, the professional bowler, and how he had a bowling alley in Memphis? I've been there dozens of times, and Chris probably handed me a pair of bowling shoes or sold me a Coke back in the 80s.

benito
Sep 28, 2004

And I don't blab
any drab gab--
I chatter hep patter

Borrego posted:

I agreed with almost everything he said about piracy but his knowledge of E.m.p.'s had me rolling. Especially when he found out it was a bomb that would take out a block and Bryan Yells "God drat it, we have no electricity you just had to pirate Ernest goes to Hollywood for the 27th time... again!

It's one of those weird things that you don't have to agree or disagree with the guy to realize that he's driven by two things: fear and rage, both based on rumors and urban legends. His rant about not wanting to go to Mexico is classic. OK, he doesn't want to go to Mexico. No big deal. But he starts explaining that eating or drinking anything in Mexico will kill you instantly, and even if you refuse to eat or drink anything, you'll be kidnapped and killed by drug cartels. He won't fly in airplanes, he refuses to eat anything other than pizza or fried chicken, him shutting down entirely in Houston...

Like the other guy said, I loved Walt's appearances on Smodcast, and even found that honking nerd laugh endearing. But the more I listen to TESD, the more I think there's a deeply disturbed, paranoid mind at work.

benito
Sep 28, 2004

And I don't blab
any drab gab--
I chatter hep patter

My iTunes is downloading podcasts right now, and I see there's a new Tell 'Em Steve Dave. That is 3 hours 40 minutes long, presumably the last installment of agonizing analysis and arguing over the Houston show.

I like the fact that podcasts can be flexible with time--they don't have to hit a precise 30 minute or 60 minute limit, but I think 220 minutes is kind of ridiculous, especially on such a pointless topic. But I'll probably listen to the whole thing later this afternoon...

Also: Some faith is restored in Adam Carolla after the Donal Logue episode. It was a return to the interview format of the older podcasts, and it kept more of the focus on the guest rather than Adam's rants.

benito
Sep 28, 2004

And I don't blab
any drab gab--
I chatter hep patter

Just listened to the most recent Smodcast with Kevin Smith's mom. She's been on there before, but it had been a while. I just realized how much Walt Flanagan sounds like Kevin's mom, not just in accent but also in cadence and mannerisms and occasionally getting ashamed by something. Kind of creepy once you notice it.

benito
Sep 28, 2004

And I don't blab
any drab gab--
I chatter hep patter

WTF with Marc Maron got disturbing today. Jonathan Ames telling the stump story... Eghghghhh... This is one of those things where you might tell someone, "Hey, check out WTF", and they decide to start today, and then look at you like you're some dangerous pervert.

benito
Sep 28, 2004

And I don't blab
any drab gab--
I chatter hep patter

sambafish posted:

Speaking of Car Talk does anyone know if there is any truth to the story Jesse Thorn told on NNF about adding in more laughs in during post processing? Jimmy and Matt react to this story as if it's real, but I honestly can't tell if Jesse is joking or not.

I didn't hear the NNF show, but most people don't realize how Car Talk is put together. You call in with a question, and then they call you back the afternoon that they're taping. That's why you don't have random callers who are incoherent, hang up, or don't even know what kind of car they drive. If I remember correctly they tape about 90-120 minutes, and it gets edited down to the best calls and the dead spots are removed. A producer feeds them some tech info occasionally. It's actually a pretty good model for a call-in show if you want to avoid all the "turn down your radio" and "longtime listener first time caller" crap.

benito
Sep 28, 2004

And I don't blab
any drab gab--
I chatter hep patter

Tig Notaro and Paul F. Tompkins were on Community tonight. And given how many podcasts Donald Glover and Joel McHale have been on, I was keeping my eyes peeled for other cameos the whole show.

The PFT part was particularly good.

benito
Sep 28, 2004

And I don't blab
any drab gab--
I chatter hep patter

cioxx posted:

I'm starting to cool towards both Marc Maron and Nerdist as of late.

I think that happens to everyone eventually regardless of the show. I used to listen pretty heavily to some of the TWIT network shows, but haven't touched them in two years. Fortunately there's enough new content out there that it's easy to switch.

The Nerdist: The recent episode with Brian Posehn was great, and the second half of the Adam Carolla one was pretty good with the Boogerman stories. (Though the first half was just Adam screaming about security guards and parking tickets like he does two or three times a week on his own show.)

Marc Maron: His podcast with Aziz Ansari would have been more interesting if it wasn't the fourth or fifth time I'd heard him as a guest on a show, and there's only so many stories the guy has to tell. Most times I kind of feel sorry for the guy, which isn't really conducive to humor. I guess it's good he didn't name the show "The Weeping Clown".

Larry Miller has been a real breath of fresh air, though, even if he gets easily off topic. But his stories are great, he's able to fill the time well, and it's not stuff you're heard over and over again.

benito
Sep 28, 2004

And I don't blab
any drab gab--
I chatter hep patter

Sorry for the late reply, but in reference to Donald Glover and Joel McHale on podcasts...

dividebyzero posted:

WHAT?!?! WHICH ONES?!? WHERE?!?!

DONGLOVER:
on the Nerdist
on The Sound of Young America
on WTF with Marc Maron

He's a great interview guest, because he's so happy and upbeat, but because he's so young (like Aziz Ansari) he doesn't have a ton of stories to tell at this point.

McHALE:
on the Nerdist
on the Adam Carolla Podcast

I think I've heard some others, but people talk about him a lot. I'm sure there are more for each of them as well, these are just ones that I could remember off the top of my head, and there's a lot of podcasts I don't listen to.

benito
Sep 28, 2004

And I don't blab
any drab gab--
I chatter hep patter

The Modern Leper posted:

Not a "true" WTF (it's a live panel), but this episode is great just because everyone just BOMBS on the stage. It's funny, but really awkward and "cringey" cause the audience just doesn't know how to take some things. I can't remember Glover's role, but I definitely need to listen to this one again.

Yeah, I kind of slapped the list together, but sometimes podcasts and NPR and Onion AV club interviews tend to run together in my memory--the same central figure will often repeat himself over and over again out of necessity. Add in TV, radio, and newspaper appearances, and they can't do something unique for each show.

I was a little annoyed when I noticed this trend of "making the circuit" on podcasts, but I guess it was inevitable. NPR got bad about this in the early 00s, when I had a job where I could listen to a half dozen different shows a day from around the country. There was the guy who wrote a history of salt that showed up on every single NPR program in the space of a few weeks. As far as I know he might even have shown up on Car Talk to talk about salting the roads in the winter.

benito
Sep 28, 2004

And I don't blab
any drab gab--
I chatter hep patter

Anyone listen to Greg Fitzsimmons? I decided to go through a few episodes starting with the Norm MacDonald one. Not only could I barely hear Norm, but he sounded like he was barely conscious. Big disappointment there. The Brian Regan one is great, though.

I'm giving it a shot because of Fitzsimmons' appearances on other podcasts. Is it worth going through the back catalog of episodes?

benito
Sep 28, 2004

And I don't blab
any drab gab--
I chatter hep patter

NecronSchmecron posted:

Kevin Smith guys, amirite?

Looks like he's had another airplane incident, so expect this to be the primary topic on his podcasts for the next couple of months:

Dallas News posted:

The skies aren't so friendly for Kevin Smith (left). Less than eight months after the director got removed from a Southwest flight, he's had trouble with Virgin America. Smith took to his blog to complain about how he and his wife, Jennifer Schwalbach, missed their flight at JFK on Monday, despite arriving at the gate with first-class tickets and minutes to spare:

He explained that he doesn't like to board early because "When you're the Too Fat To Fly guy on a plane? Well everyone stares." In a subsequent post, Smith said he'd received an apologetic e-mail from the airline.

Kevin Smith and Adam Carolla are starting to get on my nerves for the same reason: they're either rehashing the same dozen stories about their lives from ages 10-25, or they're complaining about poor customer service at airports. They're both interesting people, but drat, it gets old after a while. Go out there, do some living, have some experiences, and come back when you've got a story to tell. Don't just fill up time by repeating yourself over and over again.

benito
Sep 28, 2004

And I don't blab
any drab gab--
I chatter hep patter

FuriousGeorge posted:

I always enjoy the awkwardness that ensues when Adam Carolla goes off about Mexicans or whatever, especially when he's on someone else's show. Since he's usually in the presence of other comedians (who are generally pretty liberal) the sense of "hmm, this guy's not trying to be edgy or ironically racist, he's just actually racist" is palpable.

There are a couple of topics where Carolla gets amped up and goes past the Sam Kinison screaming and it's just pure anger and rage, and there's nothing funny or entertaining about it. It's typically the point where any guests or co-hosts shut up and everyone--listeners included--desperately wants for there to be a new subject of discussion. Personally I find it very uncomfortable, and tend to skip ahead 15 minutes or so.

It's not that I'm offended, it's more that it's not funny and it comes off as just a bitter and misdirected screed for whatever the hell is bothering him. Lisa Lampanelli can say far worse stuff but it's played off with a laugh. Tons of comics make jokes about Latinos and some are funny, some are appropriate, some are neither, but typically the flow moves with the audience or the co-hosts. With Adam it just becomes one angry dude screaming into a microphone. Hearing him go on a race/gender-tinged rampage about airport ticket agents makes you yearn for the days of "What's the deal with airline peanuts?"

benito
Sep 28, 2004

And I don't blab
any drab gab--
I chatter hep patter

Majorian posted:

Yeah, I just avoided that one. I mean, I KIND OF get the connection between nerds and MMA, but it seems like it's a bad fit for an interview.

I thought it was a good episode, besides not really knowing or caring about MMA. One thing that sets it apart from other Nerdist podcasts is that the host genuinely doesn't know much about MMA either (and in fact keeps getting the various organizations mixed up), so he asks good questions. I was going to skip it myself, but the stories about the fighter spending his teenage years drinking Dr. Pepper and making Doom levels was pretty funny, they get off on a brief tangent about tentacles in anime, and even talk about Bruce Lee for a bit.

I've been burning through some old Sound of Young America podcasts at night, and what generally happens is I fall asleep about 15 minutes in. That's not a knock on the show, and if it's something really interesting I pay attention, but since I seem to be training myself to fall asleep to the sound of Jesse Thorn's voice, I can't listen to those shows in the car.

benito
Sep 28, 2004

And I don't blab
any drab gab--
I chatter hep patter

krushgroove posted:

Like Lou says the TWIT method of talking about the new Ford whatever for 5-8 minutes is pretty annoying - if it were at least spread out in the conversation or if it bookended the show that would be much better. I really hate the way the Smodcast shows have literally 8 minutes of ads and promotions, I know it might seem 'better' to get them out in the beginning instead of at the end when people can just skip to the next show, but IMO they'd do much better to just intersperse the show with promos, even if a live show with an audience cuts to a studio-recorded promo.

It is interesting to watch this phase of experimentation with podcast advertising. You're right about the Smodcast ones--way too long and rambling. I think Carolla is hitting a pretty good stride with the ads interspersed throughout the show, a mix of pre-recorded commercials with mentions in the conversation. Greg Fitzsimmons, I think, does all his Audible ads as slipped into the conversation, so even though he repeats himself a bit, it keeps things fresh. (He also recommends specific books, which is nice.)

I wonder when we're going to start hearing slicker, more polished, professional ads? Right now most of the advertising is on a level with homemade Geocities sites from the 90s. Good enough to get the job done then, but embarrassing after a while.

benito
Sep 28, 2004

And I don't blab
any drab gab--
I chatter hep patter

Games on comedy podcasts. Discuss.

The Leonard Maltin Game doesn't count, because it's an essential component of Doug Loves Movies. But it is worth mentioning because of the many episodes that involve having to explain the game to the participants.

The various games are everywhere. Greg Fitzsimmons and Tell 'Em Steve Dave both used the same bit, the idea of telling stories and guessing which one is true. This is a terrible game because, at best you've got a 50/50 chance of getting it right, and most people get confused about the setup AND aren't really good at the necessary performance part of it.

Even worse is the recent new game on Kevin Smith's "Jay and Silent Bob Get Old", where Jason Mewes and some lucky winner from the audience get to act out a fictional sex act that neither of them are familiar with.

Why do I point this out? I used to be a corporate trainer, and would often have to employ various icebreakers and energizers during the course of a two-week class. I learned quickly to ditch the games that didn't make any drat sense and mostly frustrated the participants. The remainder were fun among the group, but would not have been entertaining to an outside audience.

Basically, these things are sometimes necessary to keep a captive audience from going to sleep, but they don't necessarily make for good broadcasting. Podcast listeners A) aren't participating and B) get really tired of hearing the rules explained every week.

benito
Sep 28, 2004

And I don't blab
any drab gab--
I chatter hep patter

The WTF with Rob Corddry is a great one--Maron is in a good mood because of the NYT article, Corddry is upbeat and doesn't have any major addictions or other personal problems, and it's hilarious. (The darker episodes are great, but it's nice to hear one that's this light.)

Near the beginning Maron mentions that he just interviewed Kevin Smith... That should be interesting.

benito
Sep 28, 2004

And I don't blab
any drab gab--
I chatter hep patter

Just started in with the Kevin Pollack podcast. Great stuff, good balance, and interesting conversation. But the length! I'm listening to the tail end of the Andy Richter episode, which is two and a half hours long. I've cleaned the kitchen, cooked and ate lunch, walked the dogs, done some laundry, caught up on e-mail, and I've still got a half hour to go.

benito
Sep 28, 2004

And I don't blab
any drab gab--
I chatter hep patter

wafflesnsegways posted:

Maron was on Air America. I don't necessarily want to hear him talk about politics all the time, but I bet he'd be great at interviewing politicians. You rarely hear really personal interviews with politicians, that would be interesting. Lots of other people would be interesting. There are lots of interesting people out there, that's all I'm saying.

I think he'd have to have a separate studio and, at the very least, be aligned with some other podcasting network for that to happen. As it is he's doing the pre-show stuff in his kitchen and recording in the garage--it's easy to invite friends to do that, but with strangers it's a different matter. Also, for politicians to appear on the show he'd have to drop the "Pow! I just poo poo my pants" and Adam & Eve ads. And even the name of the show is somewhat problematic for a politician. If constituents and potential voters hear the word "gently caress" a dozen times before the candidate even gets introduced, that's a PR nightmare. Ditto for lots of other categories of guests.

I like the show as it is, though I don't listen to it expecting any humor. I've often thought it ought to be called "Tears of a Clown", since it explores the dark, depressing, offstage life of comics.

The great thing is that there are so many different podcasts out there, there's room for a lot of divergent tastes. I really wanted to like the Greg Proops podcast, since I've always enjoyed his work in the past. But I discovered that something about his voice and pronunciation really gets on my nerves in an hour-long format. I found "The Sound of Young America" to be kind of boring, so I started listening to it to go to sleep. But then for some reason I like "Jordan Jesse Go" even though it's the same host.

benito
Sep 28, 2004

And I don't blab
any drab gab--
I chatter hep patter

Rudy Riot posted:

A lot of movies still come out in that Zucker Abrahams Zucker style every year(Scary Movies, TEEN Movie, or whatever), they're just not very good. Those dudes are in their 60s now, but I know Abrahams directed Scary Movie 4. I don't know if the other ones are still active.

One of the big problems with the "X Movie" franchise is that if you haven't seen the dozen movies that came out the year before, the individual scenes aren't meaningful or funny, and the sources aren't necessarily connected by the same subject or theme, just that they came out in the same year. There's lots of other problems, but they're made with a pretty short shelf life. The really successful and hilarious ones that worked in the past were much more general: Airplane was spoofing the whole genre of airplane disaster movies, but also worked for anyone that's ever been on an airplane. The Naked Gun took from any number of police movies and TV shows, and moving into Mel Brooks' territory, Blazing Saddles was a great parody of the western genre in general. The Brooks movies got worse as the subject material got more specific--Spaceballs, Dracula Dead and Loving It, etc.

I think the only movie that's come out in the past years that is really in the tradition of the best ZAZ movies is Black Dynamite. Not only is it a brilliantly made film, but again, it's spoofing the entire genre of blaxploitation, rather than a specific example.

benito
Sep 28, 2004

And I don't blab
any drab gab--
I chatter hep patter

Over in the Red State thread, I pointed out that I really would have no interest in going to a Kevin Smith Q&A, since he's podcasting for hours every week and constantly tweeting and otherwise transmitting his thoughts. What on earth could I possibly ask the guy? I also wondered if maybe it would be a good idea to dial back the online presence to build demand for the Red State tour.

Smith has decided to go in the opposite direction, adding FOUR MORE HOURS EVERY DAY of his rants. There's parts of this S.I.R. plan that sound interesting, but dear God...

benito
Sep 28, 2004

And I don't blab
any drab gab--
I chatter hep patter

shotgunbadger posted:

Does he even do anything anymore? I know he bought his own movie and poo poo but like, is podcasting now his job, and cashing in royalties and all?

Apparently he's making decent money off all the appearances, and has announced his plans to retire from making movies. But again: 26 hours of Kevin Smith ranting per week? Anyone that wants to listen to it all is basically taking on a part-time job.

benito
Sep 28, 2004

And I don't blab
any drab gab--
I chatter hep patter

Grant DaNasty posted:

I'm listening to the new Smodcast and Kevin said that when he asked Mosier to do a daily show, he said "I enjoy doing the show, but I don't have the pressing need to be in front of people that you have."

This is getting bizarrely meta, since at this point he mainly talks about talking. Even his ads are just invitations to come and hear him talk some more, but he's not really discussing any subjects--just mentioning his other podcasts and plans for more talking in the future, and how happy it all makes him to just keep on talking. At least with Hollywood Babble-On the co-host manages to keep him to a certain structure and occasionally talk about a movie that he's seen recently.

In the WTF interview and the Adam Carolla interview, he was actually a lot more interesting because there was some conversation and somebody sober was able to push him back on topic and introduce outside ideas. Left to his own devices it's just incoherent rambling, and I think that four more hours a day of that is just going to make it worse.

Obviously I'm not being forced to listen, and most likely won't listen to the new material. I worry though, that with the popularity of the Smodcast network, that a further reduction in quality potentially hurts other shows by association, particularly at a time when advertisers are just testing the waters with this new media. I am truly amazed at how good some of the Kevin Pollak shows are, even if I think they're a bit long for this format. Kevin Smith is starting to sound like that time on King of the Hill when Dale Gribble had his own radio station.

benito
Sep 28, 2004

And I don't blab
any drab gab--
I chatter hep patter

Just finished running through the Tobolowsky Files. Really impressive. Between him, Kevin Pollak, and Larry Miller you've got three solid character actors with a good sense of humor and a generally upbeat attitude. And all together, they've got 400 acting credits on IMDB--meaning they've worked with everyone, had successes and failures, and most importantly, have a ton of stories to tell and the ability to do so in a structured manner. (Well, Miller is kind of free form, but he talks so fast that it's not long before he gets back on point.) But they're also capable of talking about darker material without wallowing in self pity or whining or getting furious.

It makes me think about that documentary Comedian that looked at Jerry Seinfeld versus a struggling standup named Orny Adams. At some point an agent or producer is trying to straighten out Adams, and suggests that he take a look at Stephen Wright. Adams gets hostile and says, "Oh yeah? What has he done recently." The agent points out that the previous year Wright had won an Oscar for a short film.

benito
Sep 28, 2004

And I don't blab
any drab gab--
I chatter hep patter

Ugly In The Morning posted:

Also, the Dino WTF was unexpectedly skeezy. Yeesh.

That one goes up there with two others that made me want to take a shower afterward. Jonathan Ames and Jim Norton. It's such a good show, but there's the odd one that is so weird and offputting that it's going to be someone's first exposure to the show, and they'll think all of them are like that.

It's going to be weird seeing Dino on Community from now on. Ugh.

benito
Sep 28, 2004

And I don't blab
any drab gab--
I chatter hep patter

I'm surprised that Comedy Central hasn't embraced the "comedy nerd" concept. (I don't like that term, but it seems to be sticking.) Something like the documentary I Am Comic or any of the podcasts that look behind the scenes of comedy (Greg Fitzsimmons, WTF, etc.). The network has shown that it can take a more serious turn with The Daily Show. There are also some successful models from the past, like Behind the Music and E! True Hollywood Story.

I seem to recall a couple of one-off specials, but they've got a great opportunity these days with all the footage they own (all the specials, tons of comedians appeared on Dr. Katz). It doesn't have to be as dark as WTF or as fawning as The Nerdist, but there seems to be a growing interest in how comedy works, even if that discussion isn't particularly funny. Take some of that South Park ad revenue and make something like the Joan Rivers documentary.

benito
Sep 28, 2004

And I don't blab
any drab gab--
I chatter hep patter

Trying out a couple of other podcasts now that I've caught up with various ones that were recommended here. Even though I'm not a sports fan, I'm really enjoying Sklarboro Country. Some of the bits get kind of old (HENDERSON!), but so far it's not getting on my nerves.

I'm also weirdly fond of Jackie Kashian's "The Dork Forest". She's got some of the usual roster of rotating podcasters and comedians as guests, but mixes in some others that are out of nowhere. And the one with Paul F. Tompkins and his wife was kind of sweet. When she's got a guest from the upper midwest, it can get mired in regional references, but since I've got family up there it's nice to hear.

benito
Sep 28, 2004

And I don't blab
any drab gab--
I chatter hep patter

Tell 'Em Steve Dave this week has Walt trying to explain how viral videos on YouTube are the work of the Illuminati or similar conspiracy. Also, music can apparently make people go out and commit murder.

I think I'm going to have to drop this one.

Sklarboro Country with Amy Poehler was pretty cool, though.

benito
Sep 28, 2004

And I don't blab
any drab gab--
I chatter hep patter

Ugly In The Morning posted:

Joe Rogan's on todays WTF. That's a surprise, I thought they hated each other. I haven't gotten to listen to it yet, but it should be interesting.

One of the things that makes WTF so compelling is that he's bringing on guests that he either knows that he has a bad history with or assumes that he does. It's easy to invite over your lifelong friends; different story to do what he's doing. There were a few episodes that could have been just crap for shock value (Dane Cook, Carlos Mencia), but those ended up being amazing interviews.

The Rogan episode is great, and I'm not particularly a fan of the guy.

benito
Sep 28, 2004

And I don't blab
any drab gab--
I chatter hep patter

Old Swerdlow posted:

So am I the only one who is totally of Keven Smith's podcast network stuff?

I've given up on listening to Smod cast because it seems they spend more time talking about their other shows instead of just having a fun chat.

The ten minutes of ad's is just ridiculous.

I'm with you. The guy's either talking about the show he just did, or the show he's about to do, or adding future podcasts that feature more rambling. The guy can be a great storyteller, like the whole Prince thing or the Superman script. But since he doesn't actually *do* anything anymore, it's not that compelling, and anyone who has listened to him for any length of time has already heard all of his old stories repeated ad nauseum. I don't see the TESD guys going anywhere interesting soon, and I don't think I can listen to Mewes' recovery stories anymore. Hollywood Babble-On has been lots of fun without Kevin Smith, which says a lot.

But don't dare criticize the guy or his long, rambling, pointless ads in the Red State thread. Folks get angry.

On better shows... I'm glad to see WTF and Nerdist doing two decent episodes a week. And Sunday's Kevin Pollak Chat Show with Fred Savage was awesome. I knew the guy was doing some TV directing, but I didn't realize how much. Great stories about working on Party Down and It's Always Sunny in Philadelphia. A few funny nods to The Wonder Years.

benito
Sep 28, 2004

And I don't blab
any drab gab--
I chatter hep patter

Strange Matter posted:

This is my experience as well. The first episode I listened to was Brian Posehn with James Adomian. Adomian was doing his food critic character and it was incredibly unpleasant to listen to. He's rightly hated in my opinion. I gave it a second chance and it was okay, and then I listened to the episode with Patten Oswalt and Brett Gelman, and almost crashed my car when Brett recited iBrain.

I've listened to about a dozen CDR episodes in the past week, and I've found that I treat it like Saturday Night Live: I skip the music and I skip sketches I dislike. For whatever reason, I don't like the characters or the "Would You Rather?" game, but I love the actual real interview portion.

One exception: So many people in this thread talked about their love of the character Li'l Gary. It took me about three appearances before I finally got it, and now I think it's hilarious. This morning I called my dog Mott Skaukerman and he just looked confused.

benito
Sep 28, 2004

And I don't blab
any drab gab--
I chatter hep patter

big business sloth posted:

Uh, what? What? I really don't think there is any kind of "real interview portion" on CDRR, at least to speak of. If you're skipping the characters and WYR? then you're skipping 90% of the comedy, so how does that work exactly?

I'm not deep into the podcast, but for example the recent Paul Reubens show was mostly interview. For some of the early ones, there's the sort of "real" conversation (perhaps not a proper interview) before the guest goes into his or her routine or characters. It's like on late night shows where a comedian has a normal conversation with the host versus just slipping into part of the standup routine while sitting on the couch. I like the former, not the latter.

Out of an hour show, I like about 30 minutes. That's not bad, but it does mean that I'm more likely to listen to it while I'm by the computer where it's easier to skip ahead. Would You Rather? just seems to drag on and doesn't do anything for me. Kevin Pollak's "Tweet Five" seems to work better, and whether you like it or not, at least it's brief.

benito
Sep 28, 2004

And I don't blab
any drab gab--
I chatter hep patter

Steve Slavery posted:

Maybe CDR isn't your type of podcast, the Paul Rubens show was unlike the regular show at all.

I like aspects of it. It's well produced. The guests are great. It's professional--people aren't answering their cell phones or having five minute long digressions over a technical issue. I like it, just not all of it.

I might be odd here, but I don't really listen to comedy podcasts expecting to laugh. I don't even really care that much about the general industry of standup and writing jokes. But out of all of the guests and hosts that are out there in many different subjects, these are folks who are able to carry on a conversation, speak into a microphone properly, and connect with an audience either real or imagined. And that's entertaining, and enjoyable to listen to while you're running errands or doing something boring.

benito
Sep 28, 2004

And I don't blab
any drab gab--
I chatter hep patter

Conrad_Birdie posted:

But...But....Would You Rather?...My mind is blown that someone could listen to CDR and not like WYR.

It probably has a lot to do with the fact that I used to be a corporate trainer, and there are various icebreakers/engergizers/games that work and others that don't work. The really good ones are fun for the trainer, the participants, and anyone else that is nearby. Something about the WYR game annoys the hell out of me, and it probably has to do with teaching a class in Denver one summer. Frankly I dislike podcast games in general, especially when every episode involves trying to explain the rules to the guest. (CDR doesn't do this. DLM seems to go 50/50. I commend the Tweet 5 game because it's quick, simple, and snappy.)

Like I said, I've only listened to about a dozen CDR episodes so far, and I'm not piling hate upon it. I like it enough to keep listening, and perhaps I'll grow to love the parts that I'm currently skipping. I went back and forth a lot on the Adam Carolla podcast, but I think it's settled into an enjoyable show. I think the Larry Miller podcast was brilliant from the very first episode, yet I was unable to get into Uhh Yeah Dude. The great thing is that there's so much out there these days that we all have the luxury of selectively listening or ignoring altogether the stuff that doesn't hit our particular funny bones.

benito
Sep 28, 2004

And I don't blab
any drab gab--
I chatter hep patter

takamoron posted:

Haven't been able to sort through this whole thread yet, but I didn't see WKATZ listed in the OP.
The creator and host of the show is the amazingly funny Jonathan Katz of Dr. Katz and Home Movies fame. While he was not active for a while because of his Multiple Sclerosis, he's back with a vengenace!
While it hasn't been updated in a while and it's fairly erratic, I would listen to Jonathan Katz read the newspaper (and wait patiently for each time he did).

Those are great, thanks for the link. It's interesting to go back and watch episodes of Dr. Katz. Several current podcasters showed up in cartoon form, like Paul F. Tompkins, Marc Maron, Greg Berhendt, and Larry Miller. Plus a ton of other guests that show up regularly on comedy podcasts, like Dana Gould.

benito
Sep 28, 2004

And I don't blab
any drab gab--
I chatter hep patter

Fitzdog Radio was kind of odd today. His guest was Teresa Strasser who used to be Adam Carolla's sidekick. After a weird discussion of her sex life, she talked about how much she misses the podcast and can't even listen to it now. It looks like her leaving the show was more complicated than it appeared.

I'm still getting used to the new sidekick, Alison Rosen. She's not as confident as Strasser, and her voice is sort of muffled, but she's growing on me.

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benito
Sep 28, 2004

And I don't blab
any drab gab--
I chatter hep patter

Cromulent posted:

I wonder if we'll look back to this time in a few years and roll our eyes at all the wordplay in podcast names. Who Charted, Grapes of Rad, Skeptic Tank, Skarlboro Country (not necessarily saying those are bad names, btw)...it just seems like in a while we'll go "Ah, remember when podcasting took off in the early 2010's and everyone had silly wordplay titles?"

If something's successful, or is fondly remembered, people forget about the pun and just accept it as a name or title. Like The Beatles or Led Zepplin. Or how Noxema was a clever spelling of "No Eczema" a hundred years ago. Something can even have a stupid name that has nothing to do with the work, like with the comic strip Peanuts.

But if something is terrible, then you tend to make fun of the wordplay forever. Like Breakin' 2: Electric Boogaloo.

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