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bytebark
Sep 26, 2004

I hate Illinois Nazis

xzzy posted:

I looked up the address, and man, I will never have a reason to be out that way. How big is the store? Maybe when I get to the gear buying stage I'll try them out, if they're newbie friendly.

I've been in the Chicago area for 10 years and never gone through that area except when we're driving to the east coast.

It's not a huge store, not like Gunzo's at least, but they have all the basics (although for whatever reason, they don't stock CCM skates). Stick selection is very good though, and most importantly the staff actually knows what they're doing. For whatever reason (shits and giggles?) they stock those ultra-crappy $30 Sher-Wood shin pads. It's fun to feel around the poorly-padded part around where the kneecap goes one those and imagine the cracking sound of your knee cap as it hits the ice. Anyway there's probably no reason for you to venture down this far to this store, if you're closer to either of the reputable Gunzo's locations, unless they have a big sale or something (which you'd have to call to ask about). I will reiterate however that their sharpening jobs are second to none, and relatively quick because they have two machines and two people to run them.

The store is also located right down the street from Southwest Ice Arena (in Crestwood), a gritty south side rink and home of the rowdiest Friday-night open skates I've ever been to.

When I got all of my crap, I started with the skates (went to the above place, Jerry's), then got a bag at a Gunzo's pro shop. Got my shin, elbow, & shoulder pads, cup, gloves, and pants at the Gunzo's in Morton Grove. A week or so later I went to the one in River Forest and got an undershirt, helmet, mouthguard, two sticks and a water bottle. Went back to Jerry's in Alsip and got skate guards, suspenders, a dark jersey/socks and a few pairs of ultra-thin skate socks. White jersey and socks came from an online retailer selling Slap Shot movie stuff (Charlestown Chiefs!). Altogether I spent a dump truck full of money.


Edit:

xzzy posted:

Skating instructor suggested getting some superfeet last night, I haven't yet researched them.

Agreeing with another poster, get these, they're great. I have the yellow ones, you get the ones in your size range and trim them down to size with scissors.

bytebark fucked around with this message at Mar 16, 2011 around 20:30

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xzzy
Mar 5, 2009

Tonight's starting lineup is
brought to you by Satan.


Dangerllama posted:

But first do the Superfeet thing

(Christ, I feel like a salesman).

A good one, perhaps you have a future selling cars!

Do you use them in your shoes or your skates? Or both? I'm inclined to get them for my shoes to start with, my day-to-day shoes are pretty flat, but their description of the one intended for ice skates interests me.

Henrik Zetterberg
Dec 7, 2007



I've never heard of Superfeet until now. My skates aren't really that uncomfortable. Should I still consider a pair?

bewbies
Sep 23, 2003



Henrik Zetterberg posted:

I'm 5'9" and I use a 49" stick.



If my measurements are right that comes up to my mid-chest (I'm 6'). I think if I tried to use a stick like that I'd fall over on my face the first time I tried to shoot.

xzzy posted:

The reason I ask is because my teacher thinks the source of the problems I'm having with my calves/shins (short version: they burn like they're on fire) is I'm relying too much on those muscles to hold my balance. I tense up, and the muscles are fighting each other to keep me upright. It's been getting better as I get more comfortable on the ice and my leg strength improves, but there's still a lot of aches and pains.

This sounds about right to me. Specifically, I bet what you are doing is pressing down with your toes as a means of maintaining your balance, this as a result of not getting your knees bent and your back down low enough. Work on getting your posture lower (and bend those knees!), in the meantime try and take some breaks where you wiggle your toes around a bit, this should help the short term soreness.

bewbies fucked around with this message at Mar 16, 2011 around 20:42

bytebark
Sep 26, 2004

I hate Illinois Nazis

I got them not for arch support or anything, but because the regular inserts were getting sopping wet from sweat, and my foot was sticking to them and pulling them out when I took the skates off. The superfeet inserts are made of a heavier material, are stiffer, and so that solved my problem of the inserts bending up and not staying in the skate. Although it's not why I bought them, I do notice that the overall foot support is better.

xzzy
Mar 5, 2009

Tonight's starting lineup is
brought to you by Satan.


Henrik Zetterberg posted:

I've never heard of Superfeet until now. My skates aren't really that uncomfortable. Should I still consider a pair?
If it ain't broke, don't fix it.

Something like 20% of the population have good healthy feet with a solid arch and can go their whole lives without any kind of foot inserts. The rest of us just walk wrong.

Henrik Zetterberg
Dec 7, 2007



bewbies posted:



If my measurements are right that comes up to my mid-chest (I'm 6'). I think if I tried to use a stick like that I'd fall over on my face the first time I tried to shoot.

Sorry, I'm retarded. My shaft is 49". Total length wasn't counting the blade. Oops.

edit: VV

Henrik Zetterberg fucked around with this message at Mar 16, 2011 around 21:30

Dangerllama
Nov 16, 2007



xzzy posted:

A good one, perhaps you have a future selling cars!

Do you use them in your shoes or your skates? Or both? I'm inclined to get them for my shoes to start with, my day-to-day shoes are pretty flat, but their description of the one intended for ice skates interests me.

You put them in your skates. Helps with arch support and volume (I have a high arch and a narrow, low-volume foot). It'll change the feel of your skate (you'll feel like you're taking up twice as much room as before), but that should start to feen natural after a couple of skates.

Worst case scenario is that they don't help, but now you have awesome insoles for your skates.

Henrik Zetterberg posted:

My shaft is 49"

How do you walk?

bigmike
Oct 20, 2003



bewbies posted:

Heads up to anyone on the market for skates: Bauer is preparing to release a new line of Vapor skates, and as a result just about everywhere has cut the price of the current Vapor line by between $100-200 depending on the pair. Great time to pick them up.

I will grow a 110 flex if the RX60's go on sale.

bewbies
Sep 23, 2003



    Time to start on the "how to" part of the FAQ. Today I'll talk about
    shooting, people seem to have a lot of questions in general about shooting. I wish I could do my own videos, instead I had to scour youtube.


    I want to score goals. How does one do this?

    By shooting!

    I think shooting is the most technically demanding part of the game, and it is also one of the more useful skills to have at all levels of play. Being able to take a quick, heavy shot will go a long way to making you a
    dangerous motherfucker on the ice.


    Once you develop a heavy shot, you're going to see a lot of pucks going in. This is doubly true at lower levels, where goalies' positioning and reflexes aren't as good: often you really don't have to be terribly accurate (just hit the frame) to have a puck sneak in. Hard shots also create rebounds, which gives you assists, which makes people think you're a team player even if all you're doing is shooting all day long.

    That said, hockey is hard, and so is shooting. As such, I recommend you practice a lot. Luckily, shooting practice is fun! I'll give you some drills to try out later.




    Ok I am convinced, I want to be able to shoot well. Now what?

    There is one basic fact to understand about shooting: shot speed is determined by how fast your stick blade is moving as it releases the puck. In this way it is the same as golf; the only important determining factor is stick velocity. That said, there are a number of useful techniques to generate this velocity. All of them use the stick to store potential energy in the shaft, which is then released as quickly as possible into the puck to propel it forward.

    We talked about stick flex above, but I'm going to mention it again: the flex of the stick has a significant effect on how much (and how efficiently) potential energy can be stored in the stick. A stick with the appropriate amount of flex will ensure the highest possible energy loading: too stiff and you will not have the strength/technique to preload it enough, too whippy and you'll load it to its maximum level before reaching the limit of your strength/technique.



    What shots are available to me?

    First, this depends on who you ask. Everyone throughout the hockey world has different techniques and definitions for shots, so there are all sorts of answers you find out there. Here you will find mine!

    Anyway, the shot types I teach are:

  • Wrist shot - not as hard as a slapper, but release can be quicker and is far more accurate
  • Slap shot - the hardest shot, but the least accurate and longest release
  • Snap shot - quickest release, can be very hard and accurate with a lot of practice and as such it is the most used shot nowadays in the NHL
  • Backhand shot - very useful but no one can do it anymore
  • Chip shot (forehand and backhand) - useful in very specific situations


    I will describe how to do each of these in detail, and I'll post a youtube video that I think shows the proper technique.



    Wrist shot

    This is sort of a foundational shot, and it is the first shot you should work to perfect. It provides a good technical basis for the other shots (particularly the snap shot), is useful in nearly any game situation, and is really pretty easy to learn.

    When to use it:
    Pretty much anytime until your snapper is well developed. I still use it if I have a good open look and I really want to hit a small target.

    How it is done:
    Bottom hand is a touch lower than stickhandling position. The puck is drawn back behind the back leg (no need to go 6 feet behind you like you see in some videos), and weight is transferred to the back leg (bend the front knee again to ensure the weight is back). Position the puck on your blade, preferably on the heel.

    Then, simply sweep the stick forward. Drive with your back leg to shift your weight forward, slide the stick along the ice until it reaches roughly your front foot, let the puck roll from heel to toe, and as you get better, practice snapping your wrists as you come through. Roll your wrists as you follow through, and point your blade at your target.

    This is a pretty good tutorial, the little kid has a nice shot. This video featuring the legendary Mike Cammalleri is a good example of a very advanced shot.

    Other techniques and tips
  • Adding the "snap": don't try this initially, but as you get better, you can really add some velocity to this shot if you master a little snap at the end. This is done by allowing the puck to drift just slightly ahead of the blade as it is coming forward, then driving the blade down into the ice and/or into the puck to add some extra loading goodness. You then let the stick release its energy into the puck as you complete the shot. New players seem to notice this as the audible "crack" you can hear at the end of a wrister taken by an experienced player. It is very similar to the snapshot technique, which I'll discuss later.

    The timing on this is tricky, but it is really pretty simple to master. Once you've got the technique down, it is really a jack-of-all-trades shot, and it will probably be harder than most guys' slapshots in lower leagues.

  • Keeping your head up and hitting the target: I suggest that new players start this early on. Don't get used to keeping your head down while taking a wrister, it isn't really necessary. Instead, look at your target, follow through straight at it, and try and get used to doing it without looking at the puck. You'll be shocked how easy it can be to hit corners, and if you can do it with your head up, you've got a winner.



    Slap shot

    When to use it:
    Most commonly, it is used by defensemen on the point. It can also be useful in any situation where you are shooting it from outside, in which case it is very useful to be able to take it in stride.

    How it is done:
    When stationary, the puck should be just inside of your front foot. As you're learning, point your feet towards the puck. Lower hand should be about halfway down the shaft, a bit lower than your standard hand position. Weight should be on your back leg, your front knee should be bent slightly to reflect this.

    Raise the stick about waist high (maybe a bit higher, but any more than that is excessive for beginners), and keeping your eye on the puck, swing down hard, shifting your weight forward pushing hard with the back leg and drive your stick into the ice just a touch behind the puck. Follow through high, rolling your wrists over so your blade faces the ice and points at your target. The motion should be a downward one, not a forward one. To shoot high, you open the face of your blade as you make contact with the puck, to keep it low, you keep the blade level or cupped as you make contact.

    The key to getting power and accuracy with this shot, just like with any other, is preloading your stick properly. This is really determined by where you strike the ice: too far back and your stick will hit the ice, release too early and maybe swipe the top of the puck; hit too far forward and you're basically just hitting the puck, which prevents a lot of good preloading action from happening.

    Initially, you will have a very tough time elevating this shot. Don't sweat it, we were all like that at one point (generally youth players can't elevate their slappers at all until they're 11-12 years old at the earliest). Be satisfied with a hard, low shot that you can reliably get on net from the blue line. Don't fall into the trap of trying to hit the puck directly to elevate it: this is basically just a big snap shot and it is not a good habit to get into.

    This is the best video I've seen of a stationary slap shot, note his stick flex and how much weight he gets on the stick (and transferred through the shot).


    Other techniques and tips
  • Draw it inside while skating backwards: this is probably the most important skill to learn once you've mastered the basic shot. When you're playing the point, this is absolutely critical. Basically, when you're shooting, instead of just catching the puck and letting fly, you're moving backwards while controlling the puck, and you let a shot go while moving backwards. The trick to this is to draw the puck into your feet with the toe of your stick, then time your shot so you take your regular slap shot just as the puck reaches your normal release point. It is hard to do well and it takes a lot of practice, but if you're a defenseman it is incredibly useful. If you can do this reliably with your head up you are a superstar: Nicklas Lidstrom can do it better than anyone (watch the 2nd goal for an example).

  • Shooting while moving forward: this becomes very important at higher skill levels: if you only shoot while stationary, most of your slappers are going to get blocked. As a forward, you will most likely be shooting while skating. The trick here is to nudge the puck just a bit in front of you and then skate into it as you're shooting rather than trying to mimic the puck position you use while stationary. This is about the best example I could find of how to do this.

  • Keeping your head up: if you're new to the game, DON'T TRY THIS. Trust me, you're going to swing and miss, keep your eye on the puck. If you've been playing for a while and you have good muscle memory established for a slapper, you can give this a try. I tend to receive the puck, glance at its position relative to my feet, and then look up as I take the shot. I still swing and miss (or just mishit) sometimes though, its embarassing when it happens. Sergei Gonchar is wonderful at this, watch his eyes in this video.

  • Make your shot quick: it seems like a LOT of players at all skill levels are very fond of raising the stick way the hell above their heads and leaving it there for a bit while they think things over. Don't fall into this trap: make a short, quick backswing, don't pause at the top, and concentrate hard on driving that stick into the ice. A quick release is worth far more than a slightly harder shot; you'll notice that few professional players use a full windup in a game situation (and if they do, they're moving as they do it).

  • Don't aim high. We're all amazed by Yzerman's stupid overtime winner and the occasional Heatley highlights we see of him roofing slappers, but for all but elite levels of play, a low slap shot is far more useful. From the point it means that your shot is more deflectable (and less dangerous!), from a direct shot it means the goalie will have to go down to stop the shot, which means you have more of a target. A hard slapper aimed towards a post is a lethal combination for lower level goalies, as they don't get down fast enough or have the lateral mobility to deal with it.


    Snap Shot

    This has become probably the most widely used shot at the higher levels of the game. It generates velocity comparable to the wrist shot (better if you're very good), is reasonably accurate, and most importantly, has the quickest release. Personally, this is the shot I use about 75% of the time, and I bet I score 7 of 10 goals with it. I use it pretty much everywhere in the offensive zone (including the point). I do not have an exceptionally accurate snapper, but I can get it off very quickly and with some good pace on it, and it has been a reliable weapon for me for a long time.


    When to use it:
    Once you have the technique solid, it can replace any shot. Professional players can get this thing going at upwards of 80 mph, good recreational players can often times manage something surprisingly close to this. Best use, however (in my opinion at least) is on the rush. More on this later.


    How it is done:
    More than any other shot, the snapper relies on the flex of the stick to generate power. Bear this in mind as you're learning the technique: the key phrase to remember is let the stick do the work. Just like in golf, swinging harder does not always translate to higher ball/puck speed.

    As opposed to the wrist shot, where the puck starts well behind your feet, with the snapper you usually start it just behind the heel of your inside foot. Bottom hand is slightly lower than stickhandling position. Skates are pointing towards the target (in contrast to the other two shots), weight can be on either foot, but only on one foot. Head is up, looking at the target.

    The shot itself is a very quick motion: open the blade up slightly and draw the puck in towards your foot. Jam down hard on the shaft, pressing the blade into the ice, and deflecting the shaft as much as possible (this can be increased by transferring some of your weight from your skate to the stick: in other words, balance a bit on your stick). As the stick is flexed, push it forward into the puck, let the stick release its energy into the puck. This creates the loud "snap", and drives the puck forward. Follow through by rolling your wrists over and pointing your blade at the target.

    You can take this shot off either foot. I personally prefer the inside foot, and if I can, I'll get my outside leg up in the air. This puts more of my weight on the stick, and thus increases the amount of deflection it gets. This can be tricky to do though, especially for new skaters.

    It is NOT necessary to raise the stick off the ice, nor is it necessary to "sweep" the stick along the ice for any length of time. Simply lifting the heel of the stick off the ice for a brief bit and the driving your weight DOWN onto the shaft will create all the deflection you need, while keeping the shot release quick.

    Brett Hull had the best shot ever in the NHL, look at him for exactly what to do...he really was the one who introduced the modern snap shot to the world (along with Joe Sakic). This is a good closeup of how the stick should move.


    IMPORTANT:There are a lot of videos out there that show pretty poor snap shot technique. For example the following are not good references:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mFzY...feature=related

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T_h9...feature=related

    Other techniques and tips
  • Draw it inside! Just like the slapper, if you move the puck slightly before you shoot, you can avoid blocks and change the angle of the shot to the goalie. As you're skating at the defenseman with the puck, stickhandle as you normally would; when you're ready to shoot, draw the puck in towards your foot, slide your bottom hand down as you're drawing it in, flex the stick and release the puck all in one motion.

  • Shoot it in stride. This is absolutely lethal, and it is something I started doing very recently as a result of some discussion in SAS. Instead of starting to glide just before you shoot (and thus giving the defense and goalie warning you're about to shoot), you release the puck in between strides. Basically, you put your weight on the stick as you're moving your weight between strides (you can even "hop" a bit to make this happen), then release before you've stopped skating. It is very tough to do, but once you've got it down it is an extremely useful technique.

  • Keep it low! We all have a tendency to want to aim top corner with this shot as that looks cool, but a low, hard snap shot is absolutely the most effective shot at the rec league level. Work a goalie's 5 hole and the lower corners: your chances of hitting the target are better, and the goalies hate getting beaten by shots that look more like passes.

  • Play around with the puck starting position. Specifically, as you get used to it (and your balance improves), gradaully move the puck forward on your inside foot, and shift your weight further forward, sort of like Phil Kessel does here. This allows the stick to bend more, and gives you better velocity on the shot.

    Personal anecdote time: I rarely miss breakaway/penalty shots in beer league games, and 90% of them I score just by coming in fast, releasing my shot quickly and shooting low, usually 5 hole. Lower level goalies have a hell of a time dealing with shots of this nature. I really don't have to be very accurate, and I'm guaranteed to at least get the shot on net (which both deking and shooting high do not guarantee).


    Backhand shot

    There was a time when the backhand was used a LOT, and some players had better backhands than forehands. Nowadays, curved blades make it a lot less effective, sometimes you heard old coots whining about this.


    When to use it:
    When you want to shoot off your backhand stupid


    How it is done:
    Most of us find this technique fairly easy, believe it or not. Position the puck on your backhand, just behind your outside foot. Bottom hand is low, about the same spot it should be for a slap shot. Dip your front shoulder, push off your back foot, and drive the stick forward and up, pushing the puck along with it. Follow through high and at the target.

    The key to getting power on this shot is the leg drive; it is difficult to generate a lot of power with your arms alone, so legs have to get involved. This is the purpose of the shoulder dip: it draws your weight in the direction of the shot.


    Other techniques and tips
  • This is an easy shot to get too high, so work hard on keeping it down a bit. If you are getting your blade under the puck too much, just flatten it out (cup the front of the blade towards the ice).

  • It is possible to use a snapshot technique on the backhand, it just takes a lot of practice. I have not mastered this one bit.


    Chip/flip shot

    When to use it:
    When you need to get the puck up in a hurry. This can be flipping it out of your own zone, flipping it into the other team's zone, or getting it over a sprawling goalie.

    How it is done:
    On the forehand, there are two ways to do this. One is to cradle the puck on the toe of the blade, get it on its edge, and then just lift it up. This is a gentler flip, and it useful for dumping and whatnot. The other way is as a mini snap shot: drive the stick down into the ice, make contact on the toe of the blade, and follow through high and fast. This creates a lot of velocity, and is most useful for those tight in roof shots.

    On the backhand, you're using essentially the same motion as the backhand shot, but you're using more stick and less body. This costs you velocity, but it allows you to elevate the puck in a big drat hurry: the key is moving your stick quickly to get under the puck. This is particularly lethal as a breakaway move: the deke-to-backhand-roof has been a hockey tradition forever and it very effective if you can master it.



    What about one timers?

    One timers are tough; those guys in the NHL make it look very, very easy. Until you are very comfortable shooting, I would recommend not trying it.

    However, once you're ready, there are two things to remember: first, KEEP YOUR EYE ON THE PUCK, otherwise you're going to swing and miss like I often do. Second, don't swing that hard. You've got a moving puck to add energy to the shot, so you don't need to swing nearly as hard to make 'er go. Swinging easy will increase your chances of making good contact. I tend to think of it as just redirecting the puck with my stick rather than a shot.


    Awesome! Are there some general tips to follow when performing shots of any type!?

    Yes, of course there are.

  • Weight transfer is your friend. Wrists and arms can only do so much; just like in every other sport technique, you'll get more power if you get your whole body involved. Every time you practice shooting, think about where your weight is as you shoot: you want it essentially following the puck. Get comfortable with your weight on both legs, or on the stick as appropriate, and really throw it around (even if you fall sometimes).

  • Rotation is your friend too. Putting spin on the puck makes it more aerodynamically efficient, and it also helps you increase power by keeping it on your blade longer. With wrist shots specifically, always try and roll the puck all way from heel to toe on every shot to maximize rotation.


    How should I practice shooting?

    Here are some tips to keep in mind when you're practicing:

    1. Aim at something. Don't just let fly at an empty net, give yourself targets to look at and aim at. My trick is to take two sticks and lay them across the top of the net with the blades hanging down just over the top corners. I then try and hit the blades.

    2. Skate while shooting. If you only practice while stationary, you are going to have trouble transitioning to shooting while on the move. Start moving from the very beginning, even if you're going slowly.

    3. Catch passes and shoot. This is another skill that often goes kind of undeveloped. Work with a friend to pass to one another and then quickly get a shot off. Not so much one timers, but work on cradling the puck, quickly getting it into shooting position, and let it go as fast as you can.

    4. Concentrate on your release speed. It may feel cool to ring poo poo in off the post while you're practicing, but if you're taking forever to fire while you carefully aim, you're going to get let down in the game. A quick release is always better than being accurate.

    5. Practice off the ice! I have an outdoor inline rink here where I can practice, some of you might be lucky enough to have some driveway or something where you can set up a shooting pad and a net. Shooting is the easiest skill to practice off-ice, so take advantage of it.

Henrik Zetterberg
Dec 7, 2007



Awesome shooting info, thanks!

Makes me feel not as bad for not being able to get my slapshot off the ice after a full year of playing, no matter how much I try at stick time.

D C
Jun 19, 2004


Boys from Brazil LA.


I think the most important part of any shot is weight transfer. I think like 80% of my shot power comes from my legs. Especially on a slap shot you really have to lean into it. It's going to be hard for a beginner to have a powerful shot until you are totally comfortable on your skates.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WY06CZF_MDQ

I posted this video in the other thread and it led to a pretty good shooting discussion. I obviously didnt make it to be an instructional video, but especially in some of the slow-mo stuff you can see my hand position on my stick and the weight transfer into the shot, but again take it with a grain of salt I was just messing around on the ice and not every shot (if any of them, to be honest) was properly technical.

You can also see how closed my stick blade is on the low shots, and how open (even/especially on the chip shots) my blade is when I'm shooting high.

D C fucked around with this message at Mar 16, 2011 around 23:18

D C
Jun 19, 2004


Boys from Brazil LA.


So if I get up early enough tomorrow I'm going to go to stick and puck and give this a try.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q1Q47-U0OjY

Dont mind the messy condo.

Going to record at medium quality 720p and 60fps, not sure how the wide angle will look at speed but we'll find out, I'll also do some recordings at 1080p 30fps at high quality, its got a smaller viewing angle, and see how that looks

Surfing Turtle
Jun 18, 2004
I'M A TURTLE AND I'M SURFING, THAT'S CRAZY!

D C posted:

So if I get up early enough tomorrow I'm going to go to stick and puck and give this a try.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q1Q47-U0OjY

Dont mind the messy condo.

Going to record at medium quality 720p and 60fps, not sure how the wide angle will look at speed but we'll find out, I'll also do some recordings at 1080p 30fps at high quality, its got a smaller viewing angle, and see how that looks

LOL that's awesome. How much did that kit cost?

xzzy
Mar 5, 2009

Tonight's starting lineup is
brought to you by Satan.


Surfing Turtle posted:

LOL that's awesome. How much did that kit cost?

Well, the camera itself is $350.

There's cheaper options out there, but you get what you pay for.

Dangerllama
Nov 16, 2007



xzzy posted:

Well, the camera itself is $350.

There's cheaper options out there, but you get what you pay for.

You can get a GoBro for $179 on Amazon. Lots of guys use this for taking videos of themselves in their steezy ski gear after a massive 3" dump.

I hadn't thought of hockey applications. Methinks there will be too much head movement, but I'm looking forward to being proven wrong.

Dangerllama fucked around with this message at Mar 18, 2011 around 15:56

MiamiKid
Dec 14, 2003


I'll be interested to see how your footage turns out. I got a GoProHD a few weeks ago for some other work, but have stuck it on my hockey helmet a couple times. The camera under exposes because of the ice, but I think the Contour has Exposure Compensation, which is nice. Anyway, here's my clips, occasional cussing so not totally work safe.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B4E-IpbSDAw
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8wR6fnBsEjY

I've used the 720p 60fps setting.

xzzy
Mar 5, 2009

Tonight's starting lineup is
brought to you by Satan.


Dangerllama posted:

I hadn't thought of hockey applications. Methinks there will be too much head movement, but I'm looking forward to being proven wrong.

It's both awesome and sucky:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_xfW-K2PItA
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oGF2Qt1eD1g

He attaches his with a bunch of velcro:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=osFodR7jPxw

Dangerllama
Nov 16, 2007



MiamiKid posted:

I'll be interested to see how your footage turns out. I got a GoProHD a few weeks ago for some other work, but have stuck it on my hockey helmet a couple times. The camera under exposes because of the ice, but I think the Contour has Exposure Compensation, which is nice. Anyway, here's my clips, occasional cussing so not totally work safe.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B4E-IpbSDAw
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8wR6fnBsEjY

I've used the 720p 60fps setting.

The GoPro looks a lot better than the countour, IMHO. The wide angle and elevated platform make it a bit easier to watch. Maybe it was just the cage in the other one. This was actually pretty good. Image was stable, no camera shake to speak of.

My only complaint is the video makes it look like you're dumping the puck around the boards a lot instead of making tape-to-tape passes on defense

(OK, I talk poo poo because I'm terrible.)

Dangerllama fucked around with this message at Mar 18, 2011 around 17:01

MiamiKid
Dec 14, 2003


Dangerllama posted:

The GoPro looks a lot better than the countour, IMHO. The wide angle and elevated platform make it a bit easier to watch. Maybe it was just the cage in the other one. This was actually pretty good. Image was stable, no camera shake to speak of.

My only complaint is the video makes it look like you're dumping the puck around the boards a lot instead of making tape-to-tape passes on defense

(OK, I talk poo poo because I'm terrible.)

Son of a...haha yeah actually that's something I need to work on. Composure with the puck on the blue line. The footage is just from a weekly pickup game I play in with some guys older than me, no pressure to perform super well, so I need to be a bit more confident with the puck and experiment a bit.

I've taken a basic hockey class from our club hockey coaches, and he talks about developing the skill to feel the puck on the blade without having to look at it. You'll notice in the video I've always got my head down checking the puck position before I pass/shoot. Once I get a bit better at keeping my head up, hopefully I can pick some more passes out.

trilljester
Dec 7, 2004

"I have no idea what you guys are talking about. I'll have to see the video or something. Someone show me the video."


bewbies: Great topic on shooting. I basically do not do slapshots ever in a game situation. I never get anything on them and they're always worm burner shots. I've found that the majority of my shooting goals come from snapshots or wristers. Beginners should practice these 2 shots more than any other type because they are effective immediately. Slapshots take time to learn and develop to be an actual weapon, especially if you're a forward.

Also important to develop as a forward is the backhander. I do have 1 backhanded goal this season because an idiot on the other team didn't clear the puck on the boards, he thought he could fire it up the middle, right where I was forechecking. Caught the puck on my forehand, brought it to my backhand and got it 5 hole past the goalie. My friend who is a goalie has told me that backhanders are some of the hardest to stop because you can't gauge the release point very well. Keep that in mind. It's also really easy to practice against the boards during a stick and puck session. Also if you're roofing backhanders, the ladies in the sports bar will all flock to you after the game.

Dangerllama
Nov 16, 2007



Played games Sunday through Wednesday. Donated blood yesterday. Went to drop-in at lunch today. Only 8 people showed up so we played 4-on-4 the whole game.

Not saying I was hallucinating, but I'm pretty sure at one point I had to stick-handle through three panda bears and a giant shark.

Henrik Zetterberg
Dec 7, 2007



I think 75% of my goals I scored this season are backhanders

Most of them are on the ice thanks to my pitching wedge Backstrom, but hey whatever works.

ManicJason
Oct 27, 2003

He doesn't really stop the puck, but he scares the hell out of the other team.

trilljester posted:

My friend who is a goalie has told me that backhanders are some of the hardest to stop because you can't gauge the release point very well. Keep that in mind.

This is the absolute truth. Never be afraid to shovel a backhander on net from places where a forehand shot has almost no chance of scoring. Even if the goalie stops it, rebound control is harder if you don't read the shot well right away. It helps that goalies aren't expecting a shot if the player's forehand isn't pointed in an attack position.

xzzy
Mar 5, 2009

Tonight's starting lineup is
brought to you by Satan.


Of course, to hear your average color commentator describe it, the backhand is as weak as a baby and almost impossible to aim!

T-Bone
Sep 14, 2004

It always depends on the weather. When the weather is good, the team plays better.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XuW3yTxZ1HE

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H0kZGNjdeME

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xf446vU7fQo


The Adams one is one of my favorite goals of all time.

D C
Jun 19, 2004


Boys from Brazil LA.


xzzy posted:

Of course, to hear your average color commentator describe it, the backhand is as weak as a baby and almost impossible to aim!

Just for the love of god dont use a backhand to clear the puck out of the defensive zone, it never works.



I ended up having to do some work stuff today so I couldnt try my helmet cam at stick and puck, so next week it is.

dms666
Oct 17, 2005

It's Playoff Beard Time! Go Pens!

Any advice on trying to learn to stop on ice? Been trying the last few weeks at public skates with not much luck. Got just about everything else down pretty good from playing inline for over a year now

Thufir
May 19, 2004

"The fucking Mayans were right."

dms666 posted:

Any advice on trying to learn to stop on ice? Been trying the last few weeks at public skates with not much luck. Got just about everything else down pretty good from playing inline for over a year now

Work on snowplowing (heels out, inside edges scraping the ice) and then work on snowplowing while turning to one side with your weight shifting to that foot. Do it slow, you don't want to be suddenly digging your edges into the ice, more scraping with increasing pressure until you stop.

El Nam
Jan 14, 2007
We found Charlie

MiamiKid posted:

I'll be interested to see how your footage turns out. I got a GoProHD a few weeks ago for some other work, but have stuck it on my hockey helmet a couple times. The camera under exposes because of the ice, but I think the Contour has Exposure Compensation, which is nice. Anyway, here's my clips, occasional cussing so not totally work safe.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B4E-IpbSDAw
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8wR6fnBsEjY

I've used the 720p 60fps setting.

As far as positioning goes, I could see this being very, very helpful. Great videos!

El Nam
Jan 14, 2007
We found Charlie

Acethomas posted:

I'm willing to drive out to either Rinks location for a chance to stick and puck or scrim with a goon, I'll pm you when I get home.

Yea feel free, it would be cool to play with a goon. There are a lot of pick up and stick time options and I usually try play at both Rinks in a given week. I also have secrets to share with you if you decide to PM me. wink wink.

bigmike
Oct 20, 2003



Anyone have an opinion on helmets regarding concussions? There have been a wave of players who have been wearing the Cascade M11 after coming back from concussions but I've heard skeptics abound regarding their research. Their helmets are designed to be ultra-flexible (you can almost bend them in half with your hands) rather than stiff like most helmets. I've heard opinions where those are only beneficial for big hits from NHL players. It's a relatively new helmet so there isn't really a lot of data, empirical or otherwise. I'm considering that or the Bauer 9900 which is the more traditional helmet.

I've had a few hockey related concussions and recently took a very bad one from a hiking accident. Almost any hit to the head causes concussion symptoms for me now so I don't even know if a helmet really is going to make a difference.

DO YALL WANT A BOXC
Jul 20, 2010

C'EST UNE BOULETTE DE VIANDE EPICEE


dms666 posted:

Any advice on trying to learn to stop on ice? Been trying the last few weeks at public skates with not much luck. Got just about everything else down pretty good from playing inline for over a year now

Get elbow pads, knee pads, and a helmet and just try not to be afraid of looking like an idiot.

A good way to kind of get a feel is to practice it on dry land, getting a tiny bit of speed and sort of jumping sideways and landing with your feet together. A lot of the wiping out stuff on ice comes from not lifting the feet up at all at first and just making what amounts to a sharp left or right turn and then putting too much pressure at one end of your feet, thus causing your feet not to dig in but to keep going.

So snowplowing, courage, and knowing what the movement is and the balance of weight on your feet from dry land is good.

xzzy
Mar 5, 2009

Tonight's starting lineup is
brought to you by Satan.


dms666 posted:

Any advice on trying to learn to stop on ice? Been trying the last few weeks at public skates with not much luck. Got just about everything else down pretty good from playing inline for over a year now

Instructor had me put my hands on the boards with my feet perpendicular to the boards, about arm's length away. Lean on front half of the skate blade, and push one foot forward and away from your body until it hits the boards, using the skate's inside edge. It should make that classic scraping noise and produce a little snow. Get used to the angle needed to make snow and then do it while skating slowly. Get used to that, then ramp up the speed as you get comfortable. When going slow, pay a lot of attention to your edges. If your trailing foot is on the wrong edge or you shift your balance to your heel, you're gonna fall over backwards.

Eventually once you start doing it fast enough, you'll feel your rear skate try to swing behind you. This'll start to feel a little bit like a hockey stop, but the technique for a hockey stop is different. Youtube has millions of videos on how to hockey stop properly.

Thufir
May 19, 2004

"The fucking Mayans were right."

I keep bruising the poo poo out of my outside upper thigh by falling on it or banging it into the boards. Is this a problem that getting nicer pants would fix or do I need to learn to fall better or something? I have Vapor X:20 pants which have a hard plastic shell on the thighs with a tiny soft bit of foam underneath.

bigmike
Oct 20, 2003



Everybody plays and falls differently. If you happen to repeatedly have this bruise from the way you skate/fall/stop it probably wouldn't hurt to get some pants with more protection in that area. Guys that block shots are going to want better shin pads than guys that don't.

bytebark
Sep 26, 2004

I hate Illinois Nazis

dms666 posted:

Any advice on trying to learn to stop on ice? Been trying the last few weeks at public skates with not much luck. Got just about everything else down pretty good from playing inline for over a year now

Learning how to do a hockey stop is 99.9% a mental thing. I've gotten good at it on my right foot, not so much my left. If you can find a sparsely-crowded open skate (mid-day weekday skates seem to be this way) just go and practice stopping in the corners. Repeatedly. Eventually you'll get it.

Also, another poster suggested doing snowplow stops first, and that's good advice. Get good enough at these and suddenly a hockey stop doesn't seem too hard and is easy to transition to.

Dangerllama
Nov 16, 2007



dms666 posted:

Any advice on trying to learn to stop on ice? Been trying the last few weeks at public skates with not much luck. Got just about everything else down pretty good from playing inline for over a year now

I don't suppose you know how to ski, do you? It's exactly like a parallell stop on skis.

xzzy
Mar 5, 2009

Tonight's starting lineup is
brought to you by Satan.


Dangerllama posted:

I don't suppose you know how to ski, do you? It's exactly like a parallell stop on skis.

Which is funny, because I can parallell stop like a champ on skis, but thinking about doing it on ice makes me nervous. I guess it's the hard surface that does it?

Worst that happens on skis is you get some snow in your face, and maybe some snickers from your friends as you walk around collecting your gear.

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dms666
Oct 17, 2005

It's Playoff Beard Time! Go Pens!

Dangerllama posted:

I don't suppose you know how to ski, do you? It's exactly like a parallell stop on skis.

Just snowboarding, probably gonna try to go to an afternoon skate this week and try out some of the tips you guys gave me.

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