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Sheep
Jul 24, 2003


If you're actually on the correct plan, your maximum data charges for any sort of data should be like 4,200 yen. My statement says "S!メール(MMS)" and it's included in the packet deduction from the flat rate data plan.

Sheep fucked around with this message at Jul 28, 2011 around 22:15

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Lon Lon Rabbit
Mar 27, 2006
Here comes a special boy!

Thanks.

I think I confused myself reading some of the more basic plans.

tarepanda
Mar 25, 2011

Living the Dream

I heard the other day that Softbank is now charging full price for their smartphones up front. Has anyone else seen this?

dtb
Feb 1, 2011

I like to traveling world and take pictures of.

Lon Lon Rabbit posted:

Are you sure?

A friend said he got charged a tonne when he sent a bunch of photos to someone on docomo via MMS on his iPhone.

I hope that's not the case and it's all included with the pake houdai, though, as you say.

EDIT: It's pretty terrible that I've been on this plan for 2 years and still don't actually know how it works.

I send pictures to people all the time and I've never noticed a charge. However I question if he really used MMS to someone on Docomo because at yet the networks aren't compatible; that's why Japanese phones have email.

So what likely would have happened is it sent from his softbank.ne.jp address trough the SMS/MMS app, but even still I don't think that costs money

....unless he was out of the country and doing international roaming.

EDIT: Fixed some bad typing mistakes and general air-headedness

dtb fucked around with this message at Jul 29, 2011 around 02:11

zmcnulty
Jul 26, 2003



Just so everyone knows, Japan has finally caught up to the rest of the world and now has intra-carrier SMS:

http://weekly.ascii.jp/elem/000/000/049/49124/

Launched on July 13, so FIRE AWAY! Sending SMS to another carrier costs 3.15yen apiece, receiving is of course free. I don't think you can do MMS, but as dtb said, that's what email is for.

Kenishi
Nov 18, 2010


zmcnulty posted:

Just so everyone knows, Japan has finally caught up to the rest of the world and now has intra-carrier SMS:

http://weekly.ascii.jp/elem/000/000/049/49124/

Launched on July 13, so FIRE AWAY! Sending SMS to another carrier costs 3.15yen apiece, receiving is of course free. I don't think you can do MMS, but as dtb said, that's what email is for.

SMS is poo poo though for any double byte language, such as Japanese. Its great for single byte character langauges like western languages though and you can communicate quite a bit, but its extremely limiting in Japanese. I think the only interesting thing about the whole announcement is the 3.15yen apiece thing, where as if you compare that to most US carriers, its more like 11yen (which is a total RIP OFF for only sending like 160bytes of data).

tyblazitar
Oct 29, 2009

WILL AMOUNT TO NOTHING IN LIFE.

So I'm a real noob when it comes to mobile phones, and still use a basic prepaid phone. However, I want to buy a smartphone while in Japan and get with the times, so I have a few questions.

I'm looking at the Infobar A01 posted earlier in this thread, as I really like the design and UI and it seems it has most the features that are available. I'm guessing it's restricted to au only? I tried finding out about plans on their site, but my Japanese skills aren't quite there yet, and even with extensive rikai-chaning I didn't quite understand... well, anything. I'm looking for a one-year plan (or a longer plan without outrageous cancelling fees; I'm only staying about 10 months), preferably with packet-houdai and mail-houdai (or at least a high set amount), and maybe a few minutes included, but I don't call much. What kind of monthly fee am I looking at here, and how much for the phone itself?

I'm also interested in OneSeg, but I don't really know much about how it works. I'm assuming I'll have to sign up for extra services to watch TV? Is there any recording feature, or will I still have to watch stuff live?

Finally, I'm guessing payment is always month-by-month? I would prefer paying everything in one lump sum when I buy it, both because I won't have to worry about bills every month, but also because I probably won't have a bank account immediately when I get there, and I want to get the phone asap.

Speaking of getting it quickly, will I need the ARC itself, or is the little note saying it's being processed enough?

I'm probably going to bring a Japanese friend with me to the store to help me when I'm buying, but I want to be prepared in advance so I don't walk out with loads of stuff I have no idea what is, so I hope someone can help me.

jet_dee
May 20, 2007
Blah blah blah Nationstates is cool blah blah blah

I was looking at AU plans yesterday, and I read that the Everybody discount, which reduces your monthly payments significantly, locks you into an automatically-renewing 2 year contract from which there is an almost 10,000 yen cancellation fee. I don't know if there is a contract cancellation fee if you don't take the Everybody discount, though.

By the way, I found that all out on AU's English site, so why not check http://www.au.kddi.com/english/ ?

Yeah, payment is by monthly installments. You can opt to pay your bill at the convenience stores rather than have it automatically withdrawn from your bank account. Still though, sort out the bank account before your phone.

The paper saying it's being processed worked fine when I signed up with AU.

tarepanda
Mar 25, 2011

Living the Dream

tyblazitar posted:

So I'm a real noob when it comes to mobile phones, and still use a basic prepaid phone. However, I want to buy a smartphone while in Japan and get with the times, so I have a few questions.

I'm looking at the Infobar A01 posted earlier in this thread, as I really like the design and UI and it seems it has most the features that are available. I'm guessing it's restricted to au only?

Yeah. Phones tend to be locked into one company. That's pretty much the only way that companies have to draw in customers.

tyblazitar posted:

I tried finding out about plans on their site, but my Japanese skills aren't quite there yet, and even with extensive rikai-chaning I didn't quite understand... well, anything. I'm looking for a one-year plan (or a longer plan without outrageous cancelling fees; I'm only staying about 10 months), preferably with packet-houdai and mail-houdai (or at least a high set amount), and maybe a few minutes included, but I don't call much. What kind of monthly fee am I looking at here, and how much for the phone itself?

You can get a one month Plan SS (5 minutes or so) that will give you a base charge of around 1000 yen, then toss pakehoudai (unlimited data) on top of that. E-mail is just data, so it's included in pakehoudai. The shortest payment term on cell phones with au that I know of is 12 months, but I'm just saying that off the top of my head. When you cancel your phone, you will have to finish paying it off.

Depending on what you get, where you get it, and what kind of deals you get, you're looking at a base charge of around 10000 yen. au pakehoudai works on a sliding scale; you pay for your data up to a certain point (6000 yen or so? It's been a while...) and then you just don't pay more than that no matter how much data you use. So if you go all the way up to that point, you could be looking at around 16000 yen a month.

Phones are much more expensive here than in America.

tyblazitar posted:

I'm also interested in OneSeg, but I don't really know much about how it works. I'm assuming I'll have to sign up for extra services to watch TV? Is there any recording feature, or will I still have to watch stuff live?

OneSeg is just watching TV on your tiny phone screen. Reception can be crap. Your phone can record shows. You don't really have to sign up for anything extra, though there are pay channels/shows/movies.

tyblazitar posted:

Finally, I'm guessing payment is always month-by-month? I would prefer paying everything in one lump sum when I buy it, both because I won't have to worry about bills every month, but also because I probably won't have a bank account immediately when I get there, and I want to get the phone asap.

It's always month-by-month because they don't know how much they'll be charging you in the future. You may be able to buy the phone outright if you have 60000 yen or so on you, depending on what phone you want and how much it costs.

Japanese plans don't give you the ridiculous minutes that American plans do, so if you use your phone more than the allotted 5 minutes (the cheapest plan), then you have to pay for the extra minutes. Like I said before, the data works on a sliding scale as well.

It's not hard to pay. Take the bill to a convenience store and give them cash.

tyblazitar posted:

Speaking of getting it quickly, will I need the ARC itself, or is the little note saying it's being processed enough?

I'm probably going to bring a Japanese friend with me to the store to help me when I'm buying, but I want to be prepared in advance so I don't walk out with loads of stuff I have no idea what is, so I hope someone can help me.

They don't really try to bundle poo poo with phones here like in America. The only time I've seen anything like that is when someone asked if I wanted a microSD card.

You will need your alien card. They need the number and the proof of your address/occupation/visa. Obviously they don't want to give a phone to someone with a 12-month contract if their visa is three months.

Ara
Oct 18, 2003





Kenishi posted:

SMS is poo poo though for any double byte language, such as Japanese. Its great for single byte character langauges like western languages though and you can communicate quite a bit, but its extremely limiting in Japanese. I think the only interesting thing about the whole announcement is the 3.15yen apiece thing, where as if you compare that to most US carriers, its more like 11yen (which is a total RIP OFF for only sending like 160bytes of data).

Wait... what? I always felt SMS was total poo poo in English because you could barely fit a sentence in the thing before you ran out of characters, but in Japanese I use it all the time since you can cram quite a large amount of information into a smaller number of Japanese characters. Unless you type like a retard like "i am gn to the stor do u wnt nethin". Compare the number of characters in "I'm going to the store, want anything?" vs "スパーに行く、何か欲しい?"

And I never understood the point of them anyway since I'm on a cheapass prepaid phone and I get unlimited email service for 300 yen/month including unlimited free picture mails. I just reply to people with SMS when they send me an SMS.

tarepanda
Mar 25, 2011

Living the Dream

Ara posted:

I just reply to people with SMS when they send me an SMS.

Never in five years have I gotten an SMS from anyone except a foreigner... and that only once because I never replied.

tyblazitar
Oct 29, 2009

WILL AMOUNT TO NOTHING IN LIFE.

jet_dee posted:

I was looking at AU plans yesterday, and I read that the Everybody discount, which reduces your monthly payments significantly, locks you into an automatically-renewing 2 year contract from which there is an almost 10,000 yen cancellation fee. I don't know if there is a contract cancellation fee if you don't take the Everybody discount, though.

By the way, I found that all out on AU's English site, so why not check http://www.au.kddi.com/english/ ?

Yeah, payment is by monthly installments. You can opt to pay your bill at the convenience stores rather than have it automatically withdrawn from your bank account. Still though, sort out the bank account before your phone.

The paper saying it's being processed worked fine when I signed up with AU.
D'oh, I didn't even think about checking if au had an English site. Thanks for the link!

And paying at a convenience store does sound very convenient. Yeah, I'm probably getting a bank account eventually, but I'm thinking that if I'm gonna pay for a year of service, then I'm using as much of it as possibly can.

tarepanda posted:

You can get a one month Plan SS (5 minutes or so) that will give you a base charge of around 1000 yen, then toss pakehoudai (unlimited data) on top of that. E-mail is just data, so it's included in pakehoudai. The shortest payment term on cell phones with au that I know of is 12 months, but I'm just saying that off the top of my head. When you cancel your phone, you will have to finish paying it off.

Depending on what you get, where you get it, and what kind of deals you get, you're looking at a base charge of around 10000 yen. au pakehoudai works on a sliding scale; you pay for your data up to a certain point (6000 yen or so? It's been a while...) and then you just don't pay more than that no matter how much data you use. So if you go all the way up to that point, you could be looking at around 16000 yen a month.
Oh, that sounds pretty good. I probably won't use a lot of data transfer, but I like having the safety of knowing I'm not suddenly going to be charged an outrageous amount because I did something stupid.

quote:

Phones are much more expensive here than in America.
I'm not American, and I'm used to stuff being more expensive than in Japan.

quote:

OneSeg is just watching TV on your tiny phone screen. Reception can be crap. Your phone can record shows. You don't really have to sign up for anything extra, though there are pay channels/shows/movies.
Yay, my animes!

quote:

You will need your alien card. They need the number and the proof of your address/occupation/visa. Obviously they don't want to give a phone to someone with a 12-month contract if their visa is three months.
But if I have the processing note and my passport with the visa in, wouldn't that be enough? Not really a big deal, but again, if I can get a couple of weeks longer of service, then I want to.

Thanks for the help, guys!

tarepanda
Mar 25, 2011

Living the Dream

tyblazitar posted:

I'm not American, and I'm used to stuff being more expensive than in Japan.

I am too, but that doesn't mean I enjoy paying 800 USD for a phone.

tyblazitar posted:

But if I have the processing note and my passport with the visa in, wouldn't that be enough? Not really a big deal, but again, if I can get a couple of weeks longer of service, then I want to.

It wasn't enough for me five years ago. I needed the actual card with the registration number and all.

Ara
Oct 18, 2003





tarepanda posted:

Never in five years have I gotten an SMS from anyone except a foreigner... and that only once because I never replied.

I'd say 75% of Japanese people that I've exchanged mails with have used SMS exclusively, with the occasional email when I guess they accidentally selected the wrong thing or something. But then I have literally never known someone who didn't have Softbank, so maybe that has something to do with it. I will admit that I prefer SMS on my phone since it has a nice green background with white text, rather than the email's black-on-white.

tarepanda
Mar 25, 2011

Living the Dream

Ara posted:

I'd say 75% of Japanese people that I've exchanged mails with have used SMS exclusively, with the occasional email when I guess they accidentally selected the wrong thing or something. But then I have literally never known someone who didn't have Softbank, so maybe that has something to do with it. I will admit that I prefer SMS on my phone since it has a nice green background with white text, rather than the email's black-on-white.

Strange softbank people. White on black for life.

Kenishi
Nov 18, 2010


Ara posted:

Wait... what? I always felt SMS was total poo poo in English because you could barely fit a sentence in the thing before you ran out of characters, but in Japanese I use it all the time since you can cram quite a large amount of information into a smaller number of Japanese characters. Unless you type like a retard like "i am gn to the stor do u wnt nethin". Compare the number of characters in "I'm going to the store, want anything?" vs "スパーに行く、何か欲しい?"

And I never understood the point of them anyway since I'm on a cheapass prepaid phone and I get unlimited email service for 300 yen/month including unlimited free picture mails. I just reply to people with SMS when they send me an SMS.
Just in case you don't know or someone else doesn't. SMS has a limit of 160 alphanumeric characters, that's 160bytes. Each kanji/hiragana/katakana/large alphanumeric is basically composed of 2 alphanumberic characters, which means you only have an effective length of 80 Japanese characters per message. If you are condensing to kanji, then you can cram quite a bit in each message, however if you are using a fair amount of kana in you messages, then you can expect it to be hard.

VVV--Exactly, which is why I think it required a bit of digging to find on the phone I had when I was in Japan last.

Kenishi fucked around with this message at Jul 31, 2011 around 08:11

tarepanda
Mar 25, 2011

Living the Dream

He realizes that, I think... since he talks about how you can condense using kanji.

There's no point to SNS, though, when almost everyone has unlimited mail or data plans and e-mail falls under those.

tarepanda
Mar 25, 2011

Living the Dream

Sorry for the double post.

A local cell phone shop was running a massive promotion, (5000 yen in JCD gift certificates, 5000 yen in local gift certificates, 10000 yen off a new phone, and 10000 yen off for switching customers!), so I finally took the plunge, went to Docomo, and got the Galaxy S2.

I still honestly prefer my old phone for the regular numpad. But it's nice having a variety of apps available on the go -- especially chatting and Google Maps.

A few questions, though:

1. Are there any must-have, super-convenient Japanese apps? Tabelog or something comes to mind here.

2. Is there a way to set it so that the English input uses the keyboard and the Japanese input uses the numpad? Or should I just suck it up and use romaji?

3. Any must-have Japanese language learning apps other than ankidroid?

Maybe we should add a bit to the top about common/useful apps for android/iPhone?

Kenishi
Nov 18, 2010


tarepanda posted:

Sorry for the double post.

A local cell phone shop was running a massive promotion, (5000 yen in JCD gift certificates, 5000 yen in local gift certificates, 10000 yen off a new phone, and 10000 yen off for switching customers!), so I finally took the plunge, went to Docomo, and got the Galaxy S2.

I still honestly prefer my old phone for the regular numpad. But it's nice having a variety of apps available on the go -- especially chatting and Google Maps.

A few questions, though:

1. Are there any must-have, super-convenient Japanese apps? Tabelog or something comes to mind here.

2. Is there a way to set it so that the English input uses the keyboard and the Japanese input uses the numpad? Or should I just suck it up and use romaji?

3. Any must-have Japanese language learning apps other than ankidroid?

Maybe we should add a bit to the top about common/useful apps for android/iPhone?

Are you a 2ch'er? Lol, there are some useful 2ch browsing apps out there.

Thing with input is I don't think theres any way for Android to tell when you would want one keyboard over another. I suppose it may be possible to write a program and set preference, but otherwise you are stuck.

I'm actually kind of glad someone on here has a Droid phone from a provider in Japan. For non-JP phones we have to get an app called Simeji in order to get JP input on droid phones. I've been wondering for awhile if Simeji is a rip off of the default JP input system that comes with droid phones in Japan. If you would do me a favor and check out Simeji and let me know, that would be awesome.

You may want to check it out anyway since Simeji has a 'sort of' numpad input system that also lets you switch over to a QWERTY keyboard. I recommend checking it out. The input style in Simeji that you might like is known as "Flick." You have all the 'a' vowels, and you press the constant you want and flick in 1 of the 4 cardinal directions to select the other sounds you need (Starting from West and going counter clock its i-u-e-o).

How are the Galaxy S2's they look realllly nice. Is the GPS functional on them? Many of the Galaxy S's had disfunctional GPS. Is it easy to root the S2's from Docomo?

tarepanda
Mar 25, 2011

Living the Dream

Kenishi posted:

I'm actually kind of glad someone on here has a Droid phone from a provider in Japan. For non-JP phones we have to get an app called Simeji in order to get JP input on droid phones. I've been wondering for awhile if Simeji is a rip off of the default JP input system that comes with droid phones in Japan. If you would do me a favor and check out Simeji and let me know, that would be awesome.

You may want to check it out anyway since Simeji has a 'sort of' numpad input system that also lets you switch over to a QWERTY keyboard. I recommend checking it out. The input style in Simeji that you might like is known as "Flick." You have all the 'a' vowels, and you press the constant you want and flick in 1 of the 4 cardinal directions to select the other sounds you need (Starting from West and going counter clock its i-u-e-o).

It sounds like a ripoff. I couldn't stand flick; it made me really, really slow. I imagine it would be faster once I got used to it, but for now I can tap the keys much faster than I can flick accurately.

Right now I usually use the QWERTY keyboard and switch between Japanese/English input modes, putting up with romaji conversion/input.

Kenishi posted:

How are the Galaxy S2's they look realllly nice. Is the GPS functional on them? Many of the Galaxy S's had disfunctional GPS. Is it easy to root the S2's from Docomo?

I like mine so far. The keyboard is much better than what was on my first generation iPod touch years ago; that was one thing that convinced me to go with the Galaxy S2. The GPS works fine; I just used it with Strava to record my short bike commute to school. No problems there.

Google Maps works fine with it too.

I don't know about rooting; I really don't see a reason why I'd have to root at this point.

Kenishi
Nov 18, 2010


tarepanda posted:

It sounds like a ripoff. I couldn't stand flick; it made me really, really slow. I imagine it would be faster once I got used to it, but for now I can tap the keys much faster than I can flick accurately.

Right now I usually use the QWERTY keyboard and switch between Japanese/English input modes, putting up with romaji conversion/input.


I like mine so far. The keyboard is much better than what was on my first generation iPod touch years ago; that was one thing that convinced me to go with the Galaxy S2. The GPS works fine; I just used it with Strava to record my short bike commute to school. No problems there.

Google Maps works fine with it too.

I don't know about rooting; I really don't see a reason why I'd have to root at this point.

So the default input method that comes with the phone IS indeed basically Simeji? Just checking, because my Galaxy S is SIM unlocked, and I'm debating using that w/ the SIM card plan instead of getting a new phone. Just wondering if maybe the Japanese phones had a better input system by default. I just hate the size of the predict text selector, its not easy to use if you press it. That was one thing the clamshell button phones have over smartphones in my book. Only way I can conceivably see it gettitng better is if you can integrate the Google IME input prediction system on the PC. The kanji prediction on that is amazing~!

If you notice the GPS get finicky though, I'd like to know. My Galaxy S worked great when I first got it, but got worse over time. It took longer to get a satellite lock and would lose it constantly. It become near impossible to use it for directions in the car really, and even when outside running it would struggle to keep a solid lock.

A big reason for rooting is flashing new ROMs on that might improve speed. Also for SIM unlocking it once someone figures out how to (if Docomo won't do it).

Couple more questions I just though of.

Is there a lot of bloatware from Docomo on it? Stuff they preloaded that they want you to pay to use; sucking up memory on the phone.

How much is the phone? On the off chance I actually want to get it while I'm there. I'm curious how much I'll have to pay in remainder if I don't stay for a whole 2 year contract.

tarepanda
Mar 25, 2011

Living the Dream

No problems with speed. I mean, it's a dual core phone. I don't expect to ever have problems unless I'm playing some massive game on it. The normal Touchwiz interface was speedy enough, but when I tried switching to Launcher Pro, it was amazingly fast.

Like I said, I hate the Flick system and use a normal pad; both the normal pad and the QWERTY keyboard romaji input have support for the predictive text system.

I've only owned the phone for a few days and the GPS is fine. I'll be sure to complain about it if something happens... though I'm on Docomo's insurance, which means I get a free replacement if anything breaks.

There's some bloatware, but none of it starts with the phone and you can uninstall it easily. Some of the things are nice; for example, the McDonald's coupon app is installed automatically and available in your app drawer. Some things are necessary, like Docomo's e-mail app for using your @docomo address.

The phone was something like 55000 yen, but I got a lot of discounts for various reasons. I'm paying something like 1300 yen/mo over two years for the phone and insurance.

As far as flashing new ROMs goes, I wouldn't really want to mess with that on a Japanese phone; there are a few things that I really feel like I need/want in the Japanese cell phone ecosystem, so I don't want to screw with that.

zmcnulty
Jul 26, 2003



Are you able to install Swype on it?

tarepanda
Mar 25, 2011

Living the Dream

No, but only because it comes with Swype already installed.

There are also two sets of App Markets on the phone -- the normal Android App Market and a Docomo App Market. The Docomo one includes only apps filtered and inspected by Docomo. Apps bought there can simply be appended to your bill. The Android App Market is the normal App Market you love/hate and also seems to be able to charge your Docomo account directly if you register your address with gmail.

Kenishi
Nov 18, 2010


tarepanda posted:

Some things are necessary, like Docomo's e-mail app for using your @docomo address.
Ya that's the other thing that has been bugging me about using a phone from the US on Docomo. I need to make sure I can set up an email account and use it easily enough, plus be able to change the email easily enough if it starts to acquire spam.

BTW, since the Galaxy S2 has no せきがいせん, whats the preferred replacement to easy transferring of profile details? Can you do it via QCode?

Also you never clearly answered my question on the input method. Is Simeji there by default? Or is it called something else (which incidentally has the Flick method)?

There's also an Amazon app market out there apparently. Either the app to access that is on google market or you need to get on amazon and find it. I haven't checked it out, I just heard about it.

tarepanda
Mar 25, 2011

Living the Dream

You can do it via QR code, I believe. I haven't tried it for myself yet, but the Docomo rep said that you can generate a QR code which, when read, creates a profile. I've seen it done on the XPeria and it was pretty slick -- much easier than finding IR ports and lining them up and waiting and all that bullshit.

I didn't clearly answer your question because I don't know the answer. If it's not like Simeji, it's enough like what you described to be practically the same thing. You can try a phone in the store if there's anything nitpicky you're wondering about, but I'm not about to go download/install/set up Simeji when this works fine.

Under input methods, I have Swype (Japanese compatible), Samsung Japanese Keyboard (not Japanese compatible), and Samsung Keypad (Japanese Compatible) listed.

I've heard that the Amazon market is US-only.

Kenishi
Nov 18, 2010


tarepanda posted:

You can do it via QR code, I believe. I haven't tried it for myself yet, but the Docomo rep said that you can generate a QR code which, when read, creates a profile. I've seen it done on the XPeria and it was pretty slick -- much easier than finding IR ports and lining them up and waiting and all that bullshit.

I didn't clearly answer your question because I don't know the answer. If it's not like Simeji, it's enough like what you described to be practically the same thing. You can try a phone in the store if there's anything nitpicky you're wondering about, but I'm not about to go download/install/set up Simeji when this works fine.

Under input methods, I have Swype (Japanese compatible), Samsung Japanese Keyboard (not Japanese compatible), and Samsung Keypad (Japanese Compatible) listed.

I've heard that the Amazon market is US-only.
Ah ok. Sounds good.

So the input methods may actually be better in some respects hmm.

Also, now that I think about it. I think you might be right about the US only thing.

politicorific
Sep 15, 2007


2 questions:

1) I'm going to Japan for 7 days next week. I currently have a Nexus S through KT (Korea). I can unlock it pretty easily, I've been quoted about 1190 won/minute (88yen). I don't plan on using it a lot, but wonder which option is best; prepaid sim?

2) A Japanese friend is going back home after having been in Korea for a year. I'm not impressed with my Nexus S/Android and suggest she get something to tide her over until the iPhone 4s/5 is released. What's her best option?

peanut
Sep 9, 2007

CENSORSHIP ROCKS


If it's just a week, I'd just pay for roaming and try to keep usage down.

caberham
Mar 18, 2009

So I'm back up in the game
Running things to keep my swing
Letting all the people know
That I'm back to run the show


Hello, I'm another tourist coming over to Japan for 18 days. I have a unlocked iphone 3GS and unfortunately, the unlimited data roaming package for me is around 1680 yen /Day.

Looking at http://www.softbank-rental.jp/en/price/ rates, it seems that data prices can really sky rocket unless I am willing to pay the "data capped" charge of 27,000 yen. If it's that much, I might as well just bribe a local for a prepaid or just get my data roaming package

My question is, if incoming calls are free, and costs S! Mail (MMS) 1packet (128byte) [sending/retrieving] ¥1 how much am I actually paying on average for a domestic message? The phone is actually for emergencies and contacting GOOOOOONS in my great goongrilmage across Japan.

Looking at another website, http://www.globaladvancedcomm.com/simrent.html the rates seem to be a lot more attractive and I am willing to get a pocket wifi device and use the as much as I can with another goon friend of mine during the trip. Yes I have to spend more, but is this the best rate I can get? Use a softbank for a dumb phone number and use wifi for internet/facebook/SA/etc.

Another option is http://h50146.www5.hp.com/products/...i/product.html. Is it only 2940 yen for a 30 day period? I do have one of those mifi devices unlocked I think and If any Osaka goon can help me out that would be terrific

kalleboo
Jan 13, 2001

Hjälp


I just got an SH-12C today and I just came here to bust a nut over how awesome it is. It's like, a phone with all the japan features... AND it doesn't have a crap-rear end UI (and it's Android so I can use all the apps I'm used to). I was also amazed that Mobile Suica accepted my foreign debit card no problem (altho Edy rejected it :[). In the regular menus and with the still photo camera, the 3D screen is a huge gimmick, but I transferred some 3D music videos to it, and the effect really works there.

I haven't managed to get Wifi tethering on it to work though - which didn't work with the Arc I had before it either. I wonder if it's an Android issue? Wifi tethering works fine with the same SIM in my Nokia N8...

Also, this is the best Android app ever (built-in to the SH-12C). Look up any kanji currently displayed in any app on your screen (uses OCR).


On an unrelated note, what's up with 3G on the shinkansen? Using docomo, always on Nozomi trains. I remember last year I tethered on the train from Tokyo to Sendai, and the connection was solid, no ping issues, the connection didn't even drop in the tunnels. This year I rode from Osaka to Tokyo, and it was terrible, it dropped in every tunnel, 1-8 second ping times otherwise. Instead of working as I planned, I spent my train ride writing an OS X MenuExtra to monitor the current ping lag/connection status...

tarepanda
Mar 25, 2011

Living the Dream

3G bothers me. I asked the sales rep if 3G had solid coverage nationwide, and she said "of course." But my phone is constantly flickering from H (What the Hell?) to 3G.

I'll point out that the Galaxy S2 has a lot of the Japanese whizbangs (including a terrible Docomo UI that I switched out of immediately) except for Saifu Keitai. Ugh. I ended up going with it because the Japanese phones don't seem to have a ton of mod/non-official support.

dtb
Feb 1, 2011

I like to traveling world and take pictures of.

tarepanda posted:

3G bothers me. I asked the sales rep if 3G had solid coverage nationwide, and she said "of course." But my phone is constantly flickering from H (What the Hell?) to 3G.

I'll point out that the Galaxy S2 has a lot of the Japanese whizbangs (including a terrible Docomo UI that I switched out of immediately) except for Saifu Keitai. Ugh. I ended up going with it because the Japanese phones don't seem to have a ton of mod/non-official support.

I just Shinkansen'd to Nagoya and back yesterday and had no problems with my iPad or iPhone on Softbank 3G and used the WiFi on the laptop. In the past I've used EMobile on the laptop too, but now I just pay like 1,000JPY/Month for NTT mobile 'public' WiFi service.

Wark
Sep 14, 2009

Just follow me through this wall, I can show you things
no mortal eyes were meant
to see.


tarepanda posted:

3G bothers me. I asked the sales rep if 3G had solid coverage nationwide, and she said "of course." But my phone is constantly flickering from H (What the Hell?) to 3G.
The H just means that a data connection has been initiated at HSDPA speeds. It'll sit at 3G when there's nothing accessing the data connection. (Or if for some reason there's no HSPA level access and it's using normal 3G data rates, I assume.) HSDPA is basically a technology that provides faster download speeds than stock UMTS/WCDMA 3G.

tarepanda
Mar 25, 2011

Living the Dream

Wark posted:

The H just means that a data connection has been initiated at HSDPA speeds. It'll sit at 3G when there's nothing accessing the data connection. (Or if for some reason there's no HSPA level access and it's using normal 3G data rates, I assume.) HSDPA is basically a technology that provides faster download speeds than stock UMTS/WCDMA 3G.

Thanks for clearing that up for me.

The keyboard crashes on me pretty much every time I open Android Market and try to search; it's really annoying.

Kenishi
Nov 18, 2010


Since I have a placement now, and my hopes of being able to set up my cellphone in Tokyo have been dashed. Would it still be in my best interest to try to go the nearest densely populated area, which looks like it will be Mito, since I'm in far north Ibaraki, to set up my cellphone instead of doing it in a rural town.
Particularly because I'm considering just doing the SIM card only plan with Docomo and adding on a data and voice plan, but I'm just dreading having cellphone salesmen telling "oh no, you can't do that, japanese sim card are different and don't work in US phones (which is BS)."

tarepanda
Mar 25, 2011

Living the Dream

Might as well try at the closest store to you before you spend money trekking out.

Can anyone explain to me how Japanese landline phone numbers work? I'm always confused about what the hell I'm supposed to dial when an ad or something only shows four digits.

tarepanda fucked around with this message at Aug 5, 2011 around 01:31

LyonsLions
Oct 10, 2008


tarepanda posted:

Can anyone explain to me how Japanese landline phone numbers work? I'm always confused about what the hell I'm supposed to dial when an ad or something only shows four digits.

That means the first 6 (or 5 or 4) digits are common to everyone in the area. Fewer and fewer people are doing this now because most people use cell phones and don't necessarily know the local area number. I think you still have to dial the whole number, though, or at least the 7 digit number. From a cell phone you have to use the whole thing.

For example, in some parts of my prefecture numbers are listed in 7 digits because the 3 digit area code is common to the whole city, but in other places they list 6 or even 5 digits, because the numbers before that are the same for everyone in the area.

tarepanda
Mar 25, 2011

Living the Dream

Aha. Thanks.

Another Japanese smartphone gripe; the sp mode application DoCoMo provides doesn't allow you to pick the attachment field and take pictures; you can only attach things already in a folder on the camera. Likewise, when you attach a 11 MP picture, it doesn't give you an option to resize it... and there's no easy way to resize pictures on the phone anyway, so it can be really annoying sending pictures to people you know who don't have smartphones and/or aren't on unlimited data.

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zmcnulty
Jul 26, 2003



Softbank has server-side image resizing for email anyway (and it's on by default), so at least someone @softbank.ne.jp should be OK.

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