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Square Pair
Mar 16, 2011



As the VP of a small engineering company that specializes in ISR support to the DoD, - $200K to $300K is completely mind boggling to say the least. $150ish sure (deployed) - with bonuses and pay differential but you are also working 12 x 7. The biggest draw I see is the tax deferral which is why folks accept the position (that and not having to deal with corporate bullshit).

If you have any questions on resumes or how to word a resume, feel free to post a question or drop me a PM. It may be that we are looking for someone with your skill sets or at a minimum I can circulate your resume to some of the other contractors that have an opening.

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Square Pair
Mar 16, 2011



Helldump Immunity posted:

Does anybody have any experience with GMTI/SAR analysis? Looking back at my career, it was one of my strong points that I really enjoyed. Any info/leads would be greatly appreciated.

I have also done some Intel specific jobs (ISARC Liason / Electronic Combat Officer mission planning, etc), would that be enough for a collection manager position or would they just laugh at my resume?

I love you all and great thread Rrail.

JSTARS? Anyway, there is a semi-decent push in the AF for trained GMTI exploiters. It seems the Army has this piece of analysis down but it isn't a strong suite of the AF.

Square Pair
Mar 16, 2011



Rrail posted:

I'd also like to take this chance to recant my view on L3 from the first page. I kind of fibbed. They are a really lovely company to work for and generally treat their deployed contractors like garbage.

Depends on what 'subsidiary' of L3. They've 'absorbed' numerous smaller companies. I mainly deal with L3-CSW (Salt Lake) on negotiating contracts and they treat their FSRs well. Now if treating like garbage means not paying $200K - $300K a year then whelp, I'd agree.

Square Pair
Mar 16, 2011



My Name Is Jonas posted:

You guys have been talking Intel a lot....know anyone that works around Aircraft? I've got 7 years experience, and 3 of that was as a Crew Chief on C-17s and C-5s, so I know it'd be useful somewhere there. Any ideas where to look? I've got a couple friends that have done Transient Alert in Afghanistan, but they won't even give up the company name, even though they left already.

When you worked those aircraft - what contractors (from what company) were you around? Start there. I would think the transport aircraft, especially C-5 and C-17, are sustained from a depot - like here at Robins AFB with minimal OEMs fielded to support. Aren't those aircraft primarily blue suit maintained in the field?

Anyway, I would agree with DynCorp being a good bet.

Square Pair
Mar 16, 2011



Rrail posted:

It looks like L3 Vertex has just straight up normal aircraft as well, probably most prop driven, so that's an option I would imagine.

If i'm not mistaken they are the contractor supporting our Army Guardrail aircraft.

Square Pair
Mar 16, 2011



Got a question. Looks like I'll be picking up a logistics (i.e. supply) position in Afghanistan after the FY. What type medical benefits did any of you contractors get that have worked there? The compensation piece I can work - but it's the medical piece that is kinda tough. Would you normally be treated at a military hospital, transport back to a bigger hospital, then your company would arrange for medical airlift/transfer to civilian hospital if needed?

Square Pair
Mar 16, 2011



Stultus Maximus posted:

Since I just read the thread, I only now posted my resumé at clearancejobs... is that what you mean by recruiters? What I've been doing is applying directly through the company websites.

I'll PM you but can also pass your resume around. Is moving out of the question?

Square Pair
Mar 16, 2011



005060524 posted:

So Imagery Analysis is the big $$ earner in the civilian/contracting world? Or does being trained in any MI based job work, and it's more about having the top secret clearance?

A lot of it has to do with the TS/SCI. Although that may be shifting a little - the security bubbas are moving pretty drat quick now that they have civilian investigators helping out. Before it would take so drat long that it was (and still is) easier to hire someone with the clearances and just transfer them.

Any MI would work but as we've posted, Imagery (to include FMV) is tops. That also includes your MASINT exploitation experience.

005060524 posted:

What about regular CONUS companies like Lockheed, would they hire people with training and a clearance but little to no experience?

Yes. Don't expect to make top salary though. I would also suggest smaller companies focused on intel/reconnaissance. As a small business owner when my reservists/guardsmen are deployed, we pay them the delta between their military pay and their company pay so that they don't lose anything financially. A lot of your bigger companies don't do that because you're just a 6 digit employee number.

Square Pair
Mar 16, 2011



Rrail posted:

I'd love to see an offer letter or something from someone doing FMV work so we get a solid confirmation on salary.

It would be nice and informative to have something like this organized on the OP if for anything to give a no poo poo ballpark salary figure for the folks getting out. I know one of the most difficult things for me was placing a value on an intangible skill (TS/SCI, Intel, etc) and sold myself way drat short when leaving the Air Force.

For those of you looking at Information Assurance, CISSP, Security+, etc we have issued some offer letters averaging mid $90K. This is in Georgia where the cost of living is cheap, no travel, no stress, and an 8-5 job. Neither applicant had a BS/BA only IA certifications, TS/SCI, and real-world experience. They were able to start work with no training day 1.

Square Pair
Mar 16, 2011



Our Gay Apparel posted:

As for IA...I'm almost done with a cybersecurity degree through UMUC, and I have my Security+ (and obviously a TS/SCI). Would it be smarter for me to stay in imagery or jump over to IA?

Both are valuable (obviously) but If I had to bet, I think cybersecurity is going to edge out the other INTs in the near future. This is based on efforts to put imagery exploitation into the "cloud". So without going into detail, migrating away from tools being loaded on individual PCs to hosted software exploitation. You just connect to a network and whatever exploitation packages you need are there.

Also here is an issue which is common and close to home (for me):
http://spectrum.ieee.org/riskfactor...of-google-again

Square Pair
Mar 16, 2011



Stultus Maximus posted:

I was under the impression that the companies hired you for a specific contract length, like "we have a government contract for 18 months for this project and you're hired for that time" or "we need people in Afghanistan on year-long hitches" but it's not guaranteed that you will stay on after that period. So it would be hard to get a mortgage based on "well I make $90,000 the next two years and maybe something after that".

I may be totally misinterpreting what I've heard, though. It's a totally new world to me.

Well actually - if you are working for a defense contractor - your job is contingent on contracts. So that 18 months you mention is the length of the funding on the contract. If no funding is put on, that contract dies and everyone on it is moved somewhere else (if there is somewhere else to move them to).

Whether that is engineering support for a small company or working for a big copany like BAE. Lose a couple of key contracts and people start getting laid off if there aren't new contracts to absorb that work load. The best thing about large companies is they are better able to absorb losses. Unlike a small company - If I lose an existing contract there is no way to absorb that loss - I have to let people go. Big companies understand that so often 'buy' a contract by underbidding and taking a loss on the contract. It's a write off for them and they just eliminated a competitor.

Square Pair fucked around with this message at Sep 13, 2011 around 16:41

Square Pair
Mar 16, 2011



Our Gay Apparel posted:

I don't work in your white collar environment. I work in a tiny office with a 70 inch LCD, multiple Xboxes and insane computers everywhere, with one other person. No one ever bothers us. I can wear whatever I want. My job owns (except for the whole no support from CONUS thing)

You're still with the same company as when you separated?

Square Pair
Mar 16, 2011



Our Gay Apparel posted:

Yes, I've stayed so far. Still unsure as to whether I will in the long run, there are a LOT of issues. Namely expired LOAs and lack of expedience in getting us new ones. I'm open to other opportunities, if you know anyone looking for my type.


This issue is a government issue. A government contracting issue. It is absolutely horrible to get anything through contracting. My KO is sitting on $27M of expiring funds throwing roadblock after roadblock so they don't have to do the contract mods for funds that have been here since May. Before I derail this bitch, it is the same with overseas personnel/FSRs. They have to input data into SPOT, the command will only issue IDs to the FUNDED level of the contract and not the PoP, hurdle after hurdle after hurdle. The expedience is a government issue.

Trashdump posted:

I have been checking through the companies for the past three months with no luck after my wonderful layoff as a Weapon System Operator. Any advice for a current Intel analyst (NG,) with a four year degree who is tired of sitting on his rear end and not doing poo poo for work. I went from 60hr weeks (great OT) to nothing and cant stand it. There has to be OCONUS work out there for me, but goddamn they ain't biting at my resume.

I'd be interested in looking at your resume. I don't have anything OCONUS if that is your preference though.

Pudgygiant posted:

Protip, a lot (sometimes the vast majority depending on the company) of the jobs they post are contingent on winning the contract, and even then a "we like you" sometimes means "we're going to use your resume to win this contract and then not hire you".

That said, anybody got an inside line on any adpe/junior satcom/network engineer positions? It's loving hard to get back over after taking a few months off even with the direct lines to global hiring managers at two of the largest comms companies overseas.

The first statement is true. A common strategy is the 'bait and switch' for the purposes of showing recruitment or a larger labor pool than what the company really has. Having said that, I'd be interested in your resume as well. Again, no overseas positions but we do work some really cool network/SATCOM programs supporting HAISR aircraft (U2/Global Hawk).

Square Pair
Mar 16, 2011



Rrail posted:

It shouldn't take that much, since it's primarily service based. Unless you need planes, of course.

Read my PM - if you have a funding source and 'supportive' contracting officer - it's pretty quick and easy if you stay below certain thresholds. As a small company you want to fly under the radar from the big fish. There is no way you can compete unless it is a small business set-aside (and even then the fuckers find small businesses to front for them). They'll literally buy the contract taking a loss just to hire your people and watch you fold.

If your american indian - lot of opportunities.
Disabled vet >40% good to go.
Everyone else is a cost shootout.

Square Pair
Mar 16, 2011



Roving Reporter posted:

What does that bring you? Not being snarky but percentages only mean something to the VA and even less to the fed/state gov(all disabled vets are the same or so it seems). Being 70 is usually the same as 20 for status or am I just wrong and bitter?

Nope you're correct. My business partner is 40% disabled - so for some reason that has always stuck in my head as the reason we have the SDVOSB designator. The FAQ link below is just as you stated.

http://www.acq.osd.mil/osbp/programs/veterans/faq.htm

Square Pair
Mar 16, 2011



grover posted:

No, you don't want to do that. You want to put it in just one of your names, then when your 8a status expires, start a new company. That way, you get 8a status twice as long.

Yeah. The status has to be 51% ownership. I would start with wife ownership to get the women owned and 8a. There are great loan rates available for 8a through the SBA. Then after a couple of years when you graduate from the 8a program you could go to service disabled veteran owned (you would have to take 51% ownership). I don't think you can do 8A as well unless you are a minority. If you are a white boy you'll just get service disabled which is still good.

As a warning the 8a certification, like anything in the government, is a time consuming process. Invest the $5K or whatever to have a company help you prepare the documents.

Square Pair
Mar 16, 2011



deadly potato posted:



Wow. I wouldn't even compare that to stateside - as stateside folks would get more and the only hardship is the long lines at Wal-Mart. Is the pay you quoted base or full? Meaning do you get any hardship differential or anything? Tax breaks? There has to be some type of benefit besides penguins.

On a side note, my company is sponsoring a University of Georgia (UGA) research trip to Antarctica this summer. 10 days or so of college kids running around. Not sure what station they are going to.

Square Pair
Mar 16, 2011



psydude posted:

I've got an interview for a position at the Pentagon in two weeks. I know it's the worst place in the world to work in uniform, but I'm wondering how it is as a civilian contractor. Can anyone here comment on what it's like?

It depends on your job, but I loving hated it. Worked on Air Staff for a year as a civilian contractor right after I separated from active duty. The only positive thing to say is that there is a lot of growth potential and depending on your job, an opportunity to make contacts with high level government workers. From a work related program management and budgeting/planning learning experience, it's the best. I learned the "what happens behind the scenes" for acquisition programs that I was able to take with me. There is something to be said about being able to call up contacts at SAF/AQ or HQ/DA when I have an issue.

What sucks? The loving commute. The cost of living. And the loving commute. If you don't live in walking distance (Pentagon city) - learn the metro and get a place close to one.

Square Pair fucked around with this message at Oct 21, 2011 around 13:17

Square Pair
Mar 16, 2011



EngineerSean posted:



So the description of the Air Force is correct. The question to ask the recruiter is if there is an "Imagery Analyst" description - or does that fall under Intelligence Specialist? I'm not sure how it is classified, but IAs do all those things mentioned in that write-up. They'll analyze the imagery, write reports/recommendations, etc. What that description is missing is the analytical training (i.e. imagery, FMV, MASINT, HUMINT, etc). I'm assuming that's the broad description and you'll get a specific Intelligence related field (imagery. signals, etc).

Navy: The Navy has bar none the BEST electronics program of all the services. So out of what you posted, CTN would be good. Is crypto relevant in the field/as a contractor? Absolutely, but depends on how you are utilized. The pitfall of that job is being assigned the "Crypto Custodian" which is a glorified supply clerk managing crypto devices (no offense to any supply folks). However if you could get into a 'network' arena working with HAIPEs, Bulk Encryptors, etc that then leads to Information Assurance knowledge/training which is big bucks. All our data is flowing through networks either terrestrial or SATCOM and encryption is the only thing keeping it away from the bad guys.

Square Pair fucked around with this message at Oct 21, 2011 around 13:21

Square Pair
Mar 16, 2011



Rrail posted:

You'd have to have platinum ($15). Either buy that or post your e-mail.

Might want to use a disposable email. This is a Goon community after all.

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Square Pair
Mar 16, 2011



demonachizer posted:

I have never had a clearance. I am looking to see how to get into these types of jobs. I have an ex that went through the process for TS and I know that it took a long time for her.

I am married to a US citizen that was born in the soviet union and a couple years back I lived in Italy and gained dual Italian citizenship which I imagine is going to make poo poo harder for me than anything else.

You're right. The misdemeanor is the least of your problems.

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