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HUGE PUBES A PLUS
Apr 30, 2005

The Koch brothers are behind this new avatar.


Zeta Taskforce posted:

I was reading more, and realized I donít own a crock. I will ask for one for Christmas. (You made my familyís life easier because I am super hard to shop for). In the meantime could I use a glass jar with the lid on top, but not screwed on? Iím curious about temperature. Right now the chokes are being stored in my root cellar where the temperature will hover around 40 once it gets cold out. I also have an unheated that stays about 50. I think I will try two batches and see what I like better.

I use 2 qt mason jars for my sauerkraut and other fermenting projects with excellent results. I have an extra step of working on the sauerkraut in a large bowl before packing it in the jar, but it turns out fine. I put a crock and weight stone down on my wish list too, and I have a feeling this is what my mother is getting for me, as with my birthday being close enough to Christmas, I usually get one gift from her to cover both.

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ixo
Sep 8, 2004

Eventually it will kill you


Is there any reason why I couldn't or shouldn't make jelly out of bottled apple cider instead of juicing my own apples? I'd like to make Martinelli's jelly with mint, and aside from losing the bubbles I can't come up with a reason not to try it.

Joe Friday
Oct 15, 2007

Just the facts, ma'am.

Zeta Taskforce posted:


In the meantime could I use a glass jar with the lid on top, but not screwed on? Iím curious about temperature. Right now the chokes are being stored in my root cellar where the temperature will hover around 40 once it gets cold out. I also have an unheated that stays about 50. I think I will try two batches and see what I like better.

You can use jars. Keep the lids off and use the bags full of water to weigh the stuff down and keep it submerged in the brine.

40-50 degrees is a pretty low temperature for the pickling process. You really want lactobacteria to grow to get that good fermented flavor. Storage at those low temps would be more like fridge pickles. I'd store it somewhere where it's room temperature. Under sinks and in closets without clothing are good ideas.

ixo posted:

Is there any reason why I couldn't or shouldn't make jelly out of bottled apple cider instead of juicing my own apples? I'd like to make Martinelli's jelly with mint, and aside from losing the bubbles I can't come up with a reason not to try it.

Generally the point of canning your own stuff is to capture that fresh in season fruit flavor, but you can use bottled apple cider. It's already cooked so it won't taste as apple fresh and make sure to use the no sugar added kind.

Rule .303
Dec 9, 2011
(Instructions are just some other guy's opinion)

ixo posted:

Is there any reason why I couldn't or shouldn't make jelly out of bottled apple cider instead of juicing my own apples?

If you don't mind the extra cost there is probably no issue at all, but everytime you process something you add to the cost. I can because I am cheap and I hate seeing fruit rot when I can make tasty canned fruit or jam.

ixo
Sep 8, 2004

Eventually it will kill you


Cost addition is fine. And i should have been clearer, my question was more about the viability of jellying a sparkling beverage, rather than juice straight from the fruit. I'll be planting my own trees in the spring, and just want to do them as Christmas gifts until I have fruit of my own. A far as preserving what i'm currently growing, I have hundreds of lemons to deal with -- that angle is covered with lemon honey jelly, lemon curd, lemon meringue pies and salted preserved lemons.

Rule .303
Dec 9, 2011
(Instructions are just some other guy's opinion)

I had that problem this year with pears and grapes. I made grape ketchup and pear butter.

If the sugar and pectin are there you can jellify just about anything. I don't know whether or not you would need extra pectin to make Martinelli's jelly though.
If it works out let me know. I've been looking at the fruit juices in the stores wondering the same thing. (sorry I was condescending)

Joe Friday
Oct 15, 2007

Just the facts, ma'am.

ixo posted:

Cost addition is fine. And i should have been clearer, my question was more about the viability of jellying a sparkling beverage, rather than juice straight from the fruit. I'll be planting my own trees in the spring, and just want to do them as Christmas gifts until I have fruit of my own. A far as preserving what i'm currently growing, I have hundreds of lemons to deal with -- that angle is covered with lemon honey jelly, lemon curd, lemon meringue pies and salted preserved lemons.

I wish I had the same problem! I'd just give the lemon stuff away for Christmas.

When using juice, I'd mostly make sure that it doesn't have sugar added. Otherwise following a recipe would probably make the result ungodly sweet and you can't reduce the sugar because you have no idea how much is added. Sparkling items won't really effect the jelly one way or the other, but obviously you'll lose the bubbles in the cooking process and it could possibly foam more. Since you're planning on using Martinelli's, I'd give their customer service line a call and see if they have recipes and recommendations. Otherwise, follow a recipe with your cider as normal.

Edit for terrible spelling.

Joe Friday fucked around with this message at Dec 11, 2011 around 00:27

Balancing Monsters
Sep 3, 2011


I'm fairly new to eating (let alone making) pickled food beyond pickles. I am also brand new to beets (never had one until a few weeks ago, but it was a very pleasant first encounter). I decided to be brave and make some fridge-pickled beets four days ago, and finally tried them tonight. They turned out pretty good, to the best of my knowledge, though they are a bit strong on the vinegar side.

So! Question: if I let these sit in my fridge a few more days before trying them again, will the vinegar flavor mellow out like a fine barleywine, or will the beets continue to bloat themselves on vinegar to the point of inedibility? They're definitely still enjoyable at this point, but they are right on the cusp and I don't know if I should scarf them now before they're total goners, or just be patient.

If it helps at all, my recipe was loosely as follows:

~2.5 cups apple cider vinegar
~2 cups water
~1.5 pounds beets (I'm terrible at estimating weight, but it was just enough for the liquid to cover when sliced 1/2 inch thick)
half a red onion
six garlic cloves
garlic powder
onion powder
ground black pepper
kosher salt
allspice
rosemary

I don't trust myself not to make botulism enough to try canning things, but this thread has been very informative and interesting, nonetheless!

Joe Friday
Oct 15, 2007

Just the facts, ma'am.

Balancing Monsters posted:

I decided to be brave and make some fridge-pickled beets four days ago, and finally tried them tonight. They turned out pretty good, to the best of my knowledge, though they are a bit strong on the vinegar side.

Congrats on your first steps into home pickling! I love beets myself and have some beet pickled eggs in my fridge that are my go-to snack, especially when drinking.

I am happy to say that your pickles should mellow and blend in flavor over time. The longer you leave them the better and more blended/balanced they will taste. Usually I suggest a minimum of 6 weeks wait to try pickles as young pickles will taste raw or not quite done, as you describe. Beets pickle fast and absorb flavors quickly though so I'd wait another week and a half to try them again.

Also, FYI, this brine will make a phenomenal salad dressing base.

Balancing Monsters
Sep 3, 2011


Joe Friday posted:



This is everything I was hoping to hear.

It never occurred to me that I could use the brine when the beets are all eaten, but I am now on a Google odyssey of tuna, deviled eggs, potato salad, vinaigrette, ham glazes, and more that excites me greatly. All these things are good things and I am happy not to waste so much Prince-purple liquid.

Thanks again!

Zeta Taskforce
Jun 27, 2002


Joe Friday posted:

Please post pictures and/or results, action shots, etc. and let me know how yours turns out. Every crock is different, but have been nothing but pleased with mine.

I'll let you know how they turn out. Started them a couple day ago. Here are the ingredients. I bought the garlic and dill, sunchokes and the onion came from my parents garden (started the onion from seed in my house so it came home) The carrots are still growing in my garden. Bizarre fall in Massachusetts. My cat wanted to help.



I packed them in a Costco sized glass jar that once contained their 4 bean salad and cut out the top of a plastic container to form a disc that just barely fit inside. It is being weighted down with a jar of Trader Joes curry flipped upside down.



So far it's been a couple days, and things look identical to when I packed them in, but I put my finger in the brine and it tastes phenomenal, with a mixture of dill and vegetables.

In a couple weeks, if I don't kill myself I will let you know how they taste.

Joe Friday
Oct 15, 2007

Just the facts, ma'am.

Zeta Taskforce posted:

So far it's been a couple days, and things look identical to when I packed them in, but I put my finger in the brine and it tastes phenomenal, with a mixture of dill and vegetables.

In a couple weeks, if I don't kill myself I will let you know how they taste.

These look absolutely amazing. Makes me want to have a pickle exchange with you! The brine is going to be pretty neutral during this process, but you may see it turn cloudy, change color, or bubble slightly while you wait. This is a very strong salt solution so the microbeasties are in controlled growth here.

Yes, it's been a weird winter here in Seattle too. There are still leaves on some of the trees(!) and it's been pretty dry over all. This year has been a very late year for everything.

I just busted open on of my jars of sweet pickled peppers and although the texture is a bit mushy, the flavor cannot be beat. I'm going to work on improving this to blue ribbon level.

Rule .303
Dec 9, 2011
(Instructions are just some other guy's opinion)

Joe, did you ever make home made salt beef or buckboard bacon?

I'm on my 3rd shot at it, first one was tolerable, the second one was terribly salty (if wonderful in pork and beans) and I am hoping to get this one right.

I got a vacuum sealer for Christmas, and instructions out of a magazine:

Split your 1/2 pork shoulder and rub in 1 Tablespoon of Morton's Sugar Cure and 1 Tablespoon of brown sugar for each pound of pork shoulder:
In the recipe it calls to put it in a ceramic bowl or a ziplock baggie, weigh it down and turn it once a day for a 14 days in the fridge.

An old cook book says to use a wet brine and keep it soaking in it for a couple of weeks.

Cheap baggies will then dribble meat brine all over your fridge by the way, I know this.
Instead I used the vacuum sealer and at least that doesn't leak.

Just the problem is that it comes out so salty. How long should I soak it to get the salt out? One hour in cold water isn't cutting it. I know in the 18th Century British and American Navies they would boil it in big cauldrons, but is that the best way?

Joe Friday
Oct 15, 2007

Just the facts, ma'am.

Rule .303 posted:

Joe, did you ever make home made salt beef or buckboard bacon?

I don't have a ton of experience with meat curing. I've made jerky and canned meat stuff, but I'm afraid I can't help you with your current issue. However, there is a really good Charcuterie thread that has much knowledge that can probably help you out:
http://forums.somethingawful.com/sh...hreadid=3438423

They are all about curing meats in there.

Rule .303
Dec 9, 2011
(Instructions are just some other guy's opinion)

Thanks!

Oh, my favorite resource for canning recipes is the Ball Blue Book. The technique sections are fantastic too. They do all the things the Extension offices offer and they make it readable too.

TapTheForwardAssist
Apr 9, 2007

he's the one who gives his body/
as a weapon of the war/
and without him all this killing can't go on


Interesting read here, particularly all the safety stuff. Not to be one of those "but I do XYZ and I'm fine" pricks, but I've made a half-dozen batches of pickled key limes just by chucking a bunch of slitted ones into a recycled jar packed with sea salt, let them juice out, top with extra juice, and a little oil on top to cover the brine (and keep any lemons from floating up). It had never occurred to me in the slightest that this would be unsafe, but there really doesn't seem much reason not to just be safe and boil a brand new jar, heat/pressure it, seals, etc.

The sauerkraut recipe got me thinking kimchee, so I got to dig up info on that, and find all the weird kimchee variants out there. I've actually been in several military chowhalls that had Korean civilian cooks, and every couple weeks they'd add kimchee'ed cucumber slices to the salad bar, and those were amazing. Looking at recipes online though, it seems most folks are doing kimchee in a crock or non-vacuum-sealed jar in the fridge. Would it still be better to can kimchee in the formal USDA process, or would that mess up the whole fermentation aspect?

Z. Beeblebrox
Jul 10, 2003

Fra-gi-lay...It's Italian!

I have a question about sauerkraut safety for those of you who've tried making it/eating it. I've read in numerous sources that sometimes mold appears and you're just supposed to scoop it off. Some molds produce toxins and other substances that make you sick. How is this safe to eat with mold sporadically growing on top? Is there a way to ensure that mold won't grow? I really want to try making it but the whole mold thing worries me.

Joe Friday
Oct 15, 2007

Just the facts, ma'am.

TapTheForwardAssist posted:

It had never occurred to me in the slightest that this would be unsafe, but there really doesn't seem much reason not to just be safe and boil a brand new jar, heat/pressure it, seals, etc.

Well, making fermented items is a bit different then the "fresh pack" method of using fresh vegetables in brine and canning them up. I think your process for pickled limes should be fine, just change the long term storage method. If you want them to be shelf-stable, use canning jars and process them in a canner. If you have the space and don't plan on submitting them to the actual canning process, just use any clean, sterile jar and stash them in the fridge.

Covering with oil is not a good idea. Botulism loves an anaerobic situation, and unprocessed food (which has not been submitted to temperatures to kill most spores) under oil is a great example of that. Plus, fats go rancid.

Botulism cases in the US are very rare but my philosophy is always "why take the risk when 15 extra minutes will make this 1000X safer?"

TapTheForwardAssist posted:

The sauerkraut recipe got me thinking kimchee, so I got to dig up info on that, and find all the weird kimchee variants out there. I've actually been in several military chowhalls that had Korean civilian cooks, and every couple weeks they'd add kimchee'ed cucumber slices to the salad bar, and those were amazing. Looking at recipes online though, it seems most folks are doing kimchee in a crock or non-vacuum-sealed jar in the fridge. Would it still be better to can kimchee in the formal USDA process, or would that mess up the whole fermentation aspect?

Kimchee and sauerkraut are both fermented products, so you have to let them ferment somehow. I always make Maangchi's Easy Kimchi recipe, ferment it in my crock for a week then add it to clean jars and store it in my fridge. This is basically a lunar new year tradition here.

http://www.maangchi.com/recipe/easy-kimchi

If you want it to be shelf stable, find a recipe that gives instructions for fermentation and processing. There are tons out there, but I prefer to let my kimchee continue to ferment and age in the fridge.

Z. Beeblebrox posted:

Is there a way to ensure that mold won't grow? I really want to try making it but the whole mold thing worries me.

Yes, sauerkraut will mold and scum, bubble and be very active microbially. This action is caused by lactobacteria (and other wild yeasts) and give sauerkraut its trademark flavor.

Yes, molds and spores can make you sick, but like many cheeses and other cured products, the mold that sauerkraut produced and the active bacteria in the mix keep other, harmful bacteria from growing. This is not to say that sauerkraut wis immune to bad batches or never goes bad, but the lactobacteria do a great job of keeping salmonella and other evil beasties away. Additionally, the canning process heats everything up to the point where the bacteria is killed in the final product and makes the kraut shelf stable.

A flying piece of
Feb 28, 2010
NO THEY ARE NOT THE SAME THING AS CHEX

Wow, I made and canned vodka sauce with a water bath last year for extended family. I'm glad either no one ate it or no one died after reading about canning over the past few days...

HUGE PUBES A PLUS
Apr 30, 2005

The Koch brothers are behind this new avatar.


Just look at how much my mother loves me ...



10 liter ceramic fermenting crock. My only regret is it's Christmas Eve, all the stores are closing so I must wait until Monday before I can buy cabbage.

Joe Friday
Oct 15, 2007

Just the facts, ma'am.

Highspeeddub posted:

Just look at how much my mother loves me ...



10 liter ceramic fermenting crock. My only regret is it's Christmas Eve, all the stores are closing so I must wait until Monday before I can buy cabbage.

Oh man, crock posting time! Mine was last Christmas' present, but I need to get it out for annual lunar new year kimchi. Mine is a 5 liter one



Be warned, you may see salt seep through the crazing on the crock. This is normal, just wipe it off occasionally. At first I was like "what is that?!" so don't go crazy like me.

HUGE PUBES A PLUS
Apr 30, 2005

The Koch brothers are behind this new avatar.


Joe Friday posted:

Oh man, crock posting time! Mine was last Christmas' present, but I need to get it out for annual lunar new year kimchi. Mine is a 5 liter one



Be warned, you may see salt seep through the crazing on the crock. This is normal, just wipe it off occasionally. At first I was like "what is that?!" so don't go crazy like me.

That is good to know, thanks for the tip.

hbf
Jul 26, 2003
No Dice.

How long should opened, refrigerated jam last?

My blackberry and raspberry jam does not seem to be lasting a long time once opened. One, I opened in early october and last used maybe end of nov (got stuck behind something) and today I opened it and it was growing white mold. Another I have been using since October but a few weeks ago it started to smell like alcohol (fermenting?) so I discarded it. I thought it was a fluke but some jam I sent to my parents is doing the same thing.

They all had good seals when opened. Did I just not process long enough to kill everything?

Joe Friday
Oct 15, 2007

Just the facts, ma'am.

hbf posted:

How long should opened, refrigerated jam last?

Well, it depends. It should last at least a month in refrigerated conditions, and eating something within 6 weeks of opening is pretty standard. It sounds like your batch may have contamination issues. It can also just be the way this batch is. My peach rosemary butter molds within a few weeks of opening even though it is properly preserved and sealed. It happens, just eat the stuff up quick and triple check all your jars to make sure they have good seals.

Zeta Taskforce
Jun 27, 2002


Time to start using my new Christmas present!



I asked for a crock, didn't realize I was going to get a 5 gallon one. But those pickles I made a couple weeks ago are already gone. The sad thing is they never quite made it to the stage where they were completely done fermenting. I couldn't stop eating them, and then I wanted to give some to my brother-in-law who is into this raw food kick.

I still have a mountain of chokes, and I was thinking of creative ways to use them up, but as pickles I'm looking forward to eating through the pile. Also the brine is incredible in soups. I made a chicken soup last week and instead of adding more salt I used half a cup of brine. It is to die for.

Thanks Joe!

Iron Lung
Jul 24, 2007
Life.Iron Lung. Death.

So I tried my hands at Dilly Beans again, this time at a friend's house whose stove doesn't turn off! We followed the recipe from Ball's Home Preserving book for the pick-a-vegetable dill pickles.

I've seen it before in this thread, or the old version, but what is the best way to prevent floating veggies? I know packing is one way, and so we tried to pack our jars as tight as possible. It was getting to the point where I was breaking beans trying to get them into the sides and middle. A lot our beans were even sticking out of the brine so I was surprised at them all deciding to float. Our beans also turned out wrinkly, any way to avoid that?

The book also said to leave them sit for 24 hours undisturbed, but should we wait a few weeks to crack them open? I know other recipes I've read for beans have called for that. Looking forward to them!

Joe Friday
Oct 15, 2007

Just the facts, ma'am.

Iron Lung posted:

So I tried my hands at Dilly Beans again, this time at a friend's house whose stove doesn't turn off! We followed the recipe from Ball's Home Preserving book for the pick-a-vegetable dill pickles.

I've seen it before in this thread, or the old version, but what is the best way to prevent floating veggies? I know packing is one way, and so we tried to pack our jars as tight as possible. It was getting to the point where I was breaking beans trying to get them into the sides and middle. A lot our beans were even sticking out of the brine so I was surprised at them all deciding to float. Our beans also turned out wrinkly, any way to avoid that?

The book also said to leave them sit for 24 hours undisturbed, but should we wait a few weeks to crack them open? I know other recipes I've read for beans have called for that. Looking forward to them!

1. No matter how tightly you pack your food, you will get some floating. It's part of home canning. You can try blanching your food in the brine and letting it sit overnight before processing, but that might cause them to not have that wonderful snap.

2. Wrinkly food usually means either the brine solution was too strong. It can also be just that particular kind of bean, or that batch purged water, etc. I'd try the recipe again and you'll get your canning mojo there. Ball recipes are probably the most reliable and tested out there, so your source is solid (I also checked it in my Ball book and it looks like a great recipe).

3. You should let your pickles, jams and jellies all stand 24 hours before handling i.e. removing the rings, labeling, storing, etc. This assures that you have a good seal, everything is 100% cool and if you have a product that sets, it has set properly. You will need to wait much longer before the pickles will taste good.

I usually wait 6 weeks before opening a jar of pickles. Wait at least 2 to crack them open but they will be better the longer you wait. Young pickles tend to just taste like vinegar and salt.

I just made a half gallon of Cambodian/Thai style quick pickle. It's fridge pickle so it's really just:

1/2 head of cabbage, shredded
3 hot wax peppers, diced
1 carrot, diced
1 bunch scallions, chopped
7-10 whole birdseye chilies, stemmed
1 medium daikon radish, shredded



Brine

2 cups soy sauce
2 cups rice wine vinegar
2 cups water
1/2 cup sugar (to taste)

Pack those veggies in, pour brine over and cover. Stash in fridge for 24 hours and they'll be ready. They get better the longer you leave them and should be good up to a month.



Kimchi Lunar New Year megapost coming soon.

Iron Lung
Jul 24, 2007
Life.Iron Lung. Death.

Joe Friday posted:

Helpful Stuff!

Awesome, thanks for the info. As long as we're not gonna kill anyone I'm happy! The hardest part is going to be waiting 6 weeks to try these .

That quick pickle recipe looks awesome! Do you bring the brine to a quick boil and then pour it over? As for ingredients, what sort of rice wine vinegar did you use (unseasoned?), and can I sub in a jalepeno or two for the wax peppers? Looks like I need to find some big jars!

Inf
Jan 4, 2003

BBQ


Cool, wish I'd seen this thread before. I can things a few times a year, usually when something's in season, or I find a ridiculous deal. This winter I managed to get around 9lb of blackberries for $16, so blackberry jam became was my go-to gift for everyone.



I went through the trouble of making custom labels this time, too:

Rule .303
Dec 9, 2011
(Instructions are just some other guy's opinion)

I've been canning for 6 years and I have just got past the "sharpie on the lid" labeling. Sharpie on masking tape is so much more convenient and easy to read on the shelf. I never thought of doing a custom label.

Hey! you forgot to add "may contain nuts" on that there label!

Inf
Jan 4, 2003

BBQ


Rule .303 posted:

I've been canning for 6 years and I have just got past the "sharpie on the lid" labeling. Sharpie on masking tape is so much more convenient and easy to read on the shelf. I never thought of doing a custom label.

Hey! you forgot to add "may contain nuts" on that there label!


Avery makes a glossy label that's the perfect size for a regular mouth lid. I had to make my own Illustrator template for it though, Avery only provides one for Microsoft Word.

Wow, really? The seeds? Hadn't thought about that, I guess I never thought of them as "nuts." My food mill certainly removed 99%+ of the seeds, but a few small ones still slipped through.

Joe Friday
Oct 15, 2007

Just the facts, ma'am.

Inf posted:



I went through the trouble of making custom labels this time, too:



Looking good! The custom label makes it look like it's straight out of a fancy farmer's market. Can you post your recipe?

Iron Lung posted:

That quick pickle recipe looks awesome! Do you bring the brine to a quick boil and then pour it over? As for ingredients, what sort of rice wine vinegar did you use (unseasoned?), and can I sub in a jalepeno or two for the wax peppers? Looks like I need to find some big jars!

No need to boil, just mix, cover and refrigerate. I just use the plain rice wine vinegar but you could use white vinegar or cider vinegar as well. Rice wine vinegar isn't as acidic so you will get a stronger flavor with a different kind. You can pretty much substitute as you feel and go crazy with this recipe. It isn't canned and doesn't need to be shelf stable so experiment. Quick pickles are a great way to explore what kind of pickle flavors you like and then choose canning recipes according to what you like (sweeter, more sour, more spice, light flavors). When these are done I'll serve them with fresh cilantro on top with maybe a little crushed peanut. Delicious!

HUGE PUBES A PLUS
Apr 30, 2005

The Koch brothers are behind this new avatar.


Joe Friday posted:

I just made a half gallon of Cambodian/Thai style quick pickle. It's fridge pickle so it's really just:

1/2 head of cabbage, shredded
3 hot wax peppers, diced
1 carrot, diced
1 bunch scallions, chopped
7-10 whole birdseye chilies, stemmed
1 medium daikon radish, shredded



Brine

2 cups soy sauce
2 cups rice wine vinegar
2 cups water
1/2 cup sugar (to taste)

Pack those veggies in, pour brine over and cover. Stash in fridge for 24 hours and they'll be ready. They get better the longer you leave them and should be good up to a month.



Kimchi Lunar New Year megapost coming soon.

This is a work of art. I'm just getting into the joys of Thai food, I may have to try this in the future.

My new crock is entertaining as well as functional. Every once in a while I hear a burping, bubbly sound escape from the water seal, which tells me fermentation is happening.

Desiree Cousteau
Jan 15, 2012


So, I have a general question. Is it better to get new jars or will the jars at the thrift stores do as good?

Toriori
Jan 4, 2012

No Yanda's allowed

My friend gave me a jar of blueberry jam. It's really yummy but I noticed yesterday when I opened it there was mold on the top of one of the berries. Is the whole jar done or can I just scoop out the area with mold? It's really a shame if it's no good, it's really nice jam.

Joe Friday
Oct 15, 2007

Just the facts, ma'am.

Desiree Cousteau posted:

So, I have a general question. Is it better to get new jars or will the jars at the thrift stores do as good?

Any Ball, Mason or Kerr jars should be good and have standardized mouths but bring a large and small lid with you when buying just in case. There are some jars out there that are knockoffs intended for drinking, and some older jars might not be standardized (they used a cage lid or wax seal). Check everything for chips - particularly in the mouth rims, cracks or flaws as those will cause improper seals or breakage. Don't pay more than $1 per jar either, since that's about the going price new. Older jars may have been through more heat/cool cycles and may be slightly more prone to breakage, but other than that, buying a jar is a long term investment. Used should be fine.


Toriori posted:

My friend gave me a jar of blueberry jam. It's really yummy but I noticed yesterday when I opened it there was mold on the top of one of the berries. Is the whole jar done or can I just scoop out the area with mold? It's really a shame if it's no good, it's really nice jam.

It's done. Pitch it. Mold spores can be deep in contaminated food so digging out the moldy part won't necessarily save it. Sucks.

Toriori
Jan 4, 2012

No Yanda's allowed

Joe Friday posted:

Any Ball, Mason or Kerr jars should be good and have standardized mouths but bring a large and small lid with you when buying just in case. There are some jars out there that are knockoffs intended for drinking, and some older jars might not be standardized (they used a cage lid or wax seal). Check everything for chips - particularly in the mouth rims, cracks or flaws as those will cause improper seals or breakage. Don't pay more than $1 per jar either, since that's about the going price new. Older jars may have been through more heat/cool cycles and may be slightly more prone to breakage, but other than that, buying a jar is a long term investment. Used should be fine.


It's done. Pitch it. Mold spores can be deep in contaminated food so digging out the moldy part won't necessarily save it. Sucks.
Darn, I had figured.
I will definitely be making some of that Thai fridge pickle you made, looks so yummy! How long does something like that keep?

Grushenka
Jan 4, 2009

There's nothing better than borsch.


I'm thinking of making my own giardiniera, but I don't want to give myself botulism. I found a recipe online that involves letting the vegetables sit in olive oil and vinegar for two days, but I've never done anything like this before so I'd like to know if I'm going to kill myself by doing it.

This was the recipe, if anyone was interested.

Iron Lung
Jul 24, 2007
Life.Iron Lung. Death.

Joe Friday posted:

No need to boil, just mix, cover and refrigerate. I just use the plain rice wine vinegar but you could use white vinegar or cider vinegar as well. Rice wine vinegar isn't as acidic so you will get a stronger flavor with a different kind. You can pretty much substitute as you feel and go crazy with this recipe. It isn't canned and doesn't need to be shelf stable so experiment. Quick pickles are a great way to explore what kind of pickle flavors you like and then choose canning recipes according to what you like (sweeter, more sour, more spice, light flavors). When these are done I'll serve them with fresh cilantro on top with maybe a little crushed peanut. Delicious!

I tried this last night, and am anxiously awaiting the results! I was a little bummed as a few of the thai chilies in the box I bought had mold on them so I had to toss most of them after picking out clean ones. I also ended up with a ton of extra brine and ending up tossing it, is that normal? Did I pack my veggies too much? I had to use several small jars, and there was probably a good 2.5 cups of brine leftover. Still excited!

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Joe Friday
Oct 15, 2007

Just the facts, ma'am.

Toriori posted:

Darn, I had figured.
I will definitely be making some of that Thai fridge pickle you made, looks so yummy! How long does something like that keep?

About a month. Peak deliciousness will happen around the 48 hour to 2 week mark.

Grushenka posted:

recipe online that involves letting the vegetables sit in olive oil and vinegar for two days . . . botulism, etc.

This looks like a fine recipe to follow, just keep everything in the fridge at all times as the directions state and use or freeze within a week. Oil packed veg don't last very long and won't be safe for long term refrigerator storage. If you have a big batch, freeze the extra. I'd give it 6 months in the freezer.

Here are the National Center for Home Food Preservation's recommendations for oil packing garlic, which would apply to gardenia too: http://nchfp.uga.edu/how/freeze/garlic_oil.html

Iron Lung posted:

there was probably a good 2.5 cups of brine leftover.

This happens sometimes. It depends on the size of the vessels you use, how much packing was done (I loosely pack mine to avoid crushing), how much water was in the veg, how much volume the final mix was, etc. What I do is save the brine I have left over and let things settle for a few hours. After a few hours I bubble the jars, basically tapping them lightly on a toweled surface and moving the food around with a chop stick. This releases the trapped air bubbles. I think top with the leftover brine. You can either throw away the brine at that point or use it for a salad dressing base. Sometimes it happens, but if I make it again or get reports that it's too much, I'll adjust the recipe accordingly.

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