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Kenning
Jan 10, 2009

I really want to post goatse. I wish I had 10bux


I haven't made a Ramos Fizz in months at least. It's a good season for it; maybe I'll have to give the old beast a go again and just have sore arms after my drink.

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Pantsmaster Bill
May 7, 2007


I've never even drank one, I need to rectify this I think.

Vegetable Melange
Oct 23, 2008

tHROW SOME D"s ON THAT BIZNATCH


Surprisingly easy, despite the fact that you have to whip the cream. Use old tom gin or Plymouth.

Caitlin
Aug 18, 2006

When I die, if there is a heaven, I will spend eternity rolling around with a pile of kittens.


http://bittercube.com/products/

So I picked up the Cherry Bark Vanilla bitters at Binny's the other day and I'm looking for actual drink recipes instead of vague suggestions of what to drink it in because frankly I'm usually not a person who uses bitters in drinks. I drink mostly G&T or Tom Collins type drinks and usually with Hendrick's.

quote:

Aromatic and potent, with hints of cherry, cocoa and Madagascar vanilla. The cherry aroma comes from wild cherry bark, and from Syrian cherry pits. The bitters have an interesting aroma of cocoa and bitter almonds.

Description from the website in case the flavor components help with suggestions.

Thanks!

BoredByThis
Jul 13, 2001

Watch out! I'll attract you too!

Works well in place of Angostura in a Manhattan or Old Fashioned. It plays really well with bourbon in general. Also nice in things like a corpse reviver where there's an acidic component that could use some counterplay. Also a touch of it in a French 75 could be an interesting complement.

Play with it. Or come hang out with me and we can figure something out.

Actual Recipes

Cherry Manhattan.

1 Smashed Brandy Soaked or Maraschino Cherry
3 oz Rye or Bourbon
3/4oz Sweet Vermouth
4-5 drops Biters.

Muddle Cherry, shake whiskey with ice and vermouth until incorporated, strain into glass with 1 large ice cube, top with bitters.

Old Fashioned:

1 Sugar Cube
1 Wide peel of orange
1 Brandied or Maraschino Cherry
3oz Rye or Bourbon
splash of water
Bitters

Soak sugar cube with bitters and allow it to begin to dissolve. Muddle water, orange peel, cherry, bitters and sugar cube. top with whiskey.

BoredByThis fucked around with this message at Dec 19, 2011 around 22:08

Caitlin
Aug 18, 2006

When I die, if there is a heaven, I will spend eternity rolling around with a pile of kittens.


The only problem with coming over to do that is getting into the city poo poo's tricky. I was aiming to go to Kuma's before Christmas but I don't think there's any way I can make that happen with all the crap I still have to do. SOMEDAY

Thanks for the recipes though! Everyone has variations on even the most standard recipes so I figured I'd ask for a tried and true.

Of note to you, I may have recently purchased a Chimay and Lindemann's gift set so I could get glasses for them. This is all your fault.

BoredByThis
Jul 13, 2001

Watch out! I'll attract you too!

I apologize for nothing.

Halloween Jack
Sep 11, 2003

Let your word be "Yes, Yes" or "No, No"; anything more than this comes from the evil one.

There's this Moment of Truth that occurs when you realize all your "juice glasses" came free with liquor bottles.

Vegetable Melange
Oct 23, 2008

tHROW SOME D"s ON THAT BIZNATCH


The cherrybark bitters are really quite rad, we used them at one job in a sour variation with applejack and pear brandy. It's surprisingly subtle.

Me, I got a hold of some wormwood bitters from cocktail kingdom yesterday (their showroom is total geek heaven, the nice man talked me into this completely sensible purchase with no resistance on my part). The wormwood bitters I used in a KSBW old fashioned in a demo at Astor Wines, it went over well and sold almost a case of bourbon.

H.R. Paperstacks
May 1, 2006

This is America
My president is black
and my Lambo is blue

Halloween Jack posted:

There's this Moment of Truth that occurs when you realize all your "juice glasses" came free with liquor bottles.

This is what I refer to as "the good life"

TapTheForwardAssist
Apr 9, 2007

he's the one who gives his body/
as a weapon of the war/
and without him all this killing can't go on


I still haven't bought the recommended Punch! book, but since I'm visiting family for the holidays I reckoned I'd whip something up based on internet recipes. I also didn't want to go out and buy extra ingredients (other liquors, exotic flavourings, etc) for a one-shot recipe, so I read a few things and made just a really basic mix for practice.

I had some Bulleit rye I used part of to make a jar of dried cherry infusion for a gift, and I vaguely thought it would go well with red grapefruit. I ran across a recipe for Kentucky River Fish Kill punch and decided it was at least an endorsement of the flavour concept, though I skipped most of the secondary ingredients in the interest of making in unobjectionable for people who don't like Aperol and the like.

I just made a basic oleosaccharum muddling the red grapefruit peels in brown sugar for a few hours. Made a nice gooey blackish oily stuff that smelled lovely. Dumped in the Bulleit rye and let sit longer, and then added red grapefruit juice and let age overnight.


The end result I've tried both straight (not as sugary/liqueury as I'd expected, actually drinkable on its own) and over soda. Straight it's pretty fragrant and not too boozy. Over soda it's really mellow and accessible; my mom's not much of a drinker and even she likes it. The main surprise to me is that it doesn't have any of the sharp bright citrusy taste I was expecting; it bears almost no resemblance to, say, dumping whiskey into store-bought Ocean Spray Ruby Red Grapefruit juice. It tastes slightly of grapefruit, but a whole lot of peel flavour; not bitter/pithy, but in an almost cologne-like kind of way.

Overall, the flavour is more subtle and more "adult" (in terms of being deep vice bright and spiky) than I at all expected. The minor downside to that is that it's not a drink where you can really separate flavour from strength: you either drink it at 40 proof with a lot of flavour, or your drink it at 15 proof as an lightly-flavoured spritzer.


All in all, it's a decent mix and we'll certainly drink it up today. Flavours mixed well, I think rye/grapefruit/brown-sugar worked out. Any guesses though on why I got less bright fruity flavour?

TapTheForwardAssist fucked around with this message at Dec 24, 2011 around 18:21

branedotorg
Jun 19, 2009


Vegetable Melange posted:

Surprisingly easy, despite the fact that you have to whip the cream. Use old tom gin or Plymouth.

I stick the whole thing in a soda siphon with nitrous - excepting the soda.

good luck kitten
Aug 18, 2004

Tripping the light fantastic


So I was given the PDT cocktail book for Christmas; this should keep me busy for many many months. It's quite a nice book too, the illustrations in it are great and the foreword from Wondrich has gotten me excited about it since he likens it to a modern day Savoy.

Vegetable Melange
Oct 23, 2008

tHROW SOME D"s ON THAT BIZNATCH


My new job has the longest spec for a blood and sand I've ever seen, and it is DELICIOUS.1.5 black grouse, 3/4 each sweet vermouth, oj, and cherry heering.

Duey
Sep 5, 2004

A little C4, knockin' at your door

Vegetable Melange posted:

My new job has the longest spec for a blood and sand I've ever seen, and it is DELICIOUS.1.5 black grouse, 3/4 each sweet vermouth, oj, and cherry heering.

I'm gonna try this tomorrow I think, we have this ancient bottle of marie brizards Cherry liquer that we almost never use at the bar. I'm torn on whether to use Dewar's White or Johhny Walker Red. Pretty sure blended will be better here than single malt.

Kenning
Jan 10, 2009

I really want to post goatse. I wish I had 10bux


I've only ever seen aggressively smokey Islay malts in cocktails, and then it's vanishingly rare. I think there's a recipe earlier in this thread that uses Ardbeg 10, and the Dreamy Dorini Smoking Martini uses Laphroaig 10. Other than those, cocktailery always calls for blends. I favor JW Black or Chivas Regal for my mixing, depending on how smokey I feel like it ought to be. Ted Haigh recommends using Famous Grouse for the Blood and Sand, actually, since it's a more subdued Scotch, and the Blood and Sand is the sort of cocktail you use to convince people who think they don't like Scotch that Scotch is pretty darn good.

GoGoGadgetChris
Mar 18, 2010


People keep recommending that I use a Boston shaker, but I'm having a hard time finding one that isn't riddled with bad reviews. Are the pre-paired ones crap and I'm supposed to just get the stainless steel half and then use it with a pint glass, or what?

Kenning
Jan 10, 2009

I really want to post goatse. I wish I had 10bux


That's what I did. Hit up a restaurant supply, a 28 oz. tin is a few bucks and a mixing glass is almost nothing. I think I got my mixing glass at the hardware store actually.

Vegetable Melange
Oct 23, 2008

tHROW SOME D"s ON THAT BIZNATCH


Make sure that glass is tempered. Also I prefer a dedicated mixing glass and two tins, but if you don't have a well to burn, rock what you please.

Kenning
Jan 10, 2009

I really want to post goatse. I wish I had 10bux


I really wanna get an 18 oz. cheater tin for a duel tin setup, but all the restaurant stores I've been to carry 28 oz. and 16 oz., and the 16 oz. is way too small to fit into the 28 well.

Klauser
Feb 24, 2006
You got a dick with that problem!?!

Just wanted to chime in and say restaurant supply is a good place to go for your shaker. I also prefer a cheater tin over a mixing glass for shaking, but I imagine that's personal preference and you should try both.

Ernest Hemingway
Dec 4, 2009


One good thing about having a Boston Shaker is that if you have sturdy glassware you can shake drinks that you'd normally just build in the glass and stir around a bit.

Just build the drink as usual, pop the metal section on top, shake, and then pour the drink ice and all back into the original glass.

The plain old Cape Codder becomes a pretty sexy ice cold drink with a half inch of foam on top if you do this. The extra effort on presentation and individual treatment of each person's drink goes a long way into how good your drinks end up tasting.

Jahoodie
Jun 27, 2005
Wooo.... college!

kaldas posted:

So I was given the PDT cocktail book for Christmas; this should keep me busy for many many months. It's quite a nice book too, the illustrations in it are great and the foreword from Wondrich has gotten me excited about it since he likens it to a modern day Savoy.

I was just at PDT, and the best was they use their own book as a behind the bar reference if they forget something. (Their copy has secret hand written notes in it though!)

I got an Isi Twist and sparkle for making carbonated negronis, they've yet to come out half as fizzy as they should. Anyone play around with this yet?

GoGoGadgetChris
Mar 18, 2010


Thank you all for the Boston shaker recommendations. This is probably a dumb question, but what is an example of a restaurant supply store? (Bonus points for Portland Oregon area). I've googled up a few and they seem to be stores that sell industrial ovens and kitchen racks. Is that the kind of place I want to go to?

Vegetable Melange
Oct 23, 2008

tHROW SOME D"s ON THAT BIZNATCH


That's the one, though I'm very fond of the wares at Cocktail Kingdom, the Koriko shakers make all the difference.

good luck kitten
Aug 18, 2004

Tripping the light fantastic


Cocktail Kingdom is really solid, i haven't had any problems ordering things from them; still, I would not recommend getting a bar spoon from them because you can easily get one for way cheaper from somewhere like amazon. I still love my cobbler shaker I got from them.

BoredByThis
Jul 13, 2001

Watch out! I'll attract you too!

Vegetable Melange posted:

My new job has the longest spec for a blood and sand I've ever seen, and it is DELICIOUS.1.5 black grouse, 3/4 each sweet vermouth, oj, and cherry heering.

You don't work at Lula Cafe in Chicago do you. They use a similar formulation, and it is indeed delicious. They also sear and flame an orange peel for dramatic effect.

Vegetable Melange
Oct 23, 2008

tHROW SOME D"s ON THAT BIZNATCH


Kaldas, the spoons are a matter of opinion, but I love the weight, they're drop forged (so you'll never break off the bowl), the tridents are useful, and the bowls of the spoon are exactly 1/8oz. Your mileage will vary, but I got used to using them and won't go back (I bring mine to work if work doesn't supply them).

Bored, no, I'm NYC. I like to flame the twist, but that's a volume thing. IE if I have a lot of volume, flamed twists go by the wayside. Doesn't make or break the drink, but it's a really nice touch in certain instances.

good luck kitten
Aug 18, 2004

Tripping the light fantastic


Yeah that's totally fair. The thing is as a non-professional I think it's not worth it for me to invest in one while I'm still learning so much about cocktail making. I could easily see why it's an investment worth making if you work in the industry or are serious to the point where it makes your work easier or more efficient.

GoGoGadgetChris
Mar 18, 2010


Cocktail Kingdom looks pretty great. I ordered the small and large Koriko shakers, and they had a nice pair of jiggers I couldn't say no to either. G'bye money

Vegetable Melange
Oct 23, 2008

tHROW SOME D"s ON THAT BIZNATCH


GoGoGadgetChris posted:

Cocktail Kingdom looks pretty great. I ordered the small and large Koriko shakers, and they had a nice pair of jiggers I couldn't say no to either. G'bye money

I went into the showroom a few weeks ago and bought the koriko, a teardrop spoon, two point hawthorne, jiggers and an enormous mixing glass shaped like the biggest glass of brandy you ever saw, and I did it all to defray taxes on my I-9s this year. Feels good, you know? Good gear makes my job easier, but it's not by any means necessary.

Mister Macys
Apr 21, 2007

"Someone's having doubts huh? Hell, I'm just trying to keep this thing interesting. You can't write me off like that. You're just a voice pal; you don't know a damn thing about racing!"
- Sweet JP, Redline

I bought my first bottle of Hendrick's Gin a few days ago, and was planning on trying a few mixed drinks, in addition to trying it neat, and on the rocks.

Out of curiousity, does it matter what kind of cucumber I garnish/muddle with?
Would a garden cucumber be better than an english cuke? (The two that I have easy access to)

Ernest Hemingway
Dec 4, 2009


Mister Macys posted:

I bought my first bottle of Hendrick's Gin a few days ago, and was planning on trying a few mixed drinks, in addition to trying it neat, and on the rocks.

Out of curiousity, does it matter what kind of cucumber I garnish/muddle with?
Would a garden cucumber be better than an english cuke? (The two that I have easy access to)

You can't invest in fancy gin and then cheap out on the cucumber. English for sure.

GoGoGadgetChris
Mar 18, 2010


I made the Jerry Thomas Champagne Punch from the 12bottlebar blog for my new year's party and it was delicious. Trader joe's $4 bottle of Schloss was great as well.

TapTheForwardAssist
Apr 9, 2007

he's the one who gives his body/
as a weapon of the war/
and without him all this killing can't go on


I imagine that most folks in this thread are well past this point, but for anyone else just feeling these things out: making oleosaccharum is easy and fun. Basically it's just letting sugar wick out the oils in citrus peels, and it brings out a ton of interesting flavour.

The best quick writeup I've seen is this one: http://drinks.seriouseats.com/2011/...h-wondrich.html

Not really much to it, you just slice some citrus peels off (leaving as little white stuff on the peel as possible), and set it in a vessel layered with sugar. Within 20m or so the peels will start sweating, and you'll see glisteny oil and the sugar getting damp. When I did it recently (brown sugar and red grapefruit peels) it formed a black and fragrant ooze. The blog post mentions that this is also a kick-rear end way to make lemonade, so I'll definitely be trying that this summer.


As mentioned in my earlier punch post: with my juiced lemon corpses, and peels after removing them from the mix, I've made them pull double-duty by packing them into a jar with sea salt, so in a few weeks I'll have North African-style pickled lemons, which will go great on a mezze platter with some hummus and olives, or in couscous. I had expected that there would be so little juice left in the lemons after squeezing that I'd have to top them off with fresh lemon juice or pickling vinegar, but to my surprise they still oozed enough juice that, with a little packing down from above, the liquid/salt level completely covers the fruit. Pickled lemons rock, and in Texas where they're $1 for a dozen, pickled key limes are even better. I may set some of them aside to try to make some kind of Vietnamese-fusion cocktail based on chanh muối, "salty lemonade" which I love dearly.

FAKE EDIT: the Wikipedia illustration is making me salivate:

Kenning
Jan 10, 2009

I really want to post goatse. I wish I had 10bux


Yo Veggie Melange, I sprang for a half bottle of Dolin Rouge recently based on your praise and I gotta say this is some delicious loving vermouth.

Klauser
Feb 24, 2006
You got a dick with that problem!?!

Wondering if I could get some thoughts on this:

1oz rye
1oz Applejack
3/4oz amaretto
1/2oz lemon juice
Thyme sprig

Shake everything, double strain, up.

Any feedback, positive or negative would be appreciated.

I'm not sure on a garnish, I hate using thyme, not sure about a lemon peel, I feel it's lemony enough...maybe a cherry?

Vegetable Melange
Oct 23, 2008

tHROW SOME D"s ON THAT BIZNATCH


I'll shake this up when I'm at work next, looks good on paper. Why the bias against thyme?

Klauser
Feb 24, 2006
You got a dick with that problem!?!

Vegetable Melange posted:

Why the bias against thyme?

I think it smells nice, I like the taste, I just think it's ugly. I can't get away from the feeling that I'm handing someone a drink with a twig in it. The smell can be pretty strong too, not something I really want to put right under someones nose.

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Vegetable Melange
Oct 23, 2008

tHROW SOME D"s ON THAT BIZNATCH


I remember the time I first had that cocktail at Angel's Share with the quick-toasted thyme. The smell is unbelievable, not that you have a torch behind your bar (and if you do, I love you). Maybe just a few leaves, flecked around the top? In a way, that's almost the worse solution, because it's impossible to marry the texture of an herb leaf with a shaken drink, but I've had good results using sprigs of lavender as garnish.

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