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Devian666
Aug 19, 2008

Take some advice Frank.

Originally this megathread was self-evident in its purpose, you were here because you were having serious problems with your home network. Some things have changed since then, and some haven't.

If you are running an internet connection of 2 mbit/s or less you probably aren't having any significant problems. Above that, and the faster your connection, the more problems you are likely to hit. The source of a number of problems is your combo modem/router/wireless/firewall as these are commodity devices which sell on the basis of whoever has the lowest cost. If you actually use all of the functions it will overheat or run out of memory. Combo modems generally do one thing well and that is to act as a modem. Most of this op is about routers as these are how you get the most out of your internet connection.

Now you've been told you need a modem and a router. Your network should be directly connected to your router and the modem should be connected to the WAN port on your router. This means you can now take some of the load off of the modem. You can switch off wireless, firewall/filtering settings and any other functions that you don't need. Your router does all of these functions and by removing load on the modem hopefully it will heat up less and be more reliable.

This should be good for most available speeds especially if you're on ADSL 2 at up to 25 mbit/s or cable/fibre at around 100 mbit/s. If you are somewhere with speeds above 200 mbit/s you will need a mid range router and the high routers can cope with anywhere from 400-860 mbit/s. If you start getting above these speeds and do not want to be router limited you either need to build your own router or buy a suitable commercial router. This thread provides links for everything except commercial routers. There are other threads that cover this. Support in this thread is limited to whoever can help.

The thread has been restructured with routers first then firmware flashing and everything else. If you are happy with your router out of the box and it has no problems then everything is fine, until a year later when the router shits itself from overheating. Firmware flashing is not as a high a priority as it was in the past as there has been a significant improvement in stability recently. If you want full control over your router or to potentially add missing features flashing your router will be the way to go.

But I'm not good at routers

Just buy an Airport Extreme Base Station. It's easy to set up using the airport utility. This will save you the pain of network troubleshooting.

Another option although not my first recommendation is the Airport Express. The new version is an update on the earlier version and still has the 100 mbit/s wired connection but has both 2.4 GHz and 5 GHz wireless. This may work for you if you don't have the money for an Airport Exreme Base Station and aren't good at routers. It also has a niche use by being an Airplay output that you can plug your own speakers into. Which is a role filled by some expensive wireless AV solutions. The express is presented in the megathread's standard format below.

Airport Express (2nd Generation)
NOT DD-WRT OR TOMATO COMPATIBLE, 64 MB RAM, 16 MB flash, Qualcomm Atheros AR9344 @ 600 MHz processor, simultaneous dual band radio, 2X2 MIMO, two 10/100 Mb Ethernet ports, USB print server, Apple Airplay speaker streaming, $99

If you are planning to add sound via an Airport Express but you may want to add an HDTV later you can do the same job with an Apple TV. The ATV has a gigabit connection and supports 2.4/5.0 GHz wireless but has no routing functions but has an A5 processor and 8 GB of flash ram. Still works for Airplay for sound but has an HDMI socket but the audio connection is optical rather than dual optical/minijack.

BUT WHICH ROUTER? Is the WRT54GL still the suggested router?
No. Here's a short list of routers in various price ranges. Most routers listed are confirmed compatible with at least DD-WRT, where they are not compatible it is explicitly stated. Some of the routers are older but still available, and others are current generation.

A number of the problems people have with routers is that they have insufficient ram to hold the NAT table. This result in the router not working and randomly stopping downloads and streams. This is because you are downloading/uploading too many linux iso files via bittorrent. All of the routers below have at least 32 mb of RAM which is a good start. Models listed range from 32 mb to 128 mb of RAM.

A lot of Linksys routers now have a cloud management interface. The situation is still changing but they have backed down on spying on your brony porn preferences. Their support has been linking previous firmware versions for customers upset with the forced firmware upgrade

tl;dr don't buy Linksys routers with the Cisco Connect Cloud unless you want the simplified interface and enjoy being spied on.

Feel free to mock or belittle my router choices below:

Be aware that all of the sub $100 routers compromise hardware features and should only be selected if you cannot afford something better. A significant portion of the routers listed are discontinued and may only be available secondhand.

Sub $25 - I have no concept of value:
Monoprice wireless router
No details on what is inside this other than the Realtek chipset but there are numerous reports of it functioning reasonably despite the price. Limited to 100 mbit/s wired and 2.4 GHz wireless but seriously what do you expect for the price.

Sub $50:
Note: This category items may be out of stock or only available second hand. If reasonable (not junk) routers are not available in this category it may be removed in the future.
Linksys E900
Experimental tomato compatible. Broadcom BCM5357C0 300 MHz processor, 32 mb RAM, 8 mb flash.
Linksys E1200
Experimental tomato compatible. Check price and shop around as that is sometimes available in the sub $50 range. Broadcom BCM5357 300 MHz processor for both versions 1 and 2, 32 mb RAM, 4mb flash.
Linksys E2500
Experimental tomato compatible. Broadcom 5358U 300 MHz processor, 64 mb RAM, 8mb flash. Currently listed as discontinued but that shouldn't stop you from buying it.

Under $75:
Linksys E2000
Tomato capable, Gigabit, 2.4 *OR* 5ghz, 354mhz Broadcom, 32mb ram, 8mb flash. Replaced by E2500 check the under $50 category. Note that the E2500 has a considerably slower and low performance cpu compared with the E2000.
Netgear WNR3500L v2
NOT DD-WRT COMPATIBLE, 128mb RAM, 128mb flash, Broadcom 480 MHz processor, gigabit and a tomato build.
Netgear WNR3500L
NOT DD-WRT COMPATIBLE, 64mb, 8mb flash, Broadcom 480 MHz processor, gigabit, external USB DLNA server.

Under $100:
ASUS RT-N16
Tomato compatible. 128Mb ram, 32mb flash, 480mhz broadcom chipset. N support, media server and print server.
Netgear 3700/37AV
Atheros 680 MHz, dual band, gigabit, 64mb ram, 8mb flash, USB DLNA server
The new 3700 v3 does not have any third party firmware support at this time. NOT DD-WRT COMPATIBLE. Check your versions before ordering.

Under $150:
Linksys E3200
Experimental tomato compatible. Price is not always under $100 check to confirm. Broadcom BCM47186 500 MHz processor, 64mb RAM, 16 mb flash. Dual band wireless.
Netgear WNDR4000
NOT DD-WRT COMPATIBLE, Broadcom 480 MHz, dual band up to 450mbit/s, gigabit, 64 mb ram, 8mb flash, USB DLNA server
Netgear WNDR4500
NOT DD-WRT COMPATIBLE, Broadcom 480MHz, dual band up to 450 mbit/s both channels, gigabit, 128 mb ram, 16mb flash, 2 x USB DLNA server 767 mbit/s

Price is no object; I'm space rich
So you want to spend more money. This list includes router bandwidth from smallnetbuilder. If you're paying this sort of money you should think about performance. Note that the WAN to LAN throughput appears to be for a selective scenario that may not represent real world usage. That means that the router is effectively reduced to acting as a switch for benchmarking. However, the information is there for your use.

ASUS RT-N66U
TomatoUSB build available, including a TOR VPN build, but there are reports of reasonable stability with stock firmware. 256 MB RAM, 32 MB flash, Broadcom 4706 CPU at 600 MHz, 2 x USB connectors, micro SDHC socket, and dual band wireless. 732 Mbit/s

Airport Extreme 5th Generation
NOT DD-WRT OR TOMATO COMPATIBLE, 128 MB RAM, 16 MB flash, Marvell 88F6281 1.2 GHz processor, simultaneous dual band radio, Gigabit Ethernet

Apple Time Capsule
NOT DD-WRT OR TOMATO COMPATIBLE, 256 MB RAM, 16 MB flash, Marvell 88F6281 1.5 GHz processor, simultaneous dual band radio, Gigabit Ethernet, USB print server, internal 2 / 3 TB HD storage, $299/$499

Yes, the Time Capsule actually comes with twice the RAM of the AEBS. The AEBS has the same USB print server capability as the TC as well. You can also add a USB drive if you plug a USB hub into the AEBS or the TC and have an external drive and printer connected simultaneously.

What about 802.11ac routers?

Currently I'm not listing any because of the lack of devices supporting these standards. As usual you can end up buying a router like an Netgear R6200/R6300 which support high wireless speeds but it's best to wait until you have a device which can use these before purchasing. Router technology and pricing shifts at glacial speeds but by the time you need to use the new standards you will probably be able to get the routers at a lower price and the new standards will no longer be draft standards.

Firmware

If you want a router where you have firmware support, you're really going to want to get a router that is listed on one or more of the following pages:

DD-WRT Supported devices or use their look up tool
Pros: Supports many, many devices, has a completely original interface, a shitload of customization options, and is updated regularly.
Cons: Depending on the device can present some weird stability issues.
Notes: DD-WRT has a micro version that can be installed on late model Linksys WRT54G devices with gimped memory.

DD-WRT support for E2500 and E3200

Link to firmware builds.

Tomato official page
Tomato USB (fork for newer routers)
Pros: Easy to use, completely original, intuitive interface, many customization options, great QOS, and helpful real time graphs.
Cons: Does not support the multitude of devices like DD-WRT, only supports routers on the broadcom chipset.

experimental builds for TomatoUSB for E900, E1200 v1 & v2, E1500, E1550, E2500 and E3200
Link to TomatoUSB builds.

Open-WRT table of hardware
Pros: Linux for your modem or router. Extremely customizable, very stable, supports a plethora of devices.
Cons: This firmware has come a pretty long way to becoming more user friendly. However, less advanced users should stick with the DD-WRT/Tomato.
There is also a fork of this project DebWrt which allows Debian style package management using apt-get install. If it can run OpenWRT then it may be possible to install DebWrt with some technical knowledge.

For those that don't have a computer janitor license and would like openWRT but it's too technical there is the Gargoyle Router Management UI. It does come in a standalone firmware distribution with the compatibility list here. We do have one report of the distribution not working on a WRT54GL v1.1. Some configurations may not be tested.

In short, stock firmware always falls somewhere between downright horrible to almost acceptable.
Flash your routers.

For those who think flashing your router is too much at the moment Netgear firmware is stable, has plenty of features, and has a lot of the features that are offered in DD-WRT. There were earlier versions of the Netgear firmware that did experience a number of issues but this appears to be mostly resolved.

I NEED INTERNET IN MY BARN/OUTHOUSE/DOWN BY THE RIVER.
Ubiquiti has what you need. The nanostation provides 150mbps (claimed) over extremely long distances by point to point connection. ~$65 a piece (you need two). Has a built in antenna.
http://www.ubnt.com/nanostation
(Ubiquiti has several different devices available, but I believe the nanostation gives the best performance value)
The bullet is also available. It required an external antenna (n type connector), and operates on the standard B, G band, allowing you to use it with existing equipment.
For shorter distances (within the same house), all three firmwares support wireless bridge mode. Just get an extra router, link it to your main router, and you'll have internet. You can use this instead of the gaming adapters for Xbox 360.

My roommate won't quit torrenting Linux ISOs, how do I limit his connection so I can get sweet sweet pings? Also, I can't talk to him like a normal human being
QOS will let you prioritize traffic to certain applications or computers. However, don't be passive aggressive and just talk to your roommate.
This goon has a case for being passive aggressive, with a step-by-step guide for dd-wrt. Passive aggressiveness to new heights! Seems justified here.
DD-WRT QOS Guide
Tomato QOS Guide
As far as torrents are concerned, just use Speedtest to find your max upload speed, and set your client to limit to half of that. With this set, you should have zero ping impact from downloads.

I'm out of ports on my router, why doesn't anybody make an 8 port router. Woe is me
Don't fret, goon buddy. What you need is a switch. You can get both managed and unmanaged switches. You probably want an unmanaged switch as a router is already a lot to deal with. Just buy any gigabit switch with enough ports as there is no significant difference between them for home use.

Which Modem should I buy?
This is increasingly complicated and is very dependent on your local provider. I am not providing any details as I am not that familiar with what is available in the US. However, you should buy instead of rent because rentals are generally always too expensive.

As a general rule modems tend to be equally bad and the only major cost difference is for features that are on your router anyway.

Linux/BSD as routers:
These are serious routers.
Monowall or pfsense. These are both related projects, and are therefore pretty similar. These turn your x86 hardware into a dedicated router
Mikrotik Mikrotik's RouterOS is linux based and can run on either standard computer hardware, or Mikrotik's own RouterBOARDs. Neckbeard Mikrotik chat
Soekris is a manufacturer of low power x86 (AMD Geode) boards, suitable for running Linux and BSD distros, such pfsense, monowall, along with x86 versions of Open-WRT.
PC Engines sells hardware similar to Soekris' offerings, but at a generally lower price.
ClearOS provides a number of open source solutions with ClearOS being a router with a lot of features. Under the software tab there is a live demo you can lot into to check out the features. It appears to have a similar feature set to pfsense.

What about a DLNA server that my PS3 can see
You should have a look at FreeNAS in the NAS/storage megathread. You'll need to install ps3mediaserver on FreeNAS though. Fortunately there are easy to follow instructions.

cat5e vs cat6
Both are able to run gigabit ethernet. If you're running line in your walls or something, it'd be best to future proof for 10gbit with cat6, but otherwise performance is essentially identical. Even if you are streaming media the size of bluerays over your network gigabit is fine. It could be some time before 10gbit is affordable for home use, and by that time this op is likely to have been updated a number of times.

I don't need the speeds of N, help me find a G only router
Any half decent G router (say, the WRT54GL), is going to be overpriced on a spec by spec comparison to an N router. For $50 you can get a GL, or for $40, you can get an N router with a faster processor, and double the ram. You can just turn N off if you're not going to use it.

N wireless is now in the budget router category and it's probably still more than what you need.

Wireless
Wireless is not the magical process it used to be and wireless devices have become increasingly common. However, wireless problems are a pain to deal with. Generally wireless should be considered functional where there is direct line of sight between the device and router. You will have problems with range or interference especially where there are walls or other obstructions that will block the signal.

If your wireless signal is weak or does not cover enough distance you need a wireless repeater. You can get these as a stand alone device just check that you are buying the correct frequency that you need to boost, usually 2.4 GHz, as there are 5GHz only repeaters available.

If you're having problems with wireless do some testing first before posting. You can use inSSIDer 2 to see what frequencies are in use. It may be possible that your network is clashing with your neighbours network. Note that with higher speed wireless being readily available a single wireless accesspoint/router can use up to 80% of the available 2.4 GHz frequencies.

If you live in an area where you have a lot of dwellings, such as apartment living, and there is poor wireless reception due to interference then you may wish to consider getting a 5GHz router (most of those above are described as dual band). Often this band is complete empty of traffic.

Do you want to plan your next wireless expansion then maybe you should try HeatMapper as this will allow you to map out wireless strength inside your house/apartment without requiring GPS reception.

You want to check out wireless networks in the area without looking like an idiot walking around with a laptop? You can use WiFi Analyzer on your Android phone.

If you are serious business about playing games and getting the best performance you should seriously consider having a wired connection to your PC or console. Daisy chaining a series of wireless repeaters because your modem is installed in the outhouse will give you poor performance.

5ghz vs 2.4ghz
5ghz was introduced to the masses with 802.11n. It was previously only available to 802.11a devices. 5ghz offers better connectivity in situations where AP density is high. If you're having trouble finding an open spectrum, 5ghz will help. It will NOT help, however, range. 5ghz does not penetrate walls as easily as 2.4ghz, so don't count on better range by upgrading to N.

Dad's tesla coil is jamming the wireless and Mom won't let me drill holes in the basement
The networking option no one knows about is power line networking. Available in speeds of up to 500 mbit/s. This uses your power lines within your house as network cable. The quality of connection depends on range (length of wire) and the age of the wiring. Old dodgy wiring tends to give bad speeds. A house with new wiring will give good speeds, unless you have noisy electrical devices operating. This is also a good option where people will bitch about you running network cable everywhere.

Hang on what if the neighbours are spying on my brony porn through the power lines. You don't have to worry the powerline networking standards all include encryption.

I want to set up VoIP but I hate my provider more than Bitcoins
It is possible to set this up yourself but it requires a lot of technical effort. There is an Asterisk thread for this purpose. I am not going into detail on VoIP as it's not exactly user friendly at this time, and you can spend a lot of time tinkering around with the configuration.

General Troubleshooting
Here's some things to ensure router reliability:
-Keep your router cool. Routers rarely have efficient cooling, so it's important they're kept in a cool place. Overheating can cause your router to reset or lockup. From experience Linksys routers can experience over heating issues. In fact my Linksys ADSL2+ modem/router got so hot that the network LEDs stopped working and the writing on the top surface evapourated. If you bought a Linksys and you have overheating problems don't worry there is a solution.
-When possible, set up your router with "only" modes. IE: "N-Only, WPA2-Only". Many problems arise from mixed mode environments.

I need to ask you guys because my network problems aren't listed here
By all means ask as there's a lot of people that can help. For us to help you you need to help us.

-Tell us what you network setup is.
-Tell us how you use the network.
-If you have a specific situation where there is a problem please describe it in detail.

If you have 3-5 people watching netflix and youtube while you're running a bittorrent server farm you may find that your 300/300 baud modem isn't really cut out for this use.

This is all great stuff but what is a network?

This article covers networking basics through to how to set up a network. It contains a lot of information on terminology, some older networking technologies and theory, along with current information and recommendations.


This megathread is an evolution of the previous two threads.

Thanks Triikan.
Original thread. Thanks Calculon!

Devian666 fucked around with this message at Nov 19, 2012 around 22:45

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Devian666
Aug 19, 2008

Take some advice Frank.

Reserving this for future information where it is needed.

IPv6

What is this mysterious thing? IPv6 is basically the new address standard now that IPv4 addresses have run out.

Oh poo poo do I need to do something about this? Not yet everything is designed for phased transition. IPv6 went live on 6 June 2012 and you probably haven't noticed any change (you shouldn't).

How do I know if I have IPv6? Try the following link to test your connection. Unless your ISP, modem and router all support IPv6 it will probably have some failures.
http://test-ipv6.com/

How do I fix <x> problem? If your ISP doesn't support IPv6 that's an issue you would need to raise with them as they should support it currently since we are past the IPv6 switchover date. If your modem doesn't support IPv6 you may need to check for updated firmware, or more likely you may need to replace it. If your router does not support IPv6 flashing with dd-wrt will (should) fix this issue.

Any other problems just ask. I don't think we have any IPv6 experts in the thread but you never know.

Devian666 fucked around with this message at Oct 6, 2012 around 00:52

Nitr0
Aug 17, 2005

IT'S FREE REAL ESTATE


Devian666 posted:

Dad's tesla coil is jamming the wireless and Mom won't let me drill holes in the basement
Truely the networking option of last resort is powerline networking. Products on the market will not be listed here as they are universally terrible. This is not something that you use if you want more speed than your 100mbit/s wireless is currently giving you. A recent review demonstrated the speed is very dependent on range and interference. In fact the speeds in a three storey house ranged between 30 to 50 mbit/s. The top speed was achieved with powerline network adapters rated at 200 mbit/s.

This is pretty much wrong. Powerline networking can work fine but it is entirely dependant on the quality of the wiring in your house. Old house with poor wiring == poor speeds. Anything made in the last 10 years should be decent enough to run at high speed.

serebralassazin
Feb 20, 2004
I wish I had something clever to say.


Yea with decent wiring you should be fine. I have a powerline kit from zyxel (200mbps) connected from the second floor of my house to my basement and it gets me the full speed of my Fios connection without issue (3.6-3.8 MBps).

therunningman
Jun 28, 2005
...'e 'ad to spleet.

Any tips for planning a network layout for a new house?
So far I am thinking of two Cat5e and two RG6 to two points in each room. All going to a rack in the utility room.
I am debating if it is worth it to run conduits for everything.

Methylethylaldehyde
Oct 23, 2004
The Benefactor

therunningman posted:

Any tips for planning a network layout for a new house?
So far I am thinking of two Cat5e and two RG6 to two points in each room. All going to a rack in the utility room.
I am debating if it is worth it to run conduits for everything.

Having just done this, not really. Once it's up in the attic, it's not a big deal to just zip tie the bundle to a nail or something. In areas where you can actually trip or fall onto the wires, conduit is a good idea. So the area from the attic or crawlspace to the rack would be a good idea.

I did two cat5, one cat5, one RG6, and one telephone to each room in the house, and terminated them using those keystone jacks.

Devian666
Aug 19, 2008

Take some advice Frank.

Nitr0 posted:

This is pretty much wrong. Powerline networking can work fine but it is entirely dependant on the quality of the wiring in your house. Old house with poor wiring == poor speeds. Anything made in the last 10 years should be decent enough to run at high speed.

This is a your mileage may vary situation. If you have any bandwidth through puts that you could give me I can update the op.

kapinga
Oct 12, 2005

I am not a number

Thanks for starting a new thread!

Devian666 posted:

To start, if you want
Sub $50:
Linksys WRT400n
Atheros chipset 680mhz processor, 32mb, 8mb flash. Simultaneous dual band (2.4/5ghz), meaning you can support a network in each of the bands at the same time.
Linksys E1000
Broadcom 300MHz processor, 32mb, 4mb flash.

This seems to still be out of date, unfortunately. The first link is out-of-stock with no expected restocking date, and the second is $80, not sub $50.

I'm looking to get a wireless bridge going between the wireless router we have in our apt. common room and the desktops I have in my bedroom. The current router is an WRT54Gv6 (yeah, I know what you're thinking) flashed with DD-WRT micro - I'm thinking of getting a nicer 802.11n capable router and demoting the WRT54G to bridge status. Since the product list seems a little out of date, does anyone have recommendations for a b/g/n router that will support an apartment of 5 (~10-12 wifi capable devices, no torrenters)?

Devian666
Aug 19, 2008

Take some advice Frank.

kapinga posted:

Thanks for starting a new thread!


This seems to still be out of date, unfortunately. The first link is out-of-stock with no expected restocking date, and the second is $80, not sub $50.

I'm looking to get a wireless bridge going between the wireless router we have in our apt. common room and the desktops I have in my bedroom. The current router is an WRT54Gv6 (yeah, I know what you're thinking) flashed with DD-WRT micro - I'm thinking of getting a nicer 802.11n capable router and demoting the WRT54G to bridge status. Since the product list seems a little out of date, does anyone have recommendations for a b/g/n router that will support an apartment of 5 (~10-12 wifi capable devices, no torrenters)?

There were bound to be a few price issues as I drafted this a few weeks ago. Which means prices and stock were a bit different. I'll fix this when I get home.

Next up on the price list is the Netgear WNR 3500L. That gives gigabit ports, 2.4 GHz wireless N. According to http://www.smallnetbuilder.com/lanwan/router-charts/bar the throughput is limited to 255 mbit/s. This throughput rate may or may not be an issue depending on the use of your devices.

To get faster throughput it generally takes more money. If cost is an issue you could try the sub $50 routers second hand.

Devian666 fucked around with this message at Oct 10, 2011 around 20:37

kapinga
Oct 12, 2005

I am not a number

Devian666 posted:

There were bound to be a few price issues as I drafted this a few weeks ago. Which means prices and stock were a bit different. I'll fix this when I get home.

Next up on the price list is the Netgear WNR 3500L. That gives gigabit ports, 2.4 GHz wireless N. According to http://www.smallnetbuilder.com/lanwan/router-charts/bar the throughput is limited to 255 mbit/s. This throughput rate may or may not be an issue depending on the use of your devices.

To get faster throughput it generally takes more money. If cost is an issue you could try the sub $50 routers second hand.

Maybe I was slightly premature with the previous post, it looks like the E1000 is available on Amazon for around $50 new, and less than that if you want a "new refurbished" model, whatever that means. You'll probably want to update your links, but that might be it.

Thanks for the advice though. My roommates aren't too intensive on the network so these cheaper routers will hopefully do the trick.

Mantle
May 15, 2004


Thanks for the update.

A small wish though, in the future when starting a new thread, could you please arrange to have it linked in the last post of the old thread before the old thread is locked?

Devian666
Aug 19, 2008

Take some advice Frank.

Mantle posted:

Thanks for the update.

A small wish though, in the future when starting a new thread, could you please arrange to have it linked in the last post of the old thread before the old thread is locked?

My bad. It was my first thread, let alone it being a megathread. I'll try to keep this op reasonably well updated.

Methylethylaldehyde
Oct 23, 2004
The Benefactor

Chiming in that Mikrotik stuff is awesome if you want a ISP style router/ap without all the poo poo that comes with using Cisco. The downside is you have other poo poo that comes with Mikrotik, but the fancy GUI configuration and monitoring software of pretty loving nice. If you don't instantly go cross-eyed or run in horror from serial interfaces, putty, and CLI stuff, and need more than Tomato can offer you, I recommend Mikrotik.

Having a 250mW A/B/G/N that supports 40Mhz channels and 5ghz, plus can use any N-type antenna is loving nice. My AP can hear my crappy underpowered laptop signal from anywhere on the block, and if I wanted to be a dickhead, blast my signal at ~20dBm, which is loving retarded for an omnidirectional antenna.

Additionally, you can do stupid poo poo like multipath weighted round robin load balancing, with stateful routing and the ability to force specific macs, ips, or ports through different internet links. Comedy route all the counterstrike gameplay (port 7086) traffic on your network via your backup satellite link!

movax
Aug 30, 2008



If the E3000 is the renamed WRT610N, I've had 0 issues with them. I had some initial issues with two models, but that was due to some very settings on my part, causing frequent disconnects. I'm "responsible" for 4 of them right now (not in any official capacity, just my apartment + family members/friends) and they've been great, even the refurb ones.

Performance as a NAS/FTP for drives attached via USB blows though, I was hoping it would be at least "decent", but IMO not worth using for anything save perhaps a printer.

code:
Firmware: DD-WRT v24-sp2 (08/07/10) mega
Time: 10:01:45 up 98 days, 19:42, load average: 0.00, 0.00, 0.00
WAN: Disable

Oddhair
Mar 21, 2004



I've been using an old Dell tower (PIII) as a m0n0wall box for many years, but it was always a bit power-hungry for what it did. Worked wonderfully for 200+ days of uptime, even. I finally got a used Soekris net 4801-60 (233MHz, 128MB RAM embedded box) and am also running m0n0wall on it. Occasionally it just falls over, the error light comes on, and my connection dies. My house is a bit warm during the summer months, and since it's been cooling off it hasn't happened in a while.

What else can I use the Soekris box for if I want to move away from it? If I only wanted it to provide wireless, which distro should I use? DD-WRT requires a license since the embedded box is considered semi-pro. I suppose I could make it a VPN device, maybe just a wireless AP.

Current setup:
code:
Cable Modem -> m0n0wall -> LAN -> lovely Belkin wireless used as AP/switch 
                        -> DMZ -> Xbox 360, since m0n0 doesn't support UPnP
I don't really want to go back to a full computer for routing, but I'd like to use this for something.

Star War Sex Parrot
Oct 2, 2003




I posted about it in the recently-closed thread, but I just wanna throw out some love for the AirPort Extreme Base Station. It's pricey, but it's got dual-band 802.11n, guest network support, disk sharing, printer sharing, and has never locked up or crashed on me. Mine typically serves over a dozen devices (a mix of desktops, laptops, phones, tablets, and game systems) with clients surfing, gaming, torrenting, Usenet downloading, and Netflix streaming all at once during peak hours and I've literally never seen it go down.

Its biggest downsides are lack of QoS, and no web interface. You have to use a separate application installed to a machine to configure it. If you can live with that, I consider it the best consumer router on the market.

I've set up Tomato and DD-WRT on routers for family and friends and used some of D-Link's higher-end consumer stuff, but the AEBS serves my needs better than any of them.

Devian666
Aug 19, 2008

Take some advice Frank.

I'll look at adding both the Airport Extreme Base Station and Airport Express to the op. I know that for a number of people they will be preferred products. I also favour anything easy to configure as the "flash your routers" methodology will not suit everyone.

CuddleChunks
Sep 18, 2004



Devian666 posted:

Airport Express

No.

No no no no. This is poo poo. poo poo poo poo poo poo.

Retarded poo poo. Donkey poo poo. Retarded donkey poo poo. Keep it out of your OP or you'll get the yourself.

On the other hand, the Airport Extreme Base Station is a nice router and I'll back Star Wars Sex Parrot's recommendation 100%.

Oh hey, here's something for all you cheap shitheads who have to have 802.11N gear but run a mix of b/g/n poo poo and whine about how nothing works and I hate you. Stick this $25 router up your rear end!

Sorry, I've been hurt before. The linked router is $25. I have only tested it in basic office conditions with 10+ wifi devices blasting away signal in the area and it worked just fine here. We didn't have any N gear to use so I turned that all off and made it a g-only router. It runs PPPoE well, vpn's went through it without a hitch and there's a bunch of esoteric settings in the web interface that you can sperg over.

Frankly, for the price, I don't think you can get anything better. Even if it's glitchy it's still something to get you limping along until you can afford the sleek beauty of an AEBS or a Mikrotik RB751.

CuddleChunks fucked around with this message at Oct 12, 2011 around 00:48

Devian666
Aug 19, 2008

Take some advice Frank.

CuddleChunks posted:

No.

No no no no. This is poo poo. poo poo poo poo poo poo.

Retarded poo poo. Donkey poo poo. Retarded donkey poo poo. Keep it out of your OP or you'll get the yourself.

I had a look at the specification and see that it's still 100 mbit/s wired which doesn't stack up versus anything else in that category. I assume there's other problems as well given your response.

e: $25 router added for the financially retarded.

Devian666 fucked around with this message at Oct 12, 2011 around 01:11

Laserface
Dec 24, 2004
WASSUP BRO


Im using Ethernet over Power in a 130 year old house and im maxing out my 100mbps cable connection. Netgear 200mbit kit.

the only time I have ever set them up and have them NOT work is in a doctors office, who had filtered mains power to all rooms due to the operating theater equipment.

I have done a lot of home-setups that require them and they are always rock solid.

pram
Jun 10, 2001


This was the funniest thing I could think of:



I'm planning on wiring my place with ethernet, what face plates do you guys use?

CuddleChunks
Sep 18, 2004



Pram posted:

I'm planning on wiring my place with ethernet, what face plates do you guys use?

Leviton gear all the way. Dual-gang faceplates with covers for most rooms, quads for media centers. Dual-runs to each plate, labeled on each end, terminated in a patch panel at some central spot. I don't like the structured wiring cabinets as much anymore because they are always too small for all the poo poo I want to stuff in them. 19" rackmount kits just kicks so much more rear end.

Then you can light up your rooms with cheap little gigabit switches, feed those into a mikrotik RB750G for head-end routing duties and somewhere in one of the other rooms you can put a wireless router in bridge mode to give you coverage for convenience. If the coverage is poor, place it nearer to an end of the house, then put another nearer the other end. Change to opposite ends of the spectrum and off you go.

movax
Aug 30, 2008



Pram posted:

I'm planning on wiring my place with ethernet, what face plates do you guys use?

I like the Leviton (or clone) keystone plates. When we finished our basement, I ran 2 or 3 Cat5E to each plate and thanks the magic of patch panels, I could make them data or phone at will. You can get a real nice quad-port going that sports ethernet, CATV and even HDMI and some other jacks if you wanted. Only downside is that single gang-boxes can get real crowded, real fast.

The_Franz
Aug 8, 2003


Pram posted:

I'm planning on wiring my place with ethernet, what face plates do you guys use?

I just did this last year and here is what I did:

Patch panel and cat6 from Monoprice.

Leviton Decora inserts and wallplates. Personally I like these because, like electrical outlets and switches, you can remove the surrounding plate for painting without pulling out the whole bundle of wires and connectors.

Leviton quickport connectors (I used the eXtreme 6+ QuickPort jacks for ethernet). Personally I found that tselectronic.com had the best prices on Leviton stuff either online or locally, especially once you get into the 10+ unit discounts. Graybar also carries the good stuff if you have a location local to you, but their prices are slightly higher and their selection tends to be a little more restrictive.

Everything runs through an HP Procurve switch (I went with the 16 port v1410). They are fanless, perform flawlessly, were a little cheaper than the Cisco models and, unlike the Cisco, the reviews weren't filled with reports of them dying after one year.

I had an old Zyxel 2X router but I recently ditched it for a Mikrotik 750GL since the Zyxel was hitting it's limits and throttling my connection. Mikrotik routers are fantastic although you need to have some idea of what you are doing before you dive into them. CuddleChunks' Mikrotik thread has a lot of good info and a basic setup guide if you are interested. You can't beat sub-$100 hardware that gives you enterprise level configuration options.

In general I ran 3 cat6 lines to each room (2 ethernet and 1 voice) except behind the media center where I put 4 ethernet jacks for the HTPC and consoles. I also ran 1x RG6 to each room (Belden tri-shield cable and Holland connectors and splitters).

I got a small 4u wall mount rack and mounted the patch panel and switch in the top two spaces along with a small cantilever shelf on the bottom to hold the router and cable modem. This was all mounted to a board on the the basement wall along with a Leviton 110 punchdown block for the phones and the splitters for the cable. The whole thing is fairly modular and makes it very easy to switch between any combination of TV, phone and internet providers by just switching a few plugs around.

The_Franz fucked around with this message at Oct 12, 2011 around 19:02

BlackMK4
Aug 23, 2006

wat.

Does Untangle support WiFi running from the server yet? pfSense is loving pissing me off with getting wireless to work.
edit: loving pfSense Here I am sitting on the floor at 2:30am after figuring out that running adhoc or ap mode in pfSense causes kernel panics and it won't let the loving thing boot 24 out of 25 times.

BlackMK4 fucked around with this message at Oct 12, 2011 around 09:28

fryzoy
Sep 21, 2005
What.

This is probably going to end up being a dumb question, but I am out of ideas:

The situation is that I want to connect to multiple OpenVPN servers and then be able to open sockets going through any of the VPN connections by bind()-ing on the TUN-device's local IP address.
The thing is I can't let OpenVPN add routes, because the server is PUSHing a request to set up a default route - I don't want normal traffic to go through any of the VPNs/TUN devices.
So let's say OpenVPN sets up a TUN POINTOPOINT device with the local IP of 10.10.11.6 and a remote IP of 10.10.11.5. Aside from the default route the following routes would be added:
code:
route add -net <the public IP of the OpenVPN server> netmask 255.255.255.255 gw <my network's router>
route add -net 10.10.11.0 netmask 255.255.255.0 gw 10.10.11.5
the default route(s) would have been going out over 10.10.11.5, too:
code:
route add -net 0.0.0.0 netmask 128.0.0.0 gw 10.10.11.5
route add -net 128.0.0.0 netmask 128.0.0.0 gw 10.10.11.5
Now my understanding is that I would not need any of the routes if I were to bind() my socket to the TUN device's local ip (.6).

As a testcase I have a "netcat -v -v -l -p 12345" running on a remote server and try to connect to it with "telnet -b 10.10.11.6 <server> 12345".

The first case is the above two routes plus the default route(s) and everything works, the server receives the connection from the VPN's endpoint. But I wouldn't need the bind() for that due to the default routes.

Now the second case, the one I want, is just the first two routes without the default route. Nothing arrives at the server and checking with wireshark tells me that the packets are not going through the TUN device but instead get sent directly through the default ethernet device, with a source IP of 10.10.11.6. Obviously that won't work because 10.10.11.6 is not a public IP.

It's as if the bind() is completely ignored and I have no idea anymore how to accomplish this without the default routes (in which case I can't have multiple VPN connections). This is my understanding of things:
- the routing table is only used for outgoing packets
- OpenVPN handles the "wire-side" of the TUN device, rewriting and packaging packets in the SSL VPN stream and then sending them off over the public ethernet device, and also receiving responses and unpackaging them and then writing them into the TUN device
- bind()-ing a socket to a IP should make the packets go through the associated network device (in this case the TUN device) if it is successful.

I hope these are all the necessary details. I must be misunderstanding some things about the effect of the routing rules, hopefully someone can figure out where my path of thought goes wrong and enlighten me or if there is some other way to accomplish what I want.

wwb
Aug 17, 2004


quote:

Netgear WNR3500L
NOT DD-WRT COMPATIBLE, 64mb, 8mb flash, Broadcom 480 MHz processor, gigabit, external USB DLNA server.

This might be a bit dated -- I'm posting this behind a WNR3500L running DD-WRT. Now, I'm not sure if the USB stuff works, but the router itself is solid.

Ninja Rope
Oct 22, 2005

Wee.


fryzoy posted:

routing table stuff

On FreeBSD I'd use pf to set next-hop and reply-to based on source IP. On Linux I'd do the same thing with iptables marking packets and ip rule matching them and assigning them a different routing table with a different default gateway set.

movax
Aug 30, 2008



The_Franz posted:

Leviton quickport connectors (I used the eXtreme 6+ QuickPort jacks for ethernet). Personally I found that tselectronic.com had the best prices on Leviton stuff either online or locally, especially once you get into the 10+ unit discounts. Graybar also carries the good stuff if you have a location local to you, but there prices are slightly higher and their selection tends to be a little more restrictive.

Huh, how are those different from the "Regular" Leviton modular connectors, or have they just always been called QuickPort?

The_Franz
Aug 8, 2003


movax posted:

Huh, how are those different from the "Regular" Leviton modular connectors, or have they just always been called QuickPort?

They use the term QuickPort for all of their modular stuff.

Cicero
Dec 17, 2003

Jumpjet, melta, jumpjet. Repeat for ten minutes or until victory is assured.

The Asus RT-N56u is also a good router in the same class as the 3700/37AV. I have it and it's been great so far.

Devian666
Aug 19, 2008

Take some advice Frank.

wwb posted:

This might be a bit dated -- I'm posting this behind a WNR3500L running DD-WRT. Now, I'm not sure if the USB stuff works, but the router itself is solid.

I've just gone by the official support page. I don't want to suggest that something works if it doesn't work 100%. This would lead to potential complaints.

Cicero posted:

The Asus RT-N56u is also a good router in the same class as the 3700/37AV. I have it and it's been great so far.

I've been looking at adding this when I add the Airport Extreme as well. According to smallnetbuilder the RT-N56U has the highest WAN to LAN throughput out of any consumer router, in fact almost twice that of the 3700.

Devian666 fucked around with this message at Oct 12, 2011 around 19:18

DJ Commie
Feb 29, 2004

Stupid drivers always breaking car, Gronk fix car...


Another vote for powerline networking. I'm using a pair of the Belkin VideoLink 200Mbps sets on a 600 foot combo of buried Romex and extension cords to a Compaw Armada 1GHz PIII laptop and 3G CDMA modem running as a router. Oddly, it doesn't work without the UPS connected on the supply side, it must reflect the signal up the cable or limit noise.

It has no problems with the 3/1Mb connection , though I can easily max out the 15MB/s of the laptop drive copying over the network.

Devian666
Aug 19, 2008

Take some advice Frank.

DJ Commie posted:

Another vote for powerline networking. I'm using a pair of the Belkin VideoLink 200Mbps sets on a 600 foot combo of buried Romex and extension cords to a Compaw Armada 1GHz PIII laptop and 3G CDMA modem running as a router. Oddly, it doesn't work without the UPS connected on the supply side, it must reflect the signal up the cable or limit noise.

It has no problems with the 3/1Mb connection , though I can easily max out the 15MB/s of the laptop drive copying over the network.

The UPS is probably eliminating a lot of electrical noise from whichever device is plugging into it. The copy speed is impressive though.

fryzoy
Sep 21, 2005
What.

Ninja Rope posted:

On FreeBSD I'd use pf to set next-hop and reply-to based on source IP. On Linux I'd do the same thing with iptables marking packets and ip rule matching them and assigning them a different routing table with a different default gateway set.

Thank you so much! source-based routing was the keyword and using a different routing table works perfectly! This was driving me crazy, thanks again!

CancerStick
Jun 3, 2011


Possibly noob question. Please dont yell at me


I just ordered this about five minutes ago.

http://www.amazon.com/RT-N16-Wirele..._pr_product_top


Will my PS3 work with that?

Devian666
Aug 19, 2008

Take some advice Frank.

CancerStick posted:

Possibly noob question. Please dont yell at me


I just ordered this about five minutes ago.

http://www.amazon.com/RT-N16-Wirele..._pr_product_top


Will my PS3 work with that?

It should do.

If you want to stream media to the ps3 install ps3mediaserver on a pc and it will do live conversion. The ps3 is a bit picky about the file types that it will play.

CancerStick
Jun 3, 2011


The only thing the PS3 will be is a Battlefield 3 machine and possibly netflix.

I did a little google-fu and I had seen old posts about the PS3 and N routers not working? Not sure as I know jack poo poo about networking. Then I would come across posts that said it worked..

Devian666
Aug 19, 2008

Take some advice Frank.

CancerStick posted:

The only thing the PS3 will be is a Battlefield 3 machine and possibly netflix.

I did a little google-fu and I had seen old posts about the PS3 and N routers not working? Not sure as I know jack poo poo about networking. Then I would come across posts that said it worked..

It depends on the type of N wireless router. You get N wireless at 2.4GHz and 5GHz. The PS3 only does 2.4GHz and lower speeds B/G. You just need to make sure the router is set up for mixed modes or 54 mbit G wireless.

I have my ps3 running on a Netgear 3700 which supports N wireless and I've had no issues.

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blackjack
May 22, 2004

The World's Mightiest Puppet!

I hope this is the right place to ask my retarded questions.

I'm running a WRT54GL with Tomato (don't judge me, I installed it nearly 3 years ago and went away to grad school).

I'm moving to a different room and our router is located in the basement of a 1 and a half floor house. Will I need a better router to keep my sweet gaming ping and "Excellent" Wi-Fi connection?

Second question. I'm also going to need to switch to a wire-less connection on my desktop. What's a good way to get a signal? I've seen disasters strike with USB adapter solutions before, but that was many moons ago and I can only assume the technology has improved.

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