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Scaramouche
Mar 26, 2001

SPACE FACE! SPACE FACE!

Ashex posted:

That does sound a bit better, I did some searching and found a TrendNet Wireless Router that had a good review and another one from a manufacturer I've never heard of, CNet Wireless Router.


I'll probably get those two and test them out as we go through CDW so I won't get the refurbished price.

You probably already got them, but I would warn you to stay clear of TrendNET; it's basically the cheapest crappiest stuff out there in my experience. I've had their hubs and switches foisted on me by past employers ('oh they're so cheap!') but they always have died on me within a year.

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Scaramouche
Mar 26, 2001

SPACE FACE! SPACE FACE!

Was hoping you guys could help.

I've got a buddy who's running a small startup business, and he's got a little self-hosted web server. It's behind a D-Link WBR-2310 @ Firmware 1.04 (http://www.dlink.com/products/?pid=470) which is currently in EOL. I've went in there and set his virtual servers, port forwards, etc. But what happens is the thing will just flip out and not accept connections for 2-3 seconds at a time. I think it's resetting itself spontaneously. I think this because I can't get the drat thing to be 'on time'; every night the date/time reverts to April 1, 2002, 00:00:00.

Basically my question is, is this thing even worth salvaging/working with? Googling around shows me that lots of people are complaining about it, and the thing is EOL already. Otherwise I'll check out the first page and start shopping around.

Scaramouche
Mar 26, 2001

SPACE FACE! SPACE FACE!

Thanks for the infos guys, I figured as much but was hoping to not have to give him bad news. On the plus side he might be getting an angel investor involved who already has a dedicated coloc so it might be moot anyway.

Scaramouche
Mar 26, 2001

SPACE FACE! SPACE FACE!

Scaramouche posted:

Thanks for the infos guys, I figured as much but was hoping to not have to give him bad news. On the plus side he might be getting an angel investor involved who already has a dedicated coloc so it might be moot anyway.

Ha ha I read around some more and apparently heat was a problem with these things. I propped it on its side with the hot side (bottom) facing toward a window. Hasn't rebooted since. D-LINK IS SO GOOD. Not going to keep it long term but at least it's more sustainable now.

Scaramouche
Mar 26, 2001

SPACE FACE! SPACE FACE!

Don't know if this is the right place for this, but I've been asked to look into multi-homing routers by a friend for their SMB. It's three tenants in an office space, each with one ADSL line. I've set up enterprise multi home stuff in the past, but never on a budget. Is something like this:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produ...=9SIA0AT0F09993

Appropriate, or are there better solutions? The idea would be that the networks are isolated from each other internally, but be able to pool the bandwidth for multiple connections.

Scaramouche
Mar 26, 2001

SPACE FACE! SPACE FACE!

SamDabbers posted:

It'd probably be simpler, at least from a configuration/equipment standpoint, to have the tenants split the cost of one faster connection and set up QoS to ensure fair usage. "Business Ethernet" services are all the rage these days, and can often be delivered over bonded DSL circuits if that's the only last-mile option at your location. Another option is to see if the ISP will support MLPPP so you can truly bond the connections together into one fat pipe, which should perform better overall compared to load balancing.

Mikrotik routers will do MLPPP over multiple PPPoE interfaces and can also do outbound load balancing if that's what you end up going with. A suitably powerful router can be had for $100. There's a wireless version available that supports multiple SSIDs/VLANs for not much more.

Also, the router you linked has this in the details tab:

Thanks for the answer. I've done some research and probably should have said more originally. We are in a low-service area, so our only choices are Telus DSL or Microwave. Basically three DSL connections is our only option, since they won't upgrade individual connections past that, and there are no other provider choices other than line of sight microwave for about 8 times the price. This is an improvement, because we spent 3 months waiting before they would even sell more than one dsl connection to the location. The local cable operator (shaw) has generously offered to pull fibre for a token $10,000 trenching cost, which hasn't gone over well for some reason.

As far as I can tell, the ISP doesn't support MLPPP (which I've set up elsewhere in the past) because they are a corrupt public-private incumbent behemoth who is parasitically suckling the life from their customers because the government is too in love with their money to stop them. However that might be wrong, because the only discussion about MLPPP and Telus I can find is from 2010 or so on DSLreports.

I have been impressed with Microtik gear in the past, so I'll definitely check out those links, though unfortunately we're kind of stuck in the load balancing scenario at this time.

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Scaramouche
Mar 26, 2001

SPACE FACE! SPACE FACE!

SamDabbers posted:

Ah you're in Canada. I hear good things about Teksavvy (e.g. they do MLPPP) but I don't know much about their coverage area, or if they'll sell you service over Telus.

You'll probably be better off grabbing Mikrotik gear from a Canadian reseller if there is one than importing from Roc-Noc. As far as the load balancing configuration goes, this article describes the way I'd probably go about it on a Mikrotik.

Might be a happy ending after all; I got to thinking that if Telus can be out here then by definition TekSavvy can since they're using their infrastructure. Quick call to TekSavvy and it turns out that dsl with them combined (even with $4 MLPPP fee) is about $15/mo cheaper. They're offering this hardware, which I'm not sure of though:
http://www.roc-noc.com/mikrotik/routerboard/rb750g.html

Seeing as it's marked EOL by roc-noc.

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