Search Amazon.com:
Register a SA Forums Account here!
JOINING THE SA FORUMS WILL REMOVE THIS BIG AD, THE ANNOYING UNDERLINED ADS, AND STUPID INTERSTITIAL ADS!!!

You can: log in, read the tech support FAQ, or request your lost password. This dumb message (and those ads) will appear on every screen until you register! Get rid of this crap by registering your own SA Forums Account and joining roughly 150,000 Goons, for the one-time price of $9.95! We charge money because it costs us $3,400 per month for bandwidth bills alone, and since we don't believe in shoving popup ads to our registered users, we try to make the money back through forum registrations.
«83 »
  • Post
  • Reply
Zenephant
Dec 31, 2009



"I just want to give something back to the community, you know? That's why I have to open this game store, because if someone is going to carry the torch of this hobby, why not me? I have $2500 cash in the bank, and I know What Gamers Want, what could go wrong?"

Zenephant fucked around with this message at May 23, 2012 around 13:07

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

jmzero
Jul 24, 2007



quote:

"I just want to give something back to the community, you know? That's why I have to open this game store, because if someone is going to carry the torch of this hobby, why not me? I have $2500 cash in the bank, and I know What Gamers Want, what could go wrong?"

Oddly enough, I don't think that's the worst case scenario (someone without enough capital opening a store that fails in the first 6 months).

To me, it's sadder when a store lasts 10 years, then dies slowly over the course of years as their neighborhood skews a bit older, or a product line that had done well dries up, or whatever. This happened to my first gaming store. They had a last gasp with the start of M:tG (and the sports cards bubble around the same time) - but after that slowed they finally wheezed into closure. I think the injection of hope is what really killed them; having a couple years where they actually made money broke the owner's will to slog it out for nothing.

And the saddest is the store that doesn't ever really die, but never does more than stay afloat. My current game store has done so many things right (and is over 20 years old) - but you can also tell they're never really ahead or comfortable. I can't imagine the energy it would take as an owner to fight for that many years, work so many shifts yourself, win and lose that many bets... and still not have a clear path to any kind of retirement. I can imagine scrimping and counting every dollar in year 1, but at year 3 I would be looking for a way out. At year 20, I don't think you'd feel like you had a way out any more.

Don't start a game store.

Leperflesh
May 17, 2007

Dwarf tits for the blood god!

SPERG FOR THE SPERG GOD


The saddest is when a game store slowly goes down the drain, just slow enough that the owner(s) throw tons and tons of resources into trying to save it. Gradually destroying their personal finances, the finances of friends and family who lend them money, their personal reputation, and of course spreading their miasma of failure all over the local gaming scene and the perceptions of non-gamers who accidentally stumble through their door and behold the rotting interior.

Far better to get started, rapidly fail, and close up shop within six months. At least then people are likely to assume it was badly managed (seems to me that's the default assumption of the public whenever a local business fails) rather than assume "this is what game stores/gamers are like, ugh."

------------------------

On an only marginally related note: I went in to my local really-pretty-good game store, Black Diamond Games, a couple weeks ago with my friend. I go by there maybe once every couple months, and as I was pawing through the discount bin, I realized that in the last six months the only products I've bought from them were from the discount bin.

Granted I already own too many games, I have more than enough miniatures for my Tomb Kings army, and I play games infrequently enough that it's really dumb for me to spend any more money at all on games. I am not an ideal customer for these guys, even though from a financial perspective you'd think I would be (I have a career and can afford to drop maybe a hundred dollars at a time on an impulse buy, if I want to). I've been finding some pretty good stuff in the bin, though: I bought the Ogre army book for Warhammer for $25 (discounted from the regular in-store price of $37.25) and last time I was there I found copies of the Vampire Counts book (the new one!) for the same price and nearly bought it too. They had a pile of Malifaux miniatures, a bunch of Reaper, a reasonable collection of Games Workshop stuff (including three of the new finecast models!), some Citadel paints (there's a whole new line out so the old ones go in the bin), and some random stuff.

This is while there's new Malifaux stuff right there on the "new this month" table and more on the wall. I think the owner is pretty aggressive about putting stock that's not selling into the bin - even within a line that is still doing OK, like Warhammer or Malifaux. On the one hand, that's smart, because stock space costs money and as a business you can't afford to leave poo poo hanging on your precious square footage for months and years on end when nobody's buying it. You need your limited space to be full of products that will move, generating profit.

On the other hand... a well-stocked discount bin attracts people like me. The better the stuff in the bin, the less likely I am to pay full price. I don't really need anything, but I wonder if I wouldn't be buying an occasional cool-looking miniature at full price, if I couldn't get one at a discount? I dunno, maybe I'd just stop going to the store entirely, in which case that's a no-win for the owner. And of course, if I'm buying from the bin, at least I'm helping him with his short-term goal of getting rid of that stock. But given the level of discount, I'm not sure if his bin actually generates any profit... it's more of a stop-loss prospect, I think? Sell at-cost or even slightly below cost, because that's better than not selling at all.

What do you guys think? Discounting is a big issue across all retail of course. Big-box retailers advertise "loss-leaders" - products on which they will lose money for every sale - just to get shoppers into the store, on the premise (justified or not) that they'll buy other things that do generate enough profit to overcome the loss. And they tend to severely limit the total number of those loss-leader items in stock (and say so in the ad - no rain checks on these discounted items) to limit the total loss to something manageable.

Online retailers do targeted discounts (compared to MSRPs), sometimes going so far with the discount that they can't advertise the price (this is common on Amazon - their manufacturer doesn't want them advertising prices so far below MSRP because it undercuts their other retail outlets and that makes their other vendors mad). And some do blanket discounts - there are game stores online that automatically sell for x% less than MSRP for entire product lines, permanently (you can get most or all Games Workshop stuff online for less than retail, for example).

In part they have to discount, to overcome 1)the cost of shipping, and 2)compensate for the delayed gratification (compared to the instant-gratification of shopping at a local store and getting to have the item in-hand immediately). But in part by discounting they lower the ability for everyone (themselves included) to charge retail and make a reasonable profit.

But leaving aside that broad discussion... what do you guys think of in-store bargain bins, from the store-owner's perspective? Good idea? Under- or over-utilized in general? Do you tend to shop like I do, gravitating to the discount bin before even considering full-price products? Would you spend more at a store if they had no discount bin, or less, or not go there at all?

Gau
Nov 18, 2003

ASK ME ABOUT THE KEYS TO KICKSTARTER SUCCESS

My local store-owner is pretty conservative about putting books on his discount shelves, but I still go in every week or three and take a look. I can tell you why, too: he has a LOT of space, and plenty of room to keep copies of oWoD and d20 garbage books marked at full price. If he had less space, he'd be more motivated to move stock. It's better than the alternative strategy: don't order anything but restocks.

One of the good things that Merlyn's does, though, is their 10% OFF EVERYTHING ALL THE TIME NO MATTER WHAT strategy. It's great, because you feel like you're saving on everything you buy!

Tiler Kiwi
Feb 26, 2011

probably on the side of posting what he wants and just having fun


1. What are the five common business for-profit business forms?
Person way over their heads, person way over their heads and actually realizes it, personal hobby that slowly consumed the owner's life, desperate venture, midlife crisis.

2. What is the difference between a service and a product?
Products are things you sell, services are people you sell. Unless slavery is legal where you're running your business, in which case, they're products too.

3. If I offer you payment terms of 5/10, Net 30, what does that mean?
Means I'm going to stop trying to sell drugs to business majors

4. What revenue-related form are you required to fill out as an independent contractor? Who is responsible, and when?
What do you mean you didn't send in a form? Listen, I didn't hire you just so you could stand behind a register and play with yourself, I hired you to be part of a team. If you're not willing to look up this sort of, listen, I don't care about whatever job description I gave you, I'm talking to you here, this sort of thing up, then I'm starting to doubt your commitment to this place.

5. How is net profit calculated?
Actual profit minus however much you think you can bullshit the IRS.

6. True or False: A contract is legally required for all work for which you are to be paid for thirty days after it is completed.
True, unless you are very convincing when you pretend you don't know who these crazy people are that claim you owe them money. In that case it is still true and you would never think of trying to cheat people, your honor.

7. An artist gives you verbal permission to publish his art in your book. Do you have to get their permission to place that art in a new printing? What about a new edition? No to both if they know whats good for them. Not my fault they didnt get a real major.

8. You receive a cease-and-desist letter from another company, claiming you are using their intellectual property in your products. What is your first, best response? Killdozer.

9. What is the definition of the term "marginal" in the context of business?
Your wiggle room and baseline, determined by the point where it becomes more profitable to attempt insurance fraud. When above it, you get to talk poo poo. When in it, people talk poo poo about you. When below it, they do it to your face.

10. What is the difference between Gross Revenue, Gross Profit, and Net Profit?
Gross revenue/profit require laundering. Once they're clean, you net some profit.

I don't actually know anything about running a business.

Leperflesh
May 17, 2007

Dwarf tits for the blood god!

SPERG FOR THE SPERG GOD


Gau posted:

My local store-owner is pretty conservative about putting books on his discount shelves, but I still go in every week or three and take a look. I can tell you why, too: he has a LOT of space, and plenty of room to keep copies of oWoD and d20 garbage books marked at full price. If he had less space, he'd be more motivated to move stock. It's better than the alternative strategy: don't order anything but restocks.

One of the good things that Merlyn's does, though, is their 10% OFF EVERYTHING ALL THE TIME NO MATTER WHAT strategy. It's great, because you feel like you're saving on everything you buy!

That's interesting. Thing is, I don't think there's such a thing as "excess shelf space". Every foot of shelf space occupied by books that were ordered (and paid for) two years ago, and still haven't sold, is a foot of space that ought to be occupied by inventory that will sell more rapidly... and it's a portion of the business's operating capital that is tied up and not doing anything.

Obviously if you have tons of space, you can wait longer to see if you can recoup a reasonable profit on an item... but on the other hand, your bigger store maybe could be generating bigger total sales (and therefore your profit margin translates into bigger profits). Assuming you have enough customers to justify that.

Or alternatively, you could be occupying a smaller retail space, paying less rent, and selling the same amount of goods to your fixed customer base.

The 10% off everything policy, though... that means he's accepting an automatically lower margin on all goods. I learned from the black diamond blog that (for example) the markup on Magic: The Gathering stuff is 50% (that is, COGS for these is 50% if you sell at MSRP). Cutting 10% off the price means you're giving away a fifth of your gross profit on those items. Maybe you make it up in volume... but if you have shelves full of crap that never sells, maybe you actually don't.

Red_Mage
Jul 23, 2007
I SHOULD BE FUCKING PERMABANNED BUT IN THE MEANTIME ASK ME ABOUT MY FAILED KICKSTARTER AND RUNNING OFF WITH THE MONEY


Leperflesh posted:

The 10% off everything policy, though... that means he's accepting an automatically lower margin on all goods. I learned from the black diamond blog that (for example) the markup on Magic: The Gathering stuff is 50% (that is, COGS for these is 50% if you sell at MSRP). Cutting 10% off the price means you're giving away a fifth of your gross profit on those items. Maybe you make it up in volume... but if you have shelves full of crap that never sells, maybe you actually don't.

Or he is marking up the base price 9% above MSRP then giving you 10% off as a psychological effect.

Leperflesh
May 17, 2007

Dwarf tits for the blood god!

SPERG FOR THE SPERG GOD


Red_Mage posted:

Or he is marking up the base price 9% above MSRP then giving you 10% off as a psychological effect.

Really, really doubtful. Most products have teh MSRP printed on them, and even if it's not, you can easily look up prices for stuff online to see what it's going for generally. Amazon for example always shows both the MSRP, and their discounted price. You'd get caught pretty quick trying to represent all your D&D or Pathfinder books as having MSRPs 9% higher than they really are.

Red_Mage
Jul 23, 2007
I SHOULD BE FUCKING PERMABANNED BUT IN THE MEANTIME ASK ME ABOUT MY FAILED KICKSTARTER AND RUNNING OFF WITH THE MONEY


Leperflesh posted:

Really, really doubtful. Most products have teh MSRP printed on them, and even if it's not, you can easily look up prices for stuff online to see what it's going for generally. Amazon for example always shows both the MSRP, and their discounted price. You'd get caught pretty quick trying to represent all your D&D or Pathfinder books as having MSRPs 9% higher than they really are.

I get that, but like, for example, my FLGS sells at about 5% over MSRP on several products (including 4e books ) as a standard deal. The owner knows full well that people can and will go elsewhere, but he relies on the fact that some people are willing to pay a little extra for the convenience or for not supporting a chain or something.

TOOT BOOT
May 25, 2010



Red_Mage posted:

I get that, but like, for example, my FLGS sells at about 5% over MSRP on several products (including 4e books ) as a standard deal. The owner knows full well that people can and will go elsewhere, but he relies on the fact that some people are willing to pay a little extra for the convenience or for not supporting a chain or something.

I inadvertently bought a product for above MSRP once and I returned it the next day. I can't even bring myself to pay retail if I can get it somewhere else for 20% off.

Echophonic
Sep 16, 2005

Kirby Gear Solid 3:
Snake Eater

Gau posted:

One of the good things that Merlyn's does, though, is their 10% OFF EVERYTHING ALL THE TIME NO MATTER WHAT strategy. It's great, because you feel like you're saving on everything you buy!

This is what they do over at Between Books and it's awesome. The owner has been able to order drat near anything I could want and with a flat 10% off I'll gladly pay slightly more then Amazon/IPR/eBay to support him. I've probably dropped a grand there in the past 6-7 months from either impulse buys or the FATAL and Friends and Indie Games threads here. Then I got into Warhammer Fantasy Roleplay and that's already starting to sting. But, it stings less mentally when everything is 35 or 45 rather than 40 or 50.

Gau
Nov 18, 2003

ASK ME ABOUT THE KEYS TO KICKSTARTER SUCCESS

I wrote something I rather liked in the 5E thread (dear God why did I start posting there), and so it's now on the blog.

lighttigersoul
Mar 5, 2009

Sailor Scout Enoutner 5:
Moon Healing Escalation


Gau posted:

I wrote something I rather liked in the 5E thread (dear God why did I start posting there), and so it's now on the blog.

You officially just killed my last shred of curiosity for the system. Probably a good thing.

nelson
Apr 12, 2009


I don't really think the blog was fair about judging production values of a pre-published product. Once the final version comes from the printers then go ahead and judge away.

Gau
Nov 18, 2003

ASK ME ABOUT THE KEYS TO KICKSTARTER SUCCESS

nelson posted:

I don't really think the blog was fair about judging production values of a pre-published product. Once the final version comes from the printers then go ahead and judge away.

It's my fault; this is a common complaint. I wasn't judging the production values, I was judging the effort that has gone into the design and development of the rules.

Mikan
Sep 5, 2007


It's absolutely fair to judge the production values when other products in playtest phase (13th Age most prominently) have significantly better production values with maybe 1/10 of the resources and staff.

self_invention
Dec 25, 2010

chibicop on the scene

My shop sets its prices at MSRP, no more and no less, with a handful of fixed sales for army-starting and card-box-buying, and we still get customers who accuse us of 'gouging' on Magic cards because Online Shop X is selling it for 5$ above cost on a box of boosters and THAT'S THE PRICE, THAT'S WHAT'S FAIR.

Honestly I don't understand how shops can survive marking over MSRP with all the customer resentment *just* MSRP generates.

Pope Guilty
Nov 6, 2006

The human animal is a beautiful and terrible creature, capable of limitless compassion and unfathomable cruelty.

Soooo some guys opened a new store in my town. We have one gaming store on the downtown square around the courthouse that seems to do very well selling mostly boardgames and warhams- there's just about always people there when I go in, there's events, and they have some space in the building they're in that's just open gaming space that's usually seeing some use. The new place is away from downtown in a reasonably busy strip mall/shopping center sort of place, and excitingly, it's right by my house! So I went down to check the place out.

It's... well, they did wallpaper the back room in 1st ed D&D pages, which is cool-looking, but it's going to be for naught because they have all of about twenty books (like 19 Pathfinder books and the new Shadowrun core) for sale. I have no goddamned idea what their revenue model is. The best part is that they opened just as the college students who make up half my town's population were leaving for the summer.

Shame- I would've liked to have a FLGS by my house.

Red_Mage
Jul 23, 2007
I SHOULD BE FUCKING PERMABANNED BUT IN THE MEANTIME ASK ME ABOUT MY FAILED KICKSTARTER AND RUNNING OFF WITH THE MONEY


Pope Guilty posted:

I have no goddamned idea what their revenue model is.

Are they selling CCGs?

Pope Guilty
Nov 6, 2006

The human animal is a beautiful and terrible creature, capable of limitless compassion and unfathomable cruelty.

Red_Mage posted:

Are they selling CCGs?

I saw a single box of magic boosters behind the counter, but nothing like I've seen at other stores.

The whole thing gave off a "we're horribly undercapitalized" vibe.

Thanlis
Mar 17, 2011


Now and again there's a bunch of gamers who realize they can get distributor pricing for their personal games if they pretend to open a game store. Sometimes they realize it's a scam, sometimes they don't. Unfortunately it doesn't ever work well.

Dr Nick
Oct 16, 2008

This baby is off the charts

Thanlis posted:

Now and again there's a bunch of gamers who realize they can get distributor pricing for their personal games if they pretend to open a game store. Sometimes they realize it's a scam, sometimes they don't. Unfortunately it doesn't ever work well.

This is really dumb if you're renting a retail space, though. At that volume, any money you save on buying things at wholesale is going to be eaten up in the overhead.

InternetJunky
May 25, 2002



I wish the stores I visited had a discount bin. There's one store that I went to that was actually a very large store (probably 3 times the size of your typical game store) and they had shelves piled high with inventory. I thought I was in paradise until I started actually looking at the stuff they had, and almost all of it was ancient.

The had two entire shelves completely full of miniatures that were already old when I got out of the hobby 10 years ago, yet didn't have a single Privateer Press miniature. I can't imagine how much those miniatures were costing them to keep in the store when you factor in how much they could be making selling current stuff. Why wouldn't they just box up the lot and ebay it, or at least toss them in a discount bin?

ocrumsprug
Sep 23, 2010

Only this, and nothing more.


InternetJunky posted:

I wish the stores I visited had a discount bin. There's one store that I went to that was actually a very large store (probably 3 times the size of your typical game store) and they had shelves piled high with inventory. I thought I was in paradise until I started actually looking at the stuff they had, and almost all of it was ancient.

The had two entire shelves completely full of miniatures that were already old when I got out of the hobby 10 years ago, yet didn't have a single Privateer Press miniature. I can't imagine how much those miniatures were costing them to keep in the store when you factor in how much they could be making selling current stuff. Why wouldn't they just box up the lot and ebay it, or at least toss them in a discount bin?

I popped into the game store in my old home town while visiting my folks. After weaving through the warren, stepping over the backpacks of the magic players sitting at the patio table, I get to the back of the store to find an entire shelf of Chainmail from 2002 (and others shelves that were just as bad).

Everything was still MSRP.

Then I looked around and realized that I wouldn't even buy heroin in this place and left immediately. gently caress this hobby.

Gau
Nov 18, 2003

ASK ME ABOUT THE KEYS TO KICKSTARTER SUCCESS

They're following in the steps of TSR, honestly. Holding all of that inventory at MSRP increases the valuation of their business (inventory on hand as an asset), which makes their balance sheet look a great deal more healthy. As you're not properly supposed to depreciate inventory, it doesn't raise any red flags unless you look at their purchases and sales. The truth is always there.

I saw a business that had held on to half a million dollars of deprecated, unsaleable inventory for almost ten years (at a total cost of almost $250,000) because it was the security for their million-dollar line of credit. The bank never questioned it; when the building collapsed in a snowstorm (it was poorly maintained), the insurance company sent them a check for around thirty grand, the actual value of the inventory inside the building.

The bank was rather upset at that point. Federal fraud kind of upset.

nelson
Apr 12, 2009


Are you going to follow up on the common business knowledge assessment? I've been waiting for an analysis ever since I answered the survey.

Laphroaig
Feb 6, 2004

Drinking Smoke

Gau posted:

The bank was rather upset at that point. Federal fraud kind of upset.

What is this... fraooouud? You speak of?

NutShellBill
Dec 4, 2004
I AM SPUTNIK'S PARACHUTE ACCOUNT

My FLGS could stand a perusal of this thread, even if only to plant ideas in their head.

The current owners just refuse to sell anything for less than 100% markup, but are furious if

a) Anyone in the world undersells them

b) Anyone in town dares to sell what they have in stock

c) Any combination of a or b, especially if its from an online distributor.

Talk of sales, or discount clubs are quickly dismissed as fabrication or poor business sense.

The only things that have ever gone on sale are old discount GURPS books, Arcane Legions, and water damaged product.

The reason, verbatim: "Nerds will buy anything if we leave it out long enough."

Meanwhile, there are sections of the store that are literally impassible due to their being nowhere to walk that isn't stepping on a board game.

I could go on, but suffice it to say, the place has lost 99% of my business, and if it wasn't for Magic sales, would be hurting, I think.

Bieeardo
Aug 21, 2000

Someone bold, someone blue, someone borrowed, someone new...


NutShellBill posted:

The reason, verbatim: "Nerds will buy anything if we leave it out long enough."

I heard something like this drop out of a local manager's mouth once. Up until then I shopped there as a matter of habit, but never again after that. I steered custom away to other stores as well, whenever I possibly could.

Halloween Jack
Sep 11, 2003

Let your word be "Yes, Yes" or "No, No"; anything more than this comes from the evil one.

NutShellBill posted:

My FLGS could stand a perusal of this thread, even if only to plant ideas in their head.

The current owners just refuse to sell anything for less than 100% markup, but are furious if

a) Anyone in the world undersells them

b) Anyone in town dares to sell what they have in stock

c) Any combination of a or b, especially if its from an online distributor.

Talk of sales, or discount clubs are quickly dismissed as fabrication or poor business sense.

The only things that have ever gone on sale are old discount GURPS books, Arcane Legions, and water damaged product.

The reason, verbatim: "Nerds will buy anything if we leave it out long enough."

Meanwhile, there are sections of the store that are literally impassible due to their being nowhere to walk that isn't stepping on a board game.

I could go on, but suffice it to say, the place has lost 99% of my business, and if it wasn't for Magic sales, would be hurting, I think.

What's funny is that these are the same stores that don't know if any of their old product is going for more than twice the list price on ebay.

Laphroaig
Feb 6, 2004

Drinking Smoke

Halloween Jack posted:

What's funny is that these are the same stores that don't know if any of their old product is going for more than twice the list price on ebay.

Well at 100% markup, it is selling for twice the listed price.

Gau
Nov 18, 2003

ASK ME ABOUT THE KEYS TO KICKSTARTER SUCCESS

The current owners just refuse to sell anything for less than 100% markup, but are furious if

a) Anyone in the world undersells them

b) Anyone in town dares to sell what they have in stock

c) Any combination of a or b, especially if its from an online distributor.

These are constant complaints of people who are in business with a product that they don't know how to market, or don't understand the market for. Online distributors win amongst people who know what they want; the point of a retail outlet is to appeal to people who want to browse, seek advice, and make a choice based on their experience.

d) Talk of sales, or discount clubs are quickly dismissed as fabrication or poor business sense.

I've seen people describe a sale as "handing the customer money," which is a gross misunderstanding of the nature of a sales discount. (Yes, it is an expense. But it's a "good" expense, just like COGS.)

e) The only things that have ever gone on sale are old discount GURPS books, Arcane Legions, and water damaged product.

Fun fact: many publishers in legitimate bookstores don't allow damaged product to be discounted, even if it is damaged in inventory. You are supposed to return that item to the publisher for a partial refund.

f) The reason, verbatim: "Nerds will buy anything if we leave it out long enough."

This is just confirmation bias, and also hilariously demeaning to customers.

g) Meanwhile, there are sections of the store that are literally impassible due to their being nowhere to walk that isn't stepping on a board game.

It is amusing to me that people will accept the carrying cost of inventory (there is no reasonable case in which inventory has a true carrying cost of $0) but won't mark something down 10% so it sells. What's more, this sort of organization actively hinders sales. It's like they just don't understand that merchandising is a thing.

h) I could go on, but suffice it to say, the place has lost 99% of my business, and if it wasn't for Magic sales, would be hurting, I think.

This is true of most game stores. However, the good ones are maximizing their sales with the rest of their inventory. Your board game sales may only be 10% of your gross, but that's a hefty chunk of cash - and if you're doing it right, those people that bought a board game came in for something else or purchased an unrelated product!


I have a great story. A friend went into a local store looking for a gift (she knew what comic book characters the giftees like, but isn't terribly nerdy herself). So, we went up to the counter and asked the guy. He pulled up some comic book character database, found every issue that these two characters had been in together, and then compared it to their (digital) inventory listings.

He asked me if I knew how to search the boxes, and I gave him a deer-in-the-headlights look (I have no loving clue about comics). So this dude goes to the back of the store, pulls out like ten issues of X-Men whatever, lays them out on a table and explains the difference between the various issues and lines.

It was brilliant. This guy had the time and was just excited that someone was interested in obscure comics. We ended up buying just two issues, total price: $1.97. Guy was thrilled. Maybe they didn't break the bank with that sale, but that's the sort of thing that builds loyalty - I knew I could take my friend in there and we'd get great service, as opposed to the Comic Book Shop where they just look at you and say "the bins are back there."

MadScientistWorking
Jun 23, 2010

"I was going through a time period where I was looking up weird stories involving necrophilia..."


Gaming with graphic designers is kind of hilarious. They were looking at some of the newer products in the gaming store and ripping a lot of them apart due to the quality of them. Seriously, there was one game whose cover art had visible JPEG artifacting on the text. How do people think that is acceptable?

Pope Guilty
Nov 6, 2006

The human animal is a beautiful and terrible creature, capable of limitless compassion and unfathomable cruelty.

MadScientistWorking posted:

Gaming with graphic designers is kind of hilarious. They were looking at some of the newer products in the gaming store and ripping a lot of them apart due to the quality of them. Seriously, there was one game whose cover art had visible JPEG artifacting on the text. How do people think that is acceptable?

I remember Demon: the Fallen's logo having clearly been upscaled.

Arquinsiel
Jun 1, 2006

"There is no such thing as society. There are individual men and women, and there are families. And no government can do anything except through people, and people must look to themselves first."

God Bless Margaret Thatcher
God Bless England
RIP My Iron Lady


This thread has made me re-evaluate the various game stores that have been around over the years. It's interesting to see certain things in a different light now.

ocrumsprug posted:

I popped into the game store in my old home town while visiting my folks. After weaving through the warren, stepping over the backpacks of the magic players sitting at the patio table, I get to the back of the store to find an entire shelf of Chainmail from 2002 (and others shelves that were just as bad).

Everything was still MSRP.

Then I looked around and realized that I wouldn't even buy heroin in this place and left immediately. gently caress this hobby.
MSRP for Chainmail would make it cheap by today's standards though, wouldn't it? I'd probably buy a mini or two from there, but that's because I'm weird like that and we didn't have a FLGS back when Chainmail was a thing.

Gau posted:

It was brilliant. This guy had the time and was just excited that someone was interested in obscure comics. We ended up buying just two issues, total price: $1.97. Guy was thrilled. Maybe they didn't break the bank with that sale, but that's the sort of thing that builds loyalty - I knew I could take my friend in there and we'd get great service, as opposed to the Comic Book Shop where they just look at you and say "the bins are back there."
This kind of thing leads to people hearing a friend talking about how they like X obscure comic and saying "I know a place.....". Might not have what the dude wants exactly, but what're the chances he won't find something to buy in there?

Star Man
Jun 1, 2008

DWN037

I'm sure it has been said in this thread before and in the minds of any decent human being with a traditional gaming habit, but I absolutely hate gaming stores that are run by people who treat it like their personal clubhouse rather than a place of business.

There's one guy I've complained about a few times because not only is he hostile toward me, unprovoked, but outright yelled at a ten-year-old for turning a card around so he could read it instead of asking. And the people who run the place didn't seem to give a poo poo because he's a friend of theirs. If that had been my store, I would have asked the person to leave immediately. I don't put up with poo poo like that, and I don't know how others do at all.

EDIT: And something else that really annoys me about the store I was playing in is that they looked up singles prices for Magic for every single card you wanted to purchase. The only cards they wouldn't look up the prices on were basic land cards, which they charged a quarter each for. The claim that it was to sell you cards at a fair price, but all it ever did was make me look up the middle price on cards at Magiccards.info and hope like hell that there was a wide selection on that particular single to create a reasonable average on. What made it worse was that singles in the case all had a price tag on them, so anyone going in would think that was the going price, only to learn that it had gone up if it had.

Star Man fucked around with this message at Jun 9, 2012 around 08:08

Anticheese
Feb 13, 2008

$60,000,000 sexbot


MadScientistWorking posted:

Gaming with graphic designers is kind of hilarious. They were looking at some of the newer products in the gaming store and ripping a lot of them apart due to the quality of them. Seriously, there was one game whose cover art had visible JPEG artifacting on the text. How do people think that is acceptable?

I was arguing with some hardcore grogs over the rate of pay for writers (in reference to the $0.01/word rate I was offered a while back and have seen crop up elsewhere) and trying to explain how the amount of time and effort that goes into decent writing just isn't possible at that rate. I got such gems as "You don't need production values" and "writers should be happy just to work for the love of it". Artists too are completely unnecessary, and when marketing to kids, production values aren't necessary since 80s cartoons were poo poo and kids bought it anyway. Any product targeted or marketed outside of 'core' circles is also selling out horribly.

I love games, and I love writing, but drat I'm sick of unhealthy attitudes about this hobby

Star Man
Jun 1, 2008

DWN037

Anticheese posted:

I was arguing with some hardcore grogs over the rate of pay for writers (in reference to the $0.01/word rate I was offered a while back and have seen crop up elsewhere) and trying to explain how the amount of time and effort that goes into decent writing just isn't possible at that rate. I got such gems as "You don't need production values" and "writers should be happy just to work for the love of it". Artists too are completely unnecessary, and when marketing to kids, production values aren't necessary since 80s cartoons were poo poo and kids bought it anyway. Any product targeted or marketed outside of 'core' circles is also selling out horribly.

I love games, and I love writing, but drat I'm sick of unhealthy attitudes about this hobby

What really gets me is that a lot of things in this kind of thing are inspired by B-movies and pulp fiction of various kinds. There is some truly good work in that kind of media, but there's a reason why a lot of that stuff is considered second-rate in the first place.

Pope Guilty
Nov 6, 2006

The human animal is a beautiful and terrible creature, capable of limitless compassion and unfathomable cruelty.

Arquinsiel posted:

MSRP for Chainmail would make it cheap by today's standards though, wouldn't it? I'd probably buy a mini or two from there, but that's because I'm weird like that and we didn't have a FLGS back when Chainmail was a thing.

Nah, minis weren't especially cheap in 2002.

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

Dr Nick
Oct 16, 2008

This baby is off the charts

Pope Guilty posted:

Nah, minis weren't especially cheap in 2002.

Yeah, there really hasn't been all that much inflation outside of gas and food since 2000, really.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • Post
  • Reply
«83 »