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Factory Factory
Mar 19, 2010

Oh dear, oh my,
that shouldn't be said.


Definitely install new drivers/CCC. Afterburner works fine with them and will override the CCC clock settings as long as it's running.

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Blackclaw
Jan 4, 2008

DUKE NUKEM FOREVER HAS A BETTER CHANCE OF RELEASING IN AUSTRALIA THAN ROCK BAND EVER WILL


How important is it to cover the entire CPU with thermal paste? I didn't think it was at all (as you only really needed to cover the centre) - is that right?

Factory Factory
Mar 19, 2010

Oh dear, oh my,
that shouldn't be said.


Do not do the covering yourself. Don't spread the thermal paste at all. Let the pressure of applying the heatsink take care of that for you.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EyXLu1Ms-q4

As for whether the entire heatspreader should be covered, regardless of how that's accomplished, no, that's not necessary. The CPU itself is a fairly small chip in the center of the package. Most of the physical size of the CPU package these days is providing traces for all 1,155 pins.

Factory Factory fucked around with this message at Apr 6, 2012 around 23:40

cisco privilege
Dec 5, 2005

det er noget at leve for

I used to go for full painstaking CPU coverage with my hand in a plastic bag, but I just do the 'ricegrain in the center of the chip' method nowadays and temperatures are slightly better (with 70lbs compression on an HR-02, they better be). Also it's easier if you're lazy, and you don't have to worry about TIM overspill. As Factory Factory said, with the 212+ it has its own TIM pre-applied so just use that and don't mess with it.


Factory Factory posted:

Definitely install new drivers/CCC. Afterburner works fine with them and will override the CCC clock settings as long as it's running.
Thanks, that's what I was wondering about. +20% powertune isn't much, but I'll take it.


e: FF, if you're getting tired of the MLP avatar (I know I am) let me know and I'll buy you something else. Probably best to send me a pic/BB code though because I'd have no idea what to change it to beyond like a CPU die on fire or something.

cisco privilege fucked around with this message at Apr 7, 2012 around 00:06

Factory Factory
Mar 19, 2010

Oh dear, oh my,
that shouldn't be said.


Thanks, but I don't really mind it. And I already have an avatar cert ready for when I am sick of it.

dog nougat
Apr 8, 2009

Cawtion Ham


I'll post this here rather than the building thread, more appropriate.
I have this case, Silverstone GD05B and will need to use a low profile heatsink/fan. What's the opinion of Zalman CNPS8900? I couldn't find too much in the way of reviews for it. Zalman seems to make a reasonably good product...From what I understand, my heatsink needs to be somewhere in the 60 to 70mm range. I'll be using a 3570k, what do you kind folks recommend in that range?

Factory Factory
Mar 19, 2010

Oh dear, oh my,
that shouldn't be said.


Reviews on that are pretty scarce, yeah. You could always get the SilverStone NT06-E and a nice general-purpose PWM fan to go on top of it - similar expenditure, known quantity. Otherwise, for known quantity AND slightly cheaper, go for one of the Scythe coolors recommended in the OP (one of which is in the OP of the system building thread, too).

dog nougat
Apr 8, 2009

Cawtion Ham


Derp. I'm stupid and didn't even notice that in the building thread. The Silverstone might end up being too tall, the Scythe looks like my best bet. Thanks. I'm sure i'll be back with OC-ing ?'s once I get my rig built. In the meantime, I'll just keep reading the OP /

Factory Factory
Mar 19, 2010

Oh dear, oh my,
that shouldn't be said.


The case you linked takes full-height expansion cards. No way it won't fit the SilverStone cooler.

dog nougat
Apr 8, 2009

Cawtion Ham


It would fit if I wasn't going to roll with an optical drive, according to the silverstone website, I'll have a max of 70mm. Prob gonna roll with the Scythe, cheaper and goon recommended works for me.

DinosaurHouseParty
Oct 31, 2003


Blackclaw posted:

How important is it to cover the entire CPU with thermal paste? I didn't think it was at all (as you only really needed to cover the centre) - is that right?
Which cooler do you have? If its the 212 the best way to do it is three strips down the aluminum bits between the heatpipes.

cisco privilege
Dec 5, 2005

det er noget at leve for

grumperfish posted:

e: Have a question of my own. Anyone successfully using Afterburner with the CCC? Trying to decide if I should install the newest catalyst drivers to get powertune options, but I'd also like to overclock beyond what the CCC allows. Right now I'm stuck at 880/1350 on my 69*0 as pushing it any farther hits the TDP limit and the card starts throttling. I'm currently using the non-CCC catalyst drivers with Afterburner and it's working fine, but I'd like to push the card a bit more if the CCC won't conflict with AB. Cooling isn't an issue as I'm using an aftermarket kit.
Just an update to this - it was unnecessary to use the CCC with the latest Afterburner beta as the beta includes powertune controls now. Which is a good thing as I failed at getting the CCC and AB to play well together.

cisco privilege fucked around with this message at Apr 8, 2012 around 04:31

Blackclaw
Jan 4, 2008

DUKE NUKEM FOREVER HAS A BETTER CHANCE OF RELEASING IN AUSTRALIA THAN ROCK BAND EVER WILL


What's more important, the temperature as given by the BIOS or by programs like OCCT? The BIOS temperature seems rather high for what it's doing (i.e. sitting on BIOS).

I'll give context, stock cooler BIOS spat out 50C, EVO cooler BIOS spat out 37.5C. This is presumably unloaded, because it's on BIOS, right?

OCCT reports for each:

Stock cooler:


EVO cooler:


This is for an i5-760 on stock speeds. Would I be okay to start overclocking? I'm not too sure what's the best way to do it for a Lynnfield processor.

Blackclaw fucked around with this message at Apr 8, 2012 around 12:07

Factory Factory
Mar 19, 2010

Oh dear, oh my,
that shouldn't be said.


The BIOS temp will always be higher than OS idle temp, but both are accurate (assuming OCCT is getting the sensors right - verify with HWiNFO64 or somesuch). The BIOS is a very inefficient idler - it doesn't use C-states or P-states to throttle the CPU, and it has work going every single CPU cycle to check the mouse/keyboard rather than using interrupts. So the BIOS temperature is actually a very light 100% load.

Blackclaw
Jan 4, 2008

DUKE NUKEM FOREVER HAS A BETTER CHANCE OF RELEASING IN AUSTRALIA THAN ROCK BAND EVER WILL


I'm having trouble finding the definitive limits for Lynnfield (i5 760). I've got a Vcore limit of 1.4 (I believe), not too sure what the temperature limit is. Multipliers are unlocked but I don't know if I'm expected to play with the BCLK at all...

e: Apparently BCLK can affect a bunch of other parts of the computer thanks to QPI so I'll start with tweaking the multiplier. I'm not aware of the 'hard limit' on temperature though.

e: Turns out I can only change the multiplier to one above the default (22 x 133MHz = 2.93GHz). Looks like I'll be tweaking clocks!

Blackclaw fucked around with this message at Apr 9, 2012 around 01:16

cisco privilege
Dec 5, 2005

det er noget at leve for

Blackclaw posted:

I'm having trouble finding the definitive limits for Lynnfield (i5 760). I've got a Vcore limit of 1.4 (I believe), not too sure what the temperature limit is. Multipliers are unlocked but I don't know if I'm expected to play with the BCLK at all...

e: Apparently BCLK can affect a bunch of other parts of the computer thanks to QPI so I'll start with tweaking the multiplier. I'm not aware of the 'hard limit' on temperature though.

e: Turns out I can only change the multiplier to one above the default (22 x 133MHz = 2.93GHz). Looks like I'll be tweaking clocks!
I'd suggest ignoring the turbo (+1x) multiplier setting, as it will make overclocking your chip more difficult initially.

Temperature limits are similar to SB chips, in that you'll want to stay around 72C at highest (Prime95) whereas you can allow higher temperatures in max IntelBurnTest, up to ~80C at the maximum limit. It'll never get that hot during normal use, however it's fine to go up to that temperature as long as voltage isn't too crazy for testing-only. Technically you could take it up to 90C+, however you won't be pushing enough voltage through it even up to 1.4V for it to get that warm in IBT.


With your CPU, you'll be overclocking primarily via the BCLK, and RAM/QPI/etc speeds will be adjusted with multipliers. RAM should stay at or below the modules' rated speeds. You'll want to keep an eye on QPI/VTT voltage as it should be no more than .5V below RAM voltage (so if your RAM is 1.65V sticks, VTT voltage would need to be at least 1.15V - if you're using older 1.8V RAM sticks, consider replacing them, but you'd need 1.3V VTT voltage minimum). For nehalem/lynnfield chips, 1.2V to 1.3V is usually safe, although your chip may need higher voltage. I'd aim for 1.3V or lower as any increase in VTT voltage will increase CPU temperatures as well.

QPI speeds don't really need to be super-high as it won't increase performance, so going beyond ~6.4ghz is pointless (so a 32x multiplier for QPI at 200mhz BCLK = 6.4ghz which is more than enough bandwidth).

If your board supports uncore frequency changes, keep the uncore ratio at 2X RAM speed (so if you have 1600mhz RAM you'd need an uncore frequency of at least 3200mhz), but try to keep uncore at or below 3700mhz as it'll get unstable the higher you go beyond 3600mhz depending on the board. Uncore frequencies will likely limit you before your CPU unless your board allows for a high BCLK. If you're using 2000mhz RAM you're going to have a hard time running it at full speed, although there's few benefits from faster than 1600mhz, so don't worry about it and run it slower.

If you're really lucky with CPU voltage, you might be able to get away with 1.3V at your maximum stable overclock. If your board has LLC options, consider using them as it'll make your life a bit easier.


Check out this guide here for your chip:
http://www.techreaction.net/2010/09...uide-lynnfield/


Read the first few pages to understand the steps, and when doing the BCLK isolation stage, try to get your BCLK as high as it'll go without getting unstable, then back it down a few mhz from that speed.

cisco privilege fucked around with this message at Apr 9, 2012 around 02:54

Blackclaw
Jan 4, 2008

DUKE NUKEM FOREVER HAS A BETTER CHANCE OF RELEASING IN AUSTRALIA THAN ROCK BAND EVER WILL


grumperfish posted:

I'd suggest ignoring the turbo (+1x) multiplier setting, as it will make overclocking your chip more difficult initially.

Temperature limits are similar to SB chips, in that you'll want to stay around 72C at highest (Prime95) whereas you can allow higher temperatures in max IntelBurnTest, up to ~80C at the maximum limit. It'll never get that hot during normal use, however it's fine to go up to that temperature as long as voltage isn't too crazy for testing-only. Technically you could take it up to 90C+, however you won't be pushing enough voltage through it even up to 1.4V for it to get that warm in IBT.


With your CPU, you'll be overclocking primarily via the BCLK, and RAM/QPI/etc speeds will be adjusted with multipliers. RAM should stay at or below the modules' rated speeds. You'll want to keep an eye on VTT voltage as it should be no more than .5V below RAM voltage (so if your RAM is 1.65V sticks, VTT voltage would need to be at least 1.15V). For nehalem/lynnfield chips, 1.2V to 1.3V is usually safe, although your chip may need higher voltage. I'd aim for 1.3V or lower as any increase in VTT voltage will increase CPU temperatures as well.

QPI speeds don't really need to be super-high as it won't increase performance, so going beyond ~6.4ghz is pointless (so a 32x multiplier for QPI at 200mhz BCLK = 6.4ghz which is more than enough bandwidth).

If your board supports uncore frequency changes, keep the uncore ratio at 2X RAM speed (so if you have 1600mhz RAM you'd need an uncore frequency of at least 3200mhz), but try to keep uncore at or below 3700mhz as it'll get unstable the higher you go beyond 3600mhz depending on the board. Uncore frequencies will likely limit you before your CPU unless your board allows for a high BCLK. If you're using 2000mhz RAM you're going to have a hard time running it at full speed, although there's few benefits from faster than 1600mhz, so don't worry about it and run it slower.


Check out this guide here for your chip:
http://www.techreaction.net/2010/09...uide-lynnfield/


Read the first few pages to understand the steps, and when doing the BCLK isolation stage, try to get your BCLK as high as it'll go without getting unstable, then back it down a few mhz from that speed.

Thanks for the link, last successful stress test was on BCLK=160 (using IBT 'High' 10 times), now I'm getting BSODs and warnings from IBT at 170. I've got the CPU offset voltage at .025V. From the last OC megathread here apparently BSODs are indicative of a memory instability (which may be true as BCLK alters that too I believe) but I wouldn't know where to start making memory more stable. For the meantime I'm staying with BCLK=160 but is there anything I can or should do to push it further?

e: I'm using 1.5V 1600MHz RAM. I can't seem to find the PTT/QPI voltage, just these:

-Vcore
-IMC
-CPU PLL
-PCH
-DRAM
-DRAM DATA REF on CH A
-DRAM DATA REF on CH B

Blackclaw fucked around with this message at Apr 9, 2012 around 02:56

cisco privilege
Dec 5, 2005

det er noget at leve for

Blackclaw posted:

Thanks for the link, last successful stress test was on BCLK=160 (using IBT 'High' 10 times), now I'm getting BSODs and warnings from IBT at 170. I've got the CPU offset voltage at .025V. From the last OC megathread here apparently BSODs are indicative of a memory instability (which may be true as BCLK alters that too I believe) but I wouldn't know where to start making memory more stable. For the meantime I'm staying with BCLK=160 but is there anything I can or should do to push it further?
What was the BSOD code, and what voltage does that offset give you in BIOS? Make sure you've set your RAM speed & voltage manually, and that you've got uncore high enough for the RAM speed. Manually set your VTT/QPI voltage rather than leaving it on auto.

The BSOD code is important as windows7/vista will give specific ones like xx124 that indicate that CPU voltage is too low (particularly if you're getting IBT warnings). You'll want to have CPU voltage (with the offset) at 1.3V while you're testing BCLK so you can see where that runs you (you can dial it back down later but setting it artificially-high will let you test BCLK without having to constantly adjust voltage).

Blackclaw
Jan 4, 2008

DUKE NUKEM FOREVER HAS A BETTER CHANCE OF RELEASING IN AUSTRALIA THAN ROCK BAND EVER WILL


grumperfish posted:

What was the BSOD code, and what voltage does that offset give you in BIOS? Make sure you've set your RAM speed & voltage manually, and that you've got uncore high enough for the RAM speed. Manually set your VTT/QPI voltage rather than leaving it on auto.

The BSOD code is important as windows7/vista will give specific ones like xx124 that indicate that CPU voltage is too low (particularly if you're getting IBT warnings).

Sorry, didn't recover the BSOD code. I'll stress test it again to see if it'll shoot one off again.

I can set DRAM voltage manually but I can't find the VTT/QPI voltage. I made an edit to my previous post.

e: It just passed the Standard x 5 test, so you could very well be right about it just being insufficient Vcore. It's sitting on ~1.2V now, only keen to push it a little bit further as the temps are poking at ~70C. Although I've heard Lynnfields are more tolerant of high temps than Sandy Bridge.

I don't need to worry about overclocking memory, right, because the BCLK/QPI does that already and even then performance doesn't change that dramatically, right?

Current settings are BCLK=175 x 22 = 3.84GHz, looks like it's going to be stable.

Multiplier's on x22, IMC and DRAM voltages still on Auto. Should they be changed? I'm having trouble finding the voltage they're currently sitting on. In your guide the multiplier was brought down to x15 (as was the memory multiplier) and the BCLK was raised even higher, where the IMC voltage was adjusted instead of Vcore.

Is there any advantage to doing it this way?

e: Getting the occasional bounce down from my current frequency (~3.9GHz) to about 1.6GHz every now and then during IBT. Also the Linpack outputs seem to take a little bit longer. Is this okay?

e: Now I'm getting STOP code 0x00000101 - "A clock interrupt was not received on a secondary processor within the allocated time interval."

Blackclaw fucked around with this message at Apr 9, 2012 around 04:54

Factory Factory
Mar 19, 2010

Oh dear, oh my,
that shouldn't be said.


Vcore issue, give it a little more. You might have to back off a bit if you can't get it stable.

Blackclaw
Jan 4, 2008

DUKE NUKEM FOREVER HAS A BETTER CHANCE OF RELEASING IN AUSTRALIA THAN ROCK BAND EVER WILL


Factory Factory posted:

Vcore issue, give it a little more. You might have to back off a bit if you can't get it stable.

I was sitting on about ~1.3V but I don't feel too confident lifting it up any further, the place I'll be using the machine doesn't have great ventilation, and the temperature during Prime95 was looking close to the limit.

Currently 24hr testing 3.9GHz overclock.

Oh hey while I'm here I'll ask, does that '200hrs to cure' poo poo about Arctic Silver 5 hold any water, or is it a load of poo poo? I'm getting good performance already but if I have to wait a week or two to get the most out of it I might take another crack at lifting the voltage later.

Blackclaw fucked around with this message at Apr 9, 2012 around 06:01

Factory Factory
Mar 19, 2010

Oh dear, oh my,
that shouldn't be said.


Its thermal performance will get slightly better, yeah. No more than 5C, probably less.

Dogen
May 5, 2002

Bury my body down by the highwayside, so that my old evil spirit can get a Greyhound bus and ride


I generally notice the most improvement in about 24 hours. Not sure about AS5 but a lot of people also say it's not so much time as it is cycles of load/idle changing the temp that gets paste working.

cisco privilege
Dec 5, 2005

det er noget at leve for

Posted about this awhile back, but this crazy dude on overclockers has been modding Voodoo cards and he just posted another one he's working on with custom watercooling:
http://www.overclockers.com/forums/...ad.php?t=702722

Endymion FRS MK1
Oct 28, 2011


I'm kinda new to overclocking here, and I'm wondering the consequences of overclocking my HD6950. I already have the additional shaders unlocked, and I would like to bump the clokcs and voltage up to 6970 levels. Will this damage my card in the long term? Its a Sapphire, so it is at least a good card.

cisco privilege
Dec 5, 2005

det er noget at leve for

Endymion FRS MK1 posted:

I'm kinda new to overclocking here, and I'm wondering the consequences of overclocking my HD6950. I already have the additional shaders unlocked, and I would like to bump the clokcs and voltage up to 6970 levels. Will this damage my card in the long term? Its a Sapphire, so it is at least a good card.
For consequences: more heat and more noise with the reference 6950 cooler as long as you keep your overclocking reasonable. Overclocking to 6970 speeds is highly-unlikely to damage the card in the long or short term (maybe shortened lifespan in the very-long term, but by then you'd have needed to upgrade anyways).

As for the overclocking, it's fairly easy, especially if you're already unlocked. 880/1325 or 880/1350 on my card (XFX) only needed a small voltage bump to 1.1V which didn't add much heat with the reference cooler (using 950/1350 @ 1.2V now with better cooling though).

Download the MSI Afterburner beta and modify the Afterburner .ini to enable overclocking beyond the CCC per:
http://forums.overclockersclub.com/...howtopic=182403

You can disable ULPS as they've mentioned but it's not strictly necessary with a single card. It may do nothing, or it might increase stability, so that step is skippable.


Install the AB beta and reboot when it asks you to do it. After that you'll want to play around with overclocking in AB. You should enable voltage modification in settings as you'll probably need to lock it at 1.1V to get the card up to 880mhz core clocks (keep voltage monitoring disabled if you're using HWiNFO though as it'll already give you a readout). Setting a manual fan profile in Afterburner is a good plan when overclocking (check the settings menu) as the stock fan profile will let the card get too hot and then ramp up the fan at 70C. You'll want the fan to go up in steps, so at 50C you'd want it running at ~medium speed then around 70C you'd want it running pretty high as you'd be nearing the card's temperature limits. The "K" button on the left side of Afterburner's menu will run Kombuster which, like furmark, will stress the card allowing you to test your clocks/fan profile. After you've got your fan profile & clocks set how you want them, save it as a numbered profile. You can also toggle the button at the bottom to apply the overclocking settings at boot.

Without increasing powertune levels you can reasonably get up to ~900mhz (although 840-880 is safer) at 1.1V-1.17V, but beyond that you'll be hitting the card's TDP limits. Increasing the powertune levels will allow you to go higher, although you'll also see alot more heat, which is problematic with the stock cooler as it'll mean the fan will be running at a higher speed more often. The VRAM will (safely) top out around 1400mhz on a 6950, but in my experience there's really no point to running it beyond 1350mhz as you'll see more benefits from core overclocking.


e: You may also want to grab HWiNFO64 to monitor temperatures (including VRM temperatures which AB won't give you) while you're setting up a fan profile in Afterburner. You can set HWiNFO to run in sensors-only mode in the "configure" menu and it'll just get you configurable temperature & voltage readouts.

cisco privilege fucked around with this message at Apr 11, 2012 around 23:43

Endymion FRS MK1
Oct 28, 2011


grumperfish posted:

It's fairly easy, especially if you're already unlocked. 880/1325 or 880/1350 on my card (XFX) only needed a small voltage bump to 1.1V which didn't add much heat with the reference cooler (using 950/1350 @ 1.2V now with better cooling though).

Download the MSI Afterburner beta and modify the Afterburner .ini to enable overclocking beyond the CCC per:
http://forums.overclockersclub.com/...howtopic=182403

You can disable ULPS as they've mentioned but it's not strictly necessary with a single card. It may do nothing, or it might increase stability, so that step is skippable.


Install the AB beta and reboot when it asks you to do it. After that you'll want to play around with overclocking in AB. You should enable voltage modification in settings as you'll probably need to lock it at 1.1V to get the card up to 880mhz core clocks (keep voltage monitoring disabled if you're using HWiNFO though as it'll already give you a readout). Setting a manual fan profile in Afterburner is a good plan when overclocking (check the settings menu) as the stock fan profile will let the card get too hot and then ramp up the fan at 70C. You'll want the fan to go up in steps, so at 50C you'd want it running at ~medium speed then around 70C you'd want it running pretty high as you'd be nearing the card's temperature limits. The "K" button on the left side of Afterburner's menu will run Kombuster which, like furmark, will stress the card allowing you to test your clocks/fan profile.

Without increasing powertune levels you can reasonably get up to ~900mhz (although 840-880 is safer) at 1.1V-1.17V, but beyond that you'll be hitting the card's TDP limits. Increasing the powertune levels will allow you to go higher, although you'll also see alot more heat, which is problematic with the stock cooler as it'll mean the fan will be running at a higher speed more often. The VRAM will (safely) top out around 1400mhz-1425mhz on a 6950, but in my experience there's really no benefits to running it beyond 1350mhz as you'll see more benefits from core overclocking.


You may also want to grab HWiNFO64 to monitor temperatures (including VRM temperatures which AB won't give you) while you're setting up a fan profile in Afterburner.

Oh ok, thanks. I already had the clocks and voltages saved as a profile in Sapphire Trixx though. Would you recommend using Afterburner over Trixx?

Also, I just want to be clear on this, as long as I keep everything in check, temps and voltage, this won't hurt my card permanently?

Factory Factory
Mar 19, 2010

Oh dear, oh my,
that shouldn't be said.


You will very slightly increase the rate of normal wear and tear. The card will still last much longer than its useful lifetime.

craig588
Nov 19, 2005



grumperfish posted:

Posted about this awhile back, but this crazy dude on overclockers has been modding Voodoo cards and he just posted another one he's working on with custom watercooling:
http://www.overclockers.com/forums/...ad.php?t=702722



This pisses me off way more than it should. The water block isn't that well designed, and those cards could already max out their clock generator after a volt mod with just air cooling. I wouldn't care at all, except for everyone getting so excited about it in that thread.
Edit: Hahaha, he PAID someone to make that, it wasn't even a home project.

craig588 fucked around with this message at Apr 12, 2012 around 00:29

cisco privilege
Dec 5, 2005

det er noget at leve for

Endymion FRS MK1 posted:

Oh ok, thanks. I already had the clocks and voltages saved as a profile in Sapphire Trixx though. Would you recommend using Afterburner over Trixx?

Also, I just want to be clear on this, as long as I keep everything in check, temps and voltage, this won't hurt my card permanently?
If you already have your clocks & volts saved in Trixx and you're familiar with it, just stick with Trixx. Either application will do essentially the same thing as far as overclocking the card is concerned. If it's stable in games and not artifacting or overheating, you should be good to go.

HalloKitty
Sep 30, 2005

Adjust the bass and let the Alpine blast


craig588 posted:

This pisses me off way more than it should. The water block isn't that well designed, and those cards could already max out their clock generator after a volt mod with just air cooling. I wouldn't care at all, except for everyone getting so excited about it in that thread.
Edit: Hahaha, he PAID someone to make that, it wasn't even a home project.

He had the money, and now he no doubt has an extremely badass (but completely useless) 3Dfx card. Not sure why that'd piss you off.

Fuzz1111
Mar 17, 2001


SRQ posted:

Is there any way to change the FSB of a 440BX board without the option in the BIOS?
Why are you overclocking this by the way? If I still had something like that kicking around I'd make it into a PC dedicated to old games. I used to have a P2 300 with a 440BX and an ISA Soundblaster AWE64 and I wish I still had it because dosbox just ain't the same.

Endymion FRS MK1
Oct 28, 2011


I played with Trixx, and I have my 6950 running stable at 880/1325/1.14v. It runs Battlefield fine, temps stay under 60 and no hiccups. When I run Uningine Heaven though, sometimes (uncommonly) I get screen flashes during the benchmark. Settings for that are everything at highest except no AA. Is this bad?

cisco privilege
Dec 5, 2005

det er noget at leve for

Endymion FRS MK1 posted:

I played with Trixx, and I have my 6950 running stable at 880/1325/1.14v. It runs Battlefield fine, temps stay under 60 and no hiccups. When I run Uningine Heaven though, sometimes (uncommonly) I get screen flashes during the benchmark. Settings for that are everything at highest except no AA. Is this bad?
Screen flashes are a little unusual but it doesn't sound like GPU artifacts. It's probably not anything to worry about if the card's working fine in games.

Endymion FRS MK1
Oct 28, 2011


grumperfish posted:

Screen flashes are a little unusual but it doesn't sound like GPU artifacts. It's probably not anything to worry about if the card's working fine in games.

It flashed when I ran without any overclocking, but it was a little rarer. It wasn't doing it a lot, just like once every just maybe 5 or so times in the entire benchmark (with OC).

FormerFatty
Jul 18, 2006


Endymion FRS MK1 posted:

It flashed when I ran without any overclocking, but it was a little rarer. It wasn't doing it a lot, just like once every just maybe 5 or so times in the entire benchmark (with OC).

I had flashes every 30 minutes or so which eventually turned out to be caused by my cheap HDMI cable. If you have this problem, don't waste your money on an expensive cable, just buy another $5 HDMI cable from somewhere else and you should be fine.

Endymion FRS MK1
Oct 28, 2011


FormerFatty posted:

I had flashes every 30 minutes or so which eventually turned out to be caused by my cheap HDMI cable. If you have this problem, don't waste your money on an expensive cable, just buy another $5 HDMI cable from somewhere else and you should be fine.

I'm not using HDMI, it's actually a VGA monitor. Think that's the case then?

e: Regardless, I'm not worried about it, everything seems stable and running fine, so thanks to everyone's help.

Haeleus
Jun 30, 2009

He made one fatal slip when he tried to match the ranger with the big iron on his hip.


I have an i7 2600k and an ASUS Sabertooth P67 board, with the turbo multiplier set to 43. All I want to know is if there is a point to adjust the TDP settings to have turbo running indefinitely as mentioned in the OP; is there some downside to having the CPU downclock itself to 1600MHz when in low use?

cisco privilege
Dec 5, 2005

det er noget at leve for

Haeleus posted:

I have an i7 2600k and an ASUS Sabertooth P67 board, with the turbo multiplier set to 43. All I want to know is if there is a point to adjust the TDP settings to have turbo running indefinitely as mentioned in the OP; is there some downside to having the CPU downclock itself to 1600MHz when in low use?
The chip will downclock itself to 1600mhz when it doesn't need full power, and it will increase speeds per-core dynamically as needed. Dynamic overclocking will not affect stability or maximum overclocking or anything really, so there's no downsides to it. Unless you somehow count using less power to be a downside

Increasing the TDP levels will prevent the CPU from throttling at higher load, so it's not a bad idea to raise it, but you don't need it running at max overclock 24/7.


Grab HWiNFO64 and check the Summary window, and you'll be able to see it actively switching per-core speeds & voltage.

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Factory Factory
Mar 19, 2010

Oh dear, oh my,
that shouldn't be said.


Since it's an Asus board, the Turbo TDP settings are almost definitely already adjusted. While you're watching HWiNFO, if it only switches between 4.3 GHz and 1.6 GHz with no steps in between, then you don't need to do anything.

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