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Agreed
Dec 30, 2003

The price of meat has just gone up, and your old lady has just gone down


Splash Damage posted:

I used the ATi Overdrive Tool to auto-detect the overclocking settings and tried playing Battlefield 3 with those. While the performance was improved, the game keeps crashing almost immediately after lauching (about a minute). What could be the problem?

Auto-detection tends to suck.

Driver crashes are often your card's way of telling you that something just really can't take it. It can be kind of frustrating isolating what, specifically, because you've got several variables in play, but if the game runs fine visually with no noticeable artifacts and then crashes out, I'd guess video memory/the video memory controller. Generally speaking, fast GDDR5 ruled the day last generation, but memory controllers often limited the clock potential. In fact, higher overclocks on the core/shaders can sometimes be had by leaving memory clocks completely alone and just focusing on voltage and core/shader clocks.

Bottom line for you is that the auto-overclock made some errors in computerized judgment and you're going to want to reset it to stock settings and do it manually. For videocards, you can do core/shader bumps of as much as 15mhz to even 25mhz at a time because they have robust protection from death, generally speaking, and will do what you experienced (crash out precipitously then recover) within the OS itself without having to do the whole BSOD thing. For nVidia cards, driver crashes are followed by a restoration to factory default clocks and voltages - I would assume that's true for ATI as well, but I don't know. Factory Factory or another ATI user care to chime in?

Process for OCing videocard cores really isn't far off the process for OCing processors, you just do it from within your OS and use tools like the Unigen Heaven benchmark, Furmark/OCCT, EVGA Precision/MSI whatsitcalled... It's software based overclocking unless you want to get fancy with flashing a non-factory BIOS. Don't get fancy, trust me, it's a pain in the rear end unless you bought a 7970 and just HAVE to see the biggest numbers on planet earth or something. Generally you'll hit a wall in your cores/shaders/memory before you max out your stock voltage.

Speaking of which, another thing that can cause crashes is a card drawing too much power. By default, protection circuitry is pretty hardy on reference designs and there's hardware and software protection from drawing too much power. So you kinda get to play the "chip lottery" whether you like it or not. I got a GTX 580 that will run to 920MHz core at 1.25V in all DX rendering modes. That's pretty good, brings it to nearly identical performance with a stock 7970 in games where VRAM isn't the bottleneck, but some folks get 'em up to 950MHz or higher at voltages lower. Since clockrate and voltage are part of the total power draw calculation (and heat, which adds resistance as well - set up a custom fan profile to more aggressively cool when overclocking your card heavily), you might end up running up against what the card will allow power-wise even though technically it could go faster.

That's when you could, if you were tempted, get fancy and turn off protections and flash a custom BIOS and generally make a lot of errors in judgment and probably fry a perfectly good card, so be careful chasing those high numbers

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Splash Damage
May 23, 2009

by Y Kant Ozma Post


I don't understand a word you've posted. How would I go about overclocking an ATi Radeon 4800HD just a little bit, to get consistent 30fps in BF3?

Alereon
Feb 6, 2004

For me but LEFTHANDED

Splash Damage posted:

I don't understand a word you've posted. How would I go about overclocking an ATi Radeon 4800HD just a little bit, to get consistent 30fps in BF3?
Use a canned air duster to dust out the videocard heatsink and fan and monitor the temperatures with GPU-Z. As long as temperatures are okay (not going above 100C), bump the GPU clock speed up a bit (5-10Mhz) then test to see if it worked. If you don't get any crashes or weird visual artifacts (white pixels, miscolored objects, corrupted/spikey geometry). Repeat until you find the highest speed that doesn't give you errors or heat the card up too bad. If your card supports fan speed control, you can also turn the fan up a bit to give you better cooling at the cost of noise. You're probably not going to milk a whole lot out of a Radeon 4800-series card at this point though, especially if you only have 512MB of video memory.

Agreed
Dec 30, 2003

The price of meat has just gone up, and your old lady has just gone down


Splash Damage posted:

I don't understand a word you've posted. How would I go about overclocking an ATi Radeon 4800HD just a little bit, to get consistent 30fps in BF3?

A miracle, or extremely low resolutions with all settings down very very far.

It's time to upgrade, your card had a good run. There are excellent price:performance choices right now, to make a proper recommendation need to know your resolution as well as what kind of settings you're after for that 30 fps - preliminarily I'd recommend a 6850 as a killer budget card. Oh, also, if you have one, a budget. Can't play the latest hot-poo poo games at reasonably good looking settings on several generations old hardware, unfortunately, so you're looking at either a LOT of compromises, or getting with the times.

Well, approaching the times cautiously, so as not to startle the times. The 6850 is in some important ways a two-generation old card, very similar to the higher end models of the 5800-series, but it overclocks well (though if you genuinely didn't get a word of that, and I would understand that since you tried the automatic utility first, overclocking might not be for you... maybe consider a 560 Ti if you can budget it, that's a card that everyone can get great framerates in BF3 with even up to 1080p so long as you aren't looking for maxed settings, but it'll still look a hell of a lot better than consoles ).

PS. Love the cabin
Dec 29, 2011
Bee Lincoln

Can we take breaks during the 24 hour burn in?
Web browsing isn't going to be an issue but if I wanted to play something I'm not sure it'd like prime running in the background.

cisco privilege
Dec 5, 2005

det er noget at leve for

Alereon posted:

As long as temperatures are okay (not going above 100C)
ATI/AMD cards should stay at or below 80C at worst-case. 90C-100C temperatures would rapidly kill one of these cards.


PS. Love the cabin posted:

Can we take breaks during the 24 hour burn in?
Web browsing isn't going to be an issue but if I wanted to play something I'm not sure it'd like prime running in the background.
I don't really believe in the necessity of a 24-hour burn-in period myself, so at the most I'll run prime for like 4-6 hours maximum as an initial test after ~2 passes of memtest & 10 runs of max IBT. If it doesn't fail in that period, it's fine as far as I'm concerned. Beyond initial testing, day to day use will generally reveal any possible lingering problems.

If you're going to do a 24-hour burn in for whatever reason, you should do it in 1 stretch or at least 2 12-hour stretches ideally, although I still think it's excessive. If you want to play a game, by all means just turn off prime. Gaming will still be stress-testing the system.

cisco privilege fucked around with this message at Feb 11, 2012 around 16:14

VorpalFish
Mar 22, 2007
reasonably awesometm

Splash Damage posted:

I don't understand a word you've posted. How would I go about overclocking an ATi Radeon 4800HD just a little bit, to get consistent 30fps in BF3?
4800 what? 4830? 4850? 4870? 4890? There are substantial performance differences between them which will dictate whether or not what you want to do is possible. In addition, I believe the 4890 has more overclocking headroom than the others.

Agreed posted:

maybe consider a 560 Ti if you can budget it
A 560ti is the last card I would recommend to someone looking for BF3 performance unless they finally fixed the awful triangular artifacting?

VorpalFish fucked around with this message at Feb 11, 2012 around 17:14

Agreed
Dec 30, 2003

The price of meat has just gone up, and your old lady has just gone down


VorpalFish posted:

A 560ti is the last card I would recommend to someone looking for BF3 performance unless they finally fixed the awful triangular artifacting?

Edit: Less snarky, sorry, too early.

The devs of BF3 have been working on that one, it doesn't seem to be an nVidia problem but rather some unpleasant confluence of issues. I think both companies have worked substantially to fix that issue and it is mainly a "launch" problem at this point, with the vast majority of complaints months ago and hardly any since that could be related to a specific and repeatable cause (in other words, individuals with poorly overclocked or just lovely videocards might not be getting the best experience, but for most folks, seems like BF3 on a 560 Ti is doing fine now).

Agreed fucked around with this message at Feb 11, 2012 around 17:29

Dogen
May 5, 2002

Bury my body down by the highwayside, so that my old evil spirit can get a Greyhound bus and ride


It never got fixed for Animal, but I agree that most people who still had problems were unlucky outliers

HalloKitty
Sep 30, 2005

Adjust the bass and let the Alpine blast


VorpalFish posted:

4800 what? 4830? 4850? 4870? 4890? There are substantial performance differences between them which will dictate whether or not what you want to do is possible. In addition, I believe the 4890 has more overclocking headroom than the others.

Unless it's the XFX 4890, which I had. It had cheap analogue VRMs that were uncooled, and didn't like it when you did.. anything in the way of overclocking.

Agreed
Dec 30, 2003

The price of meat has just gone up, and your old lady has just gone down


6850/6870 still probably a better choice, just on value merits, depending on what kind of experience he's looking for and what his monitor's resolution is. And what card he has now.

Hey, man, specific stuff:

1. What is your monitor's resolution?

2. What is the exact type of card you have now? No way you'll get any real performance gains overclocking it if it isn't top-tier from the time period, and even then, you're definitely looking at lowering settings/resolution for a minimum-30fps experience.

3. Are you interested in upgrading? If so, budget? Depending on exactly how fancy you want to get there are a lot of options ranging from about $150-$160 up to around $300 that are on the price:performance curve and wouldn't require you to screw around with anything unless you just wanted to. Overclocking nets performance gains, but at the cost of a lot of dicking around, and it does require an investment of time in learning how to do it. While this isn't really the thread for people who don't care about overclocking, it's still SH/SC and we try to help if we can and we do understand if you're not up for putting in the effort to learn to overclock a card, coming from knowing nothing about it. There's not much to learn, but if you just don't have time, that is your business.

HalloKitty posted:

Unless it's the XFX 4890, which I had. It had cheap analogue VRMs that were uncooled, and didn't like it when you did.. anything in the way of overclocking.

What is it with XFX and cheaping out on power delivery? They'd be a great brand otherwise, but you just can't trust them to not have the bean counters go over every aspect of the reference board and take out anything that isn't necessary to achieve the stock clocks. They don't do it on every model, but they do it with alarming regularity on enough models that I feel like nobody ought to trust 'em.

Agreed fucked around with this message at Feb 11, 2012 around 18:55

Phuzun
Jul 4, 2007



Looks like Nan's gaming has the 2011 retention kit now for the Thermalright heatsinks. Also, the True Spirit that they sell is another really good heatsink, from the reviews I've seen. I'll most likely be throwing on of those on a q9550 that I have laying around and use it as a server. The 120mm version is only $30, which is a great price.

cisco privilege
Dec 5, 2005

det er noget at leve for

Phuzun posted:

Looks like Nan's gaming has the 2011 retention kit now for the Thermalright heatsinks. Also, the True Spirit that they sell is another really good heatsink, from the reviews I've seen. I'll most likely be throwing on of those on a q9550 that I have laying around and use it as a server. The 120mm version is only $30, which is a great price.
Nice find. Looks like it handled a 920 C0 at 3.9ghz with reasonable temperatures, so it has alot of cooling capacity for the price (and it's presumably easier to mount than a 212+ due to being a Thermalright product) :

http://www.overclockers.com/cogage-...eatsink-review/

The one on Nan's Gaming Gear appears to ship with TR's Venomous-X style mount instead of the TRUE-style crossbar mount. The Ven-X mount is great because you can re-mount the heatsink without needing to remove the board from the case.

cisco privilege fucked around with this message at Feb 12, 2012 around 00:44

PS. Love the cabin
Dec 29, 2011
Bee Lincoln

I need to try again with more patience, but multi overclocking my Phenom 555 BE was stable for ~7 minutes at 4GHz 1.45v and around 45c.


Hopefully with a little more vcore it'll be stable.

Gorilla Salsa
Dec 4, 2007

Post Post Post.


Gorilla Salsa posted:

I never thought that maybe the RAM was what was loving up. I'll run memtest when I get home.

So here is what Memtest 86+ v4.20 came up with:



I'm guessing this is good, which leads me to guess that I'm hosed as far as a potential overclock is concerned. Right?

Gorilla Salsa fucked around with this message at Feb 12, 2012 around 06:42

cisco privilege
Dec 5, 2005

det er noget at leve for

Gorilla Salsa posted:

So here is what Memtest 86+ v4.20 came up with:

I'm guessint his is good, which leads me to guess that I'm hosed as far as a potential overclock is concerned. Right?
Your RAM is fine (it's a bit below stock speeds, but don't worry about that at the moment), so there's only a couple other things to check really that I can see..

In BIOS, disable turbo to keep the multiplier at a specific setting. I think from your list it's: "CPU Ratio Setting: Auto"

Check the Windows Event Log for the BSOD codes, so we can rule out harddrive failures, etc.

Did you run through the Nehalem overclocking guide in the OP? It might be a good plan to revert to stock settings and go through it step by step. You've already got BCLK stable at 180 which is a safe, conservative point for X58, so build around that. It'll probably be easier ramping up BCLK and the CPU multiplier without worrying too much about the RAM overclocking just yet. Since X58 ties the RAM multipliers to QPI and BCLK (unlike Sandybridge where DRAM can be set independently without having to worry about other multipliers), you'll want to isolate those values at a low RAM clock first, and then attempt to raise the memory clocks once you have a stable CPU/BCLK overclock set.

Since you have 6 RAM modules running, try reverting to just 3 modules in parallel when you're going through the guide. It's possible that your CPU's IMC is having trouble with 6 modules & overclocking.

If your board supports saving separate OC profiles, save one before clearing CMOS/reverting to stock. Worst-case, you recorded the values on the last page to work with.

What motherboard are you using by the way? I think it was listed at one point but no idea where that post is.

cisco privilege fucked around with this message at Feb 12, 2012 around 05:57

Druuge Fuel
Jul 9, 2010



Great OP! I initially thought I was buying an awesome motherboard for OC'ing when it first came out -- as it turns out it's one of the worst. I've purchased a hyper 212+, additional ceiling fans for my case, but it still throttles down after prolonged use under ~full load. It boggled my mind for a long time until learning all about 4+1 power phases and un-sinked mosfets!! That knowledge will certainly factor into my next mobo buying decision.

This is me: http://www.asus.com/Motherboards/AMD_AM3/M4A87TDUSB3/

Relevant:
http://www.overclockers.com/forums/...ad.php?t=679903
http://tinyurl.com/7dggoqm

Animal
Apr 8, 2003


Dogen posted:

It never got fixed for Animal, but I agree that most people who still had problems were unlucky outliers

Indeed it seems to be some bizarre issue that not even EVGA is willing to touch with your own dick. God knows if its a software issue or a hardware glitch. All I know is that life is lovely now with a 560 Ti 448.

Going back to the overclocking topic, can anyone explain what the is the purpose of auxiliary voltage on MSI video cards? I can't find any good explanation.

Animal fucked around with this message at Feb 12, 2012 around 06:04

cisco privilege
Dec 5, 2005

det er noget at leve for

Druuge Fuel posted:

Great OP! I initially thought I was buying an awesome motherboard for OC'ing when it first came out -- as it turns out it's one of the worst. I've purchased a hyper 212+, additional ceiling fans for my case, but it still throttles down after prolonged use under ~full load. It boggled my mind for a long time until learning all about 4+1 power phases and un-sinked mosfets!! That knowledge will certainly factor into my next mobo buying decision.

This is me: http://www.asus.com/Motherboards/AMD_AM3/M4A87TDUSB3/

Relevant:
http://www.overclockers.com/forums/...ad.php?t=679903
http://tinyurl.com/7dggoqm
Ouch, yeah you're completely naked there.

If you want to attempt a fix on your own, grab some of these mosfet heatsinks:
http://www.sidewindercomputers.com/enmofocomohe.html
12 come in each pack, so one pack should be enough. They're tiny, and one goes on each mosfet. They don't look like they'd be that effective, but I use them for GPU VRM chips all the time (sidenote: gently caress you, Zotac).

And either (one of these will suffice, not both):
Thermal adhesive (you can get the non-"Premium" version if it's cheaper) :
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produ...N82E16835100005

or Sekisui thermal tape (only get Sekisui. 3M thermal tape is easily-available but it is garbage) :
http://www.ebay.com/itm/Sekisui-576...=item2a07e5398e

The adhesive might be easier to work with, although it would have a longer set-in time. If you're using the adhesive, DO NOT spill any on the board as it's conductive. Just use a tiny bit applied to the base of the heatsink. The tape isn't conductive, so just stick the heatsink on one side, cut it from the strip, and then apply to the board with a little [not too much] pressure. You can use a blowdryer to heat-cycle the heatsinks for a couple seconds to ensure they stay put, but it's not expressly necessary. I generally prefer tape as it's harder to gently caress up, and you can remount it if needed.


You'd want to remove the board from the case, and then either using the thermal tape or the adhesive you'd attach the heatsinks to the VRM/mosfet chips on the board (near the I/O plate).

This would at least ensure that the board's VRM's won't overheat, and hopefully stop it from throttling. No guarantees though, so blame the board-maker if it doesn't work. YMMV. You should strongly consider sinking the VRM's on your board if you're using a high-TDP CPU, as eventually the board will get unstable or stop booting if it's over-taxed for too long.


E: Just noticed that the overclockers.com page you linked mentions MOS-C1 heatsinks. Those are the ones I linked above, just with more detail on heatsink application.

cisco privilege fucked around with this message at Feb 12, 2012 around 06:23

Gorilla Salsa
Dec 4, 2007

Post Post Post.


grumperfish posted:

In BIOS, disable turbo to keep the multiplier at a specific setting. I think from your list it's: "CPU Ratio Setting: Auto"

What should I set it to? There was a guide that you had linked me that suggested 15, but when I tried that, the system didn't boot.

grumperfish posted:

Check the Windows Event Log for the BSOD codes, so we can rule out harddrive failures, etc.
The closest thing I could find was this:
code:
The computer has rebooted from a bugcheck.  The bugcheck was: 0x00000101 (0x0000000000000019, 0x0000000000000000, 0xfffff88002f64180, 0x0000000000000002). A dump was saved in: C:\Windows\MEMORY.DMP

grumperfish posted:

more
Will do.

grumperfish posted:

Since you have 6 RAM modules running, try reverting to just 3 modules in parallel when you're going through the guide. It's possible that your CPU's IMC is having trouble with 6 modules & overclocking.
What would happen if I tried to re-insert the other three after getting everything situated?

grumperfish posted:

If your board supports saving separate OC profiles, save one before clearing CMOS/reverting to stock. Worst-case, you recorded the values on the last page to work with.
I'll see if there's a way to do that.

grumperfish posted:

What motherboard are you using by the way? I think it was listed at one point but no idea where that post is.
ASUS P6T (non-deluxe)

cisco privilege
Dec 5, 2005

det er noget at leve for

Gorilla Salsa posted:

What should I set it to? There was a guide that you had linked me that suggested 15, but when I tried that, the system didn't boot.
That's odd - it should have just dropped the CPU clock to test BCLK limits. Did you revert to stock settings before you tried it?


quote:

The closest thing I could find was this:
code:
The computer has rebooted from a bugcheck.  The bugcheck was: 0x00000101
Usually this would indicate inadequate vcore, but 1.35V should be more than enough for a 920 at 3.6ghz, so there's not enough to go on right now.

quote:

What would happen if I tried to re-insert the other three after getting everything situated?
Assuming your overclock was stable by that point, you'd have more available RAM. The point of removing the sticks for now is to stabilize the OC & minimize stress on the CPU's memory controller. If it turns out that it works fine with 3 sticks but it isn't stable with 6, you might be better off getting 4x4gb RAM and selling your current kit. You'd lose triple-channel that way, but there wouldn't really be an appreciable performance difference with a dual-channel memory configuration and it may make overclocking easier.

Schiavona
Oct 8, 2008



Factory Factory posted:

The best thing to do is to Google up an AnandTech or other review of the card and see what the reviewers got. Reviewers work with reference cards, and reference cards are generally representative of the average, everyday, unbinned GPU so its very likely that their results can be applied to your card with zero effort. AnandTech especially tends to stick to non-insane voltages, and its reviewers will also tell you the best clocks you can expect at stock voltage, too. Using their numbers will give you a short-cut to finding your optimal settings, or you can just take them as-is for an easy overclock.

So, pulling up a Tom's Hardware review, they OC'd a Zotac 560ti-448 from:

Core Clock: 765 MHz
Memory Clock: 950 MHz

to

Core Clock: 860 MHz
Memory Clock: 1050 MHz

on stock voltage. So is it pretty safe to just go into Afterburner, bump the values from stock to the Tom's OC and give it a try to at least set a base level OC?

Factory Factory
Mar 19, 2010

Oh dear, oh my,
that shouldn't be said.


Yep, that's the idea. Cards vary, so do stability tests and be wary of artifacts, and be ready to dial things down a little bit just in case.

Schiavona
Oct 8, 2008



Factory Factory posted:

Yep, that's the idea. Cards vary, so do stability tests and be wary of artifacts, and be ready to dial things down a little bit just in case.

Awesome, thanks. I assume I need to make a different fan profile? The card's auto is about 40%, and I don't think it adjusts too often. Do I need to bump it up to 60%+, or will the auto setting keep it where it needs to be?

Factory Factory
Mar 19, 2010

Oh dear, oh my,
that shouldn't be said.


Schiavona posted:

Awesome, thanks. I assume I need to make a different fan profile? The card's auto is about 40%, and I don't think it adjusts too often. Do I need to bump it up to 60%+, or will the auto setting keep it where it needs to be?

For your card, it's definitely worth bumping up the fan a little. You can always test it without, but 560 Ti-448s are not especially cool cards, so the fans don't include a lot of built-in headroom at stock settings.

Schiavona
Oct 8, 2008



So just bumping the card to a 780MHz core clock and 1005MHz memory clock, it was fine in Unigine (High shaders, Normal tessellation, Anisotropy set to 4, no AA, fullscreen at 1920x1080 - overall an average of 43fps) but in OCCT, it overheated in about 2 minutes(auto-cancelling at 85C). But when I fired up BF3 and played for a while, no problems whatsoever.

At stock speeds, again Unigine was fine, but OCCT overheated at the same rate.

Is OCCT that nuts on hardware, or what?

Dogen
May 5, 2002

Bury my body down by the highwayside, so that my old evil spirit can get a Greyhound bus and ride


So like a crazy person I reseated my archon, and I had to buy some new thermal paste (settled on the Noctua stuff since I could get it with free shipping from amazon).

~5c lower under load

Idle's about the same, but it just seems like based on my experience with the 212+, the AXP II on my old 570, and now this I have to seat heatsinks twice to get them going right. I know the noctua goo isn't much better than the thermalright goo the archon comes with, so I'll assume this gain goes to me being less bad at it. Seems like my temps are more in line with a top of the line heatpipe based cooler now, at least.

Agreed
Dec 30, 2003

The price of meat has just gone up, and your old lady has just gone down


I've been thinking about reseating mine with the new hardware they mailed me but my temps are great and I can't be arsed, it's got three fans and cools ridiculously well. I re-seated it once and gained 3C, then added a third fan for another 2-3C under load, it's Done and I need to just relax.

Been overclocking my graphics card more lately, I think I might be able to get another 50mhz base memory clock at the same core clock

Kepler can't come soon enough. Wait is killing me. I've given up on moderation, I'm going to buy a high end part when it launches if it manages a substantial performance increase over ATI's 7970 so I can put the 580 in my backup machine to give its CUDA a serious kick in the rear, and nVidia doesn't usually launch the GTX 4/5/670 until they've got some less than ideal chips to make them with in quantity so top dollar and top end it will be.

Dogen
May 5, 2002

Bury my body down by the highwayside, so that my old evil spirit can get a Greyhound bus and ride


I want to overclock this 580 some more, but I have to up the voltage to go over ~860 core, and the increase in fan speed just isn't worth it to me. I get the feeling I could hit 1ghz with it if I wanted to.

Agreed
Dec 30, 2003

The price of meat has just gone up, and your old lady has just gone down


Dogen posted:

I want to overclock this 580 some more, but I have to up the voltage to go over ~860 core, and the increase in fan speed just isn't worth it to me. I get the feeling I could hit 1ghz with it if I wanted to.

That was exactly my experience, and I figure if I flashed a higher voltage BIOS I could get high 900s rather than the compromise 920mhz, but now that my core's dialed in I really feel like there's room for the memory. It's EVGA's implementation of the reference cooler, which means stuff is all thermal-interface (well, thermal pad - hey, it works fine) attached and stays cool, and I'm at 920core/1840shaders and 4200mhz effective GDDR5 (or 1050mhz base/2100mhz ddr), feels like there's room on the RAM. I don't need it, I don't think it'd really do anything more, but the core is rock solid now and I just want to tweak it more really.

Dogen
May 5, 2002

Bury my body down by the highwayside, so that my old evil spirit can get a Greyhound bus and ride


The process never ends. Even though I'm out of real stuff to tweak, I added my old monitor back into the mix to play video or whatever while I am working, and was delighted to discover I had to do some tweaking to get power saving to work right with two monitors hooked up.

Also I added a webcam to send pictures of me and the cats to my wife (they have appointed themselves my legal assistants since I started working at home), but that didn't involve a lot of tweaking.

BrandNew
May 16, 2007

Get me my BLUE WINDBREAKER!

So is there anyway using afterburner to unlock the core/memory clock further? I seem to have gotten my 6870 pretty easily up to 1000 core and 1250 memory with a slight increase in voltage. But thats as far as i can go with afterburner right now.

Dogen
May 5, 2002

Bury my body down by the highwayside, so that my old evil spirit can get a Greyhound bus and ride


BrandNew posted:

So is there anyway using afterburner to unlock the core/memory clock further? I seem to have gotten my 6870 pretty easily up to 1000 core and 1250 memory with a slight increase in voltage. But thats as far as i can go with afterburner right now.

http://forums.guru3d.com/showthread.php?t=338906

This explains how to go past the official limits. May or may not work.

betterinsodapop
Apr 4, 2004

64:1

I got my EVGA 560ti 448 Classified (not the Ultra, welp) up to 900Mhz on stock voltage, no artifacts. I could try to squeeze out some more, but I'm not sure how far to go and I don't want to have to change voltage.

This is a pretty sweet little card, but it does run a bit hot and loud with its non-reference cooling. To anybody else running this card, I'd recommend adding a side intake case fan (if you have the space.) Since adding the side fan to my case, the GPU hasn't gone over 70C under load.

BrandNew
May 16, 2007

Get me my BLUE WINDBREAKER!

Dogen posted:

http://forums.guru3d.com/showthread.php?t=338906

This explains how to go past the official limits. May or may not work.

It did, thanks.

Dogen
May 5, 2002

Bury my body down by the highwayside, so that my old evil spirit can get a Greyhound bus and ride


BrandNew posted:

It did, thanks.

Cool. It's weird those limits are set so low; my 580 is tagged to go up to 1500, as though it could ever get that high.

BrandNew
May 16, 2007

Get me my BLUE WINDBREAKER!

Dogen posted:

Cool. It's weird those limits are set so low; my 580 is tagged to go up to 1500, as though it could ever get that high.

Sadly it seems like 1k core clock is its wall anyways, even increasing the voltage a bunch it still gets some artifacting. At these numbers its already on par performance wise with a stock 6950 anyways so im pretty happy with it.

redeyes
Sep 14, 2002
I LOVE THE WHITE STRIPES!

I haven't overclocked in like 3-4 years so bear with my stupidity but I just got an Asus P8Z68-V Pro/Gen3 mobo with a Core 2600k i7. I also got some Corsair XMS3 DDR3 1600. I figure I would just go into the cool EFI bios and change the memory speed to 1600 from 1333. So I did that and when I boot back up my clock speed is locked at 3.8Ghz. This cpu is supposed to range from like 3.4Ghz to 3.8Ghz when turbo boosting but now its just stuck on 3.8Ghz. I actually like it like this but all I did was change that memory setting.

What the hell is going on?

Factory Factory
Mar 19, 2010

Oh dear, oh my,
that shouldn't be said.


Whenever you overclock an Asus board, its internal logic goes "Welp, gonna get ready for all overclocking!" It's set the Turbo multiplier to "by all cores" mode, which locks all of the cores to the same frequency at the same time, and it's raised the power limits on Turbo Boost so that the maximum Turbo state is always on (except when idle, presumably).

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Dogen
May 5, 2002

Bury my body down by the highwayside, so that my old evil spirit can get a Greyhound bus and ride


redeyes posted:

I haven't overclocked in like 3-4 years so bear with my stupidity but I just got an Asus P8Z68-V Pro/Gen3 mobo with a Core 2600k i7. I also got some Corsair XMS3 DDR3 1600. I figure I would just go into the cool EFI bios and change the memory speed to 1600 from 1333. So I did that and when I boot back up my clock speed is locked at 3.8Ghz. This cpu is supposed to range from like 3.4Ghz to 3.8Ghz when turbo boosting but now its just stuck on 3.8Ghz. I actually like it like this but all I did was change that memory setting.

What the hell is going on?

Also, if you just want to have your memory be the right speed, you just need ot change it to use XMP in UEFI and it'll use the settings Corsair has provided. ASUS is pretty good about reading XMP in my experience.

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