Search Amazon.com:
Register a SA Forums Account here!
JOINING THE SA FORUMS WILL REMOVE THIS BIG AD, THE ANNOYING UNDERLINED ADS, AND STUPID INTERSTITIAL ADS!!!

You can: log in, read the tech support FAQ, or request your lost password. This dumb message (and those ads) will appear on every screen until you register! Get rid of this crap by registering your own SA Forums Account and joining roughly 150,000 Goons, for the one-time price of $9.95! We charge money because it costs us $3,400 per month for bandwidth bills alone, and since we don't believe in shoving popup ads to our registered users, we try to make the money back through forum registrations.
«10 »
  • Post
  • Reply
Dr Ozziemandius
Apr 28, 2011

Ozzie approves

Sixgun Strumpet and LifeSizePotato have posted some incredible rare old gun box threads lately, and we've seen more come and go in recent months. We need a thread to gather in and pay homage to all the great, rare old wonders of early firearm innovation and strange branches in firearm evolution that have passed through TFR's grateful hands.

Post up your early automatic wonders from The Continent, your weird Belgian vest-pocket guns and German mouse Mausers. All the strange looking guns with the unpronounceable names, in moon calibers nobody's heard of. Whether you own them now, or just used to. Got a detail strip thread somewhere or a link to some historical or educational tidbits about your gun? Link them bitches up! Let's create a repository of unique firearm history and information.


Let's see what kind of fantasy Museum of Firearm Oddities we could put together out of guns that have actually been owned by members at some point.

I could basically just insert a link to LSP's YouTube channel here, but

I have no really early or special guns to contribute, or I would.

Old slide action Savage .22s/l/lr with a box magazine. Patent date on the barrel is for Dec 25, 1906, and there's another on the magazine for April 28, 1908.


The 1909's usually have another pin coming through right above the half-moon looking part. Also, a much curvier buttplate and a rounded knob on the grip.










Takedown is super simple, just unscrew the thumscrew and it comes apart.


My personal favorite gun, a Winchester Model 1912, from 1913. It's a 20g, and was sent for a full conversion by Simmons sometime early on. It's got a full length rib, with hand-etched Simmons markings, the optional rib patterning, and the Simmons stock and forend. The barrel's also been cut down to 24". It is the sweetest shooting shotgun I've ever handled, and the most beautiful gun I own. It may not be a particularly innovative model, but it's a pretty rare version of the best pump shotgun ever, and I feel lucky as hell to have owned it.






Dr Ozziemandius fucked around with this message at Feb 19, 2012 around 16:43

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

Sixgun Strumpet
Feb 16, 2009

Oh, this gun I paid full market price for at an online auction visible to the entire internet?

Heh, I practically stole it.

I'm rather pleased indeed.

Dr Ozziemandius posted:

Old slide action Savage .22s/l/lr with a box magazine. Patent date on the barrel is for Dec 25, 1906, and there's another on the magazine for April 28, 1908.


That savage just makes me nuts, I want one so bad.

Here's some shots of my early automatics. I can't profess to truly be in a competition with LSP. All of my early automatics and wacky guns are targets of opportunity really.









Pictured:

Bergmann-Bayard m.1910 which served the Danish army in WW1, later converted to a m.1910/21 after the war. Retired in favor of the Hi-Power.

Dreyse 1907, very similar in appearance if not mechanism to JMB's FN model 1900. This little .32acp actually saw a lot of use by the German Militia in ww2, and later in some of the more last ditch units Germany put together. Consequently there are quite a few of them around. Fun fact: The Swiss Guard used these until 1990.

Colt 1903 Pocket Hammer, with no safety at all and being larger then the 1903 pocket hammerless, on top of having the external hammer to snag on clothing, this gun only had one thing going for it: it was chambered in .38acp. I need to get this apart and show the inner workings, it isn't really what you would think. I personally put this in the "wacky early automatic" camp because it is sort of a speedbump on the road to modern automatics.

DrakeriderCa
Feb 3, 2005

But I'm a real cowboy!

Your Model 12 is still the most beautiful pumpgun I've ever seen. I'm still sooooo jealous.

To contribute, I present to you the Gevarm E2 Takedown.



It was a .22lr semi-auto rifle made by Gevarm, a French company for those who haven't heard. They were very popular in Canada because they were quite rugged and cheap. The E2 takedown is an especially awesome model, because:

1) It's an open-bolt design with a very small number of moving parts. There is no ejector, no extractor and no firing pin. The "firing pin" is a ridge machined into the face of the bolt that strikes the entire base of the cartridge, providing two ignition points and ensuring adequate function. The firearm operates on gas extraction, which means that the action's cycling is timed to allow the gas pressure from the expanding gasses in the barrel to push the casing out of the chamber and bounce out of the port on it's own time.

2) The takedown mechanism is exceptionally simple. There is a threaded bolt that runs the length of the forestock, and it's the only thing holding the barrel in the receiver. Unscrew the bolt and the rifle separates into two pieces of roughly equivalent size. If need be, the action can then be locked with a padlock but restored to action in under a minute.

3) It's just so darn happy to be a gun!

Miso Beno
Apr 29, 2004

Try to Catch Me Ridin' Dirty


DrakeriderCa posted:

Your Model 12 is still the most beautiful pumpgun I've ever seen. I'm still sooooo jealous.

To contribute, I present to you the Gevarm E2 Takedown.



It was a .22lr semi-auto rifle made by Gevarm, a French company for those who haven't heard. They were very popular in Canada because they were quite rugged and cheap. The E2 takedown is an especially awesome model, because:

1) It's an open-bolt design with a very small number of moving parts. There is no ejector, no extractor and no firing pin. The "firing pin" is a ridge machined into the face of the bolt that strikes the entire base of the cartridge, providing two ignition points and ensuring adequate function. The firearm operates on gas extraction, which means that the action's cycling is timed to allow the gas pressure from the expanding gasses in the barrel to push the casing out of the chamber and bounce out of the port on it's own time.

2) The takedown mechanism is exceptionally simple. There is a threaded bolt that runs the length of the forestock, and it's the only thing holding the barrel in the receiver. Unscrew the bolt and the rifle separates into two pieces of roughly equivalent size. If need be, the action can then be locked with a padlock but restored to action in under a minute.

3) It's just so darn happy to be a gun!



I have fired this gun and it is made entirely out of ridiculousness.

DrakeriderCa
Feb 3, 2005

But I'm a real cowboy!

Miso Beno posted:

I have fired this gun and it is made entirely out of ridiculousness.

It doesn't help that the guy who owned it before me cut it down to something like an 8" length of pull for his son.

Dr Ozziemandius
Apr 28, 2011

Ozzie approves

Sixgun Strumpet posted:

All of my early automatics and wacky guns are targets of opportunity really.


Those are the best kind. They're like little nuggets of joy.



DrakeriderCa posted:

Your Model 12 is still the most beautiful pumpgun I've ever seen. I'm still sooooo jealous.

To contribute, I present to you the Gevarm E2 Takedown.

3) It's just so darn happy to be a gun!




It's just the happiest li'l gun ever! It's amazing how simple a design can be.

DrakeriderCa
Feb 3, 2005

But I'm a real cowboy!

Dr Ozziemandius posted:

Those are the best kind. They're like little nuggets of joy.



It's just the happiest li'l gun ever! It's amazing how simple a design can be.

This is one of the reasons why I love guns so much. The designs can be like a swiss watch, or they can be elegantly simple. I can appreciate the relative complexity of both.

moosepoop
Mar 9, 2007

Get well soon!

The silly trigger mechanism alone should make the luger fit in this category

My P08 is from 1933 and it is a pretty princess.


Mauser P08 by Heintron, on Flickr

Gtab
Dec 9, 2003
I am a horrible person, disregard my posts.

Dr Ozziemandius posted:







Stunningly beautiful wood.

widefault
Mar 16, 2009


I have a few I'd call odd, or at least unique.

FN 1900, the first semi-auto to use a slide.


The Frommer 1912, otherwise known as the Stop. Uses a long recoil action like the Browning Auto 5 and Remington Model 8/81.


Husqvarna 1907, a copy of the FN 1903. It was used by the Swedes, retired, then brought back into service when issues surfaced with the Lahti. It is a scaled up version of the Colt 1903 with only minor changes.


Remington Model 8, arguably the first semi-auto rifle and origin of the AK's safety lever.


This is more of an oddball, but it is an Argentinian 1911, converted to .22lr, and used by Buenos Aires police as a training tool. The conversion is based on the Colt Ace, but shares no parts.


Sauer 1913. Not all that rare, but look at it. It's like an Art-Deco Spacegun.

Sixgun Strumpet
Feb 16, 2009

Oh, this gun I paid full market price for at an online auction visible to the entire internet?

Heh, I practically stole it.

I'm rather pleased indeed.

widefault posted:

I have a few I'd call odd, or at least unique.

FN 1900, the first semi-auto to use a slide.


The Frommer 1912, otherwise known as the Stop. Uses a long recoil action like the Browning Auto 5 and Remington Model 8/81.


Husqvarna 1907, a copy of the FN 1903. It was used by the Swedes, retired, then brought back into service when issues surfaced with the Lahti. It is a scaled up version of the Colt 1903 with only minor changes.


Remington Model 8, arguably the first semi-auto rifle and origin of the AK's safety lever.


This is more of an oddball, but it is an Argentinian 1911, converted to .22lr, and used by Buenos Aires police as a training tool. The conversion is based on the Colt Ace, but shares no parts.


Sauer 1913. Not all that rare, but look at it. It's like an Art-Deco Spacegun.


You should know that I blame you for my early automatic mania right now. I greatly desire every one of your guns for no reason I can account for.

Butch Cassidy
Jul 28, 2010

It was a sherbet that I'd screw this up!

I only have two and a half early pistols right now, but I think something else I own can fit in here.



When I was growing up, there was a small house just off Main Street inhabited by one pack-rat old widow. Her house was a repository for old boxes of trinkets that she refused to let go after the death of her husband. She died when I was in high school and her children came to town to clear the house.

My mother was the cop on duty when they first got to town and volunteered to help them while her shift was quiet. One of the sons asked her if she knew any trumpet players and she told him that I played. He asked her if I could care for an old trumpet and gave it to her when she said yes. It turns out their father had been a jazz musician and had traveled the country to settle in small town NH in his retirement. No one in their family played.

The horn is a H.N. White King Liberty made in the early end of the mid-20s.





It is an upper-end trumpet from an era when jazz horns were tuned ever so slightly differently from classical trumpets. It had a two-piece main tuning slide. If the middle segment was removed, the horn was converted from Bb to A.



This thing was an old New Englander's life and fed his family well after his own death. The finish wear shows years of use and repair.






There is a story to this valve cap. The original was lost down a vent cleaning between gigs and another musician gave the cap off his back-up horn to the owner so he could play his next set. The owner liked the story and never bothered to seek a proper replacement.



This horn matches one of my guns that I will bring into the thread later.



My favorite part of this whole trumpet, other than its absolutely beautiful tone, is the custom mouthpiece.



The old man had an overbite and commissioned a custom mouthpiece to measurements taken from his own mouth.

An early jazz trumpet with convertible key that was a genuine piece of American musical history was given to me by a few strangers simply because a cop swung by to express her condolences.

I was going to pose my weird old guns next to my trumpet because of The Rat and decided the horn's story was worth telling first.

Butch Cassidy fucked around with this message at Feb 20, 2012 around 18:40

DJExile
Jun 27, 2007

Saturday football was cool, then it got mainstream. Tuesday football is where it's at now.


Holy poo poo that is a loving awesome trumpet. Looks like it's in really nice shape for its age too.

kwantam
Mar 25, 2008

-=kwantam


Butch Cassidy posted:

I only have two and a half early pistols right now, but I think something else I own can fit in here.



When I was growing up, there was a small house just off Main Street inhabited by one pack-rat old widow. Her house was a repository for old boxes of trinkets that she refused to let go after the death of her husband. She died when I was in high school and her children came to town to clear the house.

My mother was the cop on duty when they first got to town and volunteered to help them while her shift was quiet. One of the sons asked her if she knew any trumpet players and she told him that I played. He asked her if I could care for an old trumpet and gave it to her when she said yes. It turns out their father had been a jazz musician and had traveled the country to settle in small town NH in his retirement. No one in their family played.

The horn is a H.N. White King Liberty made in the early end of the mid-20s.





It is an upper-end trumpet from an era when jazz horns were tuned ever so slightly differently from classical trumpets. It had a two-piece main tuning slide. If the middle segment was removed, the horn was converted from Bb to A.



This thing was an old New Englander's life and fed his family well after his own death. The finish wear shows years of use and repair.






There is a story to this valve cap. The original was lost down a vent cleaning between gigs and another musician gave the cap off his back-up horn to the owner so he could play his next set. The owner liked the story and never bothered to seek a proper replacement.



This horn matches one of my guns that I will bring into the thread later.



My favorite part of this whole trumpet, other than its absolutely beautiful tone, is the custom mouthpiece.



The old man had an overbite and commissioned a custom mouthpiece to measurements taken from his own mouth.

An early jazz trumpet with convertible key that was a genuine piece of American musical history was given to me by a few strangers simply because a cop swung by to express her condolences.

I was going to pose my weird old guns next to my trumpet because of The Rat and decided the horn's story was worth telling first.

This trumpet is loving awesome. I would play the poo poo out of that.

Chrome Gnome
Jan 21, 2009

yum tum yummy tum tay

drat. I have my father's H.N. White Cleveland Superior from the 50s - almost identical design, without the double slide - but the story just turns it into something else.



Now go buy another one and convert it into a blunderbuss.

Chrome Gnome fucked around with this message at Feb 20, 2012 around 21:47

Democratic Pirate
Feb 17, 2010



That trumpet makes me want to drive home and pick mine up from the closet and get good again/annoy my roommates at college. So awesome.

SadWhaleFamily
May 1, 2007



Butch Cassidy posted:

I only have two and a half early pistols right now, but I think something else I own can fit in here.

loving
awesome
trumpet


I started off playing trumpet, then moved to euphonium. I miss it sometimes.

Butch Cassidy
Jul 28, 2010

It was a sherbet that I'd screw this up!

SadWhaleFamily posted:

I started off playing trumpet, then moved to euphonium. I miss it sometimes.

So did I and moved back to trumpet once two other guys went to the euphonium. The big, downsy thing was fun to play and I scrounge about music boards every now and then looking for an H.N. white euphonium to go with the trumpet.

I'll dig out my FN 1910 tomorrow and try to get some good decent pictures before work.

Bummey
May 26, 2004

You are a filth wizard, friend only to the grumpig and the rattata.


Man, I really dig that trumpet. Mine is silver too, but not nearly as old or cool. I need to fix some of its parts, too.

SadWhaleFamily
May 1, 2007



Butch Cassidy posted:

So did I and moved back to trumpet once two other guys went to the euphonium. The big, downsy thing was fun to play and I scrounge about music boards every now and then looking for an H.N. white euphonium to go with the trumpet.

I'll dig out my FN 1910 tomorrow and try to get some good decent pictures before work.

I just looked up pricing on eBay for a decent Besson euphonium, and if I sold off all my guns I could afford it.

It is boggling to me how tempting a decision it is to do so.

mikerock
Oct 29, 2005

I know what you want. I know what you need.

Steyr-Hahn M1912




Ross M1910

The Archaic
Jul 6, 2003

Oh Coulson!

Finnish pistols anyone?

Sixgun Strumpet
Feb 16, 2009

Oh, this gun I paid full market price for at an online auction visible to the entire internet?

Heh, I practically stole it.

I'm rather pleased indeed.

I really love odd guns.







Good times spent with friends.


Sixgun Strumpet fucked around with this message at Feb 24, 2012 around 19:09

Sperglord Actual
Nov 27, 2011



Sixgun Strumpet posted:

I really love odd guns.

Sgt Fox
Dec 21, 2004

It's the buzzer I love the most. Makes me feel alive. Makes the V8's dead.


Probably the weirdest looking one I have.













Cyrano4747
Sep 25, 2006

skol'ko let, skol'ko zim!

That trumpet is the coolest thing in this thread.

I don't really have anything that really qualifies as a firearm oddity. Most of what I have is common enough that you've all seen them (or guns like them) enough that there's nothing really new there. I love my early autoloaders, but none of them are all that exceptional from a collecting standpoint.

I do have a couple of variants of common guns that are a bit unusual, though, so I guess they might fit in here.

First off, my Banner Mauser:



Looks like just another K98k? Well, it should. Think of it kind of like a prototype K98k. After World War I the Treaty of Versailles expressly forbade the German government from developing any new small arms. They more or less abided by that through the 20s, although there were numerous programs to modernize WW1-era G98s into a shorter, more carbine-like firearm. One of the big lessons of WW1 for gun makers had been that smaller guns are more handy and modern warfare really doesn't call for a 5 foot long rifle as a general issue arm, and cutting down older guns was one of the few ways they could keep up with more recent designs being put out by most other countries in the world.

Starting in the late 20s, however, it became clear that they would need a new firearm and commissioned Mauser to quietly look into modernizing the venerable G98. Note that this is all pre-Hitler. Mauser opted to go with the large ring receiver of the G98 rather than the small-ring design that had been used on the Kar98a and other WW1-era carbines, while fitting it with the more modern ladder sights that the Kar98a had used. One of the bigger changes was moving to a bent bolt handle, like the Kar98a, but with a different angle than the 98a had employed that made working the bolt yet easier and fixed a few clearance issues.

Beginning around 1932 (again, pre-Hitler) Mauser began producing these guns "for the civilian market" and, in 1933 (pre-Hitler continuing on as an existing program after he took office), the German government purchased a few ostensibly for the Rail Road and Postal Service. That might seem laughably transparent today, but it needs to be remembered that both the RR and Post Office served banking functions at that time, both transported large shipments of money or other valuables, and both had their own police sections charged with inspecting crimes inside their narrow jurisdictions. Buying up some rifles for them wasn't the sort of thing that would be at all unusual, certainly no more so than buying cops guns in the first place.

Of course, those guns were really for the military and were used as trials rifles. The military loved the design and began buying large numbers of the guns starting in 1933 and continuing on through 1934 (very much under Hitler now), something that was expedited by Hitler's kickstarting the secret rearmament of the German military. They gave Mauser some feedback on the design and, based on that, a few changes were made when the new K98k entered full production. If you look at the gun above, the most visible changes were that they deleted the finger groves in the stock and changed up how the stock springs held the barrel bands in place. Where the Banner Mauser uses an L-shaped leaf spring that is embedded into the stock (like on a G98) the K98k uses a flat leaf-spring that is held in a groove on the stock by the front band. They also changed up the angle that the bolt bends at just a touch, although the two designs are similar enough to be interchangable. Mine is a bolt mismatch but, interestingly, has an actual Banner Mauser bolt in it rather than the far more common K98k bolt you usually see on Banner rifle bolt m/m guns. The first actual K98ks came off the lines in 1934.



My rifle is 1934 dated and has the civilian Mauser banner logo on it, plus a very faded (due, unfortunately, to sanding) property stamp on the stock for the German Rail Service. It is also easily the nicest Mauser I have ever shot. The bolt is like goddamned butter, and the general quality level of the machining is crazy even for Mauser. It's basically a military rifle produced with all the fit and finish of a higher-end commercial rifle from the mid 30s. As a side note, once rearmament became open in later years the German military used these like any other K98k. It's even possible to get Russian captured guns that are a mix of K98k parts sitting on a Banner Mauser receiver.

Second, my Finnish m28.



An m28 by itself isn't that exceptional of a gun. I'm pretty sure there are at least 4 on TFR alone. It's the model that was used by the Finnish National Guard during the Winter War and is a distinctly Finnish redesign of the Mosin Nagant using a mix of old parts off Imperial Russian Mosins plus new barrels made either in Finland or Switzerland. Mine has a barrel on it made by SIG.

Uncommon, certainly, and kind of neat because it's the type of gun used by Simo Häyhä for his rifle kills, but not really an oddity. What makes this one a bit more unusual is the stock. If you look to the rear you will notice that it has two rear sling slots, one above the other. This type of stock is usually referred to as a "ski trooper's stock," as the extra cutout was put in to stabilize the gun for travel by people wearing skis. They aren't all that common, and mine is one of the few examples that I've ever seen in person. I understand that they're out there, though, so if you look enough you could probably find one. Not super rare, but certainly not something you see every day.

Incidentally, I FINALLY found out how the gently caress that second sling slot works, something that took me years to dig up. Basically, you run the dog-collar of your Mosin sling through both holes, which converts it from having a vertical orientation (where the sling comes off the bottom of the stock) to a horizontal one with the sling coming straight out the middle of the stock, like on a K98k. Arranged like this you can pull the stock flat against your back so that you can use both hands for other things, like using ski poles.

Cyrano4747 fucked around with this message at Feb 25, 2012 around 17:32

Chill_Bebop
Jun 20, 2007

Waffle SS





My old FIE Bronco was pretty bizarre



Do C96s count?

Bedbouncer
Apr 9, 2008

with the bird I'll share this lonely view


widefault posted:

Remington Model 8, arguably the first semi-auto rifle and origin of the AK's safety lever.


Also one of the few guns to use the long recoil system. Because of that and the gun's weight it has a surprisingly light recoil.

My dad has one of these, obtained from his dad.

Frank Hamer, the Texas sheriff who got Bonnie & Clyde, owned and preferred a custom 15-rd Model 8.

ninjagrips
Mar 19, 2007


C96's count for ANYTHING.

Hi guys, by the way! Long time sporadic goon, don't post much at all, just felt compelled to this time since I drooled on my keyboard a little from that C96 photo.

Ya'll have some weird awesome stuff!!

SadWhaleFamily
May 1, 2007



The closest I can come to a firearm oddity is my commercial, 1980s production Colt Service Model Ace.



(Seen here with factory checkered wood grips with Colt medallion, chilling on my dust-jacketless hardcover copy of Mockingjay by Suzanne Collins)

The Colt Service Model Ace is, essentially, a short-stroke piston-operated semi-auto rimfire pistol. The oddity about it, other than being a 1911 chambered in .22LR, is that it has a unique operating mechanism, called the "floating chamber." This differs from the original line of Colt Ace .22LR pistols precisely for this design feature, and it gained the designation "Service Model" to denote the mechanism. It was devised to, apparently, more closely mimic the felt recoil of .45ACP, though it also serves as the primary auto-loading functioning of the gun. This allows the entirety of the pistol to match the weight of a full-size 1911, without needing to eliminate weight in the slide for the lower operating pressures of .22LR.

An early advertisement for the Colt Service Model Ace claims that, with the floating chamber, "recoil has been increased four times [over that of the original Ace], simulating the recoil found in the .45 caliber Government Model Automatic Pistol".

It really doesn't. It just feels like shooting .22LR out of a 1911. Maybe almost like shooting light .32ACP loads. I guess it snaps a bit differently than straight-blowback .22LR guns.

But the floating chamber operation was designed by convicted murderer David M. "Carbine" Williams, most famous for designing the US Carbine, Caliber .30, M1.

SadWhaleFamily fucked around with this message at Apr 22, 2012 around 05:32

infrared35
Jan 12, 2005



Colt Comp Commander: Stainless full-size frame, matte blued commander-length slide and barrel with threaded compensator to bring the overall slide length back up to government size. Not very many were made, from what I understand. Got it for a seriously good price, but ended up taking pity on the guy I bought it from and sold it back to him for the same price a few years later.

Gray Stormy
Dec 19, 2006



infrared35 posted:

Colt Comp Commander: Stainless full-size frame, matte blued commander-length slide and barrel with threaded compensator to bring the overall slide length back up to government size. Not very many were made, from what I understand. Got it for a seriously good price, but ended up taking pity on the guy I bought it from and sold it back to him for the same price a few years later.



Nooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo

DrakeriderCa
Feb 3, 2005

But I'm a real cowboy!

Gray Stormy posted:

Nooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo

NNNNNOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO
That Colt Comp Commander is my favourite 1911 ever. Seriously. Ever.

infrared35
Jan 12, 2005



DrakeriderCa posted:

NNNNNOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO
That Colt Comp Commander is my favourite 1911 ever. Seriously. Ever.

Meh. Maybe it's because I'm not a huge 1911 guy to begin with, but it never impressed me with anything but its rarity. It wasn't a gun that stood out on its own merits. The trigger was decent but not phenomenal, the comp didn't seem to make any difference, it wouldn't feed JHPs at all until I bought some McCormick Powermags, and without Loc-Titing the FLGR it would unscrew itself so you'd have to keep re-rightening it during a range session.

Grand Prize Winner
Feb 19, 2007


Would any of you guys happen to have a LeMat revolver? The thing seriously weirds me out.

Sixgun Strumpet
Feb 16, 2009

Oh, this gun I paid full market price for at an online auction visible to the entire internet?

Heh, I practically stole it.

I'm rather pleased indeed.

Grand Prize Winner posted:

Would any of you guys happen to have a LeMat revolver? The thing seriously weirds me out.

Found one of the repros at a gunshow once. I considered it, but it's essentially just a really expensive wall hanger.

CAT ON THE COUCH!!
Mar 30, 2009

Hark!! Yonder goon hast defamed a lady!! Fear not, CoTC to the rescue!!

lol ponytar


Sixgun Strumpet
Feb 16, 2009

Oh, this gun I paid full market price for at an online auction visible to the entire internet?

Heh, I practically stole it.

I'm rather pleased indeed.

CAT ON THE COUCH!! posted:



Do you have a pump action AK?

I like turtles
Aug 6, 2009

"Wouldn't want to see an angry turtle with a gun, would ya? "

Well...


Grand Prize Winner posted:

Would any of you guys happen to have a LeMat revolver? The thing seriously weirds me out.

Cabelas has repros, http://www.cabelas.com/pistols-lemat-revolver.shtml

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

CAT ON THE COUCH!!
Mar 30, 2009

Hark!! Yonder goon hast defamed a lady!! Fear not, CoTC to the rescue!!

lol ponytar


Sixgun Strumpet posted:

Do you have a pump action AK?

I don't, thankfully.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • Post
  • Reply
«10 »