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doomisland
Oct 5, 2004



Yeah, if you go to the IP of your host in a web browser it will have a link to download the client. That doesn't cost you anything. The only things you will pay for are the vSphere Server and whatever licensing for the hosts + features.

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evil_bunnY
Apr 2, 2003



doomisland posted:

vSphere Server and whatever licensing for the hosts + features.
You mean vCenter.

doomisland posted:

Yeah, I can never seem to keep the names straight...
Don't feel bad, no one can.

evil_bunnY fucked around with this message at Mar 6, 2012 around 00:15

doomisland
Oct 5, 2004



evil_bunnY posted:

You mean vCenter.

Yeah, I can never seem to keep the names straight...

Rexxed
May 1, 2010

Dis is amazing!
I gotta try dis!


doomisland posted:

Yeah, if you go to the IP of your host in a web browser it will have a link to download the client. That doesn't cost you anything. The only things you will pay for are the vSphere Server and whatever licensing for the hosts + features.

Alright, I was confused by the evaluation timer on the vSphere client, which was obviously not for the vSphere client, but for the ESXi host itself. Now that the registration key has been added, there's no more timer. Thanks for the replies!

Martytoof
Feb 25, 2003



Awesome.

Awesome to
the MAX.




doomisland posted:

Yeah, I can never seem to keep the names straight...

This is me. "God drat it why isn't my google search coming up with anything??" *googles "vSphere Server" quite literally every single time*

doomisland
Oct 5, 2004



I was going over pricing for stuff and it was a terrible morning since every other sentence I was saying when trying to explain to a coworker was a mouthful. Though one of the vendors I talked to kept on calling the Remote Office and Branch Office license the ROBO license. Beep.

Mierdaan
Sep 14, 2004



I've got a shot at getting Jumbo Frames enabled this weekend since we have a shutdown scheduled for some electrical work. Is there an order of operations I need to be concerned with, as far as enabling it on the switch, SAN and in vSphere? I'm assuming as long as I get it switched over everywhere to MTU = 9000 and can verify it with a
code:
vmkping -d -s 9000 {filer}
that I'm okay to bring VMs back up?

I'm also not sure if I need to modify the vmkernel interface directly too or just esxcfg-vswitch -m 9000 the vswitch.

edit: ESXi 4.1 with NetApp NFS datastores, Compellent gear getting installed in the near future though so this is more in preparation for that.

Misogynist
Jul 14, 2003



Mierdaan posted:

I'm also not sure if I need to modify the vmkernel interface directly too or just esxcfg-vswitch -m 9000 the vswitch.
You definitely need to modify the vmknic as well; its MTU defaults to 1500.

Kachunkachunk
Jun 6, 2011


I think you still want the physical switches to be a bit more than the vSwitches and portgroups to account for overhead. And I don't think vmkping accounts for such overhead either, so it might fail by 14 bytes.

You can do, for example:
vmk0: 9000
vSwitch0: 9000
Your physical switch: 9100.

There should be a KB article along those lines; going 100 extra is just a safe ballpark figure.

And if anyone can call bullshit on it, feel free. I'm not terribly strong with my networking.

Mierdaan
Sep 14, 2004



Kachunkachunk posted:

And if anyone can call bullshit on it, feel free. I'm not terribly strong with my networking.

Me neither. Someday I'll get to stop being jack of all trades, master of none, right guys?

Misogynist
Jul 14, 2003



Edit: dumb

Misogynist fucked around with this message at Mar 6, 2012 around 21:40

feld
Feb 11, 2008

Out of nowhere its.....

Feldman



We have relations here with Quest who owns the vRanger product. Hell, it's developed a few blocks away. I haven't begged for a demo or trial license, though.

Wonder_Bread
Dec 21, 2006
Fresh Baked Goodness!


click for big

I feel as if something is wrong here, but it shouldn't be. Each VBA has 2GB of RAM and two vCPUs. The backups are all being done on an isolated gigabit network with verified near-line speeds. Pushing data to/from the target outside of PHD hits normal speeds. Yet, all my initial backups (and replications) take forever. The selected task has been running since 3pm yesterday...

e: Also you can see the weird issue I'm having where it very rarely states speeds and estimated time left. Which further makes me wonder WTF is going on. I've got a call with my sales rep tomorrow and going to try to have him pull an engineer in.

Wonder_Bread fucked around with this message at Mar 6, 2012 around 22:56

luminalflux
May 27, 2005



Anyone have any hard numbers on performance gains/losses using jumbo frames on iSCSI VMware storage and vMotion over GbE?

I found some good numbers (like single percent increase in performance), but they were invalidated by the guy having a dodgy switch. The documentation for my HP P4000 says "likely not needed" but I'm curious about how slight the gains are.

adorai
Nov 2, 2002

10/27/04 Never forget

luminalflux posted:

Anyone have any hard numbers on performance gains/losses using jumbo frames on iSCSI VMware storage and vMotion over GbE?

I found some good numbers (like single percent increase in performance), but they were invalidated by the guy having a dodgy switch. The documentation for my HP P4000 says "likely not needed" but I'm curious about how slight the gains are.
There's probably not a lot of speed difference, your biggest change will be CPU utilization. Given the power of most VMware implementations and the likelyhood that you have a TOE card on your SAN you won't see much of a change as a percentage of CPU utilization.

Wonder_Bread
Dec 21, 2006
Fresh Baked Goodness!

Nevermind. I have no idea. This turned out to not be the problem.

Wonder_Bread fucked around with this message at Mar 7, 2012 around 02:25

BelDin
Jan 29, 2001


Mierdaan posted:

Me neither. Someday I'll get to stop being jack of all trades, master of none, right guys?

Good luck with that. VMware is like InfoSec. It's the IT generalist's specialization. It definitely to be jack of all trades, master of many in this area. My experience may be different, but I'm expected to perform minor miracles every day, know more than the admins about their own server functions, and more about networking than anyone else where I work.

Rhymenoserous
May 23, 2008

I can also sing.


BelDin posted:

Good luck with that. VMware is like InfoSec. It's the IT generalist's specialization. It definitely to be jack of all trades, master of many in this area. My experience may be different, but I'm expected to perform minor miracles every day, know more than the admins about their own server functions, and more about networking than anyone else where I work.

Yep. To be a good Vmware administrator you need to..

1. Know how the physical servers work.
2. Know how the OS's use resource.
3. Know how networks work (specifically vlanning and mtu if you are dealing with legacy networks).
4. Know how storage works.
5. Everything else I forgot to list.

On the upside: Knowing VMWare is a hot thing right now and I'm on my third implementation (Started with ESX 3 in a webhosting environ, moved on to 4.1 in government, and now I'm doing a 5.0 deployment back in the corporate world).

The first one I was just a line admin implementing someone elses plans. The second time was me helping design but not doing any of the implementation. The third one I've done it all myself from the ground up and so far it's the best one yet.

Though I want to know how to get my hierarchical view back for my VM cluster so I can see what is where at a glance.

Anyone know how?

For a visual of what I'm talking about. I dropped everything into a cluster and this was the result:

Is there any way to go back to



host
-Virtual machine
host 2
-Virtual machine

Rhymenoserous fucked around with this message at Mar 7, 2012 around 16:46

Mierdaan
Sep 14, 2004



BelDin posted:

Good luck with that. VMware is like InfoSec. It's the IT generalist's specialization. It definitely to be jack of all trades, master of many in this area. My experience may be different, but I'm expected to perform minor miracles every day, know more than the admins about their own server functions, and more about networking than anyone else where I work.

Yeah, I get - and even enjoy - that about virtualization. I've always liked having a broad understanding of systems, it's only frustrating when the lack of time spent in any given area leaves me with a shallower understanding of an issue than I want, and I don't have the time to really dive into it.

Erwin
Feb 17, 2006



Rhymenoserous posted:

Though I want to know how to get my hierarchical view back for my VM cluster so I can see what is where at a glance.

Anyone know how?

For a visual of what I'm talking about. I dropped everything into a cluster and this was the result:

Is there any way to go back to



host
-Virtual machine
host 2
-Virtual machine

This is how it looks with DRS turned on and fully automated. I guess it encourages you to think of VMs as just running on a cluster and not worrying about which host they're on.

Rhymenoserous
May 23, 2008

I can also sing.


Erwin posted:

This is how it looks with DRS turned on and fully automated. I guess it encourages you to think of VMs as just running on a cluster and not worrying about which host they're on.

Well I don't like it.

Also I only have it set to make suggestions, not do any active moving.

Mierdaan
Sep 14, 2004



We don't use DRS at all and that's how it looks for me.

You can go to the Virtual Machines tab of the cluster if you want to see where all your guests are

three
Aug 9, 2007




Why don't you use DRS?

fatjoint
Sep 28, 2005
Fatjoint

Rhymenoserous posted:

Well I don't like it.

Also I only have it set to make suggestions, not do any active moving.

Click on one of the host servers in the cluster and click virtual machines to see which guests are actually running on the host.

There's very little reason to disable DRS automation, at its lowest level of automation, a guest will only be moved off a host if significant resources would be freed by doing so.

I've only been in one scenario where automation needed to disabled, that was in a stretched cluster - i.e. a cluster whose hosts are separated miles from each other.

Mierdaan
Sep 14, 2004



three posted:

Why don't you use DRS?

4.0 Essentials Plus kit.

Misogynist
Jul 14, 2003



fatjoint posted:

I've only been in one scenario where automation needed to disabled, that was in a stretched cluster - i.e. a cluster whose hosts are separated miles from each other.
Even then, since 4.1 you're probably better off just setting affinity rules. They were really designed for metro clustering configurations.

Rhymenoserous
May 23, 2008

I can also sing.


fatjoint posted:

Click on one of the host servers in the cluster and click virtual machines to see which guests are actually running on the host.

Yeah that's just a pain in the rear end, I wish it would show the hierarchical view ala a non clustered vcenter implementation. It tells you a lot more at a glance.

FISHMANPET
Mar 3, 2007



Is this... normal?


This is a machine with 12 physical cores (two hexacore Intels) running ESX 4.1. The dark red line is CPU usage, and you can see the average is only 18%, but some of the cores have these 100% spikes, even though the averages on all the cores is pretty low . Is this something I should worry about? Is there a way to see which VMs are causing the spike?

Misogynist
Jul 14, 2003



FISHMANPET posted:

Is this... normal?


This is a machine with 12 physical cores (two hexacore Intels) running ESX 4.1. The dark red line is CPU usage, and you can see the average is only 18%, but some of the cores have these 100% spikes, even though the averages on all the cores is pretty low . Is this something I should worry about? Is there a way to see which VMs are causing the spike?
Assuming you're not seeing application hiccups due to high ready times, having your CPU spike to 100% means that your processing isn't being bound by memory or I/O wait times. It's only a good thing.

Nitr0
Aug 17, 2005

IT'S FREE REAL ESTATE


Are you running virtual desktops? Could be updates all at the same time maybe? That's not a very high spike so it's probably something simple and normal.

This might be overkill for your organization but we just bought a license to http://www.vkernel.com. You can specifically have it send you reports for any large jumps in resources and lets you drill down really easily to see where it's happening.

FISHMANPET
Mar 3, 2007



Nitr0 posted:

Are you running virtual desktops? Could be updates all at the same time maybe? That's not a very high spike so it's probably something simple and normal.

This might be overkill for your organization but we just bought a license to http://www.vkernel.com. You can specifically have it send you reports for any large jumps in resources and lets you drill down really easily to see where it's happening.

No, it's just got a couple DCs, mail server, Kerberos, LDAP/DHCP, and a couple other random infrastructure things, nothing big. I guess I won't worry about it until I see problems.

My other server has two DCs, a file server, and two SCCM servers (meaning SCCM + SQL on each) and that has a slightly higher average usage, but no spikes like that.

Dilbert As FUCK
Sep 8, 2007

You either take control of who you are and fight day and night for what you might be. OR, you just accept the 'This is how the world works might as well make the best of it, and go with the flow'. What do you choose to do with your life or give up on your dreams?


Are you running iscsi by chance? I see those hiccups sometimes with iscsi, software iscsi has to offload on CPU so seeing spikes is somewhat normal. As long as your VM's seem to me functioning fine I wouldn't lose too much sleep over it

stubblyhead
Sep 13, 2007

That is treason, Johnny!

I got an email today about vmware user group regional conference coming up in a few months (http://www.vmug.com/p/cm/ld/fid=121). It's a one-day thing, but there's no details yet for my local one beyond the date. I should be able to get work to pay for it, but what's the registration cost like? Are these things even worth going to?

luminalflux
May 27, 2005



I went to one a few months back when they held the first one in Stockholm. It boiled down to boring IT people caring a lot about very boring stuff (from my perspective as a dev/sysadmin working with web apps on linux). It's one of those events where the event itself was boring as gently caress but the network was really really interesting and useful. Then again, they've promised more specific meets geared towards different areas of virtualization so it might be useful.

In this case, the event itself was free, dunno if all are. Walked out of there with a cool vMug, some good contacts, eval license for VEAAM. Also a free lunch and free beer

evil_bunnY
Apr 2, 2003



luminalflux posted:

I went to one a few months back when they held the first one in Stockholm.
haha I was pondering going to that same event.

adorai
Nov 2, 2002

10/27/04 Never forget

anyone running a VMware cluster on AMD? we are going to eval a few HP DL165C 1U servers to possibly use in our next refresh this spring. We figure 16 "core"/128GB/4x 1Gbe is about right density wise. Just curious if I should expect disappointment from our eval.

Dilbert As FUCK
Sep 8, 2007

You either take control of who you are and fight day and night for what you might be. OR, you just accept the 'This is how the world works might as well make the best of it, and go with the flow'. What do you choose to do with your life or give up on your dreams?


adorai posted:

anyone running a VMware cluster on AMD? we are going to eval a few HP DL165C 1U servers to possibly use in our next refresh this spring. We figure 16 "core"/128GB/4x 1Gbe is about right density wise. Just curious if I should expect disappointment from our eval.

Just use anandtech for reviews
http://www.anandtech.com/tag/IT
they give fair reviews of stuff.

I use some Opterons, they perform just as I would expect, amd is more price performance, intel does offer nicer power but at a price

http://www.anandtech.com/show/5058/...interlagos-6200
http://www.anandtech.com/show/5279/...a-closer-look/7

are reviews of the 16 core cpus

Dilbert As FUCK fucked around with this message at Mar 9, 2012 around 02:42

adorai
Nov 2, 2002

10/27/04 Never forget

I have a hard time taking some of these reviews seriously, specifically when I don't think the reviewers really understand datacenter needs. For instance, having 16 integer cores vs 8 hyperthreaded cores has some tangible benefits in a typical high density VMware environment where you see 1000s of idling VMs vs simply maxing out the processors and reporting which ones complete the workload faster. CPU contention is a real concern, and whether you solve it by throwing more cores at the problem or simply throwing raw compute at it to get rid of workload faster can result in a very different experience. I'm really interested in anecdotal experience, even if I run the risk of calling in the fan boys.

anandtech in particular has great reviews regarding raw performance, but I am not convinced that carries over to real life datacenter needs. I don't even know how you would measure it beyond throwing a certain load on VM after VM until you hit a certian CPU ready threshold.

FISHMANPET
Mar 3, 2007



adorai posted:

I have a hard time taking some of these reviews seriously, specifically when I don't think the reviewers really understand datacenter needs. For instance, having 16 integer cores vs 8 hyperthreaded cores has some tangible benefits in a typical high density VMware environment where you see 1000s of idling VMs vs simply maxing out the processors and reporting which ones complete the workload faster. CPU contention is a real concern, and whether you solve it by throwing more cores at the problem or simply throwing raw compute at it to get rid of workload faster can result in a very different experience. I'm really interested in anecdotal experience, even if I run the risk of calling in the fan boys.

anandtech in particular has great reviews regarding raw performance, but I am not convinced that carries over to real life datacenter needs. I don't even know how you would measure it beyond throwing a certain load on VM after VM until you hit a certian CPU ready threshold.

I'm tempted to go with the Sandy Bridge Xeons that Intel just released and call it a day. Dell came out with some servers that look pretty amazing. A Dell sales guy who we've worked with to look at some storage offered to give us a presentation about the new servers, and my boss is really interested, so this might make this an easy choice.

One step closer to real honest to god virtualization

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Kachunkachunk
Jun 6, 2011


Having a ton of cores is good for fighting thread contention, but you still have shared cache. You'll kind of have to know how the apps behave and use that to decide on whether that will be your next point of contention, or not. And unfortunately it's pretty hard to figure out without real testing (as opposed to reading documentation).

Also I'm really not a fan of AMD's errata and would go with Intel wherever possible.

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