Search Amazon.com:
Register a SA Forums Account here!
JOINING THE SA FORUMS WILL REMOVE THIS BIG AD, THE ANNOYING UNDERLINED ADS, AND STUPID INTERSTITIAL ADS!!!

You can: log in, read the tech support FAQ, or request your lost password. This dumb message (and those ads) will appear on every screen until you register! Get rid of this crap by registering your own SA Forums Account and joining roughly 150,000 Goons, for the one-time price of $9.95! We charge money because it costs us $3,400 per month for bandwidth bills alone, and since we don't believe in shoving popup ads to our registered users, we try to make the money back through forum registrations.
«65 »
  • Post
  • Reply
Mr. Despair
Nov 4, 2009


39 perfect posts with each roll.


This is actually just the OP i made for the nikon thread in the dorkroom with all the text deleted. the last post was all pulled from the pentax me superthread.






























Well, Canon has one, and we should too.

The Bodies

Nikon bodies can generally be divided into four categories, which is why comparing them with equivalent Canon bodies can get sorta confusing.

In terms of naming, entry-level and prosumer generally follow D 3x00, D5x00, or D7x00 (formerly Dxx), and compare roughly to Canon's xxxD series. Semi-pro bodies are Dxxx, and compare to Canon's xxD series. Pro bodies are Dx, and compare to Canon's xD lineup.

Entry-level bodies include the D3200 and D5200, and formerly the D40(x), D50, D60, and D5000, D5100, D3100, and D3000. They typically lack the autofocus screw (except the D50), which means they can't autofocus with screw-drive lenses (such as the excellent 50 1.8 and 85 1.8). They also can't meter old AI/AI-S lenses, although they can mount them. The D5100 and newer have the more current sensors that are far more capable of high iso.

Prosumer bodies include the D7000 and D7100, and formerly the D70(s), D80, and D90. The D70 could go either way, really. These bodies all have the AF screw, and most of them can meter AI/AI-S lenses. They can also all use their pop-up flash as a CLS commander.

Semi-pro bodies include the D600 and D800, and formerly D100, D200, D300, and D700. The build quality is significantly better (magnesium bodies), they have pretty good weather sealing, PC sockets, and basically all the nice little touches that make good cameras fun to use. There's a lot more buttons, meaning a lot less going into menus to change things. They also tend to feature faster/better AF, bigger buffers, and faster continuous shooting speed. All of them can meter AI/AI-S lenses, and all of them can use their pop-up flash as a CLS commander. The D800, D700 and D600 are full frame cameras, with the D800 and D600 featuring the newer, nicer sensors.

Pro bodies, at this point, are the D4, and formerly, the D1(x/h), and D2(x/h/hs) and D3 and D3x. They have an integrated vertical grip, and are basically awesome in every way something can be awesome. The D3, in DX crop mode, can shoot at eleven god drat frames per second. These don't feature pop-up flashes, so you'll need an SU-800, SB-800, or SB-900 if you need a CLS commander. Every aspect of these bodies is a head and shoulders above the semi-pro line (including the price).

The Lenses

There are a few basic categories of Nikon lenses. The first is DX/non-DX. DX lenses are intended for use on crop-sensor bodies, which is anything below the D700. They will mount and function on full-frame bodies, but the camera will enter 'DX crop mode', which essentially just uses a smaller center portion of the sensor to avoid what would otherwise be laffo vignetting. It also means you get smaller images, since it can't use the entire sensor, so this can be bad.

There are two types of autofocus used on current Nikon lenses, screw-drive and AF-S. People sometimes mistakenly call screw-drive AF-D - AF-D lenses can be screw drive, but not all screw drive lenses are AF-D (the D indicates that it reports distance information to the body). Screw-drive lenses will only autofocus on the D70 or above (and notably, not the D5000). AF-S lenses have the focusing motor in the lens itself, and will autofocus on any Nikon DSLR.

The last major category is G/non-G lenses. G lenses don't have an aperture ring. This isn't a big deal for most people, but it does mean you can't use them on a lot of older film bodies.

For older lenses, you might come across "Non-AI" or "Pre-AI" lenses. These will mount but not meter on the D40 and such. They will not mount on anything that can actually meter then without actual mechanical modification, and if you try to mount them anyways, you will probably break your AI indexing tab off your camera and get laughed at. The conversion isn't hard, you can do it at home with Dremel or send it out to get done by someone else for cheap.

The Flashes

Nikon's current flash technology is called iTTL. Their older TTL flashes will not work on current Nikon bodies, with the exception of the D100, which I don't think anybody is calling current. Nikon doesn't have that many flashes, so we may as well go through them individually.

SB-R200: This is meant to be used with their close-up kit, or as a tiny stick-anywhere remote flash. It can only be fired via CLS. Not only can it not be fired on a hotshoe, I don't think it even has a hotshoe. They're great for either the close-up work they were intended for, or for when you just need a tiny pop of light somewhere.

SB-400: This is, by all accounts, pretty worthless. I'm sure it fills the needs of some people, but it's basically a pop-up flash with a bounce head. Can't be triggered via CLS, nor can it be a CLS commander on bodies which either can't use their pop-up for that or lack a pop-up.

SB-600: This is their real entry-level flash. It can do CLS, has a bounce/swivel head, and basically all the things you'd expect from a hotshoe flash. It can't act as a CLS commander, though, but can be a CLS remote flash. It does, however, have a built-in wide-angle diffuser.

SB-800: Out of production now, but was/is awesome. It could be either a CLS commander or CLS remote, had a kickass built-in optical slave, a high-voltage port on the front to use with external battery packs, and an optional 5th-battery attachment for hilariously fast recycle times. It also featured a wide-angle diffuser and built-in bounce card, as well as dedicated modeling light button.

SB-900: The current five-hundred-dollar hotness. Advantages over the SB-800: Head zooms to 200mm, has options for distribution of light, improved/added gel holder, significantly better controls. There have been some reports of them overheating REALLY easily, which is unsurprising since they get the same recycle time with 4 batteries than the SB-800 got with 5.

One slight issue with Nikon flashes is that their locking mechanism doesn't work overly well on non-Nikon shoes, such as those found on lightstand adapters and such. The solution is to buy one of these, if your flash has a PC port or you're using CLS. They hold the flash tight enough that the shoe is likely to break off before the clamp does.

The Thread Title

On lenses with an aperture ring, on Nikon DSLRs, if you don't have the aperture stopped down to maximum (like f/22 or whatever), the camera will report an 'fEE' error and will refuse to take a picture. It's probably one of the most confusing and annoying errors for a newbie. Most modern lenses have locks on the aperture so you can just set it there and lock it. If you prefer to use the aperture ring to set your aperture, on the D200 at least, there's a custom setting in the "Command Dials" section that lets you do it this way.

Nikon Trivia

Nikon's lens division, Nikkor, has been around since before Nikon made cameras, or even existed. They used to, and still do, make microscope optics and things of that nature. Nikkor has made lenses for Leica screw-mount, among others.

When getting into the SLR market, Nippon Kogaku was trying to find a name for their new line of SLR cameras. They considered several, including 'Pentax', before settling on Nikon.

Nikon has a weird thing where their macro lenses are called 'Micro'. According to their '1001 Nights' page, which has a lot of great lens history on it, this was because their first close-up lens couldn't actually do 1:1 without an extension tube, only 1:2. Since they already made microscope optics, they figured they'd probably get called out for calling it a 'macro' lens when it actually wasn't, and 'Micro' just sorta stuck.

So, all that being said, here's a thread for discussion and questions of all things Nikon.

EDIT FOR CLS

CLS is Nikon's optically-based wireless flash system. Basically, you set up CLS-capable flashes as slaves (SB600/800/900/R200), and use either your pop-up flash or a CLS commander to fire them. You can use TTL metering, set the power manually, assign various flashes to various groups, etc. It's a cheap and easy way to use off-camera flash if your body supports using the pop-up as a commander. It works quite well indoors, and moderately well outdoors.

EDIT FOR LINKS
http://mir.com.my/rb/photography/photography.htm is an excellent resource for all things Nikon, both film bodies and also pretty much every lens they've ever made.

http://bythom.com is good too I guess, I don't go there much.

http://www.kenrockwell.com/nikon/compatibility-lens.htm

nielsm posted:

Nikon film bodies:

For some reason Nikon decided to give their film SLRs different names in US and Europe, so e.g. F80 and N80 is the same camera, just sold for Europe or US respectively. The exception being the pro series; F, F2, F3, F4, F5 and F6 are called the same all over the world.
Some early low-end models have very different EU/US names, e.g. F-801 is the same as N8008, but mostly it's just F swapped for N.

Anyway, some suggestions for Nikon cameras to stuff your lenses on if you like silver halides:

F4, F5 and F6 are all AF and AE professional cameras. Presumably they are really good.
F100 is the best prosumer model made. It does most things, at less cost than F5 or F6.
F90 is older than both F100, also does both kinds of AF, but doesn't work well with G lenses. I like my F90x. (F-801/N8008 is similar to F90, but has worse metering, worse AF, and doesn't handle in-lens AF motor.)
F80 also does a lot of things, but not as much. (It can't meter with non-CPU lenses, for one thing.) A bit newer than F100.
Don't bother with the rest, they are poo poo.

F3 is the king of Nikon manual focus SLRs. Does AE. (There is also F3AF which has an early AF system. It's rare.)
F2 and the original F are mostly historical artifacts by now, as far as I know.
FE and FM series should be good value choices for manual focus. FE does auto-exposure, FM does not.


Mightaswell posted:

I'd like to make note of a seldom mentioned Nikon camera with a unique feature set.

The Nikon FA
It's the only manual focus camera Nikon ever made that can matrix meter with all AI and AI-s lenses while also featuring A, S and M modes, as well as two P modes.

Also it has a closed loop exposure system that measures the actual light coming through the lens after the lens stops down an instant before making the exposure. This allows the camera to correct any calibration or error in the aperture mechanism of the lens.

It's analogous to the Canon A1, Olympus OM-2SP, and Pentax Super-A.

Mr. Despair fucked around with this message at Aug 25, 2013 around 16:34

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

SoundMonkey
Apr 22, 2006

"I am the modding."



This post reserved for some kind of updates.

nielsm
Jun 1, 2009

Not gonna wear that.

Nikon film bodies:

For some reason Nikon decided to give their film SLRs different names in US and Europe, so e.g. F80 and N80 is the same camera, just sold for Europe or US respectively. The exception being the pro series; F, F2, F3, F4, F5 and F6 are called the same all over the world.
Some early low-end models have very different EU/US names, e.g. F-801 is the same as N8008, but mostly it's just F swapped for N.

Anyway, some suggestions for Nikon cameras to stuff your lenses on if you like silver halides:

F4, F5 and F6 are all AF and AE professional cameras. Presumably they are really good.
F100 is the best prosumer model made. It does most things, at less cost than F5 or F6.
F90 is older than both F100, also does both kinds of AF, but doesn't work well with G lenses. I like my F90x. (F-801/N8008 is similar to F90, but has worse metering, worse AF, and doesn't handle in-lens AF motor.)
F80 also does a lot of things, but not as much. (It can't meter with non-CPU lenses, for one thing.) A bit newer than F100.
Don't bother with the rest, they are poo poo.

F3 is the king of Nikon manual focus SLRs. Does AE. (There is also F3AF which has an early AF system. It's rare.)
F2 and the original F are mostly historical artifacts by now, as far as I know.
FE and FM series should be good value choices for manual focus. FE does auto-exposure, FM does not.

Mr. Despair
Nov 4, 2009


39 perfect posts with each roll.



Add most of this to the op (the f75 is an excellent camera especially for it's price)

Krakkles
May 5, 2003



I will find an Fx camera someday.


(not FX, as in full frame, but Fx, as in F2/3/4/5/6.)

1st AD
Dec 3, 2004

Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu: sometimes passing just isn't an option.


My first SLR was my dad's black Nikon FE with the 50mm 1.4 AI-S lens. Served me well through high school and college photography classes, and the camera still meters and everything. I kind of wish newer cameras had the same kind of analog readouts that this one does in the viewfinder, needles and colored readouts are cool. I haven't shot film in about 10 years, but the absolutely pristine 50mm has found new life as my go-to lens for video.

After years in the Canon wilderness, I'm now a proud D600 owner.

So. When are they going to address the sensor dust issue?

try it with a lime
May 30, 2003



If you're looking for a film body to pack away in your bag as a secondary camera, buy an FM2. Small, light, fully manual, meters up to ISO 6400 and probably indestructible. Steve McCurry used one, so all your bad pictures with it are your own fault.

edit: Anyone know how much Nikon charges to clean sensors? Alternatively, I can get it done locally for $40. I'd do it myself, but I'm a big baby and I'd rather someone who has cleaned hundreds of sensors do it.

try it with a lime fucked around with this message at Nov 20, 2012 around 08:53

evil_bunnY
Apr 2, 2003



aliencowboy posted:

If you're looking for a film body to pack away in your bag as a secondary camera, buy an FM2. Small, light, fully manual, meters up to ISO 6400 and probably indestructible. Steve McCurry used one, so all your bad pictures with it are your own fault.
I have an F3 and I prefer the FM2 for most things.

powderific
May 13, 2004



1st AD posted:

So. When are they going to address the sensor dust issue?

It'll probably take a while if they do at all, and once they do, it'll take a month long trip to Nikon for the fix. Nikon USA's service isn't that great. Lensrentals has some really interesting info on repair rates and times from various manufacturers: http://www.lensrentals.com/blog/201...nuary-july-2012

Musket
Mar 19, 2008


You forgot the part where Nikon used to make glass for Canon in your history section.

Musket
Mar 19, 2008


Krakkles posted:

I will find an Fx camera someday.


(not FX, as in full frame, but Fx, as in F2/3/4/5/6.)

I keep seeing F5's and F3HPs on my local CL for dirt cheap.

Mightaswell
Dec 4, 2003

Not now chief, I'm in the fuckin' zone.


I'd like to make note of a seldom mentioned Nikon camera with a unique feature set.

The Nikon FA
It's the only manual focus camera Nikon ever made that can matrix meter with all AI and AI-s lenses while also featuring A, S and M modes, as well as two P modes.

Also it has a closed loop exposure system that measures the actual light coming through the lens after the lens stops down an instant before making the exposure. This allows the camera to correct any calibration or error in the aperture mechanism of the lens.

It's analogous to the Canon A1, Olympus OM-2SP, and Pentax Super-A.

Mr. Despair
Nov 4, 2009


39 perfect posts with each roll.


Mightaswell posted:

I'd like to make note of a seldom mentioned Nikon camera with a unique feature set.

The Nikon FA
It's the only manual focus camera Nikon ever made that can matrix meter with all AI and AI-s lenses while also featuring A, S and M modes, as well as two P modes.

Also it has a closed loop exposure system that measures the actual light coming through the lens after the lens stops down an instant before making the exposure. This allows the camera to correct any calibration or error in the aperture mechanism of the lens.

It's analogous to the Canon A1, Olympus OM-2SP, and Pentax Super-A.

Added.

red19fire
May 26, 2010


aliencowboy posted:

If you're looking for a film body to pack away in your bag as a secondary camera, buy an FM2. Small, light, fully manual, meters up to ISO 6400 and probably indestructible. Steve McCurry used one, so all your bad pictures with it are your own fault.

The FM2 was, and probably still is, the preferred camera for mountaineering. Why? because it's all mechanical (with an independent meter as an afterthought), meaning no batteries to freeze in sub-zero mountain temperatures and revert to some crappy f/22 limp-along mode. Just know your Sunny 16 rule and you can shoot on Everest, nerds.

The FM2 is better than the Pentax ME Super. There.

DanTheFryingPan
Jan 28, 2006


I rate the OP an F65 out of FM2n.

For the FM2, I suggest you go with a nice pancake, like the 45mm f/2.8 GN. Small, light, no batteries needed.

Mr. Despair
Nov 4, 2009


39 perfect posts with each roll.


red19fire posted:

The MX was, and probably still is, the preferred camera for mountaineering. Why? because it's all mechanical (with an independent meter as an afterthought), meaning no batteries to freeze in sub-zero mountain temperatures and revert to some crappy f/22 limp-along mode. Just know your Sunny 16 rule and you can shoot on Everest, nerds.

The MX is better than the FM2. There.

Fixed it for you. (And added your original post to the OP).

VoodooXT
Feb 24, 2006
I want Tong Po! Give me Tong Po!

As an owner of an F5, I'll say that it's probably one of the best film cameras ever. Solid, hefty, feels like a tank in camera form. The motor drive in that thing is super fast and incredibly silent, and I love that *clunk* sound it makes when you press the shutter button.

Beastruction
Feb 15, 2005


DanTheFryingPan posted:

I rate the OP an F65 out of FM2n.

Isn't that effectively zero though?

a foolish pianist
May 6, 2007
deadlift minimalist

Holy crap, FM2 bodies cost more than I'd figured.

evil_bunnY
Apr 2, 2003



Beastruction posted:

Isn't that effectively zero though?
That was kinda mean yeah.

try it with a lime
May 30, 2003



I bought an F65 a few weeks ago because someone was selling it with a kit lens for $35 and I wanted a standard zoom for my trip and wasn't ready to commit to something better without doing more research. The kit lens worked really nicely, but I have no idea what to do with the F65. It's the fruitcake of Nikons. Maybe I should see if it blends.

Mest0r
Apr 27, 2006

Doomsday!


I wouldn't hesitate to recommend the Nikon FE if you want a manual focus film camera. Typically sells for under $100 in either black or chrome. Has aperture priority mode if you want it. Limited to 1/1000 for the fastest shutter speed unlike it's bigger brother, the F3, which maxes out at 1/2000, but not that big of a deal.

e: Pair it with a 50mm Series E lens and you've got yourself a super cheap setup if you just want to dabble in 35mm film.

Mest0r fucked around with this message at Nov 21, 2012 around 01:19

365 Nog Hogger
Jan 19, 2008


Official Dorkroom Mod-Approved Arbiter Of What Is And Is Not Art, 2014


I assume the OP lacks information on the Nikonos series in general and on the III in specific because any mention would overshadow the rest.


Nikonos III: The best camera, in the world.

Radbot
Aug 12, 2009



I have an F4s and it could quite literally be used as a lethal weapon, it's ridiculous. I think the best Nikon film camera is the F100 - durable, weather sealed, pro feel, lots of gadgets (including metering with manual focus lenses, I believe), and it's cheap. The FM2 is sexy as hell, but I just don't buy that it's that much more reliable than an F100 with an extra set of batteries.

Valdara
May 12, 2003

burn, pillage, ORGANIZE!

I have a Nikon FE and three lenses (a telephoto, a "micro" macro, and a low-light), and I am just starting to fool around with it semi-seriously. I just took a picture of my cat with all three lenses in the lovely light of my apartment. He was not amused. Also, there are no places around me to get film developed that will give me the negatives back. However, I'm a fan. She's a nice little camera.

DanTheFryingPan
Jan 28, 2006


Radbot posted:

I have an F4s and it could quite literally be used as a lethal weapon, it's ridiculous. I think the best Nikon film camera is the F100 - durable, weather sealed, pro feel, lots of gadgets (including metering with manual focus lenses, I believe), and it's cheap. The FM2 is sexy as hell, but I just don't buy that it's that much more reliable than an F100 with an extra set of batteries.

The F100 is certainly more capable and versatile, accepts more lenses, has better metering and supports autofocus. Probably the best film camera Nikon has made compared to the price. And the F100 is like 95% of the F5 for a fraction of the cost and weight.

The FM2 has been the back-up pro body for very specific uses. Or if you can't find the 8 AA batteries (lol) for the F5.

maxmars
Nov 20, 2006

Ad bestias!


One thing I'd like to see added to the OP is the FM2n awesome speeds: 1/4000 for shooting and 1/250 for flash sync (way better than Pentax ME Super ).

I don't know where you live, but in sunny Italy times under 1/1000 are pretty much de rigueur when opening f2.8 or more. Also, 1/250 for flash sync is very handy with moving subjects (kids, animals..).

Finally, one thing I'm finding useful on the FM serie (I have an FM and an FM2n) is the multiple exposure feature. On the FM2 it can even be activated with one hand.

8th-snype
Aug 28, 2005

My office is in front room of a run down 12 megapixel sensor but the rent suits me and the landlord doesn't ask many questions.

Dorkroom Short Fiction Champion 2012

I can see fast shutter speeds being relevant for some people but flash sync speeds really don't matter with 35mm. I mean who is going through all the trouble to overpowering the sun with flash and make the shot with a 35mm? Inside 1/60th is just as good as 1/250th.

maxmars
Nov 20, 2006

Ad bestias!


8th-samurai posted:

I can see fast shutter speeds being relevant for some people but flash sync speeds really don't matter with 35mm. I mean who is going through all the trouble to overpowering the sun with flash and make the shot with a 35mm? Inside 1/60th is just as good as 1/250th.

I'm not sure we're talking about the same thing, I sure like to be able to select 1/250 when I shoot pics of moving people in the evening (e.g. my kids playing).

8th-snype
Aug 28, 2005

My office is in front room of a run down 12 megapixel sensor but the rent suits me and the landlord doesn't ask many questions.

Dorkroom Short Fiction Champion 2012

maxmars posted:

I'm not sure we're talking about the same thing, I sure like to be able to select 1/250 when I shoot pics of moving people in the evening (e.g. my kids playing).

Right but the flash duration is what freezes motion. So 1/125th or 1/60th will work just as well unless you doing some crazy bouncing. I used to get sharp photos of moving people at weddings just fine down to 1/30th and lower. Fast sync speeds are pretty much exclusively so that you can drown out all the ambient light because when you use strobes that is all your shutter speed determines.

maxmars
Nov 20, 2006

Ad bestias!


8th-samurai posted:

Right but the flash duration is what freezes motion. So 1/125th or 1/60th will work just as well unless you doing some crazy bouncing. I used to get sharp photos of moving people at weddings just fine down to 1/30th and lower. Fast sync speeds are pretty much exclusively so that you can drown out all the ambient light because when you use strobes that is all your shutter speed determines.

Now I see you're experienced in this so I am going to ask you something in the flash thread as it's not just Nikon related.. Can you please answer me there? (TIA of course!)

Beastruction
Feb 15, 2005


After using a D40 I just can't be impressed by flash sync speeds in the hundredths.

Remo
Oct 10, 2007

I wish this would go on forever

A high sync speed is nice to have when you want to have some fill light when shooting a subject against the setting sun. The higher the sync, the more you can open up your aperture


Rondo of the Sun and Moon by CorneliusK, on Flickr

35mm, f1.4, 1/1000s, sb-900 on a sync cord for HSS

Musket
Mar 19, 2008


Radbot posted:

I have an F4s and it could quite literally be used as a lethal weapon, it's ridiculous. I think the best Nikon film camera is the F100 - durable, weather sealed, pro feel, lots of gadgets (including metering with manual focus lenses, I believe), and it's cheap. The FM2 is sexy as hell, but I just don't buy that it's that much more reliable than an F100 with an extra set of batteries.

F5 is more weapon than the F4s could ever dream to be and more reliable than anything Nikon ever made besides the all mechanical FM2

Lets list off some of Canons amazin.... I cant even say that with a straight face.

maxmars
Nov 20, 2006

Ad bestias!


Remo posted:

A high sync speed is nice to have when you want to have some fill light when shooting a subject against the setting sun. The higher the sync, the more you can open up your aperture


Rondo of the Sun and Moon by CorneliusK, on Flickr

35mm, f1.4, 1/1000s, sb-900 on a sync cord for HSS

I've added you on flickr just because of that awesome image.

Paul MaudDib
May 2, 2006

My name is a killing word.


nielsm posted:

F3 is the king of Nikon manual focus SLRs. Does AE. (There is also F3AF which has an early AF system. It's rare.)
F2 and the original F are mostly historical artifacts by now, as far as I know.
FE and FM series should be good value choices for manual focus. FE does auto-exposure, FM does not.

The Nikkormat series are great too. They're "amateur" bodies compared to the F, meaning they don't have the system-camera features like interchangeable viewfinders, bulk backs, etc, but they're built to the same work-of-art standard and are still nicer than any of its contemporaries. Mine's a FT2, and the Nikon Twist is the quaintest thing. Gotta get a FM one of these days.

I don't get the love for the FE, it never struck me as a particularly nice camera. The ME/Super is loved for its enormous viewfinder and low price, the FE's is normal sized and for the same money you can get a F3. Parts are low enough that you will have trouble getting it repaired. See also, FG.

Gotta chime in on the Nikonos love too. Bad weather makes good photos and the Nikonos can survive being dived to 200 feet, a rainstorm is nothing. The 35mm lens is really good, a classic they resurrected from their original Nikon rangefinder lineup. You do have to scale focus it, it is a viewfinder camera not a rangefinder, but with a wideangle lens this is pretty easy. The later models (IV/IVa/V) are temperamental, the electronics will occasionally freeze up and the camera will need to be "rebooted" by switching to M90 and back. Don't buy them without a warranty. The rest of the Nikonos lens lineup isn't that great either, the only other amphibious (above/below water) lens is a 80mm which would be pretty hard to focus. I think people use the (underwater-only) 28mm above water without significant issue as well.

Paul MaudDib fucked around with this message at Nov 21, 2012 around 18:55

pwn
May 27, 2004

This Christmas get "Shoes"


Radbot posted:

I have an F4s and it could quite literally be used as a lethal weapon, it's ridiculous.
The F4 can take a drop to the pavement with nary more than a scratch.

Valdara posted:

Also, there are no places around me to get film developed that will give me the negatives back.
Huh.

Who doesn't give back negatives?

Krakkles
May 5, 2003



pwn posted:

The F4 can take a drop to the pavement with nary more than a scratch.
Yeah, a scratch on the pavement.

eggsovereasy
May 6, 2011



pwn posted:

Who doesn't give back negatives?

This is becoming a thing with places that mail out the film to processed. They take your film, develop and scan it then email you a link to the scanned images. Saves shipping back I suppose.

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

BonoMan
Feb 20, 2002


I'm about to pull the trigger on a D600 from Amazon because they have a nice $200 off + LowePro Fastpack 350/32gig Card/$50 credit to some tutorial site for free deal going on.


Is there any sort of trend of DSLR Black Friday deals? The Amazon deal seems to be sort of a "Black Friday Week" thing (I think...it's hard to pin down) and I'm okay with the price, but don't want to get burned a day later if there's some sort of deal I'm about to miss out on. But I also don't want to miss out by waiting too long.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • Post
  • Reply
«65 »