Search Amazon.com:
Register a SA Forums Account here!
JOINING THE SA FORUMS WILL REMOVE THIS BIG AD, THE ANNOYING UNDERLINED ADS, AND STUPID INTERSTITIAL ADS!!!

You can: log in, read the tech support FAQ, or request your lost password. This dumb message (and those ads) will appear on every screen until you register! Get rid of this crap by registering your own SA Forums Account and joining roughly 150,000 Goons, for the one-time price of $9.95! We charge money because it costs us $3,400 per month for bandwidth bills alone, and since we don't believe in shoving popup ads to our registered users, we try to make the money back through forum registrations.
«11 »
  • Post
  • Reply
dino.
Mar 28, 2010


Dear YLLS,
Looking at your threads where you talk about your transformation has always been very inspiring to me. It's like watching a friend put himself on the road to better health, and seeing the results before my eyes! There are even threads where someone will mention a really unhealthy way of losing weight, and everyone on the forum will immediately jump on board to drag him, kicking and screaming, into moving towards better health, rather than away from excess weight. Some of your stories and transformations have moved me to tears.

All of you are beautiful people, whom the rest of us aspire to be like some day. It is from that place of love that we from GWS come, with a few minor tweaks to make your daily meals a more interesting and varied event, rather than a chore to get through. We applaud your dedication to your health. We'd also like to try to contribute a bit to your happiness.

I hope that this will be a resource, where we can share knowledge with each other, and hopefully bridge some gaps. Think of it--if we teamed up, we could be an unstoppable force! When a newbie totters into YLLS, and says that cooking is too hard, you'd have somewhere to point that person, and say, "Check this thread out. There are some simple recipes that anyone can master, so give it a shot!" When someone wanders into GWS, and says that eating healthy is too hard, we can point them here, and say, "This is vetted and approved by the Adonis types over in YLLS. If you want to look like them, eat this food, and start lifting some weights."

I've spent a little bit of time going through the food logs here, and I've noticed a few trends. For one, y'all love your chicken breasts! For another, you guys love your plain steamed veg too. I totally understand where this comes from. You need a relatively quick bulk protein to hit your goal macros for the day. You need roughage, so that aforementioned bulk protein doesn't cause ... blockage. You need the nutrients in vegetables to get your body into a healthy stage.

Here's the beauty of this situation: you've done most of our work for us! If you're willing to eat plain steamed vegetables, that's an amazing first step! It means that you're willing to eat vegetables in general. Do you know how hard that is for us to do here in GWS? Most people who come in are like, "I hate vegetables, and gently caress anyone who likes them. Also, farts." You've acclimated to at least eating vegetables. Hopefully, once we get to the recipes, you'll start to enjoy them too!

Here's a couple of suggestions for what to do with vegetables, to make them more interesting. I know that others can chime in with what to do with chicken breast, because they'll be way more knowledgeable about it than I would. I'm just trying to get this party off the ground, so that we can have some kind of starting point!

Microwaved Vegetables
When I'm in a huge hurry, or I'm at a hotel room and need to get some veggies in me, I'll do this to get me through those rough patches. Yes, I actually will carry a small bottle of olive oil and some dried herbs with me when I travel. Because I'm vegan, there are frequently places who have nothing to offer me except a dry salad. A bit of olive oil, a spritz of lime or lemon juice, and some herbs will make said dry salad way more interesting. Anyway. Onwards.

If you're sick of broccoli, feel free to try this with cauliflower or sweet potatoes as well.

1 head broccoli, broken up into florets
1/2 tsp olive oil
1/2 tsp dried oregano
1/4 tsp dried thyme
1/4 tsp garlic powder
1 tsp curry powder
Splash of water
Salt, to taste

Toss the broccoli with the oil, oregano, thyme, garlic powder, and curry powder. If you don't have curry powder, don't bother. It'll be fine with just the herbs. Add the bit of water to the bottom of a microwave safe bowl. Microwave covered (I usually use a damp paper towel) for five minutes.

When it's done, season with salt to taste, and enjoy.

I admit that it's not strictly the highest calibre of cooking techniques. However, I'm hoping that you'll enjoy the forays into more flavour, and start to want to try something that will amp up the flavour even more. I'm hoping that this will help transition you into searing your veg.

Nate's Broccoli
One of my best friends is a shy cook. He's had me over many times, and generally leaves the cooking up to me. I used to do the microwave broccoli thing most of the time, because it was quick. One day, he asked me if he could sort out the broccoli, so that I'd be free to handle the rest of the meal. I happily accepted. That night, the broccoli was so good, we all ate that first. He was beaming at the end of the meal. I asked him what he did. "Oh. Let me show you."

1 head broccoli, cut into florets
Nonstick cooking spray
Salt, to taste

Spray the bottom of a cast iron skillet with the nonstick cooking spray. If you don't have one, put a 1/4 tsp of oil onto the skillet, and rub it around with a paper towel. Heat the skillet on high. Let it get very hot. In small batches, sear the broccoli on the screaming hot skillet. It'll get slightly charred as it cooks. Flip it often, as you don't want it to burn. Season with salt. Eat.

Ever since then, when we get together, I make Nate's Broccoli. He was very pleased that he taught me something that I use regularly. I reminded him that the best teachers do the most learning out of anyone else. However, when it comes to other vegetables, he prefers my South Indian method of cooking them.

South Indian Veg
Typically, this dish would involve a lot more fat. However, if you're avoiding large amounts of oil, it wouldn't help you to do it the typical way. It's why I'm having you toast the cumin and coriander separately. Ordinarily, I'd just have you add all the spices to the fat, one after another, until they pop. This method saves you a lot of fat (the typical recipe calls for around 3 TB of oil). This method also works for every vegetable.

1 head of cabbage, broccoli, or cauliflower, cut into small pieces
1 tsp coriander seeds
1 tsp cumin seeds
1 tsp black mustard seeds (or 1/3 tsp yellow mustard seed)
1 tsp oil
Salt, to taste
Red pepper flakes, to taste

In a skillet, roast the cumin and coriander seeds together until they smell nutty, and pop a bit. Remove the seeds from the skillet, and pour them into a bowl. In that same skillet, add the oil. Add the mustard seeds, and gently move them around until they pop like mad.

The flavour and aroma will be amazing. Add the vegetables, and sprinkle on the toasted seeds. Toss to combine with all the spices. Keep stirring until the vegetables get cooked to your desired done-ness. I like my vegetables to retain some crunch, so I generally stop at around 5 - 7 minutes of cooking over high heat. You may like things differently, so adjust to your preferences.

If the pan gets too dry, and the vegetables aren't giving off enough liquid, feel free to splash in a bit of water.

If you can afford a bit more fat, try roasting your vegetables.

Roasted Vegetables
1 lb baby Brussels sprouts, washed (if using bigger Brussels sprouts, please trim off a bit from the bottom of the stem, and slice them in half lengthwise)
3 TB canola oil
3 cloves garlic, sliced thin
1/2 tsp caraway seed (I like caraway with all Brassica vegetables; if you don't like it, feel free to avoid it)
1 bunch parsley, chopped fine (optional)
10 leaves basil, sliced thin (optional)
Zest & Juice of 1 lemon (optional)
Salt, to taste
Pepper, to taste

In a bowl, combine the garlic, caraway seed, and Canola oil. Mix lightly to combine. Toss in the Brussels sprouts, and coat them evenly in the oil and garlic. Lay them on one layer on a baking sheet, and bake at 350F/180C for 20 minutes. If they're not cooked in 20 minutes, keep going for another 10 minutes or so.

This is pretty much the rule for the roasting of any vegetable. Roast at 350 for 20 minutes, and keep going if it's not done. Easy.

When the roasting is done, remove the Brussels sprouts from the pan, and put it back into your original bowl. Add the chopped parsley, chopped basil, lemon juice, lemon zest, and salt and pepper. Toss to combine. Taste. Moan with pleasure. Adjust seasoning as necessary.

Raw Kale
Some days, you want raw kale, but you're not a huge fan of the chewing that it requires. No worries! You can massage it and get the same results.

1 bunch of kale, with stems removed, and chopped into bite sized pieces
2 tsp mustard (optional)
1 clove garlic, minced
1 lemon, juiced
1 tsp olive oil
salt, to taste

Sprinkle the kale with the salt. Let it sit while you mince the garlic. Combine the garlic with the lemon juice, olive oil, and mustard. Pour that mixture over the kale. Massage the leaves vigorously. Seriously, give it a bashing. It can take it. You'll see the kale transform from huge leaves into leaves that look like they've been cooked. Adjust seasoning as necessary.

This makes the base of an excellent salad. Anything you throw on top will be delicious.

Chickpea "Popcorn"
When you're trying to get your macros up, and are craving a snack, popcorn is not something you'd reach for. However, you want something to nosh on while you're watching TV, or a movie, and aren't in the mood to get your fat to the level that nuts will do. I'm using canned chickpeas, because they are especially suited for this application.

1 large can chickpeas, rinsed and drained
1 tsp olive oil
Salt, to taste
1/2 tsp ground cumin
1/4 tsp cayenne pepper

Bake the chickpeas in the oven at 350F for 30 minutes. Toss them around in the pan, and bake another 15 minutes. The chickpeas will puff up a bit, and dry out. They'll be just like eating popcorn, but without the carbs. Plenty of fibre, plenty of protein, and very tasty.

If you want to avoid the fat, feel free to toss them in a bit of tamari or soy sauce instead. It works out great!

Persian Stewed Greens
Everyone should be eating dark green leafy vegetables. They're full of iron, and fibre, and all kind of other vitamins. They're delicious too. Eat them! This is a riff on a Persian Ghormeh Sabzi. I love the flavours of the different herbs. Use as many or as few as you like. If you don't have any herbs, the recipe works just fine with only the greens, onions, and garlic.

1 bunch kale or collard greens, chopped finely
Kale or collard stems, chopped finely and kept separate from the leaves
1 large onion, diced
5 cloves of garlic, sliced
1 TB oil
1 bunch dill, chopped
1 bunch parsley, chopped
1 bunch of cilantro, chopped
1 bunch of mint, chopped
1 bunch basil, chopped
2 TB dried oregano
2 tsp ground cumin
1 tsp turmeric
Salt, to taste

In a large pot, add the oil. Add the onions and garlic, and stir to combine in the oil. Add turmeric, dried oregano, and ground cumin. The aroma will be amazing. Add the kale stems, and cook until tender. This will take about 7 minutes or so. Add the kale leaves, and cook for about three minutes. Turn off the heat. Add the dill, parsley, cilantro, mint, and basil. Cover the lid of the pot, and let it sit for about ten minutes. Stir to combine. Season with salt.

Daal
This is a staple all across India. I'm doing an even more basic version than I'm used to, because I'm hoping that once you get your feet wet with the quickest and easiest of bean recipes, you'll be willing to branch out and try different beans. This recipe works with every kind of cooked bean.

1 teaspoon canola, peanut, or safflower oil (neutral and can take high temps)
1/4 teaspoon cumin seeds
1/2 teaspoon sesame seeds
Curry leaves, if available
1 medium onion, chopped
1/4 teaspoon turmeric
Salt
1 pound canned chopped tomato, drained
1 pound canned garbanzo beans, drained
1 ½ cups water
Fresh chiles, chopped

Heat oil over high heat in a wide, shallow pan. Sprinkle in cumin. When you hear the cumin popping (about 30 seconds, if the oil is hot), add in sesame seeds. When the sesame seeds brown, toss in the curry leaves (if available) and the diced onion. Drop down the heat to medium-high, and sprinkle in turmeric and a little bit of salt. Sauté onions until soft (about 1 minute). Bring the heat back to high and add in the can of tomatoes. Stir vigorously for about 3 to 5 minutes. You'll see the tomatoes breaking down a little—this is a good thing. Add the garbanzo beans. When the beans are coated with the tomatoes, add the water. Add chopped-up chiles to taste. When water comes up to a boil, you're done!

This thing is basically a primer on daal. There are more complex versions on the GWS wiki. http://goonswithspoons.com/Daal_Tarka

Where I'd like to see this go:

You tell us what you generally need to eat, and what the restrictions are. We'll try to find you an interesting way to cook it. I personally can't speak to the meat side of things, because it's not what I know. However, I know of plenty of lovely, friendly people who will be able to help out with that.

Vegetables, however, I know. If you want me to address anything about whole grains, like kasha, quinoa, farro, kamut, millet, or whole wheat berries, ask away! I just wasn't sure how restricted your carbs are, so I didn't want to get yelled at. If you do want me to cover how to cook quinoa in interesting ways, please tell me to, and I'll happily type up a blurb about it. I love quinoa, especially since it's so filling, and it keeps my energy up for hours.

In other words, I'm not trying to come from some place of superiority. Instead, I would like to humbly share what little knowledge I have about making food exciting again, and hope that you'll all help to guide me in ways that I can help you better.

Recipe Index, courtesy of NitroSpazzz

Microwave Whitefish
Hot to Brown Meat
Stuffed Mushrooms
Kale and Onions
Etheopian Style Collard Greens
Chicken Taco Chili
Spicy Kale Chips
Salmon en Papillote
Fette Sau Broccoli Salad
Split Pea Soup
Slow Cooker Pot Roast
Red Lentil Onion Soup
Mercimek Corbasi - Turkish Lentil Soup
ARROZ CON MEAT THAT BEGINS WITH P, Chicken Adobo, Chicken Cacciatore
Cheater Yellow Rice
Spice Rubs: Indian-y, Berbere, Much simpler Mexicanish style blend, Herbes de Provence, Simple Jerk style seasoning
Curried Rice
Mercimek Corbasi/Turkish Lentil Soup
GWS Pulled Pork
Basic Roast Beef and Pig
Chickpea Popcorn, Roasted Brussels Sprouts, Microwave Broccoli
Hummus Alternative
Essentially Fat Free Hummus
Crustless Spinach and Chicken Quiche
Cauliflower roasted in cream & mustard, Brussels sprouts braised and topped with crispy bacon, Braised green beans in tomatoes & garlic, Sauteed kale with sambal & parmigiano, Cherry tomato butter, Cabbage salad with wasabi lime dressing
Chickpea and Pumpkin Soup, Lemon Rice
Crustless Quiche
Pretty Much All Chinese Food
The Bad Load
Shirataki Tofu Fettuccine
Shirataki Noodle
Creamy Kale with Goat Cheese, Cilantro-lime cauliflower "rice", Panang ground beef, Cashew-coconut pie crust, Lower Carb Pumpkin Pie
Single-serve Oyako-don
Pork Carnitas
Simple Chicken Cacciatore
Fajitas with Salsa

dino. fucked around with this message at Jan 15, 2013 around 17:30

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

Rurutia
Jun 11, 2009


Great OP. Might I suggest that if any recipes are listed, macro breakdowns should be included as well?

dino.
Mar 28, 2010


Rurutia posted:

Great OP. Might I suggest that if any recipes are listed, macro breakdowns should be included as well?

I don't know how to do it, but I would really be interested if someone could volunteer to make that happen? I think it would be really cool to see some of our recipes have those neat charts that you guys make. See? This is exactly what I wanted, Rurutia! I wanted us to learn from each other, and right here, in the first response, you're already doing so. Thank you!

Charmmi
Dec 8, 2008

:trophystare:


I'll take a shot at calculating some macros. The main ones are calorie, protein, fat, carb, fiber?

Rurutia
Jun 11, 2009


Charmmi posted:

I'll take a shot at calculating some macros. The main ones are calorie, protein, fat, carb, fiber?

Yep. I use cronometer.com because it does auto-pie charts too.

Charmmi
Dec 8, 2008

:trophystare:


Chickpea Popcorn

1 full recipe
Calories 397
Fat 12g
Carb 58g
Protein 18g

cronometer gave me 0g fiber which I thought was strange. Wolfram alpha says there are 34 grams of fiber in a 16 oz can of chickpeas.

Roasted Brussels Sprouts

1 full recipe
Calories 597
Fat 44g
Carb 48g
Protein 17g
Fiber 18g

Microwave Brocooli

1 Full recipe
Calories 185
Fat 4g
Carb 32g
Protein 13g
Fiber 13g

ladyweapon
Nov 6, 2010

It reads all over his face,
like he's an Italian.


Aw yeah, I am so ready for this thread. I am gonna make some Daal as soon as possible.

ashgromnies
Jun 19, 2004


I'm sure a lot of people look at the ingredients lists and think that it will take too much effort to make some of these things regularly, but that's not true if you put some effort into preparation.

One thing you can do is chop all your vegetables(with some exceptions, tomatoes for example should never be refrigerated -- they lose their flavor) as soon as you get home from the grocery store, and store them in Tupperware containers. Juice your citrus and put that in containers in the fridge, so you just have to pour it out when you're cooking. Crush and peel your garlic and store in a heavy ziplock bag or Tupperware. Most the stuff you buy you can expect to last around a week, so you can try to set up a weekly meal plan to reduce waste and get more control over your nutritional intake.

Speaking of which -- I am a GWS poster, not a YLLS poster. I'd like to eat a nutritious diet and begin exercising. It would be cool if we could get some input from YLLS regulars on this stuff to make this into a totally awesome hybrid guide to unfucking your lifestyle.


Edit: do you guys eat red meat or is it bad for you? I've heard people say, "it's bad for you" but I've never questioned why and choose instead to eat it 'cause beef is delicious.

ashgromnies fucked around with this message at Nov 23, 2012 around 22:36

slinkimalinki
Jan 17, 2010

Through moonlight and shadow she'd prowl and she'd pry.


ashgromnies posted:

I'm

Speaking of which -- I am a GWS poster, not a YLLS poster. I'd like to eat a nutritious diet and begin exercising. It would be cool if we could get some input from YLLS regulars on this stuff to make this into a totally awesome hybrid guide to unfucking your lifestyle.


http://forums.somethingawful.com/sh...1#post403381951

Internet Wizard
Aug 9, 2009

Hope you don't mind if I just take a little rest here. Feel free to join me...

ashgromnies posted:

Edit: do you guys eat red meat or is it bad for you? I've heard people say, "it's bad for you" but I've never questioned why and choose instead to eat it 'cause beef is delicious.

I eat beef every so often, but it's either much more expensive than chicken or way too heavy on the sat fats.

I buy chicken in the biggest packages I can find because it's the most affordable way, and it's more convenient to just make up a huge batch and then divide it up into smaller portions and toss them in the fridge.

The Wiggly Wizard
Aug 21, 2008



dino. posted:


This thing is basically a primer on daal. There are more complex versions on the GWS wiki. http://goonswithspoons.com/Daal_Tarka

Where I'd like to see this go:

You tell us what you generally need to eat, and what the restrictions are. We'll try to find you an interesting way to cook it. I personally can't speak to the meat side of things, because it's not what I know. However, I know of plenty of lovely, friendly people who will be able to help out with that.

In general, carbohydrates and fats are super easy to come by, so foods rich in protein are basically what everyone wants to know.

For example, lentils have ~30% of their calories from protein, while garbanzos have ~21% of their calories from protein. Both are obviously awesome and super healthy, but that kind of substitution is helpful for someone trying to get the most protein for their buck.

There's also a recipe thread here and many of them are pretty good, but there many culinary abominations as well.

http://forums.somethingawful.com/sh...hreadid=3068896

quote:

Vegetables, however, I know. If you want me to address anything about whole grains, like kasha, quinoa, farro, kamut, millet, or whole wheat berries, ask away! I just wasn't sure how restricted your carbs are, so I didn't want to get yelled at. If you do want me to cover how to cook quinoa in interesting ways, please tell me to, and I'll happily type up a blurb about it. I love quinoa, especially since it's so filling, and it keeps my energy up for hours.

This is good, because people in the general questions thread frequently ask about ways to get more vegetables in their diet.

SaltLick
Oct 6, 2010
Probation
Can't post for 4 hours!


The Wiggly Wizard posted:


There's also a recipe thread here and many of them are pretty good, but there many culinary abominations as well.

http://forums.somethingawful.com/sh...hreadid=3068896



Alfalfa's bulk mush is YLLS ambrosia.

Boner Slam
May 9, 2005


IF anyone could come up with a good way to eat Quark, he'd be my hero. Especially if its low carb.

Quark is like Yoghurt but harder and without any carbs at all. That means its taste is slightly soury.
The advantage is that is it low carb and 500g costs 0,40 euros.
It is by far the healthiest, least expensive protein food available.



The only thing I have found are cinnamon, walnuts and sweetener. I haven't really found a way to make it savory. It also does not play well with many protein powders because it is so sour.

dino.
Mar 28, 2010


Quark is like yoghurt cheese, right? I'd imagine that a scrape of nutmeg, a bit of fresh ground cardamom, a bit of grated ginger, and some fresh fruit would be ace. It'd taste like the Indian custard we make. I'm not sure how allowed fruit is, but whatever fruit you're allowed to have will make it awesome.

Also, if you were to use it in curry pastes of various sorts, I know for a fact that it'd give an incomparable lovely taste to anything you eat.

@Wiggly Wizard: Send me your vegetable wanters! They'll just need to tell me what veg are on the agenda, and I'll come up with ways to use them that suit their needs. Just out of curiosity, does the low protein to carb ratio of lentils and chickpeas mean that they're off the menu? If so, I won't mention them again. I just know that for me, they're a pretty decent source of fibre and longer-lasting carbohydrates. So like, if I have a bowl of black bean soup in the morning (all kind of spices, garlic, onion, tomato, ginger, salt, and chiles), it'll keep me feeling satisfied for hours, versus having a bowl of brown rice (sesame seeds, sesame oil, scallions) and a bowl of miso soup. Both are delicious, but the black bean soup seems to take a while longer to digest, and seems to give me more of a sustained energy boost.

@SaltLick: Alfalfa bulk mush? What is this?

Fanky Malloons
Aug 21, 2010

Hook it to your internal organs, so that it rips out your guts and you die.


dino. posted:

Just out of curiosity, does the low protein to carb ratio of lentils and chickpeas mean that they're off the menu? If so, I won't mention them again.

Not necessarily, because not everyone in YLLS is strictly low carb - for example, the runners around here eat tons of carbs!

For myself, I don't avoid carbs per se, but I try and make sure I eat things like brown rice, whole wheat whatever, and beans and pulses etc. Low GI carbs, I guess? Plus, I live with a vegetarian, so I'm always interested in ways to get more protein with less meat in my diet, since I don't eat a whole lot of meat anyway.

If you're worried about alienating low carb people, you can always include suggestions for lower carb alternatives in your recipes, for example I think subbing cauliflower for rice is a fairly common low-carb swap. Though having said that, people who eat low carb but are still interested in making your recipes will probably tweak them on their own anyway.

Thanks for the thread, it's cool. I just learned that you can eat kale stems - I usually throw them out!

dino.
Mar 28, 2010


Fanky Malloons posted:

Not necessarily, because not everyone in YLLS is strictly low carb - for example, the runners around here eat tons of carbs!

For myself, I don't avoid carbs per se, but I try and make sure I eat things like brown rice, whole wheat whatever, and beans and pulses etc. Low GI carbs, I guess? Plus, I live with a vegetarian, so I'm always interested in ways to get more protein with less meat in my diet, since I don't eat a whole lot of meat anyway.

If you're worried about alienating low carb people, you can always include suggestions for lower carb alternatives in your recipes, for example I think subbing cauliflower for rice is a fairly common low-carb swap. Though having said that, people who eat low carb but are still interested in making your recipes will probably tweak them on their own anyway.

Thanks for the thread, it's cool. I just learned that you can eat kale stems - I usually throw them out!

The same goes for broccoli stems as well. If they're looking really woody or overly hard, just hit them with a vegetable peeler, and take off the tough outer coating. The inside bits are sweet and tender. Very tasty. For collard green stems, I tend to chop them really small, so that they cook up quickly. It makes it so that when I have collard greens, the greens don't taste bitter, since the stems are sweeter than the leaves. Combine the two together, and you get a lovely combination.

If you're looking for a healthier alternative to hummus, I've found that using brown lentils, sauteed onions, and sunflower seeds really tastes good as a dip for sliced cucumber or carrots or what have you. It's not necessarily low fat, but it tends to have a fair bit less oil than most hummus recipes, and still tastes good (because the lentils get more creamy than chickpeas do).

1 cups brown lentils, soaked overnight
1/2 cup sunflower seeds (hulled)
2 large onions, cooked until dark brown
1 tsp oil
12 oz white mushrooms, cleaned
Salt & Black Pepper to taste

Cook the lentils in 3 cups of water, until tender. It should take about 20 minutes or so. While the lentils are cooking, roast the mushrooms in a dry pan in the oven at 350 for 20 minutes. If your oven is dodgy, just sautee them on the stove. I prefer to dry roast, because then I can avoid adding any fat.

While the mushrooms roast, and the lentils cook, cook the onion in the oil over medium low heat. You want the onion to release its liquids, and cook until it's brown. If you try to work over high heat, the onions will try to burn before they get browned. If you're not worried about fat, go ahead and cook the onions over high heat, with constant stirring, and triple the amount of oil. I just prefer to minimise the oil, so that I don't feel guilty about using quite so much sunflower seed.

Once the lentils are cooked, drain them very thoroughly. Essentially, just throw them into a mesh strainer, and sit it over a bowl. Let the contraption sit there until the lentils are cooled down. By then, most of the water will have drained off. Don't discard all the liquid. Keep some in reserve in case you need it.

Add the drained lentils, the cooked mushrooms, the browned onions, sunflower seeds, salt, and pepper into the bowl of a food processor. Pulse until the ingredients are mostly chopped up, then crank that sucker on full speed until it's pureed down.

Serve with sliced veggies or crackers for a quick snack. It keeps for about a week in the fridge.

Fanky Malloons
Aug 21, 2010

Hook it to your internal organs, so that it rips out your guts and you die.


dino. posted:

The same goes for broccoli stems as well. If they're looking really woody or overly hard, just hit them with a vegetable peeler, and take off the tough outer coating. The inside bits are sweet and tender. Very tasty. For collard green stems, I tend to chop them really small, so that they cook up quickly. It makes it so that when I have collard greens, the greens don't taste bitter, since the stems are sweeter than the leaves. Combine the two together, and you get a lovely combination.

That makes sense actually, because I do eat broccoli stems, I just never thought about the fact that you can eat other kinds of stems too.

For that lentil dip recipe, can you get away with not using mushrooms in it? I'm not a huge fan of the texture, and while I can deal with the taste for the most part, I don't like it if it's overwhelming. I really want to make that dip though.

dino.
Mar 28, 2010


Fanky Malloons posted:

That makes sense actually, because I do eat broccoli stems, I just never thought about the fact that you can eat other kinds of stems too.

For that lentil dip recipe, can you get away with not using mushrooms in it? I'm not a huge fan of the texture, and while I can deal with the taste for the most part, I don't like it if it's overwhelming. I really want to make that dip though.

Yeah, just add another 1/2 cup of the lentils. I find that with the mushrooms, there's this awesome earthy taste that comes through, but if you're not a fan, just leave them out.

Also, if you don't have the time to boil the lentils, I know that Trader Joe has this packet of boiled lentils that comes in a vacuum type bag.

SaltLick
Oct 6, 2010
Probation
Can't post for 4 hours!


dino. posted:



@SaltLick: Alfalfa bulk mush? What is this?

It's just a very easy to make meal that contains a good macro for if you're trying to pack on weight easily. It's a culinary abomination, but drat if I don't love it sometimes.


Alfalfa posted:

Mush
Type of Diet:Bulking Big Time
Cost: $2 bucks per serving max
Preparation time: 10 minutes but that will net you enough for 6-8 meals
Skill Level: Anyone
Nutrition Facts: Depends on how you divide it up.

Brown 2 lbs lean ground beef, I prefer 96/4 or higher.

Prepare 2 cups of dry brown rice to be cooked

Open 2 cans of beans (I prefer Ranch Style beans but I believe those are only local to Texas, so black beans, pinto, all work).

After rice has finished cooking add all things together in big pot and season with hot sauce, seasoned salt and whatever else you want to add. Then divide up into individual servings to meat your nutritional ratios and refrigerate.

Serve when needed.

warning when consuming make sure a window is open or you are in a well ventilated area... also warn loved ones that might be present with you

dino.
Mar 28, 2010


I see. I don't know that it's quite an abomination, but it does seem awfully bland, no? I'd imagine that a hit of cumin powder, coriander powder, some dried oregano, and red pepper flakes (if you like hot and spicy food) wouldn't be amiss. Surely some diced garlic would help matters along wonderfully. You wouldn't even need to worry about paintstaking labour or anything; just do the garlic chopping while your meat browns.

Like, you'd throw your beefs into the pan (working in 1/3 lb increments, because you don't want to crowd the pan, right?), and then add (into each increment) a bit of oregano, cumin, and coriander. Bonus points if you grind your own, but not strictly required.

To make the brown rice, go as normal. But for the beans, go for daal! The taste would be way better. I'll even be OK with you using tinned beans! Then mix the beans and rice.

To serve, put the beans and rice on the bottom, top with the ground beefs, and go from there.

Velvet Fog
Jul 26, 2006


dino. posted:

I see. I don't know that it's quite an abomination, but it does seem awfully bland, no? I'd imagine that a hit of cumin powder, coriander powder, some dried oregano, and red pepper flakes (if you like hot and spicy food) wouldn't be amiss. Surely some diced garlic would help matters along wonderfully. You wouldn't even need to worry about paintstaking labour or anything; just do the garlic chopping while your meat browns.

Like, you'd throw your beefs into the pan (working in 1/3 lb increments, because you don't want to crowd the pan, right?), and then add (into each increment) a bit of oregano, cumin, and coriander. Bonus points if you grind your own, but not strictly required.

To make the brown rice, go as normal. But for the beans, go for daal! The taste would be way better. I'll even be OK with you using tinned beans! Then mix the beans and rice.

To serve, put the beans and rice on the bottom, top with the ground beefs, and go from there.
I just made it and added broccoli and shredded cheese to the top. It turned out pretty good.

Norrskensren
Jul 25, 2011


Boner Slam posted:

IF anyone could come up with a good way to eat Quark, he'd be my hero. Especially if its low carb.

Quark is like Yoghurt but harder and without any carbs at all. That means its taste is slightly soury.
The advantage is that is it low carb and 500g costs 0,40 euros.
It is by far the healthiest, least expensive protein food available.



The only thing I have found are cinnamon, walnuts and sweetener. I haven't really found a way to make it savory. It also does not play well with many protein powders because it is so sour.

I, too, am working on making quark a regular and tasty snack thing.

I will assume you're in Germany (since I have come across no other nation with such a love of quark) and therefore, if you'd like to use it as a savoury snack I'd recommend actually getting Edeka's "Lust auf Leicht" Kräuterquark:
Calories (per 100g)- 80 kcal
Protein - 10,6 g
Carbs - 4 g
Fat - 2,4 g

It's the tastiest low-fat quark I've ever had, works great as a dip - it's excellent with carrots, for example. For a sweeter mix, I've tried mixing frozen (unsweetened) berries with plain low-fat quark. Usually works great. I don't use additional sweetener and find that works out really well, but if you need it sweet in order to tolerate it you might need to add some sweetener or honey or whatever you prefer. I've also mashed quark up with a banana and some cocoa powder and that worked too.

You could also just make your own savoury quark, my flatmate mixes dips out of it quite regularly and has it with vegetables. Imagine seasoning it like you would any other dip - herbs, various spices, garlic, etc. The sourness of quark really works in its favour here.

Charmmi
Dec 8, 2008

:trophystare:


What's everyone doing to their plain chicken breasts? I used a method that's a combination of pr0k's guide to not overcooking chicken and this video from foodwishes.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1VBgF1cJpcE

I lightly salt both sides of the chicken and lay them skin side down in a hot oven-safe pan that has enough oil to coat the bottom. It took me a couple of tries to find the right heat setting so that it will get to a nice brown in about 5 minutes without turning black. For my stove this is between the 6 and 7 marks. Then the chicken gets flipped and the other side cooks for about 5 more minutes. After that it goes into a 400F oven for 10-ish minutes depending on how thick the breasts are. I leave it to sit covered loosely with a bit of foil while I get the sides together or make a sauce with what's left in the pan or set the table, roughly 5 minutes. This gives me pretty tasty and moist chicken that is good on its own or with any variety of flavors.

MAKE NO BABBYS
Jan 28, 2010


Any suggestions for a hummus-like dip without tahini? I went to Trader Joes today and they only had pre made tahini sauce and I didn't feel like going to a second store. I'm thinking of blending some oil, spices and herbs (cilantro, most likely) in there but I'm open to more specific recipes if you've got them.

RazorBunny
May 23, 2007

Sometimes I feel like this.



If you use a drier bean, like cannellini, you can get the same texture without tahini. I like to purée cannellini beans with just olive oil, garlic, and paprika. It's not exactly hummus, but it's really tasty.

dino.
Mar 28, 2010


MAKE NO BABBYS posted:

Any suggestions for a hummus-like dip without tahini? I went to Trader Joes today and they only had pre made tahini sauce and I didn't feel like going to a second store. I'm thinking of blending some oil, spices and herbs (cilantro, most likely) in there but I'm open to more specific recipes if you've got them.

1 can white beans, drained
2 lemon, zest + juice
1 tsp cumin seeds, toasted lightly
1/2 tsp salt
1 can chickpeas, drained
4 cloves garlic

Essentially, you're making a fat free hummus. Blend everything together in a food processor. Add salt to taste.

butros
Aug 2, 2007

"The referee is always right."
-Heyneke Meyer


MAKE NO BABBYS posted:

Any suggestions for a hummus-like dip without tahini? I went to Trader Joes today and they only had pre made tahini sauce and I didn't feel like going to a second store. I'm thinking of blending some oil, spices and herbs (cilantro, most likely) in there but I'm open to more specific recipes if you've got them.

Are you me? I had the same exact experience this afternoon..

dino that looks awesome will try tonight!

e: could you chuck in sesame seeds to the blender and grind those up to get a bit of the tahini flavour?

butros fucked around with this message at Nov 26, 2012 around 00:50

dino.
Mar 28, 2010


Not quite. To get a similar flavour, please just lightly toast the sesame seeds in a dry pan over medium heat for like 5 minutes or until they smell toasty. Then, crush them in a mortar and pestle. If you have one , use a blender as long as you're trying to crush like 1 cup of seeds. If you have a spice grinder or coffee grinder, just do about 3 tablespoons.

Gemakk
Mar 28, 2010


Dry cottage cheese curds are an extremely cheap and pure source of protein. What would you guys do with it without adding too much fat or carbs to make it more palatable? Both sweet and savory varieties are welcome.

Zombie Pirate
Jan 3, 2009


Gemakk posted:

Dry cottage cheese curds are an extremely cheap and pure source of protein. What would you guys do with it without adding too much fat or carbs to make it more palatable? Both sweet and savory varieties are welcome.

Salad with cucumber and tomato and maybe onion. Pepper.

Edit: Maybe a bit of vinegar and herbs too if you're feeling fancy.

Senor Science
Aug 21, 2004

MI DIOS!!! ESTA CIENCIA ES DIABOLICO!!!


What are everyone's thoughts on quinoa and spirulina?

Boner Slam
May 9, 2005


Norrskensren posted:


I will assume you're in Germany (since I have come across no other nation with such a love of quark) and therefore, if you'd like to use it as a savoury snack I'd recommend actually getting Edeka's "Lust auf Leicht" Kräuterquark:
Calories (per 100g)- 80 kcal
Protein - 10,6 g
Carbs - 4 g
Fat - 2,4 g

It's the tastiest low-fat quark I've ever had, works great as a dip - it's excellent with carrots, for example. For a sweeter mix, I've tried mixing frozen (unsweetened) berries with plain low-fat quark. Usually works great. I don't use additional sweetener and find that works out really well, but if you need it sweet in order to tolerate it you might need to add some sweetener or honey or whatever you prefer. I've also mashed quark up with a banana and some cocoa powder and that worked too.

You could also just make your own savoury quark, my flatmate mixes dips out of it quite regularly and has it with vegetables. Imagine seasoning it like you would any other dip - herbs, various spices, garlic, etc. The sourness of quark really works in its favour here.


yup, Germany where our love of Quark knows no bounds. Thanks for the ideas.

evensevenone
May 12, 2001
Glass is a solid.

Senor Science posted:

What are everyone's thoughts on quinoa and spirulina?

Quinoa is OK but not amazing. A cup has 8g of protein and 39g of carbs (of which 5 are fiber). So that's not so good if you are aiming for a high protein-carb-ratio. The advantage is that the protein it does have has a very good balance of amino acids, but that's mostly important for vegans, even then you would have to eat a fuckton of quinoa to get a useful quantity. It's not bad if used as a grain though--I make it with some chicken broth and carrots and mushrooms and have it with chicken breasts; it's a nice alternative to rice.

Spirulina is overpriced hippie crap. By weight it has a lot of protein and some other nice stuff but it is incredibly expensive and to consume actually useful quantities of it would be prohibitively expensive, as well as pretty gross. 100g of spirulina costs like $10 and has 60g of protein.

DekeThornton
Sep 2, 2011

Be friends!


Boner Slam posted:

IF anyone could come up with a good way to eat Quark, he'd be my hero. Especially if its low carb.

I just mixed som quark with some Sriracha, black pepper and Thai sweet chili sauce and used it as a condiment on a sandwich with leftovers from saturday's roasted chicken. It worked pretty well. I can imagine it could work fine as a dip for vegetables like celery and carrots.

How do YLLS goons feel about salmon? I imagine gravlax could be pretty great. It's dead easy to make in bulk, freezes well and, at least here, it often costs in the same ballpark as chicken breasts if bought whole.

Gravlax with eggs, scrambled or an omelette, and spinach is a favourite quick after workout meal for me.

Dmaonk
Oct 15, 2007

Chinese Starcraft tomato ninja image

DekeThornton posted:

I just mixed som quark with some Sriracha, black pepper and Thai sweet chili sauce and used it as a condiment on a sandwich with leftovers from saturday's roasted chicken. It worked pretty well. I can imagine it could work fine as a dip for vegetables like celery and carrots.

How do YLLS goons feel about salmon? I imagine gravlax could be pretty great. It's dead easy to make in bulk, freezes well and, at least here, it often costs in the same ballpark as chicken breasts if bought whole.

Gravlax with eggs, scrambled or an omelette, and spinach is a favourite quick after workout meal for me.

Do you make your own gravlax? Salmon kicks rear end. It's high in healthy omega 3 fats and poo poo, so eat it often. It's higher in fat than chicken, so you might want to avoid it on lifting days if you are doing carb cycling or something, but that's getting into sperg territory.

DekeThornton
Sep 2, 2011

Be friends!


Dmaonk posted:

Do you make your own gravlax? Salmon kicks rear end. It's high in healthy omega 3 fats and poo poo, so eat it often. It's higher in fat than chicken, so you might want to avoid it on lifting days if you are doing carb cycling or something, but that's getting into sperg territory.

Yup, I make my own. It's really simple. I'll write up my recipe tomorrow. I'm off to bed now.

Senor Science
Aug 21, 2004

MI DIOS!!! ESTA CIENCIA ES DIABOLICO!!!


evensevenone posted:

Quinoa is OK but not amazing. A cup has 8g of protein and 39g of carbs (of which 5 are fiber). So that's not so good if you are aiming for a high protein-carb-ratio. The advantage is that the protein it does have has a very good balance of amino acids, but that's mostly important for vegans, even then you would have to eat a fuckton of quinoa to get a useful quantity. It's not bad if used as a grain though--I make it with some chicken broth and carrots and mushrooms and have it with chicken breasts; it's a nice alternative to rice.

Spirulina is overpriced hippie crap. By weight it has a lot of protein and some other nice stuff but it is incredibly expensive and to consume actually useful quantities of it would be prohibitively expensive, as well as pretty gross. 100g of spirulina costs like $10 and has 60g of protein.

I was thinking of using quinoa pasta in my cooking. Thank you for the clarifications on spirulina. If I want more protein I guess I'll just buy more whey.

bomblol
Jul 17, 2009

my first crapatar


How about fish/shrimp recipes? I can usually bullshit something for chicken or turkey but when it come to these I'm at a loss. I usually just saute the shrimp and bake the fish, but neither are particularly flavorful.


VVV: whydirt I know the place you're talking about and I love it.

bomblol fucked around with this message at Nov 27, 2012 around 16:11

whydirt
Apr 18, 2001


Gaz Posting Brigade

I hope it's not rude to make requests, but I'd love a recipe for a Turkish red lentil soup. My wife and I used to go to a locally owned Turkish restaurant all the time back when we lived in Bloomington, Indiana, but we've since moved away to a smaller town where our options for eating out are much more limited.

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

slinkimalinki
Jan 17, 2010

Through moonlight and shadow she'd prowl and she'd pry.


bomblol posted:

I usually just saute the shrimp and bake the fish, but neither are particularly flavorful.

Do you saute your shrimp with chilli flakes and garlic? That's drat tasty. Shrimp is also excellent in a Thai-style soup (such as a Tom Yum).

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • Post
  • Reply
«11 »