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gohuskies
Oct 23, 2010




Shoes are an all-too-often forgotten part of an outfit. Wearing shoes that fit well and look good are an important part to dressing well.

It's helpful to start by giving some examples of types of dress shoes and defining some terms. A lot of people use different names for all this stuff at times but the definitions here are fairly widely accepted.

Balmoral


Blucher


Of dress shoes that have laces, the two main categories are balmorals and bluchers. The difference between them has to do with the lacing, as you can see in the pictures. The balmoral has the lacing on the vamp (the top of the shoe) itself with the tongue covered, whereas the blucher has the lacing over a more open "mouth" with the tongue exposed. The balmoral style is “dressier”, but there generally aren't rules about what you are allowed to wear either style with, unless you are wearing them in a conservative dress environment, like a stuffy old-school law firm. Balmorals are sometimes referred to oxfords and bluchers sometimes referred to as derbys – however, some people use “oxford” to refer to any kind of shoe with laces, and since oxford also is used in reference to shirts and so many other things, I think there's less ambiguity in language to use the balmoral/blucher terminology.

Cap Toe


The classic dress shoe is the basic cap toe. Plain but with a cap across the toe, the black cap toe is the ideal shoe for job interviews and other environments when dressing safely and conservatively matters. It's not what you would wear to a party but it's the kind of shoe that every man should have on hand for when they need it.

Broguing


Broguing is the little holes in the designs on shoes. Broguing makes shoes more casual and flashier. Broguing was orginally for shoes that would be worn in swamps and other wet areas, where the little holes let the water out when one's feet got wet. Nowadays, they are rarely worn in those kind of situations, but they look good. Broguing need not be as extensive as in this example – as we saw in the balmoral/blucher example pictures above, broguing can be as simple as across the cap toe of a cap toe shoe. When broguing is on the toe of a shoe, past the cap, it's referred to as a “medallion”. When it's on the border of the cap toe, it's just a brogued toe line.

Wingtip


The wingtip is a broguing design. “Wingtip” refers to the swoopy line of broguing that kind of makes a "B" over the foot and leads back down to the sole at the mid-foot. Since wingtips have more broguing than nearly all other shoes, they are considered more casual and flashy and less conservative than the examples of broguing above.

Longwing

The longwing is a fairly rare wingtip variation where the broguing swoop over the foot reaches all the way around to the back of the shoe, rather than going down to the sole around the mid-foot.

Plain Toe


The plain toe is, well, plain. Plain toes actually usually end up being more casual because they often are bluchers, have rubber or otherwise more casual soles and are often made from more casual materials like suede. The example in this picture has a bit of a casual look because of its thick sole, for example. But they aren't always casual, as we'll see later - plain toes can be very formal when in patent leather.


The shoes we've seen so far have all been regular calfskin, but dress shoes can be made in other materials as well.

Suede


Suede is a more casual material than calfskin, but it looks great. A suede plain toe blucher is a classic dark denim/sport coat or blazer kind of shoe. Suede generally works a bit better during the day, when the texture can be seen in the light. At night or under artificial light, suede often just looks like a regular shoe.

Shell Cordovan


Shell cordovan is made from tougher leather from the butt of a horse. It's tougher and more resilient to the elements, it's much more expensive, and it's often shinier. It can be tough to tell the difference between calfskin and cordovan just by looking at it sometimes, but it can be done. Compare the black cordovan cap toe here to the black calfskin cap toe shown for the “cap toe” example. Cordovan often comes in a burgundy color, but I don't think there's a reason for that besides tradition.

Patent Leather


Patent leather is the most formal of leathers. Patent leather is usually used in shoes to be worn with tuxedos at formal events. It's not the kind of shoe you'd wear to work. Most people don't own patent leather since it is specialized, and well-polished black calfskin can replace it in a pinch. But if you want to really do black tie right, you need patent leather. The classic black tie shoe is a patent leather plain toe or a velvet slipper.


Boots can be dress shoes as well, though less often are the suit-appropriate.

Boot


This is a fairly casual boot, to the point where it's almost tough to include it. Not only is the wingtip broguing casual, but the eyelets are large and accentuated. This boot probably wouldn't be appropriate to wear with a suit, but dark denim and blazer would be fine.

Dress Boot


This is a true dress boot, that could be worn with a suit. Notice that the eyelets are different from the previous boot example – much dressier. It's basically a regular dress shoe that just goes up the ankle farther.

Chukka Boot


The chukka boot or ankle boot is in between a shoe and a boot. Often suede, the chukka is a nice casual option but they can be suit-appropriate in calfskin in black or dark brown.


While laces are dressier than anything without laces, there still are some dress shoe options that don't have laces.

Monk Strap


The monk strap is just a buckle securing the shoe shut instead of laces. This picture is of a double monk strap, with two buckles instead of one, but the principle is the same. Single monk straps are dressier, since the strap would be concealed by the pants more often than the double, when at least one will be visible pretty much always. Double monk straps are flashy and are very trendy right now and they may be on the second half of their 15 minutes of fame, so anyone buying them should be doing it because they actually like them, not just because internet style icons love them.

Loafer


Loafers are casual, but can be made in colors and designs that otherwise mirror real dress shoes, and some people do wear them in dress settings. Loafers have their own kind of designs and ornaments, rarely having the broguing like lace-ups. Horse bits, little flaps, tassels (see below), and other details are common. I wouldn't wear loafers to a job interview but some people like them and get away with them with suits.

Tassel Loafer


The tassel is probably the most common loafer ornamentation. They make you look like an old guy. Some people like that, but be aware.


There are other terms and types of shoes, and obviously combinations of these terms that don't have examples shown here, but most dress shoes fall into these general categories.

Besides the design of the shoe, the color also has a great deal to do with the dressiness of the shoe. Generally, the lighter the color, the more casual. Black is the safest and most conservative, while a lighter walnut shouts “Hey everyone, look at my shoes!” In terms of what goes with what, a lot of people have personal rules about, for example, whether it's okay to wear anything but black shoes with navy, but this largely comes down to personal taste. Black shoes are required for black suits or pants but otherwise, people can use their own judgment. People use different terms for different shades but the basic darker is more conservative, lighter is flashier continuum generally holds and these shades are just examples.

Black


The safest and most conservative color. Also for formal occasions. The only color shoe appropriate with black pants or a black suit.

Brown


Conservative without being black.

Burgundy


Brown with a reddish tinge, which you can bring out even more with polish if you want.

Bourbon


Another shade of brown.

Walnut


Most casual color as well as flashiest. Draws the most attention to the shoe of any color, for better or for worse.

Sizing can be tricky with dress shoes since some models can be longer and narrower than most other shoes their size. Different shoes from different manufacturers will have different sizing as well. There are some rules of thumb (shoes on the popular Allen Edmonds 5 last, go up one width and down one length from normal and you should be close) but often you'll have to try them on in person, either at a store or by ordering and returning.


Shoe care is also very important. Good dress shoes are very expensive and you want to protect that investment. It's important to use cedar shoe trees with them. Sierra Trading Post almost always has them on sale and sometimes Nordstroms sells them for under $20 as well. I use shoe cream on my shoes pretty often and I polish them occasionally. There are plenty of sources for shoe cream and polish, I use Allen Edmonds polish since most of my dress shoes are from them so I'm confident the colors will line up.

Here's a video of a guy doing a good shoe polishing ritual. It doesn't always need to be quite so involved as all that, but that's how to do it right. You can buy little kits that have everything you need, but it's often cheaper to buy the stuff separately and make your own shoe care kit. The previous OP had a pretty decent quote with some instructions:

Dictator posted:

Make sure you get proper shoe-trees. Not the half ones with a spiral thing in it that you have to bend over but ones that fill the whole shoe up, I recommend Seedler, Bexley or Juniper Ridge as affordable options.

Polishing/cleaning is something every man does differently, my procedure is as follows:
-Brush of any dirt with a dry horsehair brush
-Apply a thin layer of shoecream with a soft cloth (I use an old cotton tshirt)
-Apply a bit of extra cream with a horsehair brush, especially useful to get to the spots just above rims of the soles
-Let the cream sink in for a few minutes, wait till the shoes feel 'dry'

-Use a horsehair brush to thoroughly brush off any excess cream

Now the shoe is clean and the colour regained. But you wanted shine, now didn't you?

-After brushing off the shoecream, get another soft cloth and apply shoe-wax (circular motions)
-Let the wax dry in, the shoe probably looks not shiny at all ("dof" is what I'd call it in Dutch). Now get a horsehair brush and brush your babies up.
-Get your soft cloth and wipe your shoes, it should produce a nice shine
-Secret ingredient, everyone has its own, mine is to wipe my shoes with a microfibre cloth for extra shine. Nylon stockings are also commonly used for this purpose.


As for brands in shoe care: I like to use La Cordonnerie Anglaise or Saphir (and a special brand called Royal Treatment, but that's not available everywhere).


In terms of what shoe you should buy, that depends on you. What do you need it for? What is expected of you? How much are you willing to spend? In person or online ordering? Are you willing to take a risk with eBay?

I hope this helps to offer some definitions of terms and some example pictures so people can learn about the different styles and get an idea of what they are interested in and what is appropriate for their situation.

gohuskies fucked around with this message at Dec 13, 2012 around 08:56

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esquilax
Jan 3, 2003



Good OP.

I don't think your example for shell cordovan is actually shell cordovan though. I know you got it from the Allen Edmonds (AE) site but I wouldn't be surprised if it's calf.

The major difference between a shell cordovan shoe and a calfskin shoe (which are most shoes >$150) is how they wear. To compare, here are two well-worn pairs.
(pics stolen from styleforum)

A calfskin shoe will tend to wrinkle as it wears, like so.


A cordovan shoe will tend to ripple, like so.



Is shell cordovan worth the premium? I don't normally think so, but if you've already got a good rotation of shoes, the style is a good one for shell, and you've got an extra $200 to burn, it certainly looks very nice.

Yip Yips
Sep 25, 2007
yip-yip-yip-yip-yip

The cap toe and shell cordovan pictures are definitely the same.

Sunshine89
Nov 22, 2009


Should I buy rubber or metal taps?

Stink Billyums
Jul 7, 2006
MAGNUM

Since we're correcting, cordovan is horse butt, not cow, which is why it's so expensive. Because there's a law against slaughtering horses in the US there aren't enough hides to go around so we're left with one tannery making cordovan domestically, it's just scarce rather than difficult to make.

esquilax
Jan 3, 2003



Sunshine89 posted:

Should I buy rubber or metal taps?

Rubber or plastic. Metal ones are somewhat slippery, really loud, and they set off metal detectors. Even plastic ones last a really long time and are cheap to replace.

Thoren
May 28, 2008


Any suggestions for dress shoes on a budget? Also, what are the general rules for matching shoes and belt? In casual situations? Formal?

I really want a pair of walnut or bourbon dress shoes. It's a drat shame the Long Wing isn't more popular because that is one beautiful design.

No Wave
Sep 18, 2005




esquilax posted:

Is shell cordovan worth the premium? I don't normally think so, but if you've already got a good rotation of shoes, the style is a good one for shell, and you've got an extra $200 to burn, it certainly looks very nice.
Wait - the exact opposite. Cordovan is excellent if you don't have a rotation of shoes because it wears so well and lasts so long. If you've got ten pairs of dress shoes the durability of cordovan is less valuable than if you have three.

I wouldn't ever wear cordovan with a suit, but my understanding was that the dress shoes thread referred to basically anything made out of leather that was at all classically styled. Many people will come here for shoes to wear with jeans, in which case cordovan is almost the ideal.

mr. mephistopheles
Dec 2, 2009



You Look Like poo poo > Men's Dress Shoes Thread - http://www.allenedmonds.com/

I know this thread recommends AE more than any other shoe brand, but you should probably add some brands and pricing tiers to the OP like the old thread had (dogshit brands, decent budget brands, good midrange brands, top tier brands).

Thanks for making the OP, though.

gohuskies
Oct 23, 2010


mr. mephistopheles posted:

You Look Like poo poo > Men's Dress Shoes Thread - http://www.allenedmonds.com/

I know this thread recommends AE more than any other shoe brand, but you should probably add some brands and pricing tiers to the OP like the old thread had (dogshit brands, decent budget brands, good midrange brands, top tier brands).

Thanks for making the OP, though.

All of the pics are AE because AE has examples of every type of dress shoe, all shot the same way so it's easy to compare. I'd be happy to edit in pricing tiers (the previous OP's tiers were a little on the high side) or pics of shoes actually on feet and not floating in space. I already fixed saying that cordovan was from cow butt as opposed to horse butt, which the thread corrected me on.

esquilax
Jan 3, 2003



No Wave posted:

Wait - the exact opposite. Cordovan is excellent if you don't have a rotation of shoes because it wears so well and lasts so long. If you've got ten pairs of dress shoes the durability of cordovan is less valuable than if you have three.

I wouldn't ever wear cordovan with a suit, but my understanding was that the dress shoes thread referred to basically anything made out of leather that was at all classically styled. Many people will come here for shoes to wear with jeans, in which case cordovan is almost the ideal.

You have a point but I would not recommend someone spending the extra money on shell shoes unless they have developed a sense of personal style, which only really comes with experience. Paying twice as much for shoes that last an extra 10 years won't help when you hate the style after 2 (or they become unfashionable). It should really be treated as a premium rather than as something that is worth the investment. If someone comes in here asking if they should buy shell for their first or second pair of dress shoes because they heard that they last longer, the answer should be no.

edit: Plus if you don't have a good rotation, the extra money is better used by adding variety. With the money it takes to buy a cordovan AE Dalton, you can buy a regular AE Dalton plus an AE Strand. Or buy even more, since cordovan shoes almost never go on sale.

Also I don't see anything wrong with wearing shell cordovan shoes with a suit.

esquilax fucked around with this message at Dec 13, 2012 around 14:52

butros
Aug 2, 2007

"The referee is always right."
-Heyneke Meyer


esquilax posted:

You have a point but I would not recommend someone spending the extra money on shell shoes unless they have developed a sense of personal style, which only really comes with experience. Paying twice as much for shoes that last an extra 10 years won't help when you hate the style after 2 (or they become unfashionable). It should really be treated as a premium rather than as something that is worth the investment. If someone comes in here asking if they should buy shell for their first or second pair of dress shoes because they heard that they last longer, the answer should be no.

This. I got a great deal on a pair of Alden shell chukkas back in 2009 maybe because "CORDOVAN!!!!" and never wore them. They didn't work with my style and I hated the way they looked on my feet. Ended up realizing that fact and selling them a year later (for a profit ).

Around the same time, I bought pairs of AE Sanfords, a pair of Church's custom grades and a pair of Ferragamos for <$100 for the three combined, and those get a ton of wear because they work much much better with my style.

TheNothingNew
Nov 10, 2008


gohuskies posted:

Cordovan often comes in a burgundy color, but I don't think there's a reason for that besides tradition.

Tanned cowhide ages to a brown shade, while tanned horsehide ages to a red shade. So yeah, tradition basically.

OP looks good. I got why you went with the pictures you did, and I think it works. A pricing tier wouldn't be out of place.

Aramek
Dec 22, 2007

Cutest tumor in all of Oncology!

I seem to recall a consensus that Rockport Oxfords were generally looked down upon (as "for poors") in the last shoe thread, but, I've had a pair of these for about nine months now, and, even though I really like them, I'm worried about how gauche they are. I think the oxblood colour really looks pretty cool in sunlight especially.

Costlier shoes aren't totally feasible in my budget at the moment, but some of those AE's look pretty good, so, those'll be the next big purchase.

vvv Okay, cool, thanks! Everyone else in the clinic wears running shoes, and I've just never liked how they looked/felt.

Aramek fucked around with this message at Dec 13, 2012 around 19:11

Just-In-Timeberlake
Aug 18, 2003

iSheep krew represent


Aramek posted:

I seem to recall a consensus that Rockport Oxfords were generally looked down upon (as "for poors") in the last shoe thread, but, I've had a pair of these for about nine months now, and, even though I really like them, I'm worried about how gauche they are. I think the oxblood colour really looks pretty cool in sunlight especially.

Costlier shoes aren't totally feasible in my budget at the moment, but some of those AE's look pretty good, so, those'll be the next big purchase.

Those fall firmly into my "don't notice category", which isn't a bad thing. I almost never notice shoes unless they're really bad, totally clash with the rest of the outfit, or are loving amazing. Those I wouldn't even spare a second glance on.

Just-In-Timeberlake
Aug 18, 2003

iSheep krew represent


Quick question on shoe trees.

Should I leave them in all the time? I've read they only need to be in for a few hours after wearing them online, but AE says they should be in there whenever your feet aren't.

No Wave
Sep 18, 2005




esquilax posted:

You have a point but I would not recommend someone spending the extra money on shell shoes unless they have developed a sense of personal style, which only really comes with experience. Paying twice as much for shoes that last an extra 10 years won't help when you hate the style after 2 (or they become unfashionable). It should really be treated as a premium rather than as something that is worth the investment. If someone comes in here asking if they should buy shell for their first or second pair of dress shoes because they heard that they last longer, the answer should be no.

edit: Plus if you don't have a good rotation, the extra money is better used by adding variety. With the money it takes to buy a cordovan AE Dalton, you can buy a regular AE Dalton plus an AE Strand. Or buy even more, since cordovan shoes almost never go on sale.
But by this argument, we really shouldn't be buying AE and better dress shoes at all...? I can only really justify these purchases by their longevity. If they're effectively disposable, shouldn't I just buy shoes that reflect that in their price?

Plus, if resale time ever does come, Cordovan maintains its value much, much better than calf does. But obviously every purchase should be seriously thought about. I always saw that as the premise of this thread and high-end footwear in general.

guppy
Sep 21, 2004

sting like a byob

Quick note on cordovan: I don't own any myself, but if I remember correctly they require slightly different care with respect to polishing etc. Make sure you look into that before you gently caress up some nice shoes.

Harry
Jun 13, 2003


Any recommendations for shoes that you do a decent amount of walking in? I'm going to start walking to work (~2ish miles) and want to find a decent pair.

DevNull
Apr 4, 2007

And sometimes is seen a strange spot in the sky
A human being that was given to fly



I put these same links in the boot thread, but all three are great places to pick up a pair of Alden boots/shoes.

http://leathersoulhawaii.com/
http://www.unionmadegoods.com/
http://www.epauletshop.com/servlet/StoreFront

Each has a few styles that are only made for them and unique to the store.

I got some boots online from Epaulet, and have been into Union Made and Leather Soul in person. All three of them are great shops.

GZA Genius
Jan 29, 2009


Harry posted:

Any recommendations for shoes that you do a decent amount of walking in? I'm going to start walking to work (~2ish miles) and want to find a decent pair.

On that same thought, I just started Expediting at a fairly nice restaurant ($25-$35 per entree) and I need some work shoes that are comfy, but nice enough to wear while running around the restaurant.

No Wave
Sep 18, 2005




GZA Genius posted:

On that same thought, I just started Expediting at a fairly nice restaurant ($25-$35 per entree) and I need some work shoes that are comfy, but nice enough to wear while running around the restaurant.
I'd ask your coworkers/the industry thread in GWS (or GWC, I guess). You'll want them to be slip resistant and that's sort of outside the scope of this thread.

esquilax
Jan 3, 2003



No Wave posted:

But by this argument, we really shouldn't be buying AE and better dress shoes at all...? I can only really justify these purchases by their longevity. If they're effectively disposable, shouldn't I just buy shoes that reflect that in their price?

Plus, if resale time ever does come, Cordovan maintains its value much, much better than calf does. But obviously every purchase should be seriously thought about. I always saw that as the premise of this thread and high-end footwear in general.


There is a balance to be struck between quality and variety in your shoe rotation. Having 20 pairs of florsheims or having one pair of Lobbs are both less desirable than having 4-6 pairs in various styles and colors. For the price of one pair of cordovan you can buy two pairs of the same quality. If you like cordovan and have the money, great! But in many cases the money is better spent elsewhere.

My argument is, at its core, about value for the money. I don't think cordovan is automatically worth the premium over the same shoe in calfskin. Nor is cordovan automatically a better choice ignoring price. Some styles look better in calf, some in cordovan. The difference in longevity is also not really that much; properly cared for both will last over a decade, and both will need to be resoled the same number of times in between.

Koaxke
Jan 18, 2009


To add on to the previous recommendations for the OP, you should add jodhpurs in there too. Those are some drat sexy pieces of footwear that should be represented.

No Wave
Sep 18, 2005




esquilax posted:

My argument is, at its core, about value for the money. I don't think cordovan is automatically worth the premium over the same shoe in calfskin. Nor is cordovan automatically a better choice ignoring price. Some styles look better in calf, some in cordovan. The difference in longevity is also not really that much; properly cared for both will last over a decade, and both will need to be resoled the same number of times in between.
I don't disagree with any of the first part. But I will say that, realistically, almost nobody really properly looks after their shoes, and frankly I'm a lot happier in shoes that don't really have to be looked after (and still look playeriffic).

If I've represented that all shoes should be cordo, I apologize - it's a very specific material that works especially well with broguing and indies. However, I think putting $200 into making shoes cordovan isn't something you do only when you have money to "burn", which seems to imply that it's a wasteful gesture. It can be a fantastic decision and a very worthwhile expenditure.

guppy
Sep 21, 2004

sting like a byob

Koaxke posted:

To add on to the previous recommendations for the OP, you should add jodhpurs in there too. Those are some drat sexy pieces of footwear that should be represented.

I loved the way the jodhpur boots in the last OP looked, but that doesn't seem to be a categorization a lot of companies use. I never had much luck finding them online outside of a few specialty vendors.

Koaxke
Jan 18, 2009


No Wave posted:

I don't disagree with any of the first part. But I will say that, realistically, almost nobody really properly looks after their shoes, and frankly I'm a lot happier in shoes that don't really have to be looked after (and still look playeriffic).

If I've represented that all shoes should be cordo, I apologize - it's a very specific material that works especially well with broguing and indies. However, I think putting $200 into making shoes cordovan isn't something you do only when you have money to "burn", which seems to imply that it's a wasteful gesture. It can be a fantastic decision and a very worthwhile expenditure.

C&J makes a pair that looks like the ones from the old OP. They cost around $600 IIRC which isn't terrible.

esquilax
Jan 3, 2003



Koaxke posted:

C&J makes a pair that looks like the ones from the old OP. They cost around $600 IIRC which isn't terrible.

Loake makes a reasonable pair branded under Herring for $250. Only black is available right now but if they ever release more of the brown ones I'd consider it.

I think Loake is one of the better options at the $150-$300 retail level, along with Grenson and possibly Barker (not sure about Barker, never seen a pair IRL).

Dictator.
May 13, 2007
European

esquilax posted:



I think Loake is one of the better options at the $150-$300 retail level, along with Grenson and possibly Barker (not sure about Barker, never seen a pair IRL).

Don't forget Meermin

Mandalay
Mar 16, 2007

WoW Forums Refugee

DevNull posted:

I put these same links in the boot thread, but all three are great places to pick up a pair of Alden boots/shoes.

http://leathersoulhawaii.com/
http://www.unionmadegoods.com/
http://www.epauletshop.com/servlet/StoreFront

Each has a few styles that are only made for them and unique to the store.

I got some boots online from Epaulet, and have been into Union Made and Leather Soul in person. All three of them are great shops.

There's also jcrew.

DevNull
Apr 4, 2007

And sometimes is seen a strange spot in the sky
A human being that was given to fly



Mandalay posted:

There's also jcrew.

I forgot about them, but yeah. They have their own exclusive stuff too it looks like: http://www.jcrew.com/mens_category/...denForJCrew.jsp

M.C. McMic
Nov 8, 2008

The Weight room
Is your friend


It looks like the Allen Edmonds Chukkas (the "Amok" featured in the OP) are on clearance, but there's a lot of comments about squeaking on the website. Is it worth picking a pair of these up? It looks like Allen Edmonds is very responsive to complaints at the very least, and the shoes look like a good deal.

esquilax
Jan 3, 2003



M.C. McMic posted:

It looks like the Allen Edmonds Chukkas (the "Amok" featured in the OP) are on clearance, but there's a lot of comments about squeaking on the website. Is it worth picking a pair of these up? It looks like Allen Edmonds is very responsive to complaints at the very least, and the shoes look like a good deal.

It depends why they are squeaking. My AE boots tend to squeak because of leather rubbing on leather, but some talcum powder fixes it and only needs to be applied every few weeks. If they are squeaking for some other issue it might be harder to fix.

Koaxke
Jan 18, 2009


Is there any way to permanently darken my Clark's DBs? I have the beeswax color, and they are the perfect shade of brown after I apply some Obenauf's, but they lighten up after a few days.

No Wave
Sep 18, 2005




M.C. McMic posted:

It looks like the Allen Edmonds Chukkas (the "Amok" featured in the OP) are on clearance, but there's a lot of comments about squeaking on the website. Is it worth picking a pair of these up? It looks like Allen Edmonds is very responsive to complaints at the very least, and the shoes look like a good deal.
It's a tough call, especially as the closest replacement (Alden) is literally three times as expensive as the clearance price.

If the shoe ends up working, it would be a very nice deal. I decided not to go for it, as in addition to the squeaking the eyelet stance is a little awkward and the suede doesn't have much texture and I'm trying not to buy things unless I think they're perfect. But if you do pull the trigger I'll be curious to know how it goes.

M.C. McMic
Nov 8, 2008

The Weight room
Is your friend


No Wave posted:

It's a tough call, especially as the closest replacement (Alden) is literally three times as expensive as the clearance price.

If the shoe ends up working, it would be a very nice deal. I decided not to go for it, as in addition to the squeaking the eyelet stance is a little awkward and the suede doesn't have much texture and I'm trying not to buy things unless I think they're perfect. But if you do pull the trigger I'll be curious to know how it goes.

I went ahead and ordered the Amok in width E instead of my normal D (due to lack of options). We'll see what happens. If I have to return them, I will. It's worth the effort.

No Wave
Sep 18, 2005




M.C. McMic posted:

I went ahead and ordered the Amok in width E instead of my normal D (due to lack of options). We'll see what happens. If I have to return them, I will. It's worth the effort.
fail... you should have recognized the whispering from the shoe gods for what it was... But I do wish you the best.

caluki
Nov 12, 2000


I'm thinking about getting these Tricker's: http://www.sierratradingpost.com/tr...&colorFamily=01

With discounts the total would be around $300. Good purchase at that price? What color belt to people usually wear with that kind of sandy color? Is brown ok, or would it be better to get a lighter belt like this: http://www.amazon.com/Allen-Edmonds...2/dp/B00596BSTM

M.C. McMic
Nov 8, 2008

The Weight room
Is your friend


No Wave posted:

fail... you should have recognized the whispering from the shoe gods for what it was... But I do wish you the best.

I'm not super familiar with their sizing, but I do know I wear an 8.5 to 9 in length. For all I know an 8.5E fits me perfectly. Might as well try for $100 off.

What do I have to lose besides time?

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No Wave
Sep 18, 2005




M.C. McMic posted:

I'm not super familiar with their sizing, but I do know I wear an 8.5 to 9 in length. For all I know an 8.5E fits me perfectly. Might as well try for $100 off.

What do I have to lose besides time?
True. I find a huge cognitive bias in myself and others in wanting to find reasons not to return things, so I avoid putting myself in the position if possible. But if you're aware of that, np

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