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suboptimal
Oct 27, 2008

Ba-dam ba-DUMMMMMM


Mountain Biking Megathread/Q&A
Hello there! This is your one-stop shop for anything related to mountain biking. Whether you've been riding for 10 years and have a garage full of bikes worth more than most people's cars or you're completely new to the sport, this thread is for you. Use this thread to talk about your most recent epic ride, to meet up with other mountain bikers in your area, and to masturbate/complain over how expensive your gear is.

What this thread is NOT for:
Discussion of road/commuting cycling
Bashing on other mountain bikers/styles (or bashing on other cyclists in general)

Riding Disciplines/Styles

Cross-Country (XC)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=irIXRM9mmso
The most common style of riding- XC encompasses everything from more leisurely, long-distance rides to full-on spandex-clad sprinting. XC is where most mountain bikers get their start, and ultimately, it's where many choose to stay.

XC bikes are similarly diverse and are largely dependent based on the preferences, skill, terrain commonly ridden and intent of the rider in question. Many XC riders choose to ride hardtails or full-suspension bikes depending on their own subjective needs; you technically don't need full suspension to ride ANY trail (but it sure does help sometimes.) XC bikes are usually very light, (under 30 pounds for most, some much lower).

All-Mountain (AM)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5z_-LlgccN8
All-mountain should be regarded as more than XC, but less than freeride. Typical AM riders will want to be able to ride technical terrain both up AND down the trail, so most AM bikes are designed to be beefier than their lighter XC counterparts but without the overall bulk of a freeride or downhill bike.

Freeride
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0zLuqKNKOqs
Freeride is built around jumping, dropping and going fast. These bikes will feature a lot of suspension (6"+ both front and rear), weigh significantly more than their XC or AM buds, and generally perform a lot better pointed downhill than they will pointed up.

Within freeride, there's other subsets, including slopestyle and big mountain. Slopestyle borrows heavily from similar snowboarding competitions, with a lot of emphasis on huge tricks launched off large, machine-cut jumps and style. Big mountain generally refers to launching off large, natural terrain features like huge drops and occasionally cliffs.

Downhill (DH)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uwsLxrOlGGE
Downhill shares some similarities with freeride, but with less of a focus on tricks or stunts. Built to take a beating and handle at high speeds, DH bikes are very heavy (think 30+ pounds), but new technological advancements are bringing the weight down each season.

Both freeride and DH fall under the umbrella of "gravity" riding, i.e. going with gravity (going downslope) rather than fighting it (climbing back up.) Downhill bikes differ from their freeride counterparts in terms of geometry- amongst many other things; a DH bike will have a very slack head tube angle for stable handling at high speeds and a lower bottom bracket than a freeride bike.

Racing is common for all of the above styles with perhaps the exception of freeride. Enduro racing is starting to become bigger, and it's seemingly a hybrid of XC and DH racing where the focus is on descending, but the course itself will entail some moderate climbing.

There are of course other types of riding like dirt jumping, trials riding, racing, cyclocross, mountain bike touring and other forms, but these are the most commonly encountered and I'll let others chime in about those.

Looking for a bike? Here is a link to MTBR's subforums for mountain bike manufacturers.

Frequently Asked Questions

1. I'm looking to get into mountain biking! What kind of bike should I get?

This answer will vary on an individual basis. You should first spend some time researching what kind of riding options you have near you, looking at what others are riding, and assessing your general comfort level and knowledge of cycling in general. Ask around on what shops are good or cater to mountain bikers, and go there. A good bike shop worker should be more concerned about sending you home with the best bike for you rather than overselling you, but unfortunately, it doesn't always work that way. Take into account your maximum budget, and the terrain you'll be riding the most. Go to the major manufacturer sites - Specialized, Trek, Giant - and look at the bikes in your price range. These three major manufacturers have offerings from entry level to high end, and you can't go wrong in choosing one of their bikes. Consider the bikes that are available and then consider the terrain you'll be riding - are there lots of extended climbs? Rocky and rooty terrain? Is it tame and mellow? These kinds of questions can help you decide, or can help you bring the right information to this thread so we can help.

Most people tend to think that beginners should start off with a hardtail, but of course, this is all subject to your local terrain and what kind of riding you'd like to do. Expect to spend at least $600-800 USD for a fairly decent new one; also check with your LBS (local bike shop) to see if they have any deals on last year's models. Used bikes can also be a good way to enter the sport, but make sure to check the frame for any deformities, cracks, or anything beyond normal wear and tear on the frame itself and make sure the components are in good condition. Bring a friend who knows something about bikes with you if you don't know what to look for.

What's a 29er and should I get one?
A 29er is a mountain bike with wheels measuring 29 inches in diameter. This allows them to roll more easily over obstacles, but they do have arguable drawbacks like not feeling as nimble on the trail as their smaller-wheeled brethren. People will argue all day long about the pros and cons, but the best way to decide is to throw a leg over one and give it a shot. Only you can tell if it's the style that suits you.

To compound things, bike manufacturers are also starting to really push the 650b wheelset (27.5 inches in diameter, so right in between 26" and 29") for more downhill/freeride type riding.

I found a sweet, full-suspension model with disc brakes at Wal-Mart for only $150! It even comes with a free kickstand! Is this a good deal or WHAT!?

You will die a horrible, horrible death and no one will mourn you. Mountain biking has a fairly high barrier to entry in terms of cost, and department store bikes should not be considered adequate for riding down anything more technical than a gentle, grassy hill.

Bikes are complicated! How do I know what I should call each part?
Ignore the 1990s geocities web design and start here. This is by no means an exhaustive glossary, but it's generally okay.

What's singletrack?
Singletrack refers to a type of trail that is wide enough to accommodate one rider. It does not refer to the type of terrain- singletrack can be extremely smooth and polished or full of roots and rocks.

Doubletrack and fire roads are also common riding terrain.

My friend rides downhill and says that XC riders are all lame. My XC riding friend says downhillers are fat shitheads. Who's right?
This ought to settle that debate and pretty much every other one.

Hey, I've decided that I really enjoy this mountain biking thing and would like to help out with advocacy, trailbuilding, etc. How do I get started with this?
Your first stop should be the International Mountain Bike Association's (IMBA) local clubs page. IMBA helps local cycling clubs/cycling advocacy organizations with lots of things, including trailbuilding projects, and you can probably find a local organization that would be happy to have your time, effort, money, or all of the above. If you can't find a local organization, talk with the guys at your LBS and see what else is out there- some clubs may not be officially related with IMBA and may not be on the website.

Resources
Previous SA MTB megathread
Mountain Bike Review (MTBR): A site that hosts a lot of reviews and other mountain biking related content, and also has a large selection of subforums for different riding styles, components and regions across the world.
Singletracks: Hosts similar content to MTBR, but most of the guys writing reviews are simply bike enthusiasts who enjoy sharing things with their counterparts. The real gem on singletracks is their trail database- this is a great way to find out what's rideable in your area and for planning trips.
Pinkbike Caters to more of the gravity crowd, with lots of pictures, videos, gear reviews, etc. Avoid the comments at the bottom of each page unless you love being bombarded with juvenile flame wars.
Bike magazine: A good, well-written publication put out by the same company that publishes Surfer and Skateboarder magazines. Gear reviews seem to cater to the rider with a huge checking account, but please do swoon over all the awesome photos and great trip reports.
Dirt Rag magazine: Started in the late 1980s, Dirt Rag is one of the oldest mountain bike magazines out there. Still, it has aged well and is a fun read.
Fabien Barel's AM Skills: I'm not sure how long this video will be up, but this apparently came from a free DVD released with a UK magazine. There's some great tips for any level of rider here, but mostly skewed towards the all mountain demographic.
Sheldon Brown's site: Lots of good tips, mechanical information and repair guides here.

suboptimal fucked around with this message at Dec 16, 2012 around 23:19

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suboptimal
Oct 27, 2008

Ba-dam ba-DUMMMMMM


(this post reserved for further expansion if necessary)

davebo
Nov 15, 2006

Parallel lines do meet, but they do it incognito

Awesome, thanks for doing that. First page needs photos to visually lure passers-by into this sport.

taqueso
Mar 8, 2004
...






taqueso fucked around with this message at Dec 13, 2012 around 23:24

me your dad
Jul 25, 2006



davebo posted:

Awesome, thanks for doing that. First page needs photos to visually lure passers-by into this sport.


gently caress that section in the summer

davebo
Nov 15, 2006

Parallel lines do meet, but they do it incognito

me your dad posted:

gently caress that section in the summer

Haha, I remember you saying you hated that, but I still think it's a nice photo. It looks a lot nicer than it feels.

me your dad
Jul 25, 2006



I don't even know why I post in this thread anymore. I've ridden my bike two times in the last two months

CaseFace McGee
Mar 27, 2007

Where did you learn to drive?


me your dad posted:

I don't even know why I post in this thread anymore. I've ridden my bike two times in the last two months

That's twice more than I've ridden my bike in the same timeframe But there's a fatbike race in town shortly and I might bring my skinny 2.0" tires out to the fat fun.

I'm surprised the OP doesn't mention anything about our wise overlord Sheldon Brown for his database of tips and instructions for the do-it-yourself bicycle repairman.

rustybikes
Mar 12, 2004



Hello new thread!!



I recently had my ACL (and other tendons) in my left knee rebuilt, and this serves as a kind of inspirational photo. I miss that optional - it was a lot of fun!

Egg in soup
Nov 29, 2006

Yeah, up yours.

To anyone on who might be on the fence about getting into the wonderful world of mountain biking I'd have to say that mountain biking has taken me to some of the most beautiful places that I've ever been, it's introduced me to some amazing people - many of whom are the best friends anyone could hope for and I've also had some of the best times of my life as a direct result of riding mountain bikes.

Here are a couple of fun videos that give a good insight into what downhilling is all about, riding the fine line between control and chaos.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1hvtKwrurAk

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4NhlCrcD5CQ

Painful Dart Bomb
May 22, 2012


Wooo biking! Here are two of my favorite videos.

The best DH run ever?
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EqYgAX6D43Q

"How does Danny Hart sit down with balls that big?"


Some hilarious carnage
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LLFG9bwIbps

guy in a jetta
Aug 3, 2002

A twisted pictoral of phoenix, AZ



I know most of ya'll know this but I work in the warranty department at Santa Cruz Bicycles. If you have questions about mountain bike industry or warranty stuff I will answer them as best I can.

compressioncut
Sep 3, 2003

Eat knuckle, Fritz!

Thanks to Facebook, today I learned what a "sniper tranny" is:



(short, narrow transition that's hard to hit I guess)

Sinister Cyclist
Dec 25, 2010



Cool, new thread!



The OP omits street/trials/general urban messin' around which is for most riders readily accessible and a really fun way of honing your general skills.



Sinister Cyclist fucked around with this message at Dec 16, 2012 around 22:33

suboptimal
Oct 27, 2008

Ba-dam ba-DUMMMMMM


CaseFace McGee posted:

I'm surprised the OP doesn't mention anything about our wise overlord Sheldon Brown for his database of tips and instructions for the do-it-yourself bicycle repairman.

It's in there now. Also, if there are any other links you guys would like to see in there, let me know and I'll add them to the OP.

"Sinister Cyclist posted:

The OP omits street/trials/general urban messin' around which is for most riders readily accessible and a really fun way of honing your general skills.

If you'd like to write something up about it, please do so and I'll also add that into the OP.

Dead Man's Ham
Dec 2, 2002


Im in the market for a new bike now that I feel like I've beaten my entry level Giant around enough to justify stepping up in quality. I want to use bikes direct for money reasons since I really don't want to spend more then 800 or so bucks, but im finding the process pretty intimidating.

Right now im looking at these two and wondering what is driving the price difference between the models since their both XT hardtails. My understanding is that the components are the primary factor in the quality of a bike so what am I missing which promotes a 350 dollar price discrepancy and as someone who is getting into fairly difficult and technical trails is it worth looking into the more expensive one?
http://www.bikesdirect.com/products...tom_elite09.htm
http://www.bikesdirect.com/products...T_whitefork.htm

Blacknose
Jul 28, 2006

Meet frustration face to face
A point of view creates more waves
So lose some sleep and say you tried


The expensive one has hydraulic brakes rather than cables, which will make a huge difference in stopping power. It also has a pretty significant fork upgrade (Recon over a Dart). I'd pretty strongly advise you go for the more expensive option. hydraulic brakes and a decent fork will make a world of difference.

e; just to warn you the geometry on both is quite dated for properly technical riding in terms of head angle especially. You'll probably be fine but you may find technical descents are a bit of a handful with a frame that steep. I'd probably be looking for something for in the 69-67 degree range if you're going to be doing much tech descending.

Blacknose fucked around with this message at Dec 18, 2012 around 20:54

me your dad
Jul 25, 2006



Dead Man's Ham posted:

Im in the market for a new bike now that I feel like I've beaten my entry level Giant around enough to justify stepping up in quality. I want to use bikes direct for money reasons since I really don't want to spend more then 800 or so bucks, but im finding the process pretty intimidating.

Right now im looking at these two and wondering what is driving the price difference between the models since their both XT hardtails. My understanding is that the components are the primary factor in the quality of a bike so what am I missing which promotes a 350 dollar price discrepancy and as someone who is getting into fairly difficult and technical trails is it worth looking into the more expensive one?
http://www.bikesdirect.com/products...tom_elite09.htm
http://www.bikesdirect.com/products...T_whitefork.htm

What are the trails like where you ride? Do they have steep hills going up or down? Is it rocky, rooty, or smooth? Are there jumps or drops?

compressioncut
Sep 3, 2003

Eat knuckle, Fritz!

Blacknose posted:

e; just to warn you the geometry on both is quite dated for properly technical riding in terms of head angle especially. You'll probably be fine but you may find technical descents are a bit of a handful with a frame that steep. I'd probably be looking for something for in the 69-67 degree range if you're going to be doing much tech descending.

I'll reiterate. BD's 26" (tire) bikes are way less than state-of-the art, and the whole MTB catalog aren't the steals their road bikes can be. It seems to me that MTB design has reached a sort of equilibrium in the past few years (for now), but the BD designs are stuck right around the turn of the millennium.

Their 29ers look way, way better, compare http://www.bikesdirect.com/products...9_elite_xii.htm

Still helps to know what kind of stuff you're riding.

compressioncut
Sep 3, 2003

Eat knuckle, Fritz!

loving Giant. I didn't really investigate what they meant by "overdrive steerer" when I researched my bike, but I did after I had my wife get me a bunch of bike stuff for X-mas, including a stem. What it means is that the steerer tapers to 1.25" instead of everyone else in the world's 1.125".

So, I have a brand new Ragley 55mm stem that won't work for me. And here comes my question, probably the stupidest one I could come up with: would it be at all a good idea to ream the opening out the extra 1/8"? At a machine shop, not with my Dremel...

I can't get at it without wrecking the packaging, but there's about 1/4" wall thickness at the thinnest point on the stem. If the consensus is that this is a bad idea, I'll break down and order one from Giant for an extortionate amount. The Ragley came from CRC so returning it is no problem, although I'd sell it to anyone interested (31.8mm clamp, 1.125 steerer, 55mm length, anodized orange) http://www.chainreactioncycles.com/...x?ModelID=47923

Crazytroll
Feb 11, 2001

BEGGING FOR MERCY ONLY MAKES MY PENIS HARDER

Just because of the horrible poo poo that can happen in a stem failure, no one is going to advise you to make such a stem alteration.

Old 1.25" / 1-1/4" steerer clamp stems with 25.4mm handlebar clamp diameters should be fairly inexpensive; 1-1/4" stems used to be not-so-uncommon. Tandems and some early mountain bikes (Kleins and Gary Fishers) come to mind. Older stems probably don't befit any new mountain bike that comes with an oversized steerer, but it's an option.

compressioncut
Sep 3, 2003

Eat knuckle, Fritz!

I knew it was a stupid question but felt compelled to ask it.

I've got the return paperwork filled out, I'll just return it. No one I've found makes short stems for 1.25 steerers. A very few still offer long ones (100mm +), but that does me no good. Giant makes appropriate stems, but for twice the price of a decent aftermarket piece and heavier, too. Giant Canada doesn't offer the reasonably priced models, go figure.

Hadlock
Nov 9, 2004

Welcome to the Jungle.


.

Crazytroll
Feb 11, 2001

BEGGING FOR MERCY ONLY MAKES MY PENIS HARDER

compressioncut posted:

I knew it was a stupid question but felt compelled to ask it.

I've got the return paperwork filled out, I'll just return it. No one I've found makes short stems for 1.25 steerers. A very few still offer long ones (100mm +), but that does me no good. Giant makes appropriate stems, but for twice the price of a decent aftermarket piece and heavier, too. Giant Canada doesn't offer the reasonably priced models, go figure.

That sucks. Seems like the kind of bikes where they should have just gone with a straight 1.5" steerer.

Dead Man's Ham
Dec 2, 2002


Blacknose posted:

The expensive one has hydraulic brakes rather than cables, which will make a huge difference in stopping power. It also has a pretty significant fork upgrade (Recon over a Dart). I'd pretty strongly advise you go for the more expensive option. hydraulic brakes and a decent fork will make a world of difference.

e; just to warn you the geometry on both is quite dated for properly technical riding in terms of head angle especially. You'll probably be fine but you may find technical descents are a bit of a handful with a frame that steep. I'd probably be looking for something for in the 69-67 degree range if you're going to be doing much tech descending.

Thanks for the info! Ill have to go test the difference between hydraulic and standard. I've been using old fashioned caliper on the wheel brakes forever so ill probably end up throwing myself over the handlebars using something decent.

me your dad posted:

What are the trails like where you ride? Do they have steep hills going up or down? Is it rocky, rooty, or smooth? Are there jumps or drops?

I don't have a great frame of reference, but this is the most advanced trail I ride regularly (albeit much slower). Its
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dblKeeZcBrk

Ideally id like to be able to tackle biking up this section in the next year, for the time being I climb a less steep but more rooted trail to the top of the mountain.

glyph
Apr 6, 2006



compressioncut posted:

loving Giant.

I didn't know this. What a loving annoying move.

me your dad
Jul 25, 2006



Dead Man's Ham posted:

Thanks for the info! Ill have to go test the difference between hydraulic and standard. I've been using old fashioned caliper on the wheel brakes forever so ill probably end up throwing myself over the handlebars using something decent.

<<video>>

Ideally id like to be able to tackle biking up this section in the next year, for the time being I climb a less steep but more rooted trail to the top of the mountain.

That trail looks fun as hell. Do they always have the yellow tape? That's kind of a bummer, aesthetically.

I'd say follow Blacknoses' advice on the head tube angle. That trail looks to have some fun, technical descents so you'd benefit from a slacker angle. It'll give you much more confidence and stability through the rough stuff.

And normally I'd say mechanical disc brakes (AKA "cable actuated") are fine, but if your trails involve a lot of descending over techy terrain with a heavier bike, I'd recommend hydraulic. A nice set of hydraulic brakes will provide good modulation, which allows for precise control over how much brake is applied, and decrease the likelihood of going over the bars in front-wheel braking.

Blacknose
Jul 28, 2006

Meet frustration face to face
A point of view creates more waves
So lose some sleep and say you tried


That trail looks to be pretty tech. I'd say you definitely want a more modern bike than those motorbacons with hydraulic brakes and a decent fork. Can you consider options other than bikes direct? If so you can probably get something more modern, albeit with a downgrade in groupset for the same budget.

compressioncut
Sep 3, 2003

Eat knuckle, Fritz!

Blacknose posted:

That trail looks to be pretty tech. I'd say you definitely want a more modern bike than those motorbacons with hydraulic brakes and a decent fork. Can you consider options other than bikes direct? If so you can probably get something more modern, albeit with a downgrade in groupset for the same budget.

Or, something used. Beyond looking like 1999 models, the relatively well specced BDs are sold out in normal sizes. Lots of 16 and 22 inch frames (and the 22 looks like it sizes out extra huge). The HT 29er they have is the best deal by a long shot but it's long sold out.

Trek 4000 series, Giant Talon (29er), and some Konas (Blast, Cinder Cone) are around the top of his price range, new. And I don't know how available they are in the southeast US but the Brodie Surge looks pretty slack and a good descender. Ya they all have Suntour forks but you aren't getting much else for under $1000.

Blacknose
Jul 28, 2006

Meet frustration face to face
A point of view creates more waves
So lose some sleep and say you tried


Might be able to pick up a decent 2011 or 2012 bike at a good discount currently also. I'm in the UK so maybe not the best person for US pricing unfortunately.

Dead Man's Ham
Dec 2, 2002


me your dad posted:

That trail looks fun as hell. Do they always have the yellow tape? That's kind of a bummer, aesthetically.

I'd say follow Blacknoses' advice on the head tube angle. That trail looks to have some fun, technical descents so you'd benefit from a slacker angle. It'll give you much more confidence and stability through the rough stuff.

And normally I'd say mechanical disc brakes (AKA "cable actuated") are fine, but if your trails involve a lot of descending over techy terrain with a heavier bike, I'd recommend hydraulic. A nice set of hydraulic brakes will provide good modulation, which allows for precise control over how much brake is applied, and decrease the likelihood of going over the bars in front-wheel braking.

compressioncut posted:

Or, something used. Beyond looking like 1999 models, the relatively well specced BDs are sold out in normal sizes. Lots of 16 and 22 inch frames (and the 22 looks like it sizes out extra huge). The HT 29er they have is the best deal by a long shot but it's long sold out.

Trek 4000 series, Giant Talon (29er), and some Konas (Blast, Cinder Cone) are around the top of his price range, new. And I don't know how available they are in the southeast US but the Brodie Surge looks pretty slack and a good descender. Ya they all have Suntour forks but you aren't getting much else for under $1000.

Thanks again for the info! The tape is only there for the downhill race they run annually which I assume the video is a training run for, it really is a beautiful area.

Ill start checking around for used bikes and stock dumping sales, you're all right that their inventory is pretty poo poo, there were only a couple bikes for my 16-17 inch size and I wasnt interested in those models.

Painful Dart Bomb
May 22, 2012


It's also worth pointing out that whoever makes up BD's "list price" is on glue. There's no way in hell that alloy 26" hardtail retailed for $2200 in 2011. The parts are from at least 2010. Shimano no longer does 9-speed in anything higher than Alivio and Avid doesn't even make Juicys anymore.

Definitely check around at shops for clearouts. This time of year medium sized bikes might be hard to come by, but most shops are currently getting a poo poo load of new stock in so you should be able to cut a good deal on anything from last year.

evensevenone
May 12, 2001
Glass is a solid.

The problem with BD is that they don't have model years, and they apparently never remove a bike from their page. So stuff will just chill out on there from like 4 years ago and never get re-ordered or taken off.

Also the "list prices" are complete crap, obviously.

slaphappynickname
Sep 13, 2007

by Y Kant Ozma Post


BD is great for road bikes and their 29ers. I love the hell out of my Motobecane CF road bike. Full ultegra and a drat decent frame for $1700 is hard to argue with. I'll probably pick up one of their Ti 29ers one of these days, as well.

In other news, I just took the new fork on its first test ride, and so far, so good. The lockout isn't as solid as it was on my Reba, but the fork feels better on the single track, so I'm happy. Plus, it's purdy.

Here's my poo poo attempts at taking photos of myself with my spare poo poo cellphone while riding like some kind of roadie jackass.




slaphappynickname fucked around with this message at Dec 21, 2012 around 04:36

Blacknose
Jul 28, 2006

Meet frustration face to face
A point of view creates more waves
So lose some sleep and say you tried


I'm thinking about booking a weeks mountain bike holiday somewhere in Europe for the coming summer. Looking for a more gravity oriented holiday, but not necessarily full on DH. I need it to be an actual organised guided holiday as I will be travelling on my own more than likely.

Anyone got any good suggestions? I've seen a bunch of likely looking places but it's always good to hear from people who've actually been places and what they though.

DaveSauce
Feb 15, 2004
Oh, how awkward.

The grips on my XC bike are worn smooth.

Anyone got any recommendations for good grips? I don't use bar-ends so I don't need anything compatible with those.

I feel stupid asking, but there's a million different grips available and I have no idea where to even begin.

edit: these look fancy as hell, and certainly a change from most MTB grips I've seen. Anyone tried these?

DaveSauce fucked around with this message at Dec 23, 2012 around 16:39

me your dad
Jul 25, 2006



DaveSauce posted:

The grips on my XC bike are worn smooth.

Anyone got any recommendations for good grips? I don't use bar-ends so I don't need anything compatible with those.

I feel stupid asking, but there's a million different grips available and I have no idea where to even begin.

edit: these look fancy as hell, and certainly a change from most MTB grips I've seen. Anyone tried these?

ODI Rogue Lock-On: Tried and true, inexpensive, and long-lasting. The only grip I ever buy.

evensevenone
May 12, 2001
Glass is a solid.

These, if you wear gloves.

http://www.odigrips.com/ruffianlock-ongrip130mm.aspx

They're usually cheaper than $30 in bike shops, and you can get replacement inserts when they wear out.

brakeless
Apr 11, 2011

You're pretty sympathetic.
Smoke?



Ride more - the only new year's resolution you'll ever need.

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taqueso
Mar 8, 2004
...


Ruffians are the poo poo. Rogues I don't like, they are too thick for me, but some people love them.

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