Search Amazon.com:
Register a SA Forums Account here!
JOINING THE SA FORUMS WILL REMOVE THIS BIG AD, THE ANNOYING UNDERLINED ADS, AND STUPID INTERSTITIAL ADS!!!

You can: log in, read the tech support FAQ, or request your lost password. This dumb message (and those ads) will appear on every screen until you register! Get rid of this crap by registering your own SA Forums Account and joining roughly 150,000 Goons, for the one-time price of $9.95! We charge money because it costs us $3,400 per month for bandwidth bills alone, and since we don't believe in shoving popup ads to our registered users, we try to make the money back through forum registrations.
«7 »
  • Post
  • Reply
Snidely Whiplash
Jun 24, 2007
Oh Bugger!

I haven't seen a cheese-focused thread in GWS in a very long time, so I decided to make one for me and other turophiles to nerd out in. Use this thread as a forum to discuss your favourite cheese, your favourite cheese recipes, etc.

Personally, I recently started a job as a cheese buyer for a large grocery chain, and despite having a passion for all cheeses (the funkier the better), I'm constantly looking to learn more, specifically about unique artisanal cheese makers in America.

So, fellow cheese-heads, care to enlighten me?

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

orphean
Apr 27, 2007

beep boop bitches
my monads are fully functional


I appreciate cheese. I enjoy sampling heady, complex creations shot through with burgundy strips of wine. I love the decadent rich smoothness of a nice St. Andre. I love the sharp musky bite of a nice blue. That said, I know very little about cheese. I've offloaded my entire cheese selection process to other people and when I find myself in front of the ocean of fermented milk products at a typical cheese counter I am so, so lost.

Are there any rules of thumb that are common for cheese selection? Or cheese pairing? What are some perhaps more unknown cheeses I should be on the lookout for? What is the proper varietal of kraft single to form the sails of my meatship? So many questions!

Grand Fromage
Jan 30, 2006

You wildly underestimated my liver's ability to metabolize toxins.

I'm going to bookmark this thread to torture myself in my Asian cheese desert.

I actually found a decent cheese shop up in Seoul recently and have a bag of wonderfully stinky cheese in the fridge. Totally worth $50 for three 150 gram hunks.

physeter
Jan 24, 2006

high five, more dead than alive

I've mentioned it before, but as overwrought as Williams-Sonoma is, their 3 months of cheeses delivery thing is my favorite Christmas gift to receive. Honey and cheese is my new favorite pairing. Otherwise I think just earmarking $10 every time you hit the grocer is a great way to start trying different cheeses. Even if you go horribly wrong, virtually any cheese can be rehabilitated by getting put into a ramekin with some garlic cloves and olive oil, roasted in the oven, then stirred and spread on a baguette.

(And I agree in advance with the person that raves about St. Andre.)

Psy890
Jan 18, 2005


Cheese + Crackers + Mustard is one of my favorite snacks right now. Mustard is great, it has a perfect balance of Omega-3 & Omega-6. Only problem is it is generally high in sodium. So far, my favorite cheese is New York (White) Sharp Cheddar.

dumptruckzzz
Sep 13, 2010


I really don't know a whole lot, but I've been working in a grocery store cheese dept for ~8 months now, and aside from just cutting and packaging it I've also tried most of the cheeses we carry, which has gotta be around 75. So I might be able to help out with recommendations and pairings, particularly with beer.

Also St Andre barely sells at my store and we regularly have to mark it down before it passes the manufacturer's date.

I will say that if you're going to a store with an active cheese department, as in one that cuts and packages on location, get as many samples as you can. Easiest way to figure out flavors for pairings, and unless the employees are dicks its no hassle at all to cut off a sample and rewrap.

Double edit: I had some Blue Stilton the other day that tasted like I had covered my tongue in 9v batteries, can any cheese nerds explain why this would happen? I've had it before and its always been comparably mild

dumptruckzzz fucked around with this message at Feb 18, 2013 around 05:23

Juice Box Hero
Jan 10, 2007

♫ Juicy in the sky wit dimons ♫

I think a cheese thread is great. Cheese is crazy.

You might groan at talk of cheese-buying at a chain grocer, but my local Kroger Marketplace has a big cheese boat and another, even bigger, gigantic cheese boat with a full time staff who will cut samples and make recommendations.

Goat cheese is awesome, especially on pizza. Goat cheese and miracle fruit is great.

There are a billion cheddars that all taste the same.

They sell a blueberry stilton and a mango stilton. I'm a big fan of the blueberry. The delicate tart creamy stilton plays very, very well with the soft aromatic notes of the blueberry. You can't really use it as an ingredient in anything, though.

One cheese I find interesting is the "bellavitano." I believe it is a pasteurized cow's milk cheese from wisconsin. It is near white and firm (a little bit softer than cheddar, maybe?) and has a sweet flavor and flecks of sea salt embedded throughout. They age it or dunk it (?) in some ingredient for which it will be named. The merlot bellavitano has a purple rind with white dots, has a unique sweet red wine flavor (of course) and seems to be the most popular where I live.

Other varieties I have seen are espresso, black pepper, and cognac.

The cognac is amazing - almost like a dessert. Black pepper left me wanting for flavor, and espresso I have not tried.

Sarvecchio Parmesan is also promoted in my store, and I think it also comes from Wisconsin. It's strongly nutty and pleasantly shreddable. I wouldn't recognize an Italian Parmesan if you fed it to me, but this Sarvecchio stuff does perfectly well on pasta or any other hard salty parmesan application I could find.

Another cheese that has a special place in my heart is the Cypriot shepherd's cheese, Halloumi. Grill or lightly fry it, throw it on a baguette with ham and some preserves. Its flavor is salty and it has a bouncy, near-meaty bite that contrasts well with veg. Worth a try if you can find it.

It's okay if you think I'm an idiot for being interested in these cheeses. I don't claim to know much about cheese.

Juice Box Hero fucked around with this message at Feb 19, 2013 around 04:04

Casu Marzu
Oct 20, 2008

me larvae long time


Juice Box Hero posted:



There are a billion cheddars that all taste the same.



dumptruckzzz
Sep 13, 2010


Sarvecchio and BellaVitano are actually both from the same company, Sartori, which does a handful of other things too, we get in their gorgonzola. I don't think I've ever enjoyed the Bella Gold, which is just the plain cheese, but I do like the espresso even though it smells like burnt toast.

I've seriously been craving some Halloumi lately, its amazing fried and tossed in salads and probably the best thing ever in scrambled eggs. Also amazing on its own.

Juice Box Hero
Jan 10, 2007

♫ Juicy in the sky wit dimons ♫


Is it bad that of all the cheddars I've tried, the loving cracker barrel brand in the kraft singles area is the one I like the most?

dumptruckzzz posted:

Sarvecchio and BellaVitano are actually both from the same company, Sartori, which does a handful of other things too, we get in their gorgonzola. I don't think I've ever enjoyed the Bella Gold, which is just the plain cheese, but I do like the espresso even though it smells like burnt toast.

I'm gonna look out for the gorgonzola, and I'll give the espresso a try. I like my toast well done.

Snidely Whiplash
Jun 24, 2007
Oh Bugger!

dumptruckzzz posted:

Sarvecchio and BellaVitano are actually both from the same company, Sartori, which does a handful of other things too, we get in their gorgonzola. I don't think I've ever enjoyed the Bella Gold, which is just the plain cheese, but I do like the espresso even though it smells like burnt toast.

I've seriously been craving some Halloumi lately, its amazing fried and tossed in salads and probably the best thing ever in scrambled eggs. Also amazing on its own.

Halloumi makes me miss the summertime. Grilled with a balsamic glaze and salty olives is the best summertime meal ever.

Casu Marzu
Oct 20, 2008

me larvae long time


Where the hell do you live that you have such lovely cheddar?

Just walking into my normal supermarket, I can get everything from young almost unaged cheddar, to bandaged and cave aged cheddar, to ridiculous salt bombs like 10-15 year old cheddar.

Juice Box Hero
Jan 10, 2007

♫ Juicy in the sky wit dimons ♫

Casu Marzu posted:

Where the hell do you live that you have such lovely cheddar?

I'll have to ask if they have anything more interesting, or look for another source next time I'm on a cheddar hunt.

Hollismason
Jun 30, 2007

I AM A HUGE IDIOT, AND WRONG ABOUT EVERYTHING. PLEASE REMIND ME THAT I DON'T KNOW SHIT ABOUT WARHAMMER OR HOW TO NOT BE A HUGE ASSHOLE ON THE INTERNET.

ALSO, MY GUMBO IS SHITTY.

I just moved to Chicago and having Wisconsin nearby almost everyone uses cheese from there and it's fantastic. My favorite cheese would have to be anything with mustard seeds in it. oh and Irish Cheddar. I don't go for stinky cheeses that much.

This is my favorite grilled cheese sandwich is smoked bacon, w/ avocado, smoked gouda, Wisconsin cheddaron sourdough. Pretty simple and tastes amazing.

Marceline Abadeer
Oct 14, 2012

I'm gonna bury you in the ground.


So, I saw a wheel of something called "baby brie" at the grocery store and brought it home. It's tasty. I like the rind! But what's the difference between this and regular brie? Google is unhelpful!

Gegil
Jun 22, 2012

Smoke'em if you Got'em

I've had great success with trying local cheeses at our Farmer's Market. For the most part its Chevre in all its fresh glory and flavors, but once in a while you can find a locally produced cow or sheep's milk cheese that is surprisingly good.

hemorrhage
Aug 7, 2003


At Christmas, I was given a gift basket with a variety of raw milk cheeses from a place about 40 miles from where I live. Hands down some of the best cheese I've ever eaten. It's this place http://www.veldhuizencheese.com and they also sell online. My favorite was the Dublin Karst. I've also been meaning to schedule a weekend trip over there to pick up some raw milk.

dumptruckzzz
Sep 13, 2010


Marceline Abadeer posted:

So, I saw a wheel of something called "baby brie" at the grocery store and brought it home. It's tasty. I like the rind! But what's the difference between this and regular brie? Google is unhelpful!

Most likely just the size, was it a small wheel that was completely covered in the rind? When you buy brie pieces that have been cut from a larger wheel, the flavors will start developing more rapidly, which can eventually lead to some strong ammonia smells and flavors. Small wheels or sometimes even wedges that still have the rind all over won't be affected by this as much (to my understanding).

So basically there should really not be much difference beyond normal brand differences. The mini brie might be more mild than a cut and wrapped piece from a service cheese shop, but that depends on how long the cut brie has had to ripen. What you bought could also be basically Camembert but renamed to avoid confusion, but Camembert also would have a slightly stronger flavor

dumptruckzzz fucked around with this message at Feb 27, 2013 around 18:09

holttho
May 21, 2007



Hollis posted:

I just moved to Chicago and...

If you're in the Streeterville area, Fox & Obel has a pretty awesome cheese section. They tend to have a lot of one-time-only cheeses that you can't find most other places. One of the mongers there is exceptionally well-versed and can really help you hone in what you will like based on what you've had. Like any good fromagerie, they do free samples of anything you want. And don't forget to pick up something from their bakery to go along with your selections.

Personally, I love any double/triple-creme. St. Andre, Delice de Bourgogne, Pierre Robert. All 5 star choices.

bunnielab
May 19, 2005

I guess my point is that even science is a matter of faith


Someone please talk about cheese storage. Like, what is the best general method to get the longest life? We keep them in the fridge loosely wrapped in plastic in a large tupperware bin with a towel (changed weekly) in the bottom to absorb moisture. I came about this plan in a haphazard way but it does seem to make them last longer then tight plastic wrap and just sitting on a shelf.

Every oz of cheese we throw away pains me and but at the same time when I go on a cheese buying binge it is hard to buy just a weeks worth.

you ate my cat
Jul 1, 2007



I don't really eat a huge amount of cheese, but I find it keeps best wrapped first in parchment and then in foil. No idea if that's legit, but it seems to keep it from premature molding or excessive drying.

Myron Baloney
Mar 19, 2002

Weep, sad freaks of the nation

bunnielab posted:

Someone please talk about cheese storage. Like, what is the best general method to get the longest life? We keep them in the fridge loosely wrapped in plastic in a large tupperware bin with a towel (changed weekly) in the bottom to absorb moisture. I came about this plan in a haphazard way but it does seem to make them last longer then tight plastic wrap and just sitting on a shelf.

Every oz of cheese we throw away pains me and but at the same time when I go on a cheese buying binge it is hard to buy just a weeks worth.

I mostly buy harder cheeses and just keep them in ziploc bags, and I wipe them down with baking soda/water roughly every other time I handle them. If I forget they do get moldy. We just finished a huge block of baby swiss we got as a gift early in December (relatives who work for Swiss Colony) and it kept perfectly well. I also just found a chunk of Ski Queen gjetost that fell behind a produce drawer 8 or 9 months ago and it was still fine. Dried out plastic-looking hard cheese bugs me a lot more than a few spots of mold I can just trim off. Soft types I eat quickly or I'd handle like you do and white-rind cheese I wrap in paper to avoid the ammonia stink, not that I buy much.

I probably wouldn't buy Swiss Colony cheese myself but I have noticed that Roth Kase in Monroe (WI) has improved recently - they used make mostly American-style swiss and baby swiss and a few weak imitations of traditional cheeses, but they're making more varieties now and they've surprised me: the last couple times I bought Grand Cru gruyere it was almost as good as mid-price swiss gruyere and costs maybe half as much. My other WI favorites for that nice quality/value balance are Carr Valley's affordable types, everything Saxon Creamery makes, and as mentioned earlier Sartori products - their SarVecchio parmesan is the only american one worth buying. Also I think there are at least 5 WI-made brands of goat and/or cow milk Leipäjuusto (Finnish bread cheese, normally melted a bit before serving) in stores now and they're all good and they're all going to make me a fatass.

Marceline Abadeer
Oct 14, 2012

I'm gonna bury you in the ground.


dumptruckzzz posted:

Most likely just the size, was it a small wheel that was completely covered in the rind? When you buy brie pieces that have been cut from a larger wheel, the flavors will start developing more rapidly, which can eventually lead to some strong ammonia smells and flavors. Small wheels or sometimes even wedges that still have the rind all over won't be affected by this as much (to my understanding).

So basically there should really not be much difference beyond normal brand differences. The mini brie might be more mild than a cut and wrapped piece from a service cheese shop, but that depends on how long the cut brie has had to ripen. What you bought could also be basically Camembert but renamed to avoid confusion, but Camembert also would have a slightly stronger flavor

It was pretty small and rather mild, so I think you hit the nail on the head there. Thank you!

The Midniter
Jul 9, 2001



I'd always heard the praises sung of Humboldt Fog, but it was always a bit rich for my blood. Then the local Harris Teeter began selling small sample sizes of it, so I dropped the $5 for a bit of it which actually came with a straw-type thing full of honey.

I don't think I've ever eaten a more delicious cheese, and I love me some cheese. It's taken a serious amount of willpower not to drop a lot of coin on some more, because I know it'd be gone in a day.

Greatest Living Man
Jul 22, 2005

this is how I rolly polley wolley


The Midniter posted:

I'd always heard the praises sung of Humboldt Fog, but it was always a bit rich for my blood. Then the local Harris Teeter began selling small sample sizes of it, so I dropped the $5 for a bit of it which actually came with a straw-type thing full of honey.

I don't think I've ever eaten a more delicious cheese, and I love me some cheese. It's taken a serious amount of willpower not to drop a lot of coin on some more, because I know it'd be gone in a day.

Some of the more extravagant weddings in Humboldt feature multiple wheels of Humboldt Fog. So good.
I'm a fan of all of their fresh chèvre as well (and it's usually a bit cheaper.) I agree with you, though, it's expensive when it's exported. I'm always shocked at the price difference from Humboldt to anywhere else.

Altair X89
Jul 27, 2002


Juice Box Hero posted:

I think a cheese thread is great. Cheese is crazy.

You might groan at talk of cheese-buying at a chain grocer, but my local Kroger Marketplace has a big cheese boat and another, even bigger, gigantic cheese boat with a full time staff who will cut samples and make recommendations.

They sell a blueberry stilton and a mango stilton. I'm a big fan of the blueberry. The delicate tart creamy stilton plays very, very well with the soft aromatic notes of the blueberry. You can't really use it as an ingredient in anything, though.



I used to be one of those full time cheese peoples. I miss that job.

And I second the blueberry stilton. It's like cheesecake almost. I didn't know they made a mango one!

Big Bad Voodoo Lou
Jan 1, 2006


One of the best cheeses I've ever had is Cahill's Irish Porter Cheddar. In the past, I've found it at Costco around St. Patrick's Day, but only random years -- not every year, and definitely not yet this year. It is a beautiful, striking cheese, and as delicious as you would expect:



One year it came in a three-pack with Irish Whiskey Cheddar and slightly sweet and tart Ardagh Wine Cheddar, which were good, but not nearly as good as the Irish Porter:



I've never seen it anywhere else, even Whole Foods. I guess I could order it online if I wanted it that badly, but shipping is a killer.

I also like the Bellavitano cheeses -- I've tried the balsamic and the espresso, which are both incredible "desserty" cheeses.

Generally, I'm not a fan of stinky cheeses aside from basic bleu crumbles on a burger, and I've never really gotten into brie (which ironically is one of the only cheeses my wife likes), but I absolutely love every goat cheese I've ever tried, especially with fruit preserves or honey. I can't wait to get my hands on some Peppadew peppers again, to try stuffing them with goat cheese.

Other than that, I love provolone (the sharper, the better) and muenster for sandwiches, halloumi, gouda, any smoked cheeses, and any cheeses with "stuff" in them, from pepper jack to wensleydale with apricots. One of these days I have to try Red Dragon, with the mustard seeds.

As for crackers to have with cheese, I've never been a fan of the super-bland Carr's and other water crackers you usually see. I have an old-school fondness for Ritz, but the best crackers to pair with cheese (especially soft and spreadable cheeses, like chevre) are 34 Crisps. Try these if you can -- you won't be sorry.

http://www.34-degrees.com/

Big Bad Voodoo Lou fucked around with this message at Mar 2, 2013 around 15:10

dumptruckzzz
Sep 13, 2010


Kerrygold's Irish Stout Dubliner is pretty common, and could possibly be similar to the porter cheddar but I've also never had that so who knows. The Dubliner really doesn't have any strong stout flavor that I can pick up, but if you can find it around you, get a sample.

I used to really enjoy goat cheese, as in the soft Montchevre type stuff, but like a year ago I just stopped enjoying it, I can absolutely get into some Beemster Goat or Snofrisk but the soft stuff doesn't do it anymore.

Speaking of peppadews (and Beemster), I think I could eat Beemster XO (or classic... or vlaskaas) with peppadews every day without getting bored of it.

mindphlux
Jan 8, 2004

ich esse keine suppe - nein
ich esse meine suppe nicht
nein, meine suppe ess' ich nicht






so, my favorite cheese might be epoisses. anyone have any suggestions for new things I might try or look out for based on that? I think I've exhausted my local importer's selection, but might as well ask.

conversely, if any of you are far away from the southeast and happen to see Sweet Grass Dairy's Green Hill cheese - it's loving amazing. grab a bottle of the most expensive champaigne you can afford, get a wheel of that poo poo, eat it, drink, and have copious amounts of sex with whoever happens to be nearby and somewhat amicable.

physeter
Jan 24, 2006

high five, more dead than alive

bunnielab posted:

Someone please talk about cheese storage. Like, what is the best general method to get the longest life? We keep them in the fridge loosely wrapped in plastic in a large tupperware bin with a towel (changed weekly) in the bottom to absorb moisture. I came about this plan in a haphazard way but it does seem to make them last longer then tight plastic wrap and just sitting on a shelf.

Every oz of cheese we throw away pains me and but at the same time when I go on a cheese buying binge it is hard to buy just a weeks worth.
I'm convinced my method of expelling all air from a ziploc before sealing, and of not directly touching the surface of the remaining cheese, helps extend the "unmolded" lifespan by almost double. Doesn't matter with a hard aged cheese, but anything softer and I only touch the wedge/block through a paper towel or plastic wrap.

Cpt.Wacky
Apr 17, 2005


I've had to cut back on cheese purchases lately so I usually get whatever looks good in the Costco cheese section. Coastal and Dubliner most of the time, Bergenost or smoked Gouda occasionally. I like a good Double Gloucester too. Cambozola makes a fantastic hot turkey sandwich. Camembert roasted with garlic, rosemary and olive oil is an indulgent sauce for pasta.

When I want a treat I'll get something local from Mt. Townsend Creamery. I think they still have a shop in the Pike Place Market. My favorites are the Seastack, a soft cheese rolled in vegetable ashes, and Camp Fire which is a monterrey jack-style smoked with applewood and red alder.

Smokewagon
Jul 3, 2012


physeter posted:

I'm convinced my method of expelling all air from a ziploc before sealing, and of not directly touching the surface of the remaining cheese, helps extend the "unmolded" lifespan by almost double. Doesn't matter with a hard aged cheese, but anything softer and I only touch the wedge/block through a paper towel or plastic wrap.

I use the same method for the same reasons. Our cheese keeps for a very long time. I think not touching the surface of the remaining cheese is a huge factor.

Allahu Snackbar
Apr 15, 2003

I came all the way from Taipei today, now Bangkok's pissin' rain and I'm goin' blind again.


Cheese, you say?









Started making a batch of random cheeses every paycheck. What's nice is that you can use the leftover whey to make ricotta or mysost so it gives you a little something on the side too

Thumposaurus
Jul 24, 2007



Re:cheese storage I was always told the best way to store cheese was by wrapping it in parchment paper or deli paper since that lets it "breath". Plastic bags or containers hold the moisture in and can contribute to mold growth.
Cheese never really lasts long enough around here for me to notice if it makes a difference or not though.

Shooting Blanks
Jun 6, 2007
The Bartender

Just out of curiosity, how much does it cost to make a block like that?

Allahu Snackbar
Apr 15, 2003

I came all the way from Taipei today, now Bangkok's pissin' rain and I'm goin' blind again.


Your overhead for equipment and random crap is around 200 bucks, at least mine was. Incremental cost is 2 good gallons of milk, and whatever paltry amount of starter, rennet, etc is used, so I would say $15

breakfall87
Apr 22, 2004
ABunch7587's little bitch

mindphlux posted:

so, my favorite cheese might be epoisses. anyone have any suggestions for new things I might try or look out for based on that? I think I've exhausted my local importer's selection, but might as well ask.

conversely, if any of you are far away from the southeast and happen to see Sweet Grass Dairy's Green Hill cheese - it's loving amazing. grab a bottle of the most expensive champaigne you can afford, get a wheel of that poo poo, eat it, drink, and have copious amounts of sex with whoever happens to be nearby and somewhat amicable.

La Tur, Explorateur. Those two can get pretty runny, but I've never had a cheese that's funk level can contend with epoisses. Green Hill is easily one of my top choices for a cheese plate when I'm ordering cheeses for the restaurant. Unfortunately, Sweet Grass's aren't as amazing as Green Hill. I picked up their "Heat" once, which claimed it was like an artisan Pepper Jack, but it was really quite bland and a big let down until we shredded it and made sandwiches, where it did just ok.

In other news, if you like cheddars, you should see if you can find one from Lancaster, PA called Tumbleweed from 5 Spoke Creamery. It's a mix between a cheddar and a cantal, and they make it in giant cube form and whenever we order it, it comes in cut in half on the diagonal, which is kinda weird, but it is amazing.

If you like Humboldt Fog, you guys should really look at some of their other stuff. Cypress Grove's Truffle Tremor is incredible.

SilentD
Aug 22, 2012

by toby


Stilton is the best cheese! Sadly it's pricey round these parts.

cock hero flux
Apr 17, 2011


Big Bad Voodoo Lou posted:

One of the best cheeses I've ever had is Cahill's Irish Porter Cheddar. In the past, I've found it at Costco around St. Patrick's Day, but only random years -- not every year, and definitely not yet this year. It is a beautiful, striking cheese, and as delicious as you would expect:



One year it came in a three-pack with Irish Whiskey Cheddar and slightly sweet and tart Ardagh Wine Cheddar, which were good, but not nearly as good as the Irish Porter:



I've never seen it anywhere else, even Whole Foods. I guess I could order it online if I wanted it that badly, but shipping is a killer.


I recognize that cheese! They had some on a plate during breakfast at a hotel I stayed at in Dublin. It was delicious and I'd kind of regretted not finding out what kind it was.

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

Big Bad Voodoo Lou
Jan 1, 2006


Dauntasa posted:

I recognize that cheese! They had some on a plate during breakfast at a hotel I stayed at in Dublin. It was delicious and I'd kind of regretted not finding out what kind it was.

I just found it again at Costco, in time for St. Patrick's Day! This year it came with all three varieties plus a fourth, Cahill's Leicester Red, an decent but unmemorable orange cheddar with a bit of brown around the edges, and all four cheeses were sliced and packaged on a plastic tray in a resealable bag. The Irish Porter Cheddar is still my favorite, and it was nice to try it again after a few years without it.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • Post
  • Reply
«7 »