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OneTwentySix
Nov 5, 2007

fun
FUN
FUN




What is Unreal World RPG?

Unreal World is a rogue-like RPG/Survival simulation by Finnish programmer Sami Maaranen. The game's actually been in development for the past twenty years, and has gone through a lot of changes over that time. It's a bit similar to Dwarf Fortress' Adventure Mode, except instead of various monsters and bandits, the greatest threat is starvation, winter, and to a lesser extent, animals and Njerpez raiders. Still in development, the most recent version, 3.16, is the first time Maaranen offered the full game for free download, hoping to possibly transition to a donations-based model like Dwarf Fortress uses.

In the game, the player assumes the role of a man or woman from one of nine cultures, who sets out to eke out a living in the Far North. You survive by trapping, fishing, farming, trading, hunting, or gathering, being sure to stockpile fresh food, hides, and other materials while preparing for winter when food becomes scarce and freezing to death is a serious threat.

Where can I get Unreal World?

Unreal World can be downloaded for free at http://www.unrealworld.fi/. He maintains a fairly small forum and posts frequent updates on development and releases patches every so often. And if you like the game, toss him a few dollars if you can spare it; apparently he's seeing a lot more downloads since moving from his previous paid model, but his income has dropped to a third of what he used to see.

FAQ

To be updated!

Resources

- A pretty decent wiki can be found here. It's not entirely complete and it's a bit out of date, but there's lots of information that can be useful, including some guides.

- There's an in-game encyclopedia that can be accessed with F1.

- The game also has some in-game courses, which function a bit as tutorials. When you start the game, you are given an option to start one. Choose the second option, "Living in the Wild;" the first is the game without a course, and the third is a more advanced course that will be difficult to complete at first. You do get some free items and skills during the courses, and you can choose to learn some new rituals or improve your stats or skills after completing a course. If you choose not to start one, you can do so by pressing F5 at any time.

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OneTwentySix
Nov 5, 2007

fun
FUN
FUN


Getting Started

The first thing you'll need to do is create a character. You'll get a few options.

-Quick and easy, which lets you pick a name and sex for your character, pick a course, and then it dumps you somewhere in the wild with default selections.
-Custom, which allows you to select your culture, sex, a portrait (pictures depend on culture selected), starting season, location, and a scenario. You can reroll your stats, and then you can add one point to five of your skills.
-Custom, easy allows you to also subtract a point from any of your skills, and you can improve any skill up to two times.
-Custom, too easy allows you to subtract or add as many points as you want from your skills, for people that want to min-max.

A few things to keep in mind:

Each culture has different starting skills, and minimum and maximum levels for their statistics. You can find some information here on what these values are: http://unrealworld.wikia.com/wiki/Cultures

- Kaumolainen are pretty good for a new player. They have the second best average attribute levels, including the highest strength. They're best with most melee weapons, and they have the best total skill level, on average.

- Owl-Tribe are also a good choice; they have the best average attribute levels, and very high total skills on average. They're the best choice for Bow, which is extremely valuable (you'll actively hunt with Bow, Crossbow, or Javelins). Their big weakness is that they're very small, with the lowest strength (important for melee) and low endurance (ability to carry), but their smaller build is good for stealth.

Your starting season is important in that it determines how long you have to get ready for winter.

- Starting in spring gives you the most time, but it will be pretty cold (but not dangerously) for several months. Food won't be as available, since mushrooms and berries won't start being ready until summer, usually. If you start with seeds, you'll generally want to plant them at some point during the spring, or they won't get ripe in time for harvest. This can be tricky as a new player, as you'll be too busy trying to survive to get agriculture that won't pay off for two seasons going. Still, having a whole season to start getting on your feet can really help, and you should have no problem getting a cabin built in time for winter. Since gathering isn't terribly important, starting in Spring isn't a bad idea; you'll have a slightly harder first season, but if you're not going to make it, you'll starve before getting too far and can try again.

- Summer is another good time to start. More food will be available, but most of it won't be ready until mid or late summer, so you're mostly in the same position as you would be starting in the spring. However, by the time you start starving, you should be able to gather some plants and mushrooms to hold you through until your next kill or catch. You won't need to make a fire at night or wear much clothing, so that also helps. Still, it generally takes a season to get to a point where you can build your cabin, so you'll likely be building the cabin in the fall, with winter approaching. It's a pretty fair trade off, but I prefer to start in the spring.

- Fall can work, as there's food to be gathered everywhere, but you probably won't be ready for winter. It's difficult, but you'll probably die if you're a beginner. Also of note is that you really can't survive on berries completely, as you need a more balanced diet, but they'll help.

- Starting in winter can be fun once the game becomes easy, but if you don't make a large kill pretty quickly, you're out of luck. Definitely a bad choice for a new player.

As far as stats go, you'll typically want them all to be as high as possible. Reroll as you'd like. Almost every stat affects some skills, but some affect quite a few. Notable stats:

- Strength is important for a lot of melee skills, as well as Bow and a number of other survival skills. Wiki says it has no role in encumbrance, but I'm not entirely sure if this is true.
- Endurance is most useful for determining how much you can carry. Encumbrance applies a small to huge penalty to all your skills.
- Dexterity affects most of the skills in the game, so it's rather useful.
- Agility is the only thing that affects dodge, so it's very important.
- Speed affects your mobility, how fast you travel. This is very important for hunting. Speed affects no skills, however.
- Eyesight has some bonuses for skills like Bow, as well as seeing characters/animals at a distance on the world map.

Stats do not improve in the game unless you complete a course, so once you continue, you're mostly stuck with what you have. You can abuse the courses to max out your skills if you're really bored, I suppose.

You'll also get a phobia and a physique. Physique is largely determined by culture, and affects some of your stats, I believe, your stealth ability, and how much you can carry. Your phobia gives you a weakness, where you might freak out and lose control of your character for a time. Fear of horses is best, since there are no horses in the game. A fear of blood, weapons, or
people/crowds would be the worst, since this would likely kick in during combat. The Will stat determines how well you can resist these checks. For what it's worth, I've only failed my Will check a few times over quite a few games, so phobia isn't extremely important, though I don't go with blood, weapons, or crowds usually.

You'll randomly be granted two rituals, as per your culture. You'll learn more as the game goes on. They're mildly useful, but if you never use them, you won't suffer very much.

Most skills go up slowly in the game, so choose carefully. I recommend choosing a weapon, a secondary way for getting food (fishing or trapping), and physician. I'll star the best choices, but it all depends on your play style.

- Agriculture is useful only for farming. I believe it influences how many plants grow once you plant them.
- Building determines the speed? and quality of your constructions. Not terribly important, as there's no real drawback to crappy houses yet.
- Cooking determines how good your food tastes. Not very important, but may help in trading slightly if you trade cooked food.
* Herblore determines your ability to identify wild plants and mushrooms. Very useful.
- Fishing is your ability to fish. Can be useful at the start, but most fish aren't very nutritious and will starve you if you don't eat anything else.
* Hide-working determines the quality of the hides and furs you make. This indirectly affects the quality of the crafts and clothes you'll make. Also very useful for trade.
- Ritual affects how strong your rituals are. Not very important, as most rituals are really hard to tell if they do anything at all.
- Timbercraft involves felling trees. Not all that important; you'll still chop a tree with low skill, just maybe more time.
* Physician determines your ability to bandage and heal yourself. Very important, usually.
- Trapping is your ability to set traps. Important if you intend to trap, as animals are more likely to go into a good trap is they come across it (doesn't seem to affect attracting animals, though). I had an ermine recently that was constantly found a square away from one of my traps, but never actually in it, so that might have been due to low skill.
- Tracking affects your ability to find animal tracks; high skill levels will trigger alerts on the map for nearby animals. Also useful in tracking down whatever you're trying to kill. Important, but the first course gives you 20% for free rather early.
- Survival affects building a fire and a few other skills. Not as important as it sounds, except for when you desperately need a fire. Sounds more critical than it is.
- Weatherlore is your ability to predict the weather. Not useful at all, really.
- Carpentry involves making things out of wood. Somewhat useful for trades or crafting, but not critical.

- Skiing is extremely important in winter, but skiing goes up REALLY quickly. You'll reach 100% in a short while, so skip this.
* Stealth lets you get a little bit closer to an animal before it runs, which can be the difference between life and death. Very important.
- Climbing is useful for looking for game and not falling out of trees. Important, though wearing good clothes can reduce or eliminate the damage you'd take in falling. Goes up moderately fast. Minor to very important; a cloak and good physician make this far less critical.
- Swimming goes up pretty quickly, and you can get a raft or punt and avoid swimming altogether. I don't really swim, so don't recommend this skill.

* Dodge is really important at some point; animals can be dangerous, as can Njerpez warriors.
- Shield affects your ability to block with a shield. Unless you're specifically going after humans, not useful.
- The weapon skills affect your ability to hit with those weapons, as well as possibly damage. Of note, spear governs javelins, which are ranged. Melee weapons are useful against people, not so much against game.
* Bow or crossbow are very useful, but crossbows are rare and hard to find. Bow is probably the most important skill in the game, at least for me.

You want either high bow, crossbow, or spear to hunt. Fishing can be important, as can trapping. Physician can be very useful, but not critical (it affects how fast you'll heal after bandaging, so if you don't get into a lot of fights/falls, you won't need it much). Stealth is extremely important in hunting. And hideworking can be important for a lot of things, mostly trade, making better arrows, and clothes. You might also instead put points in an area you're very weak in.

Finally, you'll be given a choice on where to start. Press "C" to see the cultural regions. I recommend starting in the SW, near the Driik; they're the best for trading - have the best quality items, most stores. The north can be fun too, though, as you get more bears. In the east, you'll have more hostile Njerpez. It can also be useful to start near a river (hard to see, but look for an area with lots of blue. Not very common by the Driik, though) as you can find rapids, where trout and salmon, the most nutritious fish, can be caught. Press R to move your starting location, and then E to continue when it settles in an area you like (no idea why you can't select the site yourself.)

Then, you get a starting scenario. This determines your condition, as well as what items you might have. Some decent choices:

- Unfortunate Hunting Trip will give you some weapons, and possibly an early kill that will start you a bit ahead, with food and a bear hide. However, the bear (or maybe wolf? Not sure if it's random) might kill you, too, but you can just start over. Not good for a beginner, but maybe a second attempt.
- Lonely Settler gives you a start on a cabin, some logs, and an axe or two. Not a bad choice for a late season start, but no immediate survival advantages other than an axe; if you don't start with a handaxe, you can't do a lot of things.
- Traps and trapping give you some traps. However, trapping can be hit or miss and might not provide any early food.
- I want to be a fisherman gives you some fishing equipment. Very useful, but you'll slowly starve on a fish-only diet, unless you can get some of the larger fish (especially trout/salmon). Fishing can also starve you in that you spend the entire day trying to catch fish, and may eat more food than you catch. Still, fishing is a nice emergency food source.
- Abandoned trap fence gives you a start on a trap fence. Useful to see how to set up a trap fence, and may provide passive food every so often.
- Abandoned camp gives you some free tools.
- Agriculture gives you free seeds, which can be pretty important as you can't easily get seeds in the game, aside from abusing the courses or stealing from fields (pissing off the villagers). Agriculture won't pay off for quite a while, but pretty much guarantees that you won't starve once you're set.

There are also some challenge options I didn't list here (aside from the hunting trip). The fishing option is probably the best for a beginner, but the trap fence can pay off big, too, but maybe not in time. Go with whatever you'd like, though; all of the advantages except the fishing supplies are more long-term than immediate benefit.

Then, you get to choose to take a course. These work as tutorials, so I recommend doing them, as they'll give some instructions. They also give some free skill bonuses, tools, and food, so you might think of it as cheating, especially once you get good at the game. Take the second option, and then later consider doing the third.

How to Play

You'll start with a screen like this:



In the top left, you have your time of day/temperature gauge. The higher the red/blue bar, the warmer it is. The white line represents freezing. On the right, you'll see some information. The top shows your penalties to skills; you'll note my character is already suffering -6% to his skills. If he'd been running, he'd lose points from fatigue, and injury can seriously harm your skills. You can lose points if you don't eat for long enough, too.

You'll notice a blue arrow for heading. This is where you're facing, and you can change this by the left and right arrows. Pressing the up arrow will make you move forward toward your heading, and back the opposite. It takes a bit to get used to, but it's a lot better now that he's changed how objects are moved.

The hunger, thirst, and nutrition bars show you how close you are to dying. Hunger and thirst are short-term. If they get too high, or stay high too long, your nutrition decreases, and as nutrition decreases, you slide toward starvation. Early on, this is your greatest threat. It takes a while to go down, and a while to go up, too. Of note, as you starve, your stomach shrinks, so you can't eat as much, complicating the problem.

Nutrition also depends not on hunger, but quality of food. Each food item has carbs, fat, and protein, and without all three, you'll lose nutrition. If you eat lots of small game, be sure to eat the fat, too, as fat is very nutritious. Meat from larger animals is nutritious, as are the larger fish (trout and salmon). If you're starving but eating a lot, this is because you're not eating a balanced diet - small fish are a major cause of this. Small fish, berries, mushrooms, and plants in general aren't very good except for buying time for a better meal, though you can cook stews and things if you get a pot, which can be more balanced.

Then, the big section in the middle is the world map. You can move long distances on here, and time moves faster than on the local map. Press enter to switch to the local map.



First off, you'll notice that my encumbrance went up; the game gave me some items since it's a new character. The text box gave some information, and the scale on the map changed. As you turn or move, the black areas will be filled in. A few basic commands to get you started:

- ? brings up the help screen, which lists the commands. Don't forget to look up commands this way, though I always miss what I'm looking for on the screen for some reason on my first pass.




- Space brings up the character profile. You can see your attributes, and on the right you can see options to get to other screens. Don't forget about these, though you can access them in other ways (s for skills, A for armor - important to view warmth coverage, F6 for the map, etc.)



- The skills page is especially important, as it can help you remember how to use your skills. Pressing Alt+Skill letter will let you use that skill with needed. So this can help you remember what does what, though the interface is REALLY bad and unintuitive, you get used to it eventually.



Of note would be ALT+l to climb, Alt+v to build a fire, etc., Alt+m for logging options, and so on. If there is a /, that means the skill is auto-used. Over time, you'll be able to see the daily increases (marked by a +), and total increases, represented by a different shading over your original values.

Be sure to reference this menu or the ? menu frequently!

- i shows your inventory, where you can examine your weapons and armor for a better idea as to how strong it is, and see what you have, etc. Note the filter button on the bottom left, and the next and previous page buttons.



- # is also important for extended commands. Talking, standing, sleeping, cutting a carcass, etc. If you're trying to do something early on, you'll probably find the option in the #, Alt+v (survival), Alt+m (tiMbercraft), i(nventory), or M(ake) menus.

- Other important keys would be q to drink, , (comma) to pick up, d to drop, m to move and m again to drop, ; to grab from adjacent squares, h to hide, and F3 to look at a square/animal, etc. Enter will zoom out to the world map.

Surviving

From here on out, your goal is to get ready for winter by building a cabin, a cellar (to keep food fresh), obtaining what tools you can't make through trading (or murdering vagabonds/Njerpez) - namely, pots, quality axes, getting decent weapons/arrows/cordage for food or bandages, making warm clothes out of fur, crafting skis/poles, and making sure you have enough preserved food to last you the winter. Dogs can help quite a bit, too, so you might want to get a dog or a cow for milk, etc.


Anyhow, that should be more than enough to get anyone started. If you have any questions, feel free to ask here; there have been URW threads in the past, so there are other players here that I'm sure will be glad to help. I might do a short LP to go over the
game a bit better if people'd like it. But yeah, I thought we could use a thread on this game; it's quite a bit of fun and a new beta release just came out a day or two ago, adding commands for dogs and a bunch of other things. And now it's free, so I'd imagine a lot of people might want to try it that hadn't before.

OneTwentySix fucked around with this message at Apr 6, 2013 around 02:58

Cyberdud
Sep 6, 2005

Space pedestrian

This is awesome, I've paid for the game twice over it's existence and even started an old thread about it back in the day. This is a pretty good game to simulate living in the wild. I hope they fixed passing out from blood loss after getting your toe grazed by a squirrel and getting nibbled to death.

OneTwentySix
Nov 5, 2007

fun
FUN
FUN


Yeah, that isn't a problem. There have been a lot of changes; there's a lot of auto-selection of materials now (no longer need to select certain things in crafting), dogs are awesome, better animal AI (including predators hunting other animals/your livestock, herbivores going for your fields), selection of tools one tile away (no longer need to carry around a million axes as you build your house, can leave club/stone by the tanning area, etc), and a bunch of other things. The game is getting pretty great; I just really hope he adds some sort of family type stuff to the game, where you can build your own settlement with other people, etc, so you can have more late game things to do.

He also changed how you move items, like logs. You just press m over an object, select it/them, and move, and press m to drop. Makes building a cabin a lot easier.

Dog Fat Man Chaser
Jan 13, 2009




OneTwentySix posted:

He also changed how you move items, like logs. You just press m over an object, select it/them, and move, and press m to drop. Makes building a cabin a lot easier.

Last I played you had to drag tile by tile and my god was it tedious, cabin building took forever with it. This sounds like a massive improvement, I'm downloading the new version and chipping in a donation now.

Meltdown321
Jun 5, 2004

A Great Supporter of Mounty Bob

Nice guide. I haven't played this for years. I bought a pretty old version.
I'll give it a go again, there's probably been a lot of changes since I tried it last.

Laser Spider
Jan 28, 2009



I was wondering if this game would get a new thread now that it's donationware. Unreal World is actually surprisingly relaxing as far as these sorts of games go; one description I read calling it "the backwoods on your desktop" is highly accurate. The only big downside to it is that there's not much that you need to do once you've finally completed a house and secured a reliable source of food, so if you need structure in games then you might end up getting bored with it eventually. Still, though, I thought it was good enough to where I was willing to buy a lifetime registration ($35, back before the author made it free) for it.

Newbie survival tip: If you find a village, you can crash there as long as you want. It's free shelter and a guaranteed source of water, both of which can be a big help in starting a new character. One of the scenarios starts you at a village, but if you really want to cheese it then you can pick a different (and more beneficial, as that one gives you no special starting equipment or anything) scenario and just randomize your starting position until you get one in one of the populated parts of the world.

OneTwentySix
Nov 5, 2007

fun
FUN
FUN


Dog Fat Man Chaser posted:

Last I played you had to drag tile by tile and my god was it tedious, cabin building took forever with it. This sounds like a massive improvement, I'm downloading the new version and chipping in a donation now.

It's a lot better now; construction still takes the same amount of time/work ingame, but takes a fraction of the time playing. It's also nice for moving piles; instead of picking up something, moving, and dropping, just haul it over and stop hauling. Plus, there's now multiple selection for pick up and dropping, etc., so you can select all or whatever. This last release added a lot of improvements, if not a lot of new content (though there are a lot of improvements with animals, especially dogs, which don't run away if they're not leashed anymore).


The thing that does suck about the game is that once you've built your cabin and gotten everything together that you need, there's no real challenge or anything left to do, unless you set goals and restrictions for yourself. One good kill can feed you for a couple weeks, or even a couple months once you're able to smoke or dry it. And when you have all your tools, you don't really need to trade for anything else, ever, unless you want to get armored up and go after Njerpez.

It's a lot of fun until that point, though. I really like the early game, when you're basically only days away from starvation at any point, and killing a squirrel is the difference between life and death. It can be fun to set limits like only five cuts of meat and the fat from a kill, or no trading, though right now I want to see how awesome dogs are, and see if deer raid my fields.

Some of the things he has planned eventually sound like it would make the endgame more fun, though who knows when he'll get to them.

http://www.unrealworld.fi/urw_development.html


One good tip for new players I'd recommend is to find an alder or rowan tree and peeling bark from it (Alt+M). Use this to tan your hides instead of the fat; the fat is high energy, nutritious, and low in weight. I typically try to find a place with an alder by the river when I build my cabin for tanning purposes.

OneTwentySix fucked around with this message at Apr 6, 2013 around 19:58

Rockopolis
Dec 21, 2012


Oh man, this is quite possibly the greatest Iron-Age Finland survival simulator ever made!

More seriously, though, I'm having an exceptionally hard time with the first course, the tracking portion; I can't find any drat tracks at all, and then I usually end up starving. I've only ever managed to find an animal once, and that was an elk marching around in a swamp or something, leaving no tracks. The only time I managed to get it to trigger was after I killed a Njerpez, found his tracks, and starved to death.

OneTwentySix
Nov 5, 2007

fun
FUN
FUN


Try climbing a tree on the world map to find game. You don't usually find tracks on the world map, and if your tracking is high enough, occasionally it will say, "You see some fresh track here." if you climb, you can usually find something somewhere, and you can walk over and check it out; if it isn't in that square anymore, try climbing again. The issue is if you fall, you can get hurt rather badly, and you'll want to avoid getting hurt worse until you heal up (be sure to use physician to bandage yourself up).

Wolfgang Pauli
Mar 26, 2008

One Three Seven

Hunting definitely isn't the best way to stay alive. If anything, it's mostly a hobby to occupy your time while your fishing nets are soaking or you're waiting on your trap lines. I've never found anything more than a squirrel in the recent versions. I've never actually gotten anything from a trap, either, since you need to literally block entire worldmap tiles of land with trap fences.

h_double
Jul 27, 2001


I downloaded this for MacOS a few weeks ago, and I really want to like it more, except for a couple of things with the UI:

1) The UI response is sloooooowwwww, like when I press a key to issue a command, there's a 1-2 second delay before it registers. Is the PC version like this too?

2) There doesn't seem to be any way to make the alt key work on the Mac version, which means you can't activate skills directly, you have to go through the skills menu (which would be fine if it weren't for the delay waiting for the keypress to register).


I like the chilled out survivalist thing, and I've played a ton of roguelikes so I'm comfortable with a fairly sparse/semi-cryptic UI, but the slow responsiveness of the interface really makes stuff more tedious than it ought to be.

Is it like this for everybody or is the Mac version just not in a very playable state?

OneTwentySix
Nov 5, 2007

fun
FUN
FUN


I find things to hunt all the time; are you climbing trees? Trap fences are great, but they're more of a "free animal every month or three" than a steady food source.


There's no lag in the PC version; you might report it as a bug?

Chafey
Jun 14, 2005

greenface does not understand


I had just thought about this game about three days after it went free - I played a ton of it on my laptop years ago, and now that the full version is in my hands again I've been on one of my wacky cannibal murder rampages again. I never seem to last more than two or three weeks...

Sackmo
Oct 13, 2004


Thanks a ton for making this thread and pointing out the new donation based funding model. I remember playing around with this several times in the past, but every time I looked at the purchasing options I just sort of rolled my eyes and forgot about it. I'll definitely be giving him for his decision to move away from that.

Now it's time to go live out my dreams of being the next Dick Proenneke.

TerminalBlue
Aug 13, 2005

Ah, but don't worry, it'll all make sense; I'm a professional.


Wow, this is something. I paid for a version or two but generally set the game aside because honestly development was pretty glacial.

And this just after remembering the game fondly while playing Skyrim with hunger, thirst, and freezing to death mods.

Is success still measured by how long it takes for a big cat to spawn inside of your fences and murder you in your sleep?

Captain Diarrhoea
Apr 16, 2011


I paid for this quite a long time ago, my games generally went the way of DF Adventure Mode in that I would root around before seeing how many village children it would take to beat me in a melee. Turns out not that many.

EgoEgress
Mar 12, 2012

I'm deep yo


Oh, cool. I have wanted to play this- maybe I'll try it out now and chip in a donation. Gotta say, though, I've always thought the photographs in the game looked rather silly.

lonter
Oct 12, 2012


EgoEgress posted:

Oh, cool. I have wanted to play this- maybe I'll try it out now and chip in a donation. Gotta say, though, I've always thought the photographs in the game looked rather silly.

I love the photographs and the music, it's got a cool hobby programmer living in rural Finland feel

Captain Diarrhoea
Apr 16, 2011


EgoEgress posted:

Gotta say, though, I've always thought the photographs in the game looked rather silly.

It makes me feel like a jerk for saying this cause it's cool those guys went to the trouble, but an artwork overhaul would really improve the tone.

h_double
Jul 27, 2001


The sprites and UI could use a little polish, but the photos are awesome.

The soundtrack is conspicuously good too.

nucleicmaxid
Aug 23, 2007


h_double posted:

The sprites and UI could use a little polish, but the photos are awesome.

The soundtrack is conspicuously good too.

I like everything but the random grunting/chewing noises.

Keshik
Oct 27, 2000

optimates fellat capra


This game has completely loving consumed my life for two days straight.

Moridin920
Nov 15, 2007
OXYGEN
THIEF


If the end game was making a little village or whatever this would probably be a perfect game for me.

Laser Spider
Jan 28, 2009



h_double posted:

I downloaded this for MacOS a few weeks ago, and I really want to like it more, except for a couple of things with the UI:

1) The UI response is sloooooowwwww, like when I press a key to issue a command, there's a 1-2 second delay before it registers. Is the PC version like this too?

2) There doesn't seem to be any way to make the alt key work on the Mac version, which means you can't activate skills directly, you have to go through the skills menu (which would be fine if it weren't for the delay waiting for the keypress to register).


I like the chilled out survivalist thing, and I've played a ton of roguelikes so I'm comfortable with a fairly sparse/semi-cryptic UI, but the slow responsiveness of the interface really makes stuff more tedious than it ought to be.

Is it like this for everybody or is the Mac version just not in a very playable state?

I'm a Mac user and the game runs just fine for me. Assuming you're playing UrW 3.16-beta3, what version of the OS are you on? I'm still way back on 10.6.8, so maybe there's something in 10.8 that messes with it.

As for skills, you can use Cmd + the skill hotkey so as to avoid the skill menu.

Princey
Mar 22, 2013


h_double posted:

I downloaded this for MacOS a few weeks ago, and I really want to like it more, except for a couple of things with the UI:

1) The UI response is sloooooowwwww, like when I press a key to issue a command, there's a 1-2 second delay before it registers. Is the PC version like this too?

2) There doesn't seem to be any way to make the alt key work on the Mac version, which means you can't activate skills directly, you have to go through the skills menu (which would be fine if it weren't for the delay waiting for the keypress to register).


I like the chilled out survivalist thing, and I've played a ton of roguelikes so I'm comfortable with a fairly sparse/semi-cryptic UI, but the slow responsiveness of the interface really makes stuff more tedious than it ought to be.

Is it like this for everybody or is the Mac version just not in a very playable state?

I've been playing on a Mac, and 1 isn't true for me; the game's perfectly responsive. For 2, try using Command instead of Alt. I really haven't had any issues so far. Edit: Beaten.

I love survival games, so I'd had my eye on Unreal World for a while. So far it's been pretty fun! I've made it to the end of August and I'm pretty much ready for winter now. I was fortunate and caught a whole herd of reindeer plus an elk in my trap fence, so I was able to make a bunch of fur clothing to trade for things and smoke a bunch of meat. It would be nice to catch something else a little closer to wintertime, though, since I'm not sure how long the meat will last.

OneTwentySix
Nov 5, 2007

fun
FUN
FUN


Yeah, I'd really love it if you could grow into a village; support a larger group of people, etc. Some of that is planned, but who knows when he'll get to it.


^^^
You know you can smoke and dry meat to preserve them, right? Another good thing is that in winter, your food lasts much longer in your cellar, since it's basically a freezer at that point.

nucleicmaxid
Aug 23, 2007


I just killed a Njrepez warrior! ... Then I cut the meat from his bones and cooked it so I didn't starve ... This game is so amazing.


It smells like the roasted human cut is ready.

You finish eating the tasty roasted human cut.

Arthe Xavier
Apr 22, 2007

Artificial Stupidity


Strange that I've never heard of this game, and I'm a Finn. I'm very interested to try this game out, though, so I'm downloading it as we speak.

nutranurse
Oct 22, 2012

Unlikeliest of Slash Fics

nucleicmaxid posted:

I just killed a Njrepez warrior! ... Then I cut the meat from his bones and cooked it so I didn't starve ... This game is so amazing.


It smells like the roasted human cut is ready.

You finish eating the tasty roasted human cut.

Yeah, one of my favorite things to play as is a crazy cannibalistic owl-tribe person. I pick the "escaped slave" scenario, end up with little more than a knife and some rags, and spend the rest of the game stalking down villagers and eating them one-by-one.

Hotwire
Mar 11, 2006

hehehe


So is this now completely free free? I bought the unlimited upgrade copy years and years ago, but trying to track down the details and updating from the long-since-defunct download link in the email was a hassle I just couldn't bother to go through after a few years. Nice.

And it was mentioned above, but the music really is better than it has any right to be.

Hotwire fucked around with this message at Apr 13, 2013 around 18:43

nucleicmaxid
Aug 23, 2007


It is now completely free.

Hihohe
Oct 4, 2008

There are no rules in cat town!

ill give this game a lil' looky try

im a girl btw
Jan 15, 2004



I get addicted to UrW for a couple weeks every now and then but I lose interest once I've built a house and have so much food it's going off in my cellars faster than I can eat it all. Then I just end up seeing how many townspeople I can kill (not many)

My favourite starting scenario was the failed hunting trip because you could cut up your dead father and have plenty of meat to get you started. There are certainly better starting scenarios (I think the fisherman one is the best because you get free nets) but, cutting up your dad for food

girth brooks part 2
Sep 6, 2011

Tell us we will die like dogs.


Nice OP OneTwentySix.

This is one of my favorite games. I've payed for it several times, and bust it out at least once a month. The one problem is, has been stated before, there's not to much more to do after a certain point unless you make stupid little projects for yourself. I love the music for some reason, and, since I don't speak Finnish, the prayers get a chuckle out of me every time.

If you've never played it before now's the perfect time to try it. Especially if you enjoy rogue-likes or don't mind rough UI's.

Also thought I'd share a few of my favorite moments:

When my first character encountered my first cougar I thought it would be bad rear end to hurl my hatchet at it. It scored a nice hit, but didn't kill it. Then the cougar ran off with my hatchet, and only cutting implement, stuck in it's back. My character eventually died from exposure since I wasn't able to build a shelter, or fire, or anything really.

I pulled a dumb and made my guy fall into one my own of punji pits, and a stake got driven into his brain. Miraculously he lived, but had a quarter sized hole in his skull that never healed.

Another character built a mansion on a large island off of the coast, and covered the island in booby traps. He would then go out and hire towns folk, abandon them in the center, and spend his days reenacting The Most Dangerous Game. The gods eventually grew weary of this and sent an army of bears to put an end to it. Which they did.

EDIT: Oh hey, it has a new desktop icon. It's nice I like it, but I'm gonna miss little bro.

girth brooks part 2 fucked around with this message at Apr 16, 2013 around 00:48

nucleicmaxid
Aug 23, 2007


So I finally got the hang of this game. I get set up, I've got a cabin with a fireplace, about 200lbs of smoked meat or so (I killed a few people and half of it is human meat ) I've got 2 cellars, a pig, some vaguely ok equipment, over 1000 firewood, massively strong fishing, a farm full of potential food...

I look at the calendar, and it's the middle of June. What the hell do I do for the next nine months?

Minorkos
Feb 20, 2010

very high player looking for a small son to coach - m4m - 41

Looking at this game makes me feel patriotic. I love survival games, so I'll try this out.

girth brooks part 2
Sep 6, 2011

Tell us we will die like dogs.


nucleicmaxid posted:

So I finally got the hang of this game. I get set up, I've got a cabin with a fireplace, about 200lbs of smoked meat or so (I killed a few people and half of it is human meat ) I've got 2 cellars, a pig, some vaguely ok equipment, over 1000 firewood, massively strong fishing, a farm full of potential food...

I look at the calendar, and it's the middle of June. What the hell do I do for the next nine months?

That's sort of the problem with this game, but I have a few suggestions. You could get some canine friends, start a cattle ranch, go exploring, go spelunking/bear hunting, declare war on those purple dorks, build a sauna, look into drying meat since the smoked meat won't quite last as long as you'd like (still lasts a good amount of time though), and I think you may be able to brew your own beer now (maybe not I haven't tried yet, but it's something he's been talking about for awhile).



Oh and I found a graphics mod:

http://z3.invisionfree.com/UrW_foru...topic=1921&st=0

It doesn't change things too horribly much, but it looks decent and is kind of a nice change.

Kevin DuBrow
Apr 21, 2012



I like to go around some town, use a giant pile of spoiled meat to bribe six or seven dumb peasants to follow me, and go stab some foreign trader in the neck. In the ensuing chaos I walk a few screens away and take a nap. When I come back, everyone's dead and I can pick through my choice of masterwork broadswords and mail coifs.

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Foodahn
Oct 5, 2006



I personally like to start in a more northern region and with the Lonely Settler start (I think that's the one with some half finished cottages and a bunch of axes?), it's much easier to find big game and foxes in the north and with that start all you need to trade for is a bow and some arrows. In the beginning food can be a problem if you have terrible fishing because you're going to have to make do with just a fishing pole for a while. Once you get a bow and 20ish arrows you can start hunting down elk and finishing your huge cabin complex and elaborate trap maze (which will eventually kill you). The one minor problem, aside from food, is that it's kind of a pain in the rear end to find someone with a good bow and some arrows to trade with if you don't have nice furs, which is really hard to get without a bow and arrows. Trapping seems great, but I've never gotten it to work reliably, though I admit I haven't tried it much in the northern areas. Foxtraps are great for trading though.


IMO bow is the best skill, followed by hideworking and then probably physician, of course you'll need dodge as well but you can't really boost it. If you want to hunt crazy poo poo like warriors or bear, you'll need dogs, probably quite a few, and they're less of a pain with the newish update where you can talk to them and give commands, a bunch of dogs eat A LOT though, so it's more for when you get bored.



The biggest problem is fighting boredom once you get established, it's kinda like Dwarf Fortress in that way.

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