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Pick
Jul 19, 2009

Panthera tigris
If a cat draws human penises, is it a furry-1?


Tinker Bell was a computer-animated film released in 2008, which utterly blows my mind, because it doesn't feel like five years since I was sick to the gills and needed something from the damned RedBox.

This film currently has a 6.6 on IMDB. Not exactly a ringing endorsement for Tink 'n' Friends.


These friends.

"So why the new thread, Pick?" you ask your computer screen like an idiot. "Why not just append this to your Bee Movie and Shark Tale review thread?"

Well, because my mission here is very different than it was in the quality dead zone. You see, I really like Tinker Bell. I think it's a good movie. And no, not just a good movie considering [excuse], or in spite of [other excuse]. I mean that I enjoy this movie and think it is exceptional for its core audience. Which, granted, is primarily little girls.

Now, before someone makes a brony joke, let me point out that I'm a woman (oh god am I really old enough for that word? ) and I have a particular interest in high-quality entertainment for children. I don't always like children, but I do respect them. They're smarter than we give them credit for, and they deserve entertainment that will teach them and guide them appropriately. It's easy to dismiss children as movie-goers since, let's be honest, they can have pretty awful taste. However, taste is a learned thing. Would kids enjoy lovely movies if we weren't always foisting lovely movies on them? Maybe what they're reacting to is a poo poo comfort zone. In sum, don't show them Bratz Babies, okay? So we'll move on.

To start off, I wasn't excited about this film. And it has less to do with Disney's 3d animation department than it did with Tink herself. See, I was never a fan of the Peter Pan (1953) film version of Tinker Bell (which for ease I'll probably usually type Tinkerbell). In fact, as a kid, I thought she was a total turd. And seeing her in unrelated Disney media baffled me. Tink's a jerk! Why do people love and glorify this jerk? She's a jerk!



Well, I've somewhat revised my opinion on old Tink. And she deserved a shot in her own film since, among other things, she can talk, and therefore explain her reasoning for, at times, getting real fuckin' pissed off.

Not that it's really necessary to extend such credit, since for all intents and purposes, she's a different character anyway. The movie takes place before she meets Peter Pan, and her role is entirely different as well. Proooobably because this Tink isn't really based on Barrie's Peter Pan, but instead in the Disney Fairies franchise, which is basically related to the traditional Peter Pan mythos in name alone. It began with a series of licensed children's books in 2005.

I know what you're thinking. Baaaarf. Paying some dorkus to write garbage for kids. Well, watch your loving mouth, because Disney went to Gail Carson Levine to do it. That is, the author of Ella Enchanted (the Newberry award-winning children's book of 1998). I'm sure she did an excellent job, since she's an excellent author. Now there are assloads of these books by a variety of authors. I wouldn't be shocked if some are great and some suck, but that's the nature of the game.

The franchise has grown a lot, but for the time being, I'll focus on the films. Yes, films. There are five (sort of), and more are coming. I like them all to some degree, though the first is certainly my favorite. A new one has been released every year, though I seem to recall we'll have to wait until 2014 for the next one. (And the 2011 film, Pixie Hollow Games, is more like a TV special.) Why the delay for the next film? Planes. Yes, loving Planes took away my goddamn fairy movies! Fuckers! gently caress you!

Soooo, saunter up to a RedBox and you're greeted with this:



Welllll, there's no dopey eyebrow smirk, so maybe there's hope? Here's hoping there's less unabashed racism than in the original Peter Pan! And off we gooo!

And in we gooooooo!

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Pick
Jul 19, 2009

Panthera tigris
If a cat draws human penises, is it a furry-1?


Chapter 1: Fairies Alive! :

This is an origin story, as are many movies with the main character's name serving as the title. Interestingly, the 1953 Peter Pan was going to start with Peter's origin, but it was dropped. Now we're getting that tale at last, just... well, still not for Peter. Or perhaps preceding even Peter. After all, who came first?

The first time that a baby laughs, a fairy's
life takes flight
When the moon comes up to shine her face
and the birds are fast asleep
And the lanterns hang from every post,
The fairies leave their keep!
They join their hands and sing their songs,
The mariners all can't hear!
In the springtime when the earth is new,
The fairies might draw near!


So, the film opens with narration about fairies, played over scenes of fairies covertly doing their jobs drawing frost and other such crap. I'll admit, this is annoying at first (weather ain't caused by fairies, you dickbags) but there are thematic elements that come later that make this all right with me. Anyway, a shot of a fairy pans over to a baby in a crib. (I almost wrote "crab", but the baby's not in a crab.) And the baby... laughs!

We then watch a dandelion flufflet being carried by the wind all the way to NeverLand (IN SPACE!) They can't really be blamed for this. "Second star to the right" is kind of a thing now. This fluff passes over NeverLand for a good aerial shot, then progresses down and through the woods, flowerbeds, and associated ~nature~.



This wakes up all the fairies. Jeez, thanks Tink.

They all head to the big tree, where the dandelion fluff is apparently headed. It's helped along by a "random" fairy--one who isn't random at all. You'll meet her later. This takes at least one re-watch to notice, but it's worth noticing.



There are already a lot of solid visuals here. The choice of nighttime for Tinker Bell's arrival lends us this wonderful cool/warm contrast. It also permits us a more painterly background, with the darkness blending many of the surrounding colors. Anyway, once we get inside the tree, we're treated to some more interesting artistic decisions.



Fairy dust pools into shelf fungus, pouring from some unknown source. Wait, unknown? Didn't Tinker Bell (and ostensibly other fairies) produce pixie dust? Well, not in this series. Here, the tree produces the dust and the fairies use it for professional applications. And they use it quite a lot less than you'd think. Another important plot point to bear in mind: pixie dust is a scarce and controlled resource. Anyway, an infusion of pixie dust brings Tinker Bell into her true form.



Interestingly, she appears with neither her trademark hairstyle nor her green dress.

She looks around to other groups of fairies huddled around in the tree. They seem to be "themed", which is a correct assessment. I will admit though that this movie doesn't always know what the themes of its fairies are, but that doesn't become distracting until the fifth movie. Anyway, the ministers of the seasons and their queen, Clarion, arrive to greet the newcomer. You'd think there'd be more laughing babies in a world of billions of people, but eh, special fairies. Or maybe NeverLand time is weird. Or maybe the baby has to laugh, like, FOR REAL. Maybe some babies never make the cut.



Minister of Summer, Minister of Spring, Queen Clarion, Minister of Autumn, Minister of Winter.

(According to the continuity-loving fifth movie, the Minister of Winter shouldn't be able to be here at this time, but it's not a big deal.) Anyway, leadership is 2/5ths male, though it might be hard to tell. Those guys are, appropriately enough, quite fey. But there are male fairies who aren't. Just not in GOVERNMENT.

Visually, I think Clarion is one of the worst-looking characters. But it's not so bad. The graphics of the entire movie are somewhat limited, that's obvious (it's a DisneyToon Studios production, not a "legit" Disney 3D production like Wreck-It Ralph or Bolt). However, I think they economized really well. Most DisneyToon productions did, at least on the technical side of things. Obvious example: Bambi II. Whatever complaints folk might have about it, the film looks gorgeous and right in tune with the original. Only, in constant dollars, with a budget of like 1/10th of the original's.

Queen Clarion welcomes Tinkerbell to Pixie Hollow. She holds Tink's hand as she shows her briefly how to use her wings. It's intentionally motherly.

Next, a representative fairy from each of the groups we saw earlier comes forth and places some sort of article on one of a series of flat mushrooms surrounding Tinkerbell. They smile and in some cases wave (notably Silvermist, the water fairy voiced by Lucy Liu). The fairies, that is, not the mushrooms. No anthropomorphic plants hereabouts.

Tink approaches the flower symbol brought forth by the flower fairies (including Rosetta, the Southern belle).



poo poo

gently caress

that ain't

poo poo

try again

Tinkerhell tries a water droplet. No such luck. She tries to touch a wee little tornado while being watched by... the fairy who helped her get to the tree?



That's right. Vidia. Say that name out loud and then try to piece together the role she will play in this movie. Okay good. (Interestingly, she wears pants, like Fawn and Chloe, which is relatively uncommon among the fairies but not as uncommon as you'd think.)

Tornado is a flop. Crap.

Oh.

Oh wait.

The hammer

the hammer is glowing!!

Grab the hammer!!!!




Oh my god she's loving Thor!

Haha, not really. But she is a tinker fairy. That's her talent.

The other fairies whisper among themselves that the hammer glowed like NUTS, which must mean she'll be a very good tinker. Kind of deterministic, but that's how it's going to be. Silvermist notes that it was a brighter glow than for Vidia during her ceremony, suggesting that Vidia is also extremely skilled, or at least had the potential for great skill. I think this is interesting because it means we're establishing relative ages. But since a fairy apparently shows up at the age it will remain, or at least having passed childhood, it'd be impossibly to tell at a glance. Or is this true? There are fairies who definitely "look" older.

Now Queen Clarion tells the other tinker fairies to welcome her to their "talent kin"! Woo!



W-wo... oo?

Woo?

Tinkerbell does not feel the woo.

These two are Bubble and Clank, a staple of the series. They serve as representatives of tinkerdom, that is, huuuuge dorks.

Pick fucked around with this message at Apr 28, 2013 around 04:41

Keanu Grieves
Dec 30, 2002

TEAM DYLAN


I'm trying to wrap my head around the fact that there are five films in this franchise and, until 20 minutes ago, I was only dimly aware of one.

Oh, yeah, and then there's this...

Keanu Grieves fucked around with this message at Apr 28, 2013 around 12:16

Krypt-OOO-Nite!!
Oct 25, 2010


^ I envy you a little, I've got a 5 year old daughter so I've seen these films more times than I can count.

You should watch the latest one just for the insane fairy biology lesson in how fairies are born or the 2nd one to see Tinkerbell being a massive jerk towards her well meaning boyfriend.

I've got to admit as a bit of snob when it comes to classic kids tales I wasn't too happy about my kid watching these movies but their surprisingly ok and sort of the closest thing she's got to an girl-orientated action adventure franchise. Plus she also loves the 2003 almost literal adaption of Peter Pan which has pacified my need for her to appreciate the original story.

....The two "comedy" tinker guys are still unfunny and lame however.

Krypt-OOO-Nite!! fucked around with this message at Apr 28, 2013 around 17:14

Abitha Denton
Jan 10, 2012


Krypt-OOO-Nite!! posted:

....The two "comedy" tinker guys are still unfunny and lame however.

Anyone who wears comedy bug-eye glasses to greet a newborn person gets a pass in my book. If that's how they look all the time, so much the better.

Pick
Jul 19, 2009

Panthera tigris
If a cat draws human penises, is it a furry-1?


Krypt-OOO-Nite!! posted:

I've got to admit as a bit of snob when it comes to classic kids tales I wasn't too happy about my kid watching these movies but their surprisingly ok and sort of the closest thing she's got to an girl-orientated action adventure franchise.

I think that's the key here. I try not to think of them as in the ranks of, say, the traditional Disney animated features canon, because these are straight-to-DVD and made on a budget to match. However, for what they are, they're constructed with a lot of artistry and care and I think they're great for children. But yes, especially for girls, not because fairies are "for girls" necessarily, but because so much of children's media instills detrimental and even hostile attitudes towards women. This is a refreshing, if not perfect, alternative.

Chapter 2: STEM fairies:



Here's the Pixie Hollow tree again in daylight, surrounded by the woods representative of the four seasons. Bobble and Clank decide to fly her through said seasons to take a look at what the fairies there do. They fly through the Winter Woods, again in utter defiance of the fifth movie, rabble rabble. But anyway, here's a picture of Bobble and Clank from the books:



It's not difficult to see what they were going for here. It's fat nerd and lanky, bespectacled nerd. I do like how they render Bobble's eyes, though (turns out it's Bobble and not Bubble, it's just hard to tell with the accents--Clank is voiced by a Scottish dude, and Bobble is voiced by an American guy with an affected accent).

By the way, if you're wondering how they get around the issue of calling men "fairies", worry not. They're technically "sparrowmen". Haha but they're totally fairies, and I think the script slips up a few times. I'll check for it. If nothing else, the race as a whole and groups of this species are always referred to as "fairies", not "fairies and sparrowmen". I guess men just have to include themselves into the fold indirectly, assumed to be included if still linguistically excluded. There is no real-world analogue to this, guys. Nothing in the history of mankind. No man alive could see it.

As Tinkerbell, Bobble, and Clank fly over these different areas, we see the different core fairies doing their jobs. Tinkerbell doesn't know them yet, but they'll be fast friends, of course. Here is Fawn, the only fairy to get a different voice actress in subsequent films.



She's painting ladybugs as part of some bullshit manual labor process. gently caress. Enjoy spotting up billions of Harmonia axyridis.

Fairies generally do "nature" jobs. So they paint leaves, guide animals, plant seeds, all sorts of crap. But enough about those nature fairies--it's time to head on down to Tinkertown!



Aww, yep. In the dirt.

Tinkerbell is actually quite curious and excited.


Background minorities.

And who wouldn't be? They're building poo poo!



All of these constructions have an obvious natural bent. We don't see metal, we see sticks and flowers and whatnot. It's in keeping with the aesthetic of the film, and generally I think they're convincing, even if you know an axle made out of a somewhat bendy twig would in fact be terrible. We also see that they use animal labor. The level of communication that is possible between fairies and animals is never made totally clear. They also made insects and mammals about the same level of brightness, and everything can understand fairy speak, it's just not clear how much they're really processing.



Tinkerbell is introduced to... her house?! This is rather significant, considering in the introduction of the film, we witness fairies emerging from flowers when they wake. As far as this film is concerned, tinker fairies might be the only fairies with permanent homes. Industrialization?! Of the fairy world!? And perhaps a whiff of class inequality? Do tinkers have inherent material wealth that is by design or incidence precluded from the others? Is that their recompense for lacking the inherent magics of the others--the magic of infrastructure?



Look at this house!

And then look in the far-right corner, where the closet is. Yep, she has other clothes now. But they're certainly not her trademark dress.



Yeah, this has to go.

Tinkerbell does her thing and then flies down to the workshop where Bobble and Clank are trying to fix a car.





The eye-popping gag lives on!

Anyway, the tinkers then explain to Tinkerbell what tinkers do. Basically, they're mechanics, engineers, and inventors. And manual laborers, too, of course. The distinction is kind of fuzzy at this scale. Anyway, as soon as they wrap up their little explanation, we meet Fairy Mary, leader of the tinkers.



"Y'all got to stop fuckin' around."

That quote is only implied, but yes, implied. In general, Fairy Mary is cast as a tough but caring boss. As head of the tinker fairies she has the unenviable position of managing a heap of dorks.

Lotish
Dec 10, 2008

I pick up my Devil Axe...
...and DEVIL!


Krypt-OOO-Nite!! posted:

^ I envy you a little, I've got a 5 year old daughter so I've seen these films more times than I can count.

You should watch the latest one just for the insane fairy biology lesson in how fairies are born or the 2nd one to see Tinkerbell being a massive jerk towards her well meaning boyfriend.

I've got to admit as a bit of snob when it comes to classic kids tales I wasn't too happy about my kid watching these movies but their surprisingly ok and sort of the closest thing she's got to an girl-orientated action adventure franchise. Plus she also loves the 2003 almost literal adaption of Peter Pan which has pacified my need for her to appreciate the original story.

....The two "comedy" tinker guys are still unfunny and lame however.

Same here. As movies made for five year old girls go, this is one of the least offensive I've seen (my niece loves some really awful Barbie movies, which is my frame of reference). Tink is a jerk, but the show doesn't act like that's not a problem. They make a point of how she alienates her friends, treats people with disrespect, and jeopardizes lives and livelihoods because of her wilfulness. While this particular movie is not a favorite of mine, there's at least one that I actually really like.

Yeah those dweebs are a drag.

edit: spoiler for the series, if not this movie in particular.

Lotish fucked around with this message at Apr 28, 2013 around 22:25

OneThousandMonkeys
Oct 9, 2005

The Strangest Vengeance Ever Planned

Keanu Grieves posted:

I'm trying to wrap my head around the fact that there are five films in this franchise and, until 20 minutes ago, I was only dimly aware of one.

Oh, yeah, and then there's this...



At first I thought this was a "Get ready for this load of poo poo in late 2013-early 2014" thread. That's how aware I was of the Tinkerbell franchise.

weekly font
Dec 1, 2004


Everytime I try to fly I fall
Without my wings
I feel so small
Guess I need you baby...



My friends worked at Disney for several seasons and when I went down to visit I met a girl who worked as Tinkerbell and they pretty much only hired developmentally stunted pixies to play the role, unsurprisingly.

Pick
Jul 19, 2009

Panthera tigris
If a cat draws human penises, is it a furry-1?


Lotish posted:

Same here. As movies made for five year old girls go, this is one of the least offensive I've seen (my niece loves some really awful Barbie movies, which is my frame of reference). Tink is a jerk, but the show doesn't act like that's not a problem. They make a point of how she alienates her friends, treats people with disrespect, and jeopardizes lives and livelihoods because of her wilfulness. While this particular movie is not a favorite of mine, there's at least one that I actually really like.

I guess I should make clear that I'm trying to be Ebertesque in my approach and largely consider the needs of the target audience here. Yet, I enjoy watching good children's media in large part because I love the idea of children loving these good things, of them being provided for.

Anyway, it still avoids many pitfalls I've seen in more "mature" films. A lot of that discussion will come after the plot summary.

Which one's the one you like best, by the way?

SocketWrench
Jul 8, 2012



I admit I've watched a couple of these out of sheer boredom with nothing better on. The friendship line* of the whole thing gets retardedly redundant and lamer as the movies progress. But again, being geared towards kids, I guess teaching them about things that really don't exist the same in the real world is par for the course.

I admit though, I find the way the developers explain things like the spots on ladybugs and whatnot kind of interesting from a creative standpoint.
And I do like Bobble mainly because of his awkwardness and those dorky glasses.





*The friendship line being no matter how bad you are your friends will always forgive and give up everything to help you succeed at even the simplest task imaginable while learning "valuable" life lessons.

Lotish
Dec 10, 2008

I pick up my Devil Axe...
...and DEVIL!


Pick posted:

Which one's the one you like best, by the way?

Honestly? The Secret of the Wings. No one is especially obnoxious (except that one librarian character) and it's got some interesting lessons about understanding your limits but also reasonably challenging traditions that have gone too long without a critical examination. Also Tink isn't really the one who causes all the problems; it's the well-intentioned people trying to stop her that makes things worse for a change.

Pick
Jul 19, 2009

Panthera tigris
If a cat draws human penises, is it a furry-1?


Lotish posted:

Honestly? The Secret of the Wings. No one is especially obnoxious (except that one librarian character) and it's got some interesting lessons about understanding your limits but also reasonably challenging traditions that have gone too long without a critical examination. Also Tink isn't really the one who causes all the problems; it's the well-intentioned people trying to stop her that makes things worse for a change.

My #1 problem with that film is having a fairy voiced by Timothy Dalton. It's confusing to my brain.

Pick fucked around with this message at Apr 29, 2013 around 17:28

Madurai
Jun 26, 2012


I like the fact that they gave Tink a trade skill. I'd never really connected the name as anything but onamotapeia, but making her a tinsmith seems to work.

Pick
Jul 19, 2009

Panthera tigris
If a cat draws human penises, is it a furry-1?


Chapter 3: Adventure in Never Land!

Fairy Mary asks the two dorks whether the wagon is finished, as it's the task that Tinkerbell interrupted. The answer? Nope! See, Bobble and Clank are kind of bumblers. Nice guys, but in no way threatening. In fact, despite what I said about Timothy Dalton, the male fairies ("sparrowmen", psssch) are always designed to be as unintimidating as conceivably possible. Bobble and Clank are cutesy and rather sexually ambiguous. I don't mean that in the Bowie way where you want to gently caress Ziggy Stardust no matter which it is, I mean in a way that suggests a sexual null.



Bobble there is sort of stuck with a gangly pre-pubescent body (forever?!). It doesn't really have any defining sexual characteristics. Compare his design to Fawn's, if I otherwise forget to do so. Clank is on the other end, where he's thick in a babyish way that disguises his evidenced strength and presumed musculature. Also, no body hair. Which frankly would be weird on fairies. Like, I think it would be weird on fairies. Oh, well, I mean on like the arms and legs. I make a particular point to never, ever think about the presence or absence of fairy pubes.

Anyway, Fairy Mary tells them to make their goddamn deliveries with the wagon, then, if it's so loving finished. She also allows Tink to go with them. It's worth noting that B&C's behavior towards Tinkerbell is rarely if ever flirtatious, and really the only "romantic" tension you could ascribe to them is their amazement when revised Tinkerbell shows up. But even that could be in part admiration of the transformation more than any romantic interest. These two are kept as Tink's work friends right out of the gate. From the look of things, fairies don't poo poo where they eat.

(What do they eat? Where do they poo poo?? Questions.)

On their way to deliver crap with the wagon (with Clank holding up the side of the unfixed cart), they sense... evil.

Or maybe just... some other thing? Something not evil?



This is a classic setup for a friend to arrive.

But it's not a friend!




Nope! It's rear end-whippin' thistles! Apparently, in the books, they're under the command of the thistle queen or something like that. Here, they're just a goddamn nuisance that wants to whip your flesh off. (Really, it does a number on acorn top, which is rather more sturdy than fairy flesh.) The group manage to run away, but the thistles have been foreshadowed and thus will obviously return.

Unfortunately, they run off too quickly and lose control of the cart. They hit in the middle of one of the fairy work zones. The wagon is trashed and the mouse is frightened.



Sad mouse.

Luckily, Fawn is there. Yep, it's time to meet Tink's new friends. Oh, Tink's not casting Bobble and Clank aside as besties (she totally is), it's just that the new friends she makes are great at everything and also so cool as opposed to her less great at things, less cool (now secondary) friends.

Fawn pets the mouse's nose to help it calm down.

Silvermist then does the same thing to Tinkerbell.



Scenes like this make me afraid of GISing for pictures of characters. That's why I make all my own screencaps. why deviantart why

Other fairies arrive to help, including almost all of Tink's core friend group. That is, in total,

== Fawn: Animal fairy, as seen above. Long, chestnut braid. Wears pants, has freckles. The tomboy of the bunch, which is saying a bit because Tink tends to fill that role too. Fawn was originally voiced by America Ferrera (Ugly Betty). They make a point that Fawn is particularly talented as an animal fairy, but poo poo, none of Tink's top-tier friends are going to suck.

== Rosetta: Flower fairy. Has the accent of a Southern belle. She dons clothing made of flowers... like almost everybody else. She was seen earlier in the film, the representative of flower fairies. She has the distinction of being the main protagonist of one of the films in the series (Pixie Hollow Games). Her dresses tend to be short and rather modern in design; it's worth paying attention to why they chose the styles they did for particular characters.

== Iridessa: Light fairy. I think she's the weakest character, actually, because she never does anything wrong or expresses much of a personality. They tried to set her up as the "smart one", but they're all written to be pretty intelligent, except maybe for Silvermist.

== Silvermist: Water fairy voiced by Lucy Liu. Do you watch Elementary? You should; she's great in that. Lucy Liu, that is. Silvermist is weird. She's just kind of a weirdo. Really, really nice though. Perhaps overly nice. Weird nice. Weird weird. She's also the most touchy-feely. I get the feeling they were trying to make her kind of a hippie, but instead she seems vaguely out of it at all times.



But enough of that poo poo, Tink's fine. So let's do what we came here to do, eh?



Distribute... tools?

But what kind of tools could a fairy need?

schwenz
Jun 20, 2003

"DANCE. Like it's nobody's business."

Also, you suck dicks or something


I have seen all of these with my daughter at some point, and I agree that they're good movies. Unfortunately for me, Phoebe greatly prefers the Barbie flicks. Those are bearable, I guess, but I have a hard time watching the Barbie films. They look like they were all animated in an old version of Poser.

I like that you pointed out that Bobble and Clank are thrown aside when the new, prettier, more popular girl shows up. This seems to be a recurring rhing in movies for young girls and I really struggle with it. They all make an effort to say, "everyone is equal! Nerds are normal people just like you and me!" And then they just abandon them.

I worry about it a lot with Phoebe. She's only seven, but you can already tell she's going to be very pretty. I've already caught her trying to single out other girls as nerdy, or fat. I'm terrified shel'll grow up to be a Heather.

Pick
Jul 19, 2009

Panthera tigris
If a cat draws human penises, is it a furry-1?


schwenz posted:

I like that you pointed out that Bobble and Clank are thrown aside when the new, prettier, more popular girl shows up. This seems to be a recurring rhing in movies for young girls and I really struggle with it. They all make an effort to say, "everyone is equal! Nerds are normal people just like you and me!" And then they just abandon them.

Yeah, it's a topic that will warrant further discussion, because the writers were really between a rock and a hard place here. In fact, a lot of the decisions in the film are, by necessity, the lesser of two evils, or at least have a dark interpretation/implications. In a way, I appreciate the realism, but on the other hand, you won't want that questionable implication to seem like the take-home message.

I think it is especially difficult to make quality entertainment for young girls because they're already bombarded with so many genuinely harmful messages. You want to drive the right ideas home and exclude the bad ones, but it's never so simple. I do like that the films have many protagonists, so there are many individuals with which watchers can identify. On the other hand, you still wonder whether "pretty girls who are naturally great at stuff!" is a very nuanced genre.

In that vein, I'd actually be happy for this to turn into the general "What should I let my girls watch?" thread, since I didn't realize there were so many parents here!

Pick
Jul 19, 2009

Panthera tigris
If a cat draws human penises, is it a furry-1?


Chapter 4: no, your fairy's a tool

So, the nature-talent fairies (that's movie terminology, and a useful category) need tools, eh? Welcome to one of the only times Iridessa ever does anything!



Seal the gay away.

Yep, she asks Silvermist to help her create rainbows, which she then seals for use... on the "mainland". I don't know why fairies consider Earth the mainland, but they do. Maybe because they're all technically born there?

I've discovered that in the books, the fairies are born at a baby's first laugh (okay) but die when the child stops believing in fairies. Owch. So maybe fairies don't live forever. ... Except that the movie clearly handles things much differently. Or is Queen Clarion going to kick it in 4 years? If nothing else, a fairy's lifespan couldn't exceed a human lifespan. Really, though, it doesn't come up. This movie has a different mechanism for fairy death. (And Tinkerbell is almost sucked into a combustion engine in the third movie, which you assume would be fatal.)

Anyway, Tinkerbell asks about the mainland, since she doesn't know much about it, being newborn, essentially. Her new friends tell her all about it--how the seasons need to be changed (unlike in Neverland, where a season is a region and not a time). The nature-talent fairies have to go there and do the work, because apparently having Earth on a tilted axis doesn't actually entail jack. Or maybe fairies tilt the earth? Gonna need a lot of fairies. Are there volcano fairies? If so, they've done some dick moves.

Tinkerbell then exclaims that the mainland sounds amazing! Her friends giggle happily in reply. Of course the mainland is great!

Tink, Bobble, and Clank then take off. There's work to be done!

They end up being rattled by a gust of wind... that gust being, of course, Vidia!

Vidia's name probably derives from the Latin word for envy, "Invidia". Anyway. Tink asks Bobble and Clank to go ahead. She wants to talk to this fast-flying fairy! Speaking of which, Vidia has much longer wings than the other fairies. A wise design touch that I doubt most people noticed.

Tinkerbell disrupts Vidia's attempts to pollinate flowers... multiple times, in multiple ways... while trying to get Vidia's attention. Vidia ignores her about as long as she can, but eventually relents.


Frame decimation made her hand weird; sorry.

Tinkerbell asks Vidia what her talent is. "... What do you think it is?"

Tink assumes Vidia is a pollinator. Not a bad guess, since in this world apparently bees and poo poo don't pull their nature-weight. But, as noted, Vidia is a "fast-flying fairy" which is a "rare talent". Don't know why, and wouldn't have assumed such, given that earlier in the film there seemed to be as many fast-flying fairies as any other type. Or maybe those were just wind fairies and Vidia is part of a subclass of wind fairies? It's not mentioned, but it doesn't really need to be. The point is, Vidia sees herself as hot poo poo.

Vidia notes that wind is necessary for a number of essential season-related tasks... and for bringing fairies from the mainland. Including Tink!

That's exciting to Tink! Since hey, all the fairies rely on the tinkers, too!

Woah there. Vidia don't like that comparison. Vidia don't like that one bit.



This shot is done with a sky background, which would be annoyingly sparse, except the character animation is at its peak here. Tinkerbell is exuberant and trying to bridge a gap, whereas Vidia shuts it down expertly. Tink gets pissed at Vidia's attitude and exclaims that she when goes to the mainland, she'll prove how goddamn important tinkers are/she is. Vidia is amused. The mainland? Tinkerbell?

Yeah, see, no one told Tinkerbell that tinker fairies don't go to the mainland. And Vidia's not going to tell her. Instead, she sets Tinkerbell up for a fall. What makes this scene work for me is that both of them are being kind of dickish. ("I'll show her what a rare talent really is!") It's a good intro to Tinkerbell's characteristic flaw: anger. After all, you don't really want to lead with it in a film like this, it needs to be introduced gently. So bringing her anger in when it's largely appropriate is a good way to foreshadow later events when she gets pissed less defensibly. (Movie 2 comes to mind.)

Imgur is not letting me upload images and continue this at the moment, so I guess I'll say a little about Vidia.

I went and read Vidia's "Disney Fairies Wiki" entry out of curiosity. She's fallen in love with a dragon, lives in a lone sour plum tree, and sounds like a major dick. She is not an antagonist in that series, though, or at least not a normal one. Vidia's dickishness in the movies seems to be more directed, however, and purposeful in the context of the film. Vidia is basically "bad Tink". I'd characterize their major distinguishing features to be popularity and manipulativeness. Vidia seems to be generally respected for her abilities, but not "popular" like Tink (Tink's popularity waxes and wanes, but always ends on a strong note film-by-film). Vidia is an aloof loner, really. She and Tink also both seem to be strongly motivated by anger, but Tink's anger is extremely transparent, whereas Vidia's tends to manifest more subtly.

What's strange is I'm not really sure what made them develop differently. Tink became popular almost immediately, with very little obvious input on her part. Was Vidia once popular? Did she blow it? Did the other fairies get sick of her loving mind games or what? It can't just be her pride, since Tink's also quite proud, as is Rosetta. Not that pride is bad, of course. In fact, I rather like that Tink is assertive about her skills. I get sick of the meek lead, male or female.

Pick fucked around with this message at May 2, 2013 around 05:38

Women's Rights?
Nov 16, 2005

Ain't give a damn


I'm enjoying the walkthrough. Tinkerbell has always annoyed the poo poo out of me so I never wanted to watch the movies, but I might have to check them out...I figured the films would all be sparkling and giggling and DON'T FORGET TO BUY THIS TOY KIDS, but it's actually not sounding like too bad of a movie.

Pick
Jul 19, 2009

Panthera tigris
If a cat draws human penises, is it a furry-1?


Women's Rights? posted:

I'm enjoying the walkthrough. Tinkerbell has always annoyed the poo poo out of me so I never wanted to watch the movies, but I might have to check them out...I figured the films would all be sparkling and giggling and DON'T FORGET TO BUY THIS TOY KIDS, but it's actually not sounding like too bad of a movie.

If nothing else, the movie does not feel toy-motivated at all. I mean, it is, don't get me wrong. There are definitely toys for this series--more than you'd think. A brisk trot through Target will prove it. But the movie itself doesn't seem to concern itself with this concept.

Chapter 5: day at the beach!

I tried to upload this last time but Imgur was being a dickface. Let's see if it's working now.



There we go. Though Tink flew away from Vidia in a tiff, she is distracted along the way by a mysterious bright light on the very edge of the beach. What could it be?

Well, as it turns out, it's a variety of things. Crap things! ... Human crap things. But, alas, this isn't Adventure Time. We are not in a post-apocalyptic wasteland where fairies are the result of some sort of hideous mutation. As is later explained by Bobble, these are "lost things", and lost things periodically wash ashore on NeverLand. Wow, thanks, dickbags of Earth! Your litter is showing up in space.



Tinkerbell immediately starts loving around with this garbage.

Which is great.

She's curious and having a great time investigating the properties of these strange objects she has found. Including the coin, which as it turns out was the object that shone brightly enough to originally attract her.



She mimics its expression, and it's pretty funny. I am surprised that the coin lacks so much surrounding detail. Perhaps there's a reason that they didn't want VICTORIA DEI GRATA all around the sides. I don't know, personally. That's all it's missing for the most basic Victoria coin designs, far as I'm familiar.

Tinkerbell grabs her load of poo poo from the beach and flies off to the tinker benches. Interestingly, one of the items is a gemstone, but it never has particular importance and she never pays it any mind aside from its practical use.



A screw rolling around is way better.

Fairy Mary, on her rounds, notices and confiscates the "junk" for cluttering up the workplace. It's not treated as evil or insidious behavior, just that why the eff would you have that ess around? Tinkerbell is discouraged but basically takes it in stride.

Fairy Mary reminds the trio that the Queen's Review is that night. That is, the review of preparations for spring. This is a time of particular importance for tinkers, because they're so heavily involved with preparation versus actual implementation.

We then see Tinkerbell begin to tinker... and continue to tinker... and drat. Still tinkering. This is expressed in a scene I think looks great and was quite clever.



It sort of reminds me of an old Chuck-e-Cheese animatronic diorama, where different figures are lit when they're important, and unlit when they're "away" (but just inactive). In this context, though, I think it's visually pleasing and effective. We see that the other fairies work diligently, but there's a dropoff that leads us into a night of progressive darkness. (I couldn't capture the whole thing in a .gif, so pardon.) It's touches like this that make me appreciate the film. There were many easier, lazier ways to express this information, but they found an artful one instead. Additionally, the different levels and orientations of the lit areas look great. Tink's also on a subtle incline which adds a lot of visual interest relative to a flat surface.

It's also always clear that women are well-represented, and the last fairy to leave is clearly female.

We then watch Tink design and create... at least one mechanism we have no reason to yet understand.

We then flash to other fairies, pre-dawn, doing prep for the Review. We see some fairies painting ladybugs again, which we've witnessed previously. This is foreshadowing, though you wouldn't know it. Which is the right kind of foreshadowing!

Bam! We then cut to tonight's overseer, the Minister of Spring.

He's clearly very, very tense. And when he hears the Queen has arrived, he almost has a goddamn heart attack before ordering the music fairies to get crackin'. We see the music fairies, but music is not really a "natural" thing, so who are these people? We see them, but they honestly look more like garden fairies. A mystery for now. Maybe just regular fairies who know how it's done. I think Fairy Gary (offer not available in this film) has bagpipes in a later movie? But he's lead dustkeeper, not a music fairy.



Oh god I've only done this spring thing like a million fukkin times!

The Queen ribs him a little bit for freaking out so hard over something they do all the goddamn time. She goes into her generic spiel about hard work and solid preparation and blah blah almost intentionally boring and then--

"QUEEN CLARION!"

--blares Tinkerbell, interrupting everything.

This shout wakes Vidia, who had been resting in a tree.

"I've invented some great things for Tinkers to use when we go to the mainland!"

Everyone's like

oohhhh

ohhhhhhh

nobody

i mean

poo poo

No one told Tinkerbell that tinkers don't go to the mainland. Level to which Tink has made an rear end of herself? 10%. It will increase.



I used this shot mostly because it's the best one we get of the other Ministers. This movie is... not terrible about race representation among everyday fairies, but it loving drops the ball on the hotshots. 100% whitey zone.

Mr. Flunchy
Mar 26, 2005



I got dispatched to review Secret of her Wings. It nearly broke my brain. This thread is giving me minor PTSD.

Pick
Jul 19, 2009

Panthera tigris
If a cat draws human penises, is it a furry-1?


Mr. Flunchy posted:

I got dispatched to review Secret of her Wings. It nearly broke my brain. This thread is giving me minor PTSD.

Haha, sucker.

I am trying to just jet through the summary though, because the points I really want to make require the entire movie. It's easy to review a movie everyone is seen; I'm basically exposing everyone to the film, then talking about it.

ReV VAdAUL
Oct 3, 2004

I'm WILD about
WILDMAN


I don't have kids and this would never be a film I'd watch (or even know existed) but I'm really enjoying your summary, thank you and I look forward to seeing more.

Pick
Jul 19, 2009

Panthera tigris
If a cat draws human penises, is it a furry-1?


Chapter 7: I know affection is less hilarious than hate, but this review will have a point.

Queen Clarion is so weirdly plastic compared to the other characters. It's almost weird. She's an "important" character, so you think she'd get special attention. But perhaps they assigned someone to animate her who wasn't quite confident enough to take artistic risks, like whoever was doing the Minister of Spring, who for better or for worse is emoting like a motherfucker. Maybe he's part of why Clarion seems so dull?

Anyway, I forgot to mention the Everblossom. You GOTTA GET SPRING ON before it blooms or you're hosed.



Weirdly, it's not nearly as important as the seasonal marker that defines Tinkerbell and the Lost Treasure, the second of the films. In a way, it's foreshadowing though for the social structure of fairies. They supposedly create and change natural phenomena, but only really at the behest of other natural phenomena. Whatever. Where were we? Oh, yeah! Tink in dismay!

Everyone's gasping with what an idiot she's made of herself already. Tinkers? Using poo poo on the mainland? Is she high?

While everyone is stuck in Awkward Zone, Tinkerbell uses their silence to introduce her new inventions. Including... a nutcracker!



gently caress!

Okay, scratch that, first one, gently caress it, doesn't count--

The Minister of Spring tries to interrupt her... even Clarion, but Tinkerbell brings out the flower sprayer before they can get enough in edgewise.



The Minister of Spring gets an exaggerated whimper. Which I actually find really funny? It's difficult to explain.



Tinkers don't go to the mainland, honey. "Your work is here."

Tinkerbell pretends that this is a welcome revelation. It's painfully awkward to watch. I mean, not in the badly-scripted way, it's just that feeling you get when you're watching someone else realize they've got a firm foot stuck in their mouth. See, you get where she was coming from. She was genuinely misled. And she was trying to help! And this isn't a slight against her personally. There's no good way for anyone to address the issue at this point. Clarion has no choice to hurt Tink's feelings, and Tink has no choice but to pretend that she doesn't mind.

Tinkerbell retreats, leaving most everyone stunned, except for Vidia, who seemed to be enjoying the show. It was her intended vengeance, after all, for... Tinkerbell seeming slightly arrogant in the face of Vidia's immense arrogance. gently caress with the bull, get the horns I guess.



I'm not convinced that Tinkerbell's model is a healthy one to be showing young and impressionable children, but at least they kept her face very rounded and childlike. The most angular of the fairies--by far--is Vidia, who you're not supposed to like at this time. Meanwhile, Clank and Mary are rounded characters who we're supposed to view positively. Not really any of Tink's clique, though? Anyway, Tinkerbell bemoans her role. "Vidia was right. Being a tinker stinks."

Fairy Mary--who didn't go to the Queen's Review, having far too much work in the factory--views the comment with disdain, as well as the reasoning behind it. She doesn't want to visit the mainland. Why should Tink? Furthermore, she inquires, what exactly would Tink bring to the table? She can't paint flowers or speak to animals, so what the hell would she even do there, huh?

Then we get to one of the core lines of the film:

"You are a tinker. It's who you are. Be proud of it!"

Mary then flies off, reminding Tink that "[her] work is here." We then get a good face-slam from Tink on her worker's bench, then a really good Tink's-eye-view of the empty and dismal production facility.



nooo don't want no proletariat


Tinkerbell, in her infinite wisdom, decides that Fairy Mary is right. Her desire to go to the mainland is foolish... until she learns one of those nature skills! Friends, assemble!

Shonagon
Mar 27, 2005

It is impervious to reason or pleading, it knows no mercy or patience.

I'm enjoying this, keep going. I thought this was a cracking kids film, unfortunately it reduced my three year old to jelly ('HAPPY SAD MUMMY, HAPPY SAD!' so we'll be watching it again when she's 15 or so.

hemale in pain
Jun 5, 2010


I'm vaguely tempted to try watching one of these now as I do appreciate decent kids entertainment and they are on Netflix. I've always just assumed that the cheaper disney CGI films were terrible after seeing a lot of really poor adverts.

Rasczak
Mar 30, 2005



I first saw this series a few years ago because I've got two young girls, they're surprisingly watchable. The only one I haven't seen is the direct-to-TV one, I didn't even know that existed.

It should be noted that Disney started making the fairy movies after John Lasseter of Pixar fame was named the Chief Creative Officer of poth Pixar and Walt Disney Animation Studios, post-merger. Disney Animation has had a noticable uptick in quality since then.

Gaz-L
Jan 28, 2009


Rasczak posted:

I first saw this series a few years ago because I've got two young girls, they're surprisingly watchable. The only one I haven't seen is the direct-to-TV one, I didn't even know that existed.

It should be noted that Disney started making the fairy movies after John Lasseter of Pixar fame was named the Chief Creative Officer of poth Pixar and Walt Disney Animation Studios, post-merger. Disney Animation has had a noticable uptick in quality since then.

Actually, as I recall, it was already in pre-production, it was just one of the very few projects he didn't cancel when he took over.

Rasczak
Mar 30, 2005



Gaz-L posted:

Actually, as I recall, it was already in pre-production, it was just one of the very few projects he didn't cancel when he took over.

Lion King 4 on the other hand was not so fortunate.

Even if the first one was already in pre-production, it probably still benefited from the regime change.

Justin Godscock
Oct 12, 2004

Aw, son of a bitch!

Gaz-L posted:

Actually, as I recall, it was already in pre-production, it was just one of the very few projects he didn't cancel when he took over.

Yeah, Lassater made a huge deal back then that under his watch there would be no more lovely DTV sequels or spinoffs.

It surprised a lot of people when he let Tinkerbell live because it was Disney's next big DTV project (and one nobody had high hopes for) so I guess something must have impressed Lassater enough to let it see release and spawn 4 (and soon to be 5) sequels.

soapgish
Mar 17, 2013

__________


I once saw this while sitting my niece. It wasn't awful, or bad, but it lost potency before being good. I was surprised at its competency but there was nothing particularly notable.

Rasczak
Mar 30, 2005



Justin Godscock posted:

Yeah, Lassater made a huge deal back then that under his watch there would be no more lovely DTV sequels or spinoffs.

It surprised a lot of people when he let Tinkerbell live because it was Disney's next big DTV project (and one nobody had high hopes for) so I guess something must have impressed Lassater enough to let it see release and spawn 4 (and soon to be 5) sequels.

Right, even though it was in pre-production when Lassiter took over, the first one still came out 2 years later. He probably saw the potential in something that wasn't like "Cindarella 4: Somehow More Unwatchable than the 3rd" and steered it in the right direction.

Mr. Flunchy
Mar 26, 2005



I saw a preview of 'Epic' today which is not only terrible, but rips off the Tinker Bell movies in a big way. Though if you genuinely like these, you might like that.

Pick
Jul 19, 2009

Panthera tigris
If a cat draws human penises, is it a furry-1?


Chapter 8: Bit Pieces

This next section is one of my least favorite in the film, since it's basically exposition for the series as a whole. It's funny and cutesy, but largely immaterial to the film. I mean, it serves a purpose, so it's better than some parts of some films (like the entire Jonah subplot in Master and Commander, for example). I'm going to jet through these pretty quickly, since I want to get the summary done.

We see a shot of the Pixie Hollow tree again. Inside, fairies are lining up to get their allotment of pixie dust. Remember, unlike in Peter Pan, fairies don't make the dust. The tree makes the dust and the fairies use it.



Here's Terrence (a name I always mentally follow up with "And Phillip") supplying Iridessa with her portion. Tink flies by and she is super loving excited, where her friends were assuming she'd be bummed after being utterly shamed the previous day. Not Tinkerbell!

Tinkerbell wants them to teach her a nature talent. Any one will do! I mean, so a hammer glowed. So what? That doesn't mean she can't do something else if she wants to. She might not be that great at it, but it's a direction she'd prefer, since it'd mean she could visit the mainland. Besides, Tink loves nature!



--She assures, whacking a bug that then flies off... awkwardly. It's a pretty funny moment the first time you see it (and still not bad thereafter). Reminds me of Lindsay from Arrested Development.

Rosetta thinks Tink is nuts, Fawn is amenable, Silvermist is enthusiastic, and Iridessa is pessimistic. A fairly good look at their approaches. Rosetta is a traditionalist throughout the films, Fawn is flexible, Silvermist just likes doing things without really thinking about it, and Iridessa is always skeptical. All are valid here, in a way.

Tinkerbell stresses how much she wants this. She sees being a tinker as essentially having a "non-talent", since it's all stuff fairies can do with their hands. Any fairy could do it, really, it's just that the nature talent fairies can do so much else!

Silvermist agrees to help, and the others step in one-by-one to support the endeavor.



And Silvermist is so loving excited! So she goes first, trying to teach Tinkerbell how to align dewdrops on spiderwebs. Though this is a "nature talent", it's still completely hands-on. She physically picks up water and runs it down the spider silk. So really, it's not as different from tinkering as Tinkerbell assumes. She still can't do it, though. She just gets angry and frustrated and gets everyone soaked. Natch.



For such a low-budget film, it looks surprisingly good. Again, you really need to take this product in context as a direct-to-DVD feature from the same people who brought you motherfucking Cinderella II. We're talking a budget literally about one hundredth of Tangled's.

We then sweep over to where Bobble and Clank are working in the factory. Tink's AWOL, so they try to cover for her. Fairy Mary seems to believe it to some extent, although she's clearly suspicious of the phenomenon of Tink's absence. And no wonder, since Bobble and Clank are terrible liars.



Afterwards, we see Tinkerbell working with Iridessa. Iridessa can physically hold and handle light, so yeah, that's a pretty unique capability. She wraps it in a leaf so that Tink can parcel it out to fireflies. Tinkerbell is unable to hold or manipulate light, so again, she gets angry. She chucks the leaf to the ground and the light escapes in a little ball, which ricochets around until landing firmly on Tink's rear end.



Alas! That's enough failure for one day, Tink! But there's more to come!



Dawn in the tinker accommodations. Again, tinkers seem to have a little "city" going on whereas everyone else sleeps in tiny bullshit flowers.

Tinkerbell has actually returned to her table in the factory and is assembling teapots. Fairy Mary approaches her and reveals that she's caught wind of what Tinkerbell was doing. She expresses her disappointment that Tinkerbell would try to circumvent her role in society. This distresses Tinkerbell even further, and in her despair, she insults Bobble and Clank by insulting tinkerdom in general. Part of a pattern of Tinkerbell's short temper harming her friends. She flies off, unsure of what to say to the two. She owes them an apology, but they'll have to wait awhile.

Next up is her time with Fawn (the only fairy without a returning VA). Fawn's cast as the tomboy of the group, but honestly she's no more so than Tinkerbell herself. Fawn does have pants though.

Fawn's job is to direct animals, which frankly sounds PRETTY loving AWESOME.

She's teaching birds how to fly. She seems to be a better instructor than the other fairies were, but we know where this is headed even so.



"HEY, LITTLE FELLA! YOU WANNA DO SOME FLAP-FLAP TODAY?!"

It's so over-enthusiastic and fake that it's just about perfect. Annnnddd yeah, that's not going to go over too well.



I think they saved this one for last (and it is last--we never get to Rosetta for reasons that'll become clear) because it is the funniest by far. Tinkerbell just sucks a load here. In her efforts to force bird compliance, she bodyslams a baby bird. How loving slick is that? Other nearby fairies start laughing. Owch.

She then sees a hawk, intending to ask it for help.

AS IT TURNS OUT, hawks eat fairies.

Now, I earlier mentioned that in the books, fairies die when the child who bore then stops believing in fairies. In the case of these movies, fairy mortality seems to be much more... tactile. As in, holy poo poo, it's like that dinner table scene in Pan's Labyrinth! But with hawks!

The hawk chases Tinkerbell into a tree. Now, this hawk is now Owl of Ga'Hoole, but it looks quite good for an animal that barely gets any screentime. Sometimes I don't really understand where they prioritized things. I think the hawk looks a lot better than Terrence or Clarion.



Tinkerbell hides in a tree. A tree where Vidia was also hanging out! Tink looks like she's in for a quality shanking.



As the hawk breaks in, Vidia ends up falling through the hollow of the tree and out onto the branch. Where the hawk is hanging out. gently caress!

Luckily, other fairies come to the rescue and start chucking stuff at the hawk, who decides to back off. Vidia is rather roughed up by the occasion, but don't worry, it's mostly juice from the berries that the other fairies were throwing around. Honestly, Tink's the only one who seems to give a poo poo about Vidia, which is rather amazing since all her interactions with Vidia have been negative. Vidia's pretty loving unpopular, clearly. In a way, she's a non-standard Mean Girl, since she's an outcast Mean Girl, not some sort of queen bee.



Tinkerbell's friends arrive to ensure she's okay too. Tink breaks down about how she can't do anything worthwhile and is basically useless, just a teapot assembler in a world of people who wield, well, real magic. She flies off. Man, Tinkerbell flies of a lot. But it's not out of character, and in fact denial and avoidance are major facets of her characterization in this film.



We're treated to another very pleasant background, a good introduction to one of the movie's most well-executed scenes.

Pick fucked around with this message at May 17, 2013 around 04:02

Pick
Jul 19, 2009

Panthera tigris
If a cat draws human penises, is it a furry-1?


Chapter 9: Seaside

Oh thank christ, I can finally start talking about why I like this film so much. See, most of the movie up to this point is establishment of ground rules not only for the film, but for the franchise. We're seeing how fairies are born, where they live, what they do, how their society is structured, what kind of values they forward, etc. Unfortunately, laying down the laws of the land often leads to a rather restricted and boring story. Take Star Trek (2009) or Spider-Man (20..12?) for example. They're not bringing out the big-gun villains in those films or the nuanced plots. And it's probably wise that they don't. Those films are origin stories, and so is this. Tinkerbell even works as a direct superhero analogue in a lot of ways. She is introduced to a world she doesn't understand. She has amazing powers, but feel that they alienate her. She longs for a conventionally successful life instead, but it is impossible. Her talents are more than her gift; they are her responsibility.

What's interesting though is that Tinkerbell is a hero of the working class. Her skills are prosaic by the standards of her culture--and even by the standards of her friends. This isn't Superman zipping from the skyscrapers of Metropolis to... I don't know, loving Mars or whatever dumbshit thing he's doing that week. She is the rocket scientist sending someone else there. The main antagonist of this film, to the extent that she's actually an antagonist, is Vidia, whose powers are individualistic and clearly inherent (to the point of being physically evident, e.g. her longer wings).

Anyway, I noted that Tinkerbell ran off following her outburst at her friends. This isn't really presented as "ideal" behavior, but it's one of Tink's open and real flaws. Notice that this, like her tendency to lose her temper, are actual character flaws, unlike "being clumsy"/"Kryptonite allergy"/"doesn't like ham". Tinkerbell is humanized thanks to these characteristics. Part of why she works as a role model is that she is convincing as a person. As much as I like Sleeping Beauty, it's harder to see Aurora as the kind of personality you'd encounter on the street. Anyway, time to meet up with Tinkerbell again:



Tinkerbell has been moping beneath a leaf. Amusingly, her moping is still angry and sarcastic. She's throwing rocks, too, which is a distinctly tomboyish kind of activity for a woman in film. You can't really see Snow White chuckin' rocks at poo poo.

She hears a clinking noise and goes to investigate. Importantly, she walks over to where she thinks she heard the noise. This is symbolically important, as flight is an indicator of magic. Walking is an indicator of groundedness (). Think about the word "pedestrian". It means "one who walks", but also "common", as in "pedestrian tastes". Tinkerbell is, by her society's reckoning, pedestrian.



She happens across some weird cogs and garbage on the beach. She immediately begins to feel the pieces and investigate their properties. Tinkerbell is curious, but not mindlessly so. She is evaluating the resources at her disposal.

She realizes she can open that large cylinder.



Inside, a hollow. Also there is a snail there. Together they represent Tinkerbell's emptiness and slow development. There's the suggestion that if this can be fixed, then Tinkerbell with be fixed with it.



Ah! It's a music box. Tinkerbell doesn't know this; she doesn't know what a music box is and has never seen one. However, by examining all the components, she finds reassembly a breeze. (This is done in part by measuring the distances between grooves and other such things.)



Her friends have been trying to find her, but when they do, they remain silent and watch her work. She's gathered and laid out all the parts she could find of this strange device. Notice that there are many rusty cogs and screws. We're not talking cutesy bullshit mechanized parts; these look rough and brazenly industrial.



The music box almost functions, but it is missing one vital component. Tinkerbell fingers the hole (quiet you!) trying to discern what might be the appropriate last piece. It's this:



A ballerina, the turning of which powers the music box. This piece has both practical utility and an undeniable femininity. This is the film's open declaration that the two are not mutually exclusive. There doesn't even need to be a compromise. They simply do not contradict.

Tinkerbell celebrates her success by dancing with the ballerina, thus powering the box and empowering herself.



Tinkerbell's friends finally reveal themselves to congratulate her.

"It's a really pretty... what is it?" (Silvermist, natch.)
"I don't know. I just found it."

Tinkerbell brushes it off. But Rosetta isn't going to stand for that. She's basically the leader, after all.

quote:

Rosetta: Tinker Bell, don't you ever realize what you're doing? You're tinkering!

Tink: No, this--

Rosetta: Creating those gadgets, figuring things out, fixing stuff, like this! That's what tinkering is, sweetie.

Iridessa: Don't you like doing this? Isn't it what you really love?

Silvermist: Yeah, who cares about going to the Mainland, anyway?

Tink: Well, I do, remember? I want to see where these things come from!

Oh poo poo. Goal unresolved!

But perhaps defensibly. (And hey, a desire pegged as "selfish" that actually makes sense?) After all, if this is Tinkerbell's interest, then the denial of her journey to the Mainland is pretty damned cutting. It's basically an institutional refusal to let her enrich her knowledge base, even in the context of her own career! Of course it doesn't matter to the others. Their journey to the mainland is for work alone; for Tinkerbell, it would be for self-learning. Different but understandable perspectives on the same issue.

Tinkerbell's friends don't get where she's coming from on this, and Rosetta refuses to try to teach Tinkerbell about gardening, asserting that Tinkerbell's "talent" is clear, and therefore so is her role. It isn't intentionally cruel, coming from them. They see themselves as trying to make Tinkerbell appreciate herself. Tinkerbell doesn't read it that way and becomes desperate, then angry. She vows to see it through without them. This time it's her friends who leave.

Pick fucked around with this message at May 18, 2013 around 04:41

Rirse
May 6, 2006

The Let's Play
Archaeologist




Didn't notice the thread until now, but I'm surprised to find this is suppose to be good compared to the crap DTV that preceded it. Besides stuff mentioned in the thread, wasn't this one of Brittany Murphy's last roles before she died?

SocketWrench
Jul 8, 2012



To add to Tink trying to teach that bird to fly, it looked like it was the runt and rather sickly compared to the one Fawn teaches...she was set up for failure from the start. Something I wondered about that was whether it was planned, Fawn not being truly accepting of Tink being successful, or if it was just a unnoticed thing for the benefit of plot to fail Tink. I mean you wouldn't not notice you were leaving a noobie with something least likely to work unless you didn't want them to succeed or the plot took a sudden gasp for air to continue on

SocketWrench fucked around with this message at May 20, 2013 around 00:20

Pick
Jul 19, 2009

Panthera tigris
If a cat draws human penises, is it a furry-1?


Chapter 10: I totally forgot about this thread

Okay so I'm back!! I'm actually doing this because I think it's important. Plus, I never got to why I liked the movie, so hold onto your hats, dingbats!

So, last time, which was a long time ago, Tinkerbell felt abandoned by her friends. You know, seeing as they refused to help her further and then flew away. Which is a pretty understandable time to feel put-out.

She sees the second star to the right... from Neverland... which is implied to be Earth. Astronomy doesn't work that way, but whatever, magic!

Tinkerbell then does something absolutely nuts... she goes to Vidia. Yes, Vidia, the same fairy who has been maligning Tinkerbell much of the time. Not that Tinkerbell has fully understood that yet. Tinkerbell begs--begs!--Vidia to help her discover a different talent. At first, Vidia slams the door in Tink's loving face because ~Vidia~--



--but eventually Tinkerbell's completely openly pathetic pleas reach Vidia's cold, fairy ears.

Oh, I didn't mean that in the, you know, sympathetic way.



Come oonnn innn, Tinkerbell. We'll talk this out.

I chalk this up as another one of those "I bet a lot of fanfiction--" scenes, but I try not to think about those things. I just posted on Godawful FanFiction ... what, ten years ago? Oh my god, have I really been touching the poop for a decade? I make bad life choices!!!

And so does Tinkerbell, in that she listens to Vidia. As a suggestion on being a good garden fairy (because god loving knows Vidia isn't even going to pretend Tink could be a fast-flier like her) she recommends that Tinkerbell try to wrangle the wild thistles with the aid of Cheese the mouse. This is a reference to the books, which I haven't read, so there may be more to this that I'm missing as a mere movie-watchin' pleb.

Tinkerbell creates a pen for housing the thistles, which is another example of tinker-dom, although it's not underscored. Rare subtlety in a kid's film. She gives a really sweet jazz-up speech to Cheese, whom she rides off into the tall grass.



She has every intention of trashing those loving thistles, which astonishes Vidia, who was mostly just setting her up to watch her eat dirt.

Tinkerbell can indeed wrangle thistles, but only to a point. She expected one or two, and she got a mass. She ends up running so many through her corral that it breaks and collapses and the thistles... keep running. But where to?

To the gently caress-poo poo-Up Zone.


Whoooo poo poo. Time to blitz.

The thistles attack everyone and generally cause havoc with Tinkerbell in hot pursuit.







In the weirdest example of vaguely inappropriate imagery, the thistles love to... whip people's asses. Not a joke. Clank gets his rear end thoroughly whipped by thistles earlier, but these later scenes show a particular butt-frenzy.

Anyway, in a surprisingly zombie-apocalypse kind of shot, Tinkerbell (atop Cheese) witnesses the results of the thistle onslaught.



She caused it. Everyone knows it. Fairies look on as they try to right one another and gaze upon their damaged preparations.

Tinkerbell's friends arrive at once, of course. To loving lambaste her.



"I thought... if I could just capture the thistles, that--"

"There isn't a garden fairy alive who can control those weeds! What were you trying to prove?!"

Then the very level-headed, wise Queen appears.



"fuckin' Tink what's your damage!?" {may not be perfectly transcribed}

resurgam40
Jul 22, 2007
Still dancing, still singing, and still surprised by joy.

Ohh, boy, what's Tink going to do now?

And hey, thanks for coming back to this. My interest in this series has been mostly completely nil (except for seeing the sequels and thinking, "They're still making those?"), but this write-up reveals that this story has a lot more nuance than I thought. It seems like a "be yourself" story at first glance, but the fact that the film acknowledges the limits of that lesson - such as, "How can I know this is really what I want to do?" and "How can I be a good worker if I can't ever see the origin of what I do?" - and seeks to address these limits in the story, is remarkable. Besides, the ol' bildungsroman has always been an interest of mine, so I'm interested in where this goes.

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Mr. Unlucky
Nov 1, 2006


Keep aiming for that low hanging fruit. What a loving waste of time.

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