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fisting by many
Dec 25, 2009





Download the beta (Windows & Mac) http://www.dukope.com/

Buy it! $9.99 / 6.99
Steam | GOG | Official site


In Papers, Please you are an admissions agent at the border of a fictional Soviet bloc country. You must allow or deny entrance into glorious Arstotzka based on the ever-changing and increasingly complicated regulations.

Your meager pay is merit-based, you are given five Arstotzkan credits for each person you process. There are only so many hours in a day so you must work well enough to care for your family.

At the beginning of the day you are briefed on any new regulations. Non-Arstotzkans only required a valid passport before, but now require an entry ticket as well.



Hmm, something is missing here.



However, just because there is an inaccuracy does not mean they should automatically be denied. Sometimes there is a simple mistake, so you must interrogate the applicant by pointing out the discrepancy. I pop open my trusty rulebook and point to the table where her entry ticket isn't.



Oh, she had it all along. Good thing I asked.



Everything is in order here. Enjoy your stay.



For some bizarre reason I've found myself incredibly engrossed in what is basically an interactive story combined with a paperwork simulator. Not every person with invalid papers is a terrorist, and the initially lax penalty for wrongly allowing someone entry gives you the freedom of making a moral decision over your job (You are given two warnings per day before having your pay reduced). Some of the applicants are more than random names and faces and have a story behind them, and despite being a lowly border agent your actions can determine their fate.

It's only in the beta stage right now and you can only play the first eight days but this is one of the few games I am so hyped for that I'll be buying it Day 1.

Free Jorji

Guides & stuff

M.O.A. Manual courtesy of Deutsch Nozzle & nielsm


Cheat sheet courtesy of Chunjee


Guide to most of the documents and everything that can possibly be wrong with them, by Coolguye

Spoilers Token & Ending list

fisting by many fucked around with this message at Aug 13, 2013 around 08:04

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Thompsons
Aug 28, 2008

Ask me about onklunk extraction.

One of my favorite details is how there's no functional difference between detaining someone and denying their passport. If anything, it's far more efficient to just deny people with improper/forged documents since arresting them requires opening the rulebook, going into inspect mode, finding the discrepancy and then interrogating the person in the booth. And if someone's missing a document, you can deny them on the spot at no penalty instead of just asking them where it is and having them be like "oh yeah, almost forgot" and handing it over.

Hopefully the full game will go even further into the blurry dilemmas of working as an ethical government drone versus an efficient one and the general malaise of Eastern European societies.

fisting by many
Dec 25, 2009



Thompsons posted:

One of my favorite details is how there's no functional difference between detaining someone and denying their passport. If anything, it's far more efficient to just deny people with improper/forged documents since arresting them requires opening the rulebook, going into inspect mode, finding the discrepancy and then interrogating the person in the booth. And if someone's missing a document, you can deny them on the spot at no penalty instead of just asking them where it is and having them be like "oh yeah, almost forgot" and handing it over.

Hopefully the full game will go even further into the blurry dilemmas of working as an ethical government drone versus an efficient one and the general malaise of Eastern European societies.

I like detaining people because it's more fun Also If you detain the human trafficker there is an article about his arrest in the news, but if you only deny him there is an article about prostitutes being murdered

confused
Oct 3, 2003

It's just business.

I really enjoyed playing the game. I'm really interested to see where it goes. I like that is a good example of game as social commentary.

While playing it, I did have two ideas which I think would make it stronger. One, the protagonist is currently described as being conscripted into the job. I think it would be more interesting if they were a willing participant. In many (most?) countries, especially repressive ones, government (or military) jobs are the good jobs since governments tend to take care of their own. Two, I wasn't sure about the pay based on speed mechanic. Have you ever known a government which rewarded people on efficiency?

general chaos
May 20, 2001


I love every design decision that went into this game. The cramped desk space? Love it. The tinny, garbled Arstotzkan speech sounding over the intercom? Love it. The score attack nature of the game? Love it. The Place holder art? Stunning comment that perfectly illustrates my love for it.

zedprime
Jun 9, 2007


Maybe I am just that excellent of a paper pusher but it feels like it could benefit from some difficulty balancing, or maybe its just planned for the later days as part of the final product. It generally seemed pretty easy to push enough paper to make bank while avoiding enough mistakes to allow the heart string tugging story people through. My enjoyment seemed to stem from being a gigantic rear end in a top hat as opposed to any sort of tension the game was interested in portraying between abusing your job perks and keeping your family healthy.

Jimmy4400nav
Apr 1, 2011

Ambassador to Moonlandia


I've played the demo and I gotta say, I really like this game, it has a great atmosphere and gives a good social commentary to life in the former Eastern Bloc an the monolithic nature of the political institutions.


zedprime posted:

Maybe I am just that excellent of a paper pusher but it feels like it could benefit from some difficulty balancing, or maybe its just planned for the later days as part of the final product. It generally seemed pretty easy to push enough paper to make bank while avoiding enough mistakes to allow the heart string tugging story people through. My enjoyment seemed to stem from being a gigantic rear end in a top hat as opposed to any sort of tension the game was interested in portraying between abusing your job perks and keeping your family healthy.

From what I played, I think between the rent going up and more and more Byzantine paperwork being required, you'll be spending more money and making less of it as the game goes on, though I do agree early on, its real easy to push through people for the first three days, but for all we know, more stuff might happen later on that will deplete funds. Heck, maybe as the government starts to come apart at the seems, they start paying you for every other paper you process, or some other draconian measures.

loam
Jan 19, 2012


general chaos posted:

I love every design decision that went into this game. The cramped desk space? Love it. The tinny, garbled Arstotzkan speech sounding over the intercom? Love it. The score attack nature of the game? Love it. The Place holder art? Stunning comment that perfectly illustrates my love for it.

I agree, this game is fantastic. The gameplay would be really quite monotonous by itself, but the atmosphere and progression makes the tasks so much more interesting.

PyrionFlax did a hilarious playthrough of the game: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iqLFFEX4Obg

XboxPants
Jan 30, 2006

FUCKING MAGNETS, HOW DO THEY WORK?!



confused posted:

I really enjoyed playing the game. I'm really interested to see where it goes. I like that is a good example of game as social commentary.

While playing it, I did have two ideas which I think would make it stronger. One, the protagonist is currently described as being conscripted into the job. I think it would be more interesting if they were a willing participant. In many (most?) countries, especially repressive ones, government (or military) jobs are the good jobs since governments tend to take care of their own.

Are you sure? I thought they described it as a "lottery" system - you may have applied for work, and been waiting some ungodly amount of time for a position to open up. I got the impression that it was a privilege that I was able to get a job and keep my family alive, anyway.

staplegun
Sep 21, 2003



This should teach you all you need to know about this game: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MdnWUX-zqao

Noisycat
Jul 6, 2003

If you give a mouse a cookie, you are supporting underground furry terrorists.

I love paperwork, haha. Thanks for the link for this game, I'll check it out.

Captain Beans
Aug 5, 2004

Whar be the beans?

general chaos posted:

I love every design decision that went into this game. The cramped desk space? Love it. The tinny, garbled Arstotzkan speech sounding over the intercom? Love it. The score attack nature of the game? Love it. The Place holder art? Stunning comment that perfectly illustrates my love for it.

I agree completely, this game and the design of it is great. Hope it makes it onto steam so everyone can enjoy the feeling of rubber stamping dangerous looking people so you can get paid and out the door by 6pm.

The same guy made a game where you run a pro government newspaper that spins news, I'll be trying that out too.

Captain Beans fucked around with this message at Apr 30, 2013 around 23:37

general chaos
May 20, 2001


XboxPants posted:

Are you sure? I thought they described it as a "lottery" system - you may have applied for work, and been waiting some ungodly amount of time for a position to open up. I got the impression that it was a privilege that I was able to get a job and keep my family alive, anyway.

While it is certainly a privilege to serve glorious regime of Arstotzka, I interpreted a hint of implied kickbacks. You're moved into a new house with daily rent and it seems fairly drafty with its crazy high heating bill.

Maximum hints incoming. Don't look if you want any tension to remain in your game: pay for heating and food on alternate days. Your son will be nourished by dreams of brighter tomorrow in glorious Arstotzka. Your family has a relatively low chance of getting sick and medicine is cheap compared to what you'll save in your daily bills.

Work as fast as possible. If you're quick you can get at least 20 people processed on your first day. Later on, you can save time with a number of tricks. Don't bother interrogating most discrepancies - you can deny people based on the information in front of you without penalty. If someone is associated with a brothel, their credentials are always impeccable. If someone didn't give you their passport initially (one of the few instances where you're required to use the discrepancy button) they're most likely okay (with one exception.) If someone disparages glorious Arstotzka within your office, impudent though they may be, they always seem to have their paperwork in order.


Remember that the faster you work, the likelier it is that the people who have been waiting in line will fulfill their dream of entering glorious Arstotzka.

Avocados
Jul 31, 2010

Imagine growing a flower


I felt like I was actually working while playing this game. Take that as you will, I don't think a game actually made me feel like I was doing paperwork. (Except here im working to keep my sickly family alive ). Interested to see how this game unfolds.

Thompsons posted:

One of my favorite details is how there's no functional difference between detaining someone and denying their passport. If anything, it's far more efficient to just deny people with improper/forged documents since arresting them requires opening the rulebook, going into inspect mode, finding the discrepancy and then interrogating the person in the booth. And if someone's missing a document, you can deny them on the spot at no penalty instead of just asking them where it is and having them be like "oh yeah, almost forgot" and handing it over.

Hopefully the full game will go even further into the blurry dilemmas of working as an ethical government drone versus an efficient one and the general malaise of Eastern European societies.
Actually that's a pretty cool loophole. I wonder if that was purposeful or just an oversight. If they decided to go that route, I wonder how they would pull some heart strings with the society you are choosing to hurt.

Avocados fucked around with this message at May 1, 2013 around 00:12

letgomyAgo
Aug 6, 2012


I am surprised by how stupidly engrossing I found this game. It held me rapt for 2 entire 8 day sessions. Kind of excited to see this in full release.

Ohtsam
Feb 5, 2010

Not this shit again.


Definitely buying this even if it doesn't get greenlit. One of the more creative and interesting game concepts I've seen in a while.

procitizen
May 9, 2010


"Invalid city" gets me every time, but it's pretty loving ridiculous how engaging this is for a paperwork simulator.

Beardless Riker
Apr 14, 2005



In the first couple of days I would miss stuff like issuing city, and missed invalid gender a couple of times, but by the end of the 8th day I was a denying and detaining machine. For some reason I really get a kick out of detaining someone and hitting the horn right away so it says something like 'Entry is not guaranteed.'

RobTG
Sep 11, 2001

by T. Finninho


Take payola all day, detain people who don't know how to grease the palms.

Solomonic
Jan 3, 2008

ALFREEEEEEEEEED
WHO LEFT THE CAP OFF MY FUCKING GLISTEN


I have to say the concept of the game kinda threw me for a loop, but this is actually really fun. I can't even put my finger on why exactly I like it so much, something about a combination of the atmosphere and the low-key nature of what I'm doing. No shooting, no platforming, just checking paperwork for discrepancies. I'll totally buy this when it gets released, regardless of whether it's on Steam or not.

How do I detain people? Sometimes I'll find a discrepancy like mismatched cities or genders, but all I can do it point it out to them, listen to them insist I'm wrong, and then deny them entry.

Beardless Riker
Apr 14, 2005



Solomonic posted:

I have to say the concept of the game kinda threw me for a loop, but this is actually really fun. I can't even put my finger on why exactly I like it so much, something about a combination of the atmosphere and the low-key nature of what I'm doing. No shooting, no platforming, just checking paperwork for discrepancies. I'll totally buy this when it gets released, regardless of whether it's on Steam or not.

How do I detain people? Sometimes I'll find a discrepancy like mismatched cities or genders, but all I can do it point it out to them, listen to them insist I'm wrong, and then deny them entry.

Detaining people is a feature that comes along a few days into the process, based on my one play-through.

Baronjutter
Dec 31, 2007

...the engine tracks thousands of details for each unit meaning it will be a far deeper game than your grandpa's chess.
Pre-order CHESS now and receive the DLC "queen" unit.

This is pretty good but the interface can be pretty lovely and half the time you know what is wrong but it's a puzzle to figure out what to click.

Do you only get paid for letting people in? Do you get paid for denying people if there's a valid reason?

Bold Robot
Jan 6, 2009

Be brave.


Baronjutter posted:

This is pretty good but the interface can be pretty lovely and half the time you know what is wrong but it's a puzzle to figure out what to click.

Do you only get paid for letting people in? Do you get paid for denying people if there's a valid reason?

Agreed - it'd be great if there were a list of the day's regulations along the side of the screen somewhere to save time when you've identified a discrepancy. That said, there's a lot of initial hunting but once you've done a few days it gets a lot better.

As far as I can tell, you get paid for everyone you process. I think this actually includes people who you screw up processing - you get paid for processing them, then get docked for screwing it up, so you just lose the time rather than any money.

Do you get a warning if you deny someone without a valid reason? I wanted to deny the human trafficker but his papers seemed legit and my family's gotta eat.

Grinnblade
Sep 24, 2007



Bold Robot posted:

As far as I can tell, you get paid for everyone you process. I think this actually includes people who you screw up processing - you get paid for processing them, then get docked for screwing it up, so you just lose the time rather than any money.

Do you get a warning if you deny someone without a valid reason? I wanted to deny the human trafficker but his papers seemed legit and my family's gotta eat.

(edit: There was a failure in logic here, it's gone now)

You get two warnings per day before you get docked, and yes, denying entrance to somebody who is otherwise clear to enter is a penalty.

Regarding your spoiler, the human trafficker, both times I've played, has the same name on his passport as on the note one of his potential victims gives you earlier in the day. Highlight the note and the name on the papers and you can interrogate and detain him.

Grinnblade fucked around with this message at May 1, 2013 around 17:11

Baronjutter
Dec 31, 2007

...the engine tracks thousands of details for each unit meaning it will be a far deeper game than your grandpa's chess.
Pre-order CHESS now and receive the DLC "queen" unit.

I denied the guy but a bunch of dead women were still in the drat news the next day. They seem to die regardless of what you do.

The core gameplay here is interesting but there's only a hint of a narrative near the end of the demo. Looking forward to what they develop. But I hope the game gets more complex with the narrative and moral choices rather than just your rule book filling up more and more over time. I'm not really interested in the game if it's just "more rules get added every day".

Aesculus
Mar 22, 2013


Baronjutter posted:

I denied the guy but a bunch of dead women were still in the drat news the next day. They seem to die regardless of what you do.
You can actually save them, shut down the human trafficking ring, and get the credit for it. Give the letter about the human trafficker to him and then you get the option to arrest him.

v: Nope, all that happens if you let him in is you get this game's version of achievements(little badges you can see when you're in the end of day screen) and you get a regular penalty I think. Also, there's no way to avoid any of the terrorists, if you deny the first one the next one'll be the terrorist, and this continues on forever.

Aesculus fucked around with this message at May 1, 2013 around 17:24

Baronjutter
Dec 31, 2007

...the engine tracks thousands of details for each unit meaning it will be a far deeper game than your grandpa's chess.
Pre-order CHESS now and receive the DLC "queen" unit.

I really want to let the crayon passport guy in. Does anything bad happen? He seems so harmlessly adorable.
Is there any way to stop the first terrorists or is there no way? Like is there is specific person you can deny or will it just randomly happen to anyone you let in? What if you let in a bunch of people and then deny everyone else?

DeusExMachinima
Sep 2, 2012


Baronjutter posted:

I denied the guy but a bunch of dead women were still in the drat news the next day. They seem to die regardless of what you do.

The core gameplay here is interesting but there's only a hint of a narrative near the end of the demo. Looking forward to what they develop. But I hope the game gets more complex with the narrative and moral choices rather than just your rule book filling up more and more over time. I'm not really interested in the game if it's just "more rules get added every day".

There really needs to be a stronger narrative for the game. I think there will be, it's just a beta but it got pretty interesting by the last day. Hopefully they give you the option of becoming the payola terrorist cell mac daddy of the far side of the Iron Curtain.

cock hero flux
Apr 17, 2011
Tell me to shut the fuck up.

Had fun with it even though it was just a beta. Detaining people is fun.

Dre2Dee2
Dec 6, 2006

Just a striding through Kamen Rider...


FUUUUCK, this game is amazing. Games as art... it's here

Bold Robot
Jan 6, 2009

Be brave.


On the day when there are security concerns and you need to search people from the K-country, do you have to go through that whole process or can you just deny them? It takes forever.

Baronjutter
Dec 31, 2007

...the engine tracks thousands of details for each unit meaning it will be a far deeper game than your grandpa's chess.
Pre-order CHESS now and receive the DLC "queen" unit.

You should search them still I think, the people with guns and bombs and drugs and poo poo actually get arrested and you get paid.

Bold Robot
Jan 6, 2009

Be brave.


Yeah but you get paid for a denial, too, and it takes less time.

Baronjutter
Dec 31, 2007

...the engine tracks thousands of details for each unit meaning it will be a far deeper game than your grandpa's chess.
Pre-order CHESS now and receive the DLC "queen" unit.

I think it would help if like some money actually appeared on the screen or floated up with a *kaching!* sound. Would help motivate you to go faster and provide feedback that you're getting paid per transaction.

turnways
Jun 22, 2004



Watching other people play this game is sometimes goddamn infuriating. Like, how can you make such obvious mistakes? The names are different, it's right there! The rulebook is in front of you! You've done this like six times before! It makes me want to play through again, only to make my own set of unbelievably stupid mistakes. This is a fantastic piece of work, and probably one of the most refreshing games I've played all year.

One thing I love is the sound. The fake foreign mumbly language, the sounds of papers shuffling around, the click of the shutter. He really nailed that, and it really makes the whole experience. Also the way the documents move around is just superb, everything feels like it's got weight to it. I don't think this game would've been half as enjoyable if it were just still images or spreadsheets.

Evilpiggie
Feb 22, 2009


This game gives me such a unbridled sense of power. Thank God I am not a government official.

Dre2Dee2
Dec 6, 2006

Just a striding through Kamen Rider...


Heh, this game is awesome because taking your time, double checking everything is correct and helping people out leaves you starving.

Not giving a gently caress and doing things as fast as possible? Food and heat in Arstotzka!

Thompsons
Aug 28, 2008

Ask me about onklunk extraction.

Papers, Please just got Greenlit.

babies havin rabies
Feb 24, 2006



This game is pure genius. The accessible and simple yet challenging gameplay. The direct conflict of moral and financial interests. The statements it makes about humanity and state security.

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Antti
Oct 10, 2006


This game is strangely engaging even though it's pretty close to my actual day job, which doesn't involve guarding a border, but does include looking through people's travel documents to make sure they're valid, authentic and don't have disrepancies, and being part of the process of deciding who gets in and who doesn't.

So, yeah. I guess it helps I find my job engaging too, but does this tell more about me or the game?

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