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nutranurse
Oct 22, 2012

Unlikeliest of Slash Fics



If you are anything like me (which I hope you are because I'm a pretty rad dude) you like yourself a good business tycoon simulator. Game Dev Tycoon is a good business tycoon simulator.

Ok, but tell me more about the game you arrogant goon.

Like I said, Game Dev Tycoon is a business simulator, and, as you can gleam from the title, it specifically is a game development business simulator. Also, as the thread title suggests, the game bears many simularities to Kairosoft's hit iOS/Android Game Dev Story. The premise is the same (pick and choose game genres, themes, and what platforms you release them on); the overall business manage is pretty similar (hire employees, market your lovely games prey upon gaming trends); heck Game Dev Tycoon even lifts Game Dev Story's isometric graphical orientation.

But before you cry "Soulless Copycat" understand that Game Dev Tycoon expands upon virtually every aspect seen in Game Dev Story and throws in its own additions/charms.



You start out making games from your garage and (hopefully) end up in a high-end studio complete with your own R&D department. The journey's a long one, putting you up against reviewers (who are arbitrary assholes), fan communities (who are fickle as hell), and your own (frequent) mistakes.

I cannot stress the depth to the customization in this game enough. At first you are pidgeoned holed into choosing from limited types of games from an equally limited set of themes, but as the years roll by the market explodes and you will be making that Mecha Hitler Alt-History Scifi Robot Shooter you've always dreamed of. However, this is just the surface of the game creation process and before long you will be tweaking the specifics of your games via custom game engines you & your in-game staff make yourselves.



The game really shines in this regard. Say you make "Limitless Legends", a fantasy-rpg. Depending on what research you have conducted and how you have built up your game engine, you could make several very different games. You can opt-for a linear story-based game with fancy graphics, but little depth, in the hopes that it will sell well on the newly released console selling like hotcakes. Or you could make a simple, colorful 2-D kiddie game for a less powerful handheld system that holds a bigger market share. Or you could make the game into a sprawling, open-world PC game complete with all the dingbats and doodads you want.

None of these, though, are guaranteed to sell well. Surely, but steadily, the game ramps up in its difficultyóin part because of all the customization options at hand.



At it's heart Game Dev Tycoon has a fairly robust and interactive economic system that you should watch like a hawk, least you end up bankrupt (like all of my game companies). Alongside general gaming trends, you must deal with competing gaming companies/platforms, market you games to the masses, and occasionally be threatened by your publishers. I would go on and on, but honestly a lot of the game's features are best experienced when haplessly stumbled upon. In fact, with the gradual reveal of features the game's developers have structured it in such a way that it rather accurately mimics the gaming industry's transition from humble beginnings to the sprawling, multi-faceted behemoth it is today.

Trust me though, this well goes pretty deep.


Sadly (thankfully?) this was an April Fool's gag

Alright, how much does this gem cost? ? ?

Nope! You can get what is arguably the best tycoon game of the past decade for a just $7.99.

You can buy the game directly from their site or from the Microsoft Window's store. Also, vote for the game on Steam Greenlight; you will receive a Steam key once the game has gone through Gaben's Gauntlet.

As of the 29th of August Game Dev Tycoon has been released on steam. If you bought the game through Green Heart Games then you should have received an e-mail detailing how to get your steam key.

If you don't trust my word (but you really should, I'm a friendly fellow) you can try out the demo that goes through the first 5 years of simulation.

Also, the game is completely DRM-Free.

Cool beans! Who made this awesome game?

Brothers Patrick and Daniel Klug of Greenheart Games, an indie-start up. This is the first game.

I encourage all you goons to share the success (but mostly failure) stories of your ridiculously named games.

No Nutranurse, gently caress you. This game is terrible

More than a few goons, myself included, know that there are flaws with this game. Be forewarned that a lot of the difficulty you may encounter comes from a distinct lack of feedback on why your games are lovely. Most of the specifics we can say about the game's mechanics are based on conjecture, so get ready to be confused. I urge you to play through the demo before buying the game.

Also, the game does not lend itself very much to a second playthrough should you find your winning combination when it comes to game development (though prior to that, you will lose a lot or just muddle through). Consoles are always released at the same time, always are compatible with the same genres/audiences, and will always fail at specific times. It also does not help that the game developers are staunchly against modding. So, yeah, go into this with your eyes open to the game's flaws.

That said, if you're here to tell us why the game is awful try to do so in a manner fueled by unchecked vitriol. If Greenheart Games ever happen upon this forum I would hope that they could gleam some constructive criticism from our opinions, as it is their first game.

Remember, Losing Is Fun.

nutranurse fucked around with this message at Aug 29, 2013 around 21:49

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Aureon
Jul 11, 2012

by Y Kant Ozma Post


It's a good, addictive game.
That said, it's also pretty lovely in numerous ways.
The game is 'piloted'. You won't have a blockbuster twice in a row, no matter what.
You cannot 'specialize' in any type of games: You'll have to release multiple genres, and there's no specialization at all. Like, Sid Meier sat down and was suddenly a world-class dialogue expert, sound expert, and graphics expert.
It's very obviously a very small project. Graphics is basically nihil, and in the last stage, my i7 clocked at 4ghz couldn't keep the game flowing properly. Yeah.
The devs are very passive-aggressive about piracy. Whatever. I didn't feel the game was worth that $8, because seriously, i could remake it in a month, and i'm a beginner in programming, so i got a copy with a friend and we split it.

The beauty of this game is mainly that it's a "How good is your video games taste"?
Too bad that, for example, the 'perfect' weights for a RPG (modified by topic, such as Fantasy, console and audience) are always the same: You cannot try to do a dialogue\strategic RPG (Dragon Age), or a "Good in all aspects", such as Final Fantasy, or a massive World Building project such as Skyrim: The 'perfect' weights for PC\Fantasy\RPG are those, and if you do not respect them decently, the best vote you can get is a 5.
Also, of course, it's more like "How is your taste similar to the authors'". Except for some genres, which are much easier than others to do, which are strategy and simulation: It's very obvious that you can tone Dialogue and Story to 0.

Also, the game doesn't ramp up in difficulty. It's a Gaussian curve.
In the first and last stage, it's completely impossible to fail. By contrast, when you're in Medium games, doing the really difficult part of the game, you can go under VERY easily; if you don't get out a blockbuster within 5-8 games (which again, partly depends on RNG), you're done.
Instead, a properly marketed AAA will easily turn a profit even with straight 4's, i've had a game turn a profit with a 2.75 review score.
You also lose the possibility of doing 'small, new projects' when you acquire larger games: They will be flat-out rejected. Large\AAA or die.


That said, i'd kill to be able to look in the source code and really understand the algorithms which determine points, sales, and reviews. They're very rightfully intricated and randomized, i've been trying with statistical analysis on 50-60 datapoints as constant as possible (FIrst game, etc) and could barely crack the good weights for 3-4 combos.

Turncoat Mommy
Oct 3, 2010






Those complaints and how well the consoles do seem to be fixed instead of randomized pretty much cover everything bad I have to say about the game. It's a fun newgrounds game I paid for 8 bucks though.

pixelbaron
Mar 18, 2009



I hope I can crush my veteran developers will to live, toss their lifeless husks to the wolves, and then hire some young college graduates that will "just do anything to make vidya games" and start the cycle anew.

If I can't my immersion will be ruined.

VarXX
Oct 31, 2009


Yeah, you really can't take any liberties on your games or they will tank. It's really lame.

BuzzW
Jul 30, 2006



All those complaints are valid, but I got 8 bucks of fun out of it.

My biggest disappointment is that you can't develop for the (equivalents of the) Sega CD, 32X, or Saturn. Or Virtual Boy. I could have saved them!

nutranurse
Oct 22, 2012

Unlikeliest of Slash Fics

Aureon posted:

That said, i'd kill to be able to look in the source code and really understand the algorithms which determine points, sales, and reviews. They're very rightfully intricated and randomized, i've been trying with statistical analysis on 50-60 datapoints as constant as possible (FIrst game, etc) and could barely crack the good weights for 3-4 combos.

There's pretty much nothing preventing you from going in and looking through the files, I think (at least that's what I've read on the forums), so dig through the code to your heart's content?

And yeah, there are problems, though I think you are exaggerating on calling the game a newground's flash thing.

quote:

The devs are very passive-aggressive about piracy. Whatever.

Read a bunch of stuff on this and from what went on, to how the dev's responded, I think it was moreso a very level headed approach to the whole piracy situation.

For those of you not in the know, basically what the devs did was release a cracked version of them game that was coded to have your game company fail no matter what after a certain time due to piracy. Now, I honestly feel that if your game company fails in real life you can't just blame piracy (you probably made lovely games), so I can see how people might go knee-jerk "PIRACY'S NOT THE PROBLEM". Heck, let me quote the dev's blog about the thing:

Game Dev Dudes posted:

Trying to appeal to pirates

I know that some people just donít even think about buying games. They will immediately search for a cracked version. For this reason, when we released the game, we also published a page which targets people who search for a cracked/illegal version. Unfortunately, due to my lack in search-engine-optimization skills, that page has had no impact yet, but I hope it will convince some to buy the game in the future...

I do think itís important to try to communicate what piracy means to game developers to our consumers...

...To the players who played the cracked version!

Iím not mad at you. When I was younger, downloading illegal copies was practically normal but this was mostly because global game distribution was in its infancy. To be fair, there are still individuals who either canít make a legal purchase because of payment-issues or who genuinely cannot afford the game. I donít have a quarrel with you. To the rest who could afford the game consider this:

Would you like to see a bigger/better sequel of Game Dev Tycoon in the future? Buy the game! Creating this game was already expensive and this was just a small game. If we ever want to make a bigger/better version we need a lot of support!
Do you hate the trend towards social or pay-to-play free games? Buy games from independent developers! (start with ours )
Do you hate the recent trends in the industry? Buy DRM free games.
We are not wealthy and itís unlikely that we will be any time soon, so stop pretending like we donít need your 8 dollars! We are just two guys working our butts off, trying to start our own game studio to create games which are fun to play.

The game is DRM free, you can use it on up to three of your computers for your own use, you get copies for Mac, Windows and Linux, you can continue your game before piracy wrecked your company and we even aim to provide you with a free Steam key once the game is on Steam. All for a mere 8 bucks.

I think most of the ~*~contrevsery~*~ over the situation comes from people being obtuse as hell when they get trolled for something that probably does suck a great deal for a small, start-up game developer. Christ, the game's 8 bucks, has no micro-transactions/DRM of any kind, and is fairly robust for what you pay for it. This coming from someone who is a-ok with the torrent scene.

Game chat:

Well, you can experiment with your games a bit. For instance, I was middling through years 5-9 until I happened upon making the absolute hit "Peebles the Pirate" a Gameboy pirate-themed "casual" game for kids. This led me to pretty much base my whole company around Peebles, later seeing me make every and anything from a Casual/Action game to a Casual/Simulator game to a Casual/Adventure game. So in some regards you can specialize.

I did, however, go bankrupt after taking a publishing contract from Electronic Mass Publishing () and summarily went the way of so many companies that EA interacts with: they bought me out, whored out my IP, and I got a game over.

nutranurse fucked around with this message at May 3, 2013 around 22:35

Espy
Apr 21, 2010

Would you draft me?
I'd draft me.
I'd draft me hard.


nutranurse posted:

There's pretty much nothing preventing you from going in and looking through the files, I think (at least that's what I've read on the forums), so dig through the code to your heart's content?

And yeah, there are problems, though I think you are exaggerating on calling the game a newground's flash thing.


Read a bunch of stuff on this and from what went on, to how the dev's responded, I think it was moreso a very level headed approach to the whole piracy situation.

For those of you not in the know, basically what the devs did was release a cracked version of them game that was coded to have your game company fail no matter what after a certain time due to piracy. Now, I honestly feel that if your game company fails in real life you can't just blame piracy (you probably made lovely games), so I can see how people might go knee-jerk "PIRACY'S NOT THE PROBLEM". Heck, let me quote the dev's blog about the thing:


I think most of the ~*~contrevsery~*~ over the situation comes from people being obtuse as hell when they get trolled for something that probably does suck a great deal for a small, start-up game developer. Christ, the game's 8 bucks, has no micro-transactions/DRM of any kind, and is fairly robust for what you pay for it. This coming from someone who is a-ok with the torrent scene.

Game chat:

Well, you can experiment with your games a bit. For instance, I was middling through years 5-9 until I happened upon making the absolute hit "Peebles the Pirate" a Gameboy pirate-themed "casual" game for kids. This led me to pretty much base my whole company around Peebles, later seeing me make every and anything from a Casual/Action game to a Casual/Simulator game to a Casual/Adventure game. So in some regards you can specialize.

I did, however, go bankrupt after taking a publishing contract from Electronic Mass Publishing () and summarily went the way of so many companies that EA interacts with: they bought me out, whored out my IP, and I got a game over.

I actually was able to beat the game going through the 30 years and basically becoming Blizzard Entertainment at the end with cashcowing off one major 8-9 MMO and then making expansions will dumping money into making my developers better. Then I tried to make a console and suddenly my stockpiles of money evaporated and I got a game over in the "overtime" section of the game.

Moral of the story: Do not dig deep and try and run two MMOs that have not had expansions in awhile, generate a new higher graphics engine, while also developing a console. You will lose all your money.

Aureon
Jul 11, 2012

by Y Kant Ozma Post


You failed in the third stage? whoa. Over-extension 101.

On the piracy thing: i "somewhat" pirated it, since i bought it and gave a copy to a friend (after i was done with it, because i have 1999 morals or something), which i feel is my right.
The passive-aggressive thing i was referring to was a message that pops up in the early tutorial which goes on and on "You bought our game! THANKS YOU! YOU'RE AWESOME!" which i can't see the reason but to make the pirates feel 'bad' (hell, i felt bad for them and i bought the drat thing!)

I also don't really get how making this could've been expensive, the whole graphics is something that could've be done by highschoolers, the backend is drat good, but back-end is easy.

The game is a single .exe that cannot be unpacked easily (And in the readme there's a "Do not try to reverse engineer", to boot), so the algorithms are out.
That's kind of good though, 'cause otherwise the internet would have unfallible guides already.


Ingame: To whoever manages to get AAA titles in 30 years, i salute you.

(USER WAS BANNED FOR THIS POST)

nutranurse
Oct 22, 2012

Unlikeliest of Slash Fics

I think them saying "Thanks for buying our game" is just them saying "Thanks for buying our game." It probably is pretty cool for them to have actually made something that people find worth purchasing. vv

And on a second check, you're right about the whole "don't dig through our game". I (stupidly) didn't read the rest of the thread on their official forums about modding and apparently, while it's easy to pick through, they don't want you to do it at the moment.

I'll probably start a LP of this within the hour. Mostly because I'm bored and intermittently employed and also thrilled to see what games you goons will vote on making/seeing how long it will take for us to go bankrupt. Shouldn't take too long.

Espy
Apr 21, 2010

Would you draft me?
I'd draft me.
I'd draft me hard.


Aureon posted:

You failed in the third stage? whoa. Over-extension 101.

On the piracy thing: i "somewhat" pirated it, since i bought it and gave a copy to a friend (after i was done with it, because i have 1999 morals or something), which i feel is my right.
The passive-aggressive thing i was referring to was a message that pops up in the early tutorial which goes on and on "You bought our game! THANKS YOU! YOU'RE AWESOME!" which i can't see the reason but to make the pirates feel 'bad' (hell, i felt bad for them and i bought the drat thing!)

I also don't really get how making this could've been expensive, the whole graphics is something that could've be done by highschoolers, the backend is drat good, but back-end is easy.

The game is a single .exe that cannot be unpacked easily (And in the readme there's a "Do not try to reverse engineer", to boot), so the algorithms are out.
That's kind of good though, 'cause otherwise the internet would have unfallible guides already.


Ingame: To whoever manages to get AAA titles in 30 years, i salute you.

Don't mock my Y30+ failure I just literally wanted everything ever in one instance.

nutranurse
Oct 22, 2012

Unlikeliest of Slash Fics

So basically you continued to do what Blizzard did/is doing.

Thompsons
Aug 28, 2008

Ask me about onklunk extraction.

Someone needs to make a guide for the small office stage of the game because holy poo poo is it a drag.

Death by Chickens
Jan 12, 2012


I really am trying to like this game.

The game really doesn't seem to want me to.

I think if they worked on the balance and gave the player a bit more info about trends it would be better. At the same time I really hate the idea that certain genres require more or less work in specific categories; it makes no sense, why are things like graphics and sound weighted depending on the "needs" of the genre? I think they should have kept certain aspects separate from the stages, and made it so you can dump as much money and time as you want on perfecting these things from a technical and then artistic standpoint. In real life there's no reason an adventure game can't have a sophisticated game engine, or a strategy game have a good story.

This would all be fine except for the fact that you can hit all the marks and still fail. And then the game gives me very little feedback as to what the problem was. I had a playthrough where I make like 5 mil off of Monster Master while still in my garage, then dumped like 3 mil into moving into a new studio, hiring 2 new people, and creating the best drat custom engine possible. Then every single game I make until I go bankrupt gets scores between 3-7. What? So more employees and better quality engine = worse games? Most of the genre combos were 'good' ones and yet the reviewers still poo poo on them. And the 1 or 2 solid games I made that got 8's sold poorly.

At the end of every playthrough I'm just left about what the hell happened.

It sounds like the game gets way easy with expansions, sequels, and MMO's, but most of the time reviewers just seem to unanimously start hating my company before I get to that point.

Mordaedil
Oct 25, 2007

Yup, that's a skjold all right.

Welcome to real life game development.

Reason
Sep 10, 2006


I bought this game because of how they dealt with piracy, what a funny thing to do to silly pirates. Also I'm terrible at this game and always go out of business almost immediately after moving into a new office.

Death by Chickens
Jan 12, 2012


Mordaedil posted:

Welcome to real life game development.

lol that's what I keep telling myself.

I do expect some amount of randomness and failure, that's part of the fun. But it's definitely not fun to spend hours playing and fail for no discernible reason.

nutranurse
Oct 22, 2012

Unlikeliest of Slash Fics

edit:^^^Beats doing well for real-life years only to fail all of a sudden because you happened to make the next Daikatana.

Death by Chickens posted:

It sounds like the game gets way easy with expansions, sequels, and MMO's, but most of the time reviewers just seem to unanimously start hating my company before I get to that point.

Hahaha, nah. It doesn't. You're still at the whim of the shitheel reviwers, unreliable fans, and fickle-as-gently caress market. See an above goon's story of going full Blizzard only to crash and burn by going full Blizzard and trying to do something other than their failing (relatively) MMO scheme. Welcome to the game! When you fail you fail hard, when you win it's just a temporary stopgap before you get bought by Electronic Massive Publishing.

It helps that I approach this game as a kind of approach to what it must be like to be a game developer. Tons of failures because, windfalls of cash & fame because, misery is ever present.

edit2: But for all of the failure, the game is pretty fun and has an odd kind of charm. Not to mention there's a degree of complexity/depth to the whole thing, though I suspect some of it comes from out obscured some mechanics are.

Aureon
Jul 11, 2012

by Y Kant Ozma Post


Nevermind, i got the source. The code isn't even obfuscated, even the COMMENTS are left in.
e: No, for the actual code they aren't, just for all the libs they were left in. Still pretty easy to get.
For someone that didn't want it to be reverse engineered, perhaps loading the uncompressed, un-obfuscated code in a temp folder...

e: by good management, you can bypass the need of making good games in the third stage. AAA Marketing will do the job for you.

Aureon fucked around with this message at May 4, 2013 around 00:08

Dr. Video Games 0031
Jul 16, 2004



With real life game development, you can actually read and take in lots of feedback and choose how to respond to that. In Game Dev Tycoon, there is virtually no feedback for why your games get rated low and sell poorly. It's incredibly frustrating when you get record ratings in the design and technology categories, you had skilled employees working on parts of the game that suit them well, and you focus on the strong parts of the genre (story for RPGs, level design for action games, etc), and you STILL get slammed by the press, sell no copies, and are left utterly clueless. Whether that's true to life or not, it's not very fun for a video game.

I found the way to success is just trying to figure out how to min-max each genre. Once you get a feel for how to do that properly, most games you release will be decent, and you'll get hits more often. By the time I was making AAA games, every game I developed was pulling in $50 million+. Also my console was pulling in craploads of money. And then my next game that was released exclusively for that console sold like twenty million copies, which was three times the number of consoles that were on the market.

The one tip I can give is that you absolutely have to make sure you diversify. Never release the same setting/genre twice in a row. Always wait a couple years before retreading old ground. This even goes for sequels. You can't do the annualized franchise thing, everyone will hate every game like that forever. Basically just release a large number of really different genres regularly and as long as you focus on the right areas during development, you should generally be okay most of the time. You don't have to be afraid of releasing niche products, there is no such thing. A hardcore surgery sim for PC can become a blockbuster hit. During the Large/AAA games, like three quarters of my games got 7+ review averages, many getting 9+ averages. My company was pretty loving awesome, apparently.

Aureon
Jul 11, 2012

by Y Kant Ozma Post


I got most of the weights down.
By down, i mean from the source code.
Should i ruin the game for:
A) Goons?
B) Everyone who reads the wiki?
C) GameFaqs?

Should i try to fix some dumb stuff and make a patch to send the devs as an 'idea' \ 'mod'?

nutranurse
Oct 22, 2012

Unlikeliest of Slash Fics

Well I think the devs have stated they don't want mods (or something to that effect, not sure, check their official forms). Actually, after going on their forums myself I found this:

quote:

Hey everyone,

Reverse-engineering is prohibited for Game Dev Tycoon. This is mentioned in the EULA and Copyright notices.

So in short; No. Mods are not supported/allowed.

~ Tyler

Which, while lame as hell in my opinion, is the official word on the matter. (If you do mod anything PM me, I'd be interested to see your changes).

As for spoilers. I dunno, just don't be a dick about them? Feel free to post them, I just ask that you use spoiler tags because part of what makes this game fun, to me at least, is not knowing why the game does what it does.

oldskool
Aug 9, 2010


Dr. Video Games 0031 posted:

With real life game development, you can actually read and take in lots of feedback and choose how to respond to that. In Game Dev Tycoon, there is virtually no feedback for why your games get rated low and sell poorly. It's incredibly frustrating when you get record ratings in the design and technology categories, you had skilled employees working on parts of the game that suit them well, and you focus on the strong parts of the genre (story for RPGs, level design for action games, etc), and you STILL get slammed by the press, sell no copies, and are left utterly clueless. Whether that's true to life or not, it's not very fun for a video game.

This is my major beef (granted, I've only played the demo but it's the same issue I have with Game Dev Story). When something goes wrong it's my fault for making a wrong choice, and I can accept that, but 9 times out of 10 I just get four reviews of "This game sucks, waste of time, waste of money, horrible!" and am left with no idea what exactly I did wrong. The other 1 time out of 10 I'll get something like "Should have focused more on Engine".
So 10% of the time, I am notified of one necessary piece of one third of the development cycle to focus on for one genre-category combination! Even that includes nothing regarding what facets I've included in whatever game engine I use, the matchup of the console's target audience with the game's target audience and honestly that's as far as I ever get in research before I go bankrupt

Malachite
Mar 2, 2004


Dr. Video Games 0031 posted:



The one tip I can give is that you absolutely have to make sure you diversify. Never release the same setting/genre twice in a row. Always wait a couple years before retreading old ground. This even goes for sequels. You can't do the annualized franchise thing, everyone will hate every game like that forever.

I wonder how strict that actually is. I focused near exclusively on adventure, action & rpg games, or any mix of those 3 and produced only for PC. Its rare that I have a game get below 8s in scores and I'm #1 at g3 every year. Most of my games are fantasy or cyberpunk with the occasional medieval or sci-fi. Though if you make a sequel quickly people get really offended and give 1s & 2s even if it was produced the same way as your straight 10 game. All I really do is have maybe 5 different series and cycle between them, building a new engine before starting the cycle over again. Apparently I have so many fans that I got away with forgetting marketing existed until year 25 or so.

The biggest pitfall I ran into was subpar employees. Not maxing out your budget and hiring the best just lowers your scores. A small game built by 2 great dudes is better than a large multimillion one built by mediocre employees. Maybe the developers were trying to say something there.

Aureon
Jul 11, 2012

by Y Kant Ozma Post


Basic "How does it work" stuff; no numbers below:
Do not read if you haven't had your first gameover atleast

Consoles : Multiplying weight for Audience and Genre. To determine if the weight applies to sales only or to sales and votes; i think the Ganre applies to both, Audience just to sales.
Topics: Exactly like consoles, they don't have the sales multiplier for market share though, obviously.
Genres: Apart of the two mentioned, there's a "Golden Weight" that if deviated from, impacts sales and votes negatively.
Features: Straight-up points. Code is obfuscated, so i can't be sure, but there doesn't seem to be any interaction by features apart of giving a certain 'v' boost, i guess to sales\score.
This is the biggest letdown, since it literally doesn't seem to care if you've got a gamepad on the NES or not. I may be wrong, i very well hope i am.

Will delve deeper. Code's partially obfuscated, but that won't stop me!

Aureon fucked around with this message at May 4, 2013 around 00:44

Dr. Video Games 0031
Jul 16, 2004



That ties into another thing I was going to post but wasn't 100% sure on: Never skimp on game costs. If your slider settings allow you to add additional features without going over the limit, do so. It doesn't matter if it doesn't make sense (dialog trees in a city sim?), do it. It will always make your game better.

That said, I don't know what going over a slider setting's limit actually does to a game. Will adding skill trees be an improvement even if it means gameplay will only be at 90% efficiency? I never figured that out.

Aureon
Jul 11, 2012

by Y Kant Ozma Post


I'd think it's neutral.
Preliminary numbers on how are sales calculated:

Score is floored.
A base number is multiplied by game size (10/15/20/25), then divided by a number depending on the score, starting with 10: [1, 5, 10, 20, 40, 60]. The formula changes radically if the score is 4 or less, it seems that there's a substantial divide everywhere between 'good' games (5+) and 'bad' games (4-).
It also seems that there's no decimal scores, and that 8.75 is 8.
Design and Technology points should be as near as possible to a 'golden ratio' that depends on the game genre.

It seems that someone else in literally the past three days has done (and is doing) the same decoding work i am doing, on the wiki. I'll head to posting my poo poo there;
And just like every management game worth it's salt, losing is fun!

Aureon fucked around with this message at May 4, 2013 around 01:43

Dirty Job
Dec 20, 2006

Posting on SA. Now THAT's a Dirty Job


I bought this, but for Macs it only runs on OSX 10.7. So now I either have to upgrade to 10.7 or get a refund.

I've watched a couple Let's Plays though, and it looks like fun! Maybe I'll just bite the bullet.

a nest of hornets
Nov 17, 2012

cheesy anime pizza undresses you with pepperoni eyes

I hate this game and I came here to say it's a terrible ripoff of GameDevStory. I gave them $8 because their piracy story was funny, turns out that's about the only novel feature.

At any point, where the "script" of the game deviates from that of GameDevStory, the user experience goes to poo poo and it becomes a confusing mess. I quit after about 30 minutes, I found myself looking forward to things that GameDevStory did, and not Game Dev Tycoon. Zero innovation whatsoever. I think OP is full of poo poo. They didn't "expand upon" or "add charm" to anything, don't fix what isn't broken!

It seriously seems like they spent more time coding pop ups to repeatedly nag-thank me for giving them money, than they did making the goddamn game usable or even remotely enjoyable. It's almost as if they feel guilty for being so ruthlessly unoriginal.

I'd also like to point out that a Game Dev Story 2 was made for PC, but it was never translated to English.

Dr. Video Games 0031
Jul 16, 2004



There is exactly one message thanking you for buying the game, and exactly one message talking about the effects of piracy, and then that's that. Those don't even show up on repeat playthroughs.

VarXX
Oct 31, 2009


Dr. Video Games 0031 posted:

There is exactly one message thanking you for buying the game, and exactly one message talking about the effects of piracy, and then that's that. Those don't even show up on repeat playthroughs.

I got 2 messages about Piracy in my last playthrough and yes, I paid the $8 for the game. This game is too frustrating. It starts off fun but as soon as you leave the garage it just gets frustrating. I really feel like it's a lesser Game Dev Story. As said there's no feedback as to what is wrong with your games and it ends up being just a game of toying with sliders until something works.

Dr. Video Games 0031
Jul 16, 2004



Another thing, really take the message about needing 100K fans to self-publish medium games to heart. Absolutely never self-publish until you have 100K fans, maybe even wait a bit longer. I think the game must be programmed to automatically make the first good game you self-publish above that 100K fan threshold a major hit that will gross $15 million or so.

Blue Rupie
Mar 25, 2013


I actually played both the bugged pirated version and actual purchase version of the game.

You see, one of the fanatics gave me a pirated copy of this game and I decided to give it a shot. The news on the entry is not released during the time so I blindly installed it on my Mac.

At first, everything seemed to be a carbon copy of GDS in terms of presentation but then I realize that not only the game's "plot" is on rails, my progress is also forcefully chained up in that one period. Always, constantly, I got great scores and $2 mill profit at the end of year 4.

Fuming that no matter how good my game will be, I always get average scores until it hit some milestones, I moved on to a neat office where I recruited 2 members of my team. One is a super programmer paid for 350k and the other regular game designer at the same price. I should warn you that although your guts and history tells you that people that makes entertaining games and practice the art of coding/designing/drawing in shoestring budget will succeed in the game industry, the game tells us that the recipe of making games was a code master with no passion at making games paired up with an "idea guy" with no experience at making a single game. This lazy slob duo is all you need along with another duo if necessary to fill up the total of 4 slots. The developer is piss weak and later got replaced by the slob combo that I mentioned above. I even named one of my games "Sakred Diamondz" in honor of the revelation.

The game goes pretty smoothly and even surprised by how many ideas were placed Gamebiz series. You will need to create an engine to give your game certain features such as open world design or Surround sound but somehow a 20 year engine can make a modern PS4 game. Suddenly at the 9th year, I hit a cliff wall by the difficulty. In retrospect, I think this is when the anti-pirate stuff kicked in which my performance plummeted and give bad rating but oddly, I did not receive such message. Maybe I skipped it along with the other repetitive tutorial dialogues I don't know but also oddly is that I got a perfect score in the master system and even gained profit but did not break the $2mil margin. In the end however I survived for two years by developing proven small scale games in the PC. After several game overs, I thought this game isn't really easy at all and for once a proper game.

So from this experience I bought the game and started playing all over again only to realize the news on the entire fiasco and the game's difficulty was meant to play as an irony. Also the second play-though using the genuine version was not only the same story but also really easy.

There is an option cropping up once in awhile which (I swear this is true) you can literally sabotage your unknown opponent and also "steal" their themes. When you didn't do it, your loss. When you payed them they will do it perfectly, with no consequences (according to my second run) or any failures at all. Now I can give them bonus for giving this idea a crack but why should I when I don't even know who the opponent is in the first place! It's like it's been tacked on to please certain fans or to make sure one of their housemates to shut it for winning a bet in a drinking game.

The soundtrack is just two pieces of looping generic music which will be irritating when you play it for over several hours in a endurance based game. Only one of the two change depending on what office you have (Answer: there are two office upgrades). The difficulty is, at best, easy if you got a game encyclopedia on hand (or a single A5 paper strategy guide) and deduce it with the power of logic. The timeline is linear as Call of duty's corridor with no way in which you can actually extend or contribute to anything in the history of gaming at all, leaving you wondering what did you change in the gaming market.

The amount of selections, although it's vast, is nothing compared with GDS. Where is the board, first person shooter, puzzle and visual novel as as a genre? And no zombies or bikini as a theme? C'mon! How can I complete "Sakred Diamondz" and "Faint or Alive: Extreme Beach Tennis" without both of them!? Also as a non-serious note, WHERE IS CTHULHU. No, it's not filed as "Mystery" I want an exclusive theme for him!

Overall the game is a disappointment for me. Nothing is presented well both on the gameplay front or in the technical front. It feels like a mixture of ideas on all of the retrospectively simple or dumbed down Game Dev Games and duct taped all together. All wrapped up in a boring uninspiring character models and music that can be replaced by anything. Like isometric pixel art in awesome chiptunes.


Dr. Video Games 0031 posted:

That ties into another thing I was going to post but wasn't 100% sure on: Never skimp on game costs. If your slider settings allow you to add additional features without going over the limit, do so. It doesn't matter if it doesn't make sense (dialog trees in a city sim?), do it. It will always make your game better.

That said, I don't know what going over a slider setting's limit actually does to a game. Will adding skill trees be an improvement even if it means gameplay will only be at 90% efficiency? I never figured that out.


I think the sliders place limits on how many design and technology points that you can contribute.
Rough equation on my head in general goes like this:

The raw contribution points * percentage of the excess work (from the scale of 1.0 to 0) * Percentage of the closeness of the "perfect game" target + Features that were used in points = The final points of the game.

From this deduction, I would say put in much features as much as you can.

Blue Rupie fucked around with this message at May 4, 2013 around 02:43

Dr. Video Games 0031
Jul 16, 2004



Just curious, what inspired you to buy the game after having your initial negative experience with the pirated version?

a nest of hornets
Nov 17, 2012

cheesy anime pizza undresses you with pepperoni eyes

Jesus! I was tempted to write a similar post in some vain attempt to find value in the $8 I gave away to these shitlords, but you've got it covered.

Hah, I had no idea I was "halfway" through the "game", being at the second office. That they made a gameplay mechanic that involves ripping off your opponent is cute, at least I can hold this over my head and claim they knew exactly what they were doing with this PR-driven money grab.

VarXX posted:

I got 2 messages about Piracy in my last playthrough and yes, I paid the $8 for the game. This game is too frustrating. It starts off fun but as soon as you leave the garage it just gets frustrating. I really feel like it's a lesser Game Dev Story. As said there's no feedback as to what is wrong with your games and it ends up being just a game of toying with sliders until something works.

Don't forget the blue boxes that you have to remember to click or unclick otherwise they could add thousands of dollars of unwanted cost to your game or new game engine, and gently caress incremental updates.

Every time you research a new feature, you need to go make an entirely new game engine. There's no such thing as reusable code or assets. Franchises? Branding? Nah, we don't need those.

Blue Rupie
Mar 25, 2013


Dr. Video Games 0031 posted:

Just curious, what inspired you to buy the game after having your initial negative experience with the pirated version?

I thought it would be vastly different from other "Game Dev" games late game (I mean there is a section where you can research a Steam service) as well as having a vastly harder difficulty curve.

FOLLOW ME BRUH posted:

I hate this game and I came here to say it's a terrible ripoff of GameDevStory. I gave them $8 because their piracy story was funny, turns out that's about the only novel feature.

At any point, where the "script" of the game deviates from that of GameDevStory, the user experience goes to poo poo and it becomes a confusing mess. I quit after about 30 minutes, I found myself looking forward to things that GameDevStory did, and not Game Dev Tycoon. Zero innovation whatsoever. I think OP is full of poo poo. They didn't "expand upon" or "add charm" to anything, don't fix what isn't broken!

It seriously seems like they spent more time coding pop ups to repeatedly nag-thank me for giving them money, than they did making the goddamn game usable or even remotely enjoyable. It's almost as if they feel guilty for being so ruthlessly unoriginal.

I'd also like to point out that a Game Dev Story 2 was made for PC, but it was never translated to English.
There is one over in AdeptGamer forum but you need to pay US$5. Unfortunately they hit a snag and dialogs were not translated.

Blue Rupie fucked around with this message at May 4, 2013 around 01:59

Zero One
Dec 30, 2004

Z is the new C

Aureon posted:

I'd think it's neutral.
Preliminary numbers on how are sales calculated:

Score is floored.
A base number is multiplied by game size (10/15/20/25), then divided by a number depending on the score, starting with 10: [1, 5, 10, 20, 40, 60]. The formula changes radically if the score is 4 or less, it seems that there's a substantial divide everywhere between 'good' games (5+) and 'bad' games (4-).
It also seems that there's no decimal scores, and that 8.75 is 8.
Design and Technology points should be as near as possible to a 'golden ratio' that depends on the game genre.

It seems that someone else in literally the past three days has done (and is doing) the same decoding work i am doing, on the wiki. I'll head to posting my poo poo there;
And just like every management game worth it's salt, losing is fun!

Someone put this on the game's forums: http://www.flickr.com/photos/marleyman/8702282887/

Don't know how accurate it is.


I really want to like this game but... it's too much guess work.

Wooten
Oct 4, 2004



I bought this after seeing a couple LPs because it looked like a relaxing little game. I have to say I'm pretty dissapointed. Everything is just random guessing and frustration. I feel like there is no feedback at all. I fail over and over as soon as I get an office. Then when I tried to look up what I was doing wrong I found nothing but articles about how clever the devs were for tricking pirates. Cool I guess, but it would have been better if they spent as much time writing some documentation as they did uploading broken versions of their game to bit torrent. I'm not usually one to rage over indie games I spent less than 10 bucks on, but this one seems spitefully lovely to me for some reason.

Blue Rupie
Mar 25, 2013


Oh and just to prove that it's possible to go 30+, here's me idling with a MMO pumping and sucking cash at the same time.

Man I love mah monies.

Blue Rupie fucked around with this message at May 4, 2013 around 02:21

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Aureon
Jul 11, 2012

by Y Kant Ozma Post


Zero One posted:

Someone put this on the game's forums: http://www.flickr.com/photos/marleyman/8702282887/

Don't know how accurate it is.


I really want to like this game but... it's too much guess work.

It's crap, it was a thing the wiki contributors (me included) made from guesswork and experimental data. (RPG and Action weights are egregiously wrong)
The wiki now has the 'true' weights up, lifted from the game code itself.

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