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geeves
Sep 16, 2004



This thread is for the discussion of all things Canon -- lenses, bodies, flashes, accessories, rumors, etc. Feel free to add any knowledge, ask questions, and wank about gear.

Here's a little introduction:

Canon is one of the leading camera brands. The Canon system is made up of their camera bodies, hotshoe flashes and accessories, and lenses. Canon's first DSLR, the EOS DCS 3, was a 1.3 megapixel camera developed in collaboration with Kodak in 1995. The camera was a sight to behold.




Camera Bodies
Canon's camera bodies can be divided into 8 categories: The early DXX line, Digital Rebel line / XXXD line, XXD line, 5D line, the 6D, the 7D (6D and 7D to possibly become a 'line'), 1D line, 1Ds line and the 1DX.

Here's a year-by-year display of Canon's DSLR lineup


All the Camera bodies have different sizes. With exception of the 1D lines, here they are relative to each other, including the super small SLR1



The DXXs
5 years later, in October of 2000 Canon introduced the D30. The D30 introduced Canon’s CMOS imaging sensor technology. CMOS technology had been previously used by Canon in the development of its AF and metering sensors, this was the first time it had been used for the imaging sensor. The D30 was succeeded by the D60 (not to be confused with Nikon's D60, or Canon's later 30D and 60D). These cameras were interesting in that they were APS-C (1.6x crop) cameras, but the EF-S mount was not yet implemented.

D30 | D60

The Rebels



Beginning with the Canon EOS Digital Rebel (in Europe: 300D), Canon introduced their entry-line, consumer dSLR series. The Rebels are inexpensive, but also reflect their price in their performance and construction. The line has been split seemingly in two: the XXXD line (Rebel, XT, XTi, XSi, T1i/2i/3i/4i/5i, SL1) and the XXXXD line (Rebel XS and T3).

The latest Rebel, the SL1 / 100D, is the smallest DSLR made by Canon, even compared to the already small Rebel line. If you have large hands, the T5i is already cramp-worth (a grip helps greatly) the SL1 just looks like it would make my hands hurt. The T2i - T5i are largely the same camera with small (if any changes), the T3i and up have swivel LCDs. This isn't a bad thing in that you can save some money and not get caught up in a name update.


To add insult to injury, the SL1 introduced a brand new 18mp sensor that, given the timing of releases, could easily have been included with the T5i. But Canon being Canon will probably wait for the next gen 7D or XXD body for it.


Their lineage is as follows:

Rebel (300D) | XT (350D) | XTi (400D) | XSi (450D) | T1i (500D) | T2i (550D) | T3i (600D) | T4i (650D) | T5i (700D) | SL1 (100D)


The XS and T3 are the low end of entry level. They lag behind the XXXD in construction, controls, frame rate, buffer size, and general features.

XS (1000D) | T3 (1100D)

In any case, the Rebels offer an affordable first step into photography, and are fully compatible with the entirety of the modern Canon system.

Good applications for the Rebels:
  • A first, inexpensive dSLR for learning
  • A great option for casual use for people that want better image quality and are willing to put a little effort into their snapshots

The XXDs



Starting with the 10D, the XXD line is Canon's 'pro-sumer' line of cameras, directed at the serious amateur, or beginning professional. They feature solid, magnesium-alloy construction, good autofocus performance, handling tailored for on-the-fly shooting, good FPS, and are often turned to by wildlife shooters who want the 1.6X crop factor for the most reach on their telephotos. Their line is as follows:

10D | 20D | 30D | 40D | 50D | 60D | 60Da

The 20D->30D and 40D->50D are all seen as more minor upgrades, opposed to the 10D->20D and 30D->40D upgrade. The 20D is still a solid camera, if a bit dated.

Then there is the 60D. Canon took a step backward in the XXD line with the 60D, opting for plastic rather than magnesium construction, inferior controls to the 50D, no flash PC sync socket, fewer fine control features like multiflash control and AF adjustments. This is likely due to Canon releasing the 7D and finding themselves with the XXD line being rather redundant.

But there is the 60Da, a variant of the 60D tuned for astrophotography. The camera features a re-worked infra-red filter leaving the camera more sensitive to a specific emission frequency (656nm) of hydrogen, key to capturing images of features such as nebulae (gas clouds) in space. The 18MP camera continues where 2005's 8MP EOS 20Da left off.

Good applications for the XXDs:
  • "Serious amateurs" who want a solid camera for all-around use
  • Backup body for serious shooters
  • A way to get a little extra reach for people whose primary body is FF or APS-H
  • You want to shoot nebulae.

The 7D



In September of 2009, Canon introduced the 7D. The 7D is an interesting beast. It packs 18mp into an APS-C sensor, but then surprises with decent high ISO performance (better than the 50D). It features a great, brand-new autofocus system and fires at 8fps, making it pretty much ideal for wildlife and bird photography as well as a capable sports and all-around performer. It also shoots HD video.

7D

Good applications for the 7D:
  • All-around use for serious amateurs
  • Pretty much the best 1.6x body out there -- so extra reach for people whose primary body is FF or APS-H
  • Especially for sports, birds, wildlife

The 6D



The 6D is Canon's new "entry-level" full frame camera. When the 5Diii was introduced at nearly $1,000 more than the 5Dii with its greatly improved feature set, Canon introduced its new line. It comes with a 20.2 megapixel sensor, silent shutter capable, 11 Point AF system, iMAGE Gateway to share with iOS and Android systems along with GPS and a built-in WiFi transmitter. The 6D's lowlight ISO capabilities have been reported to exceed that of the 5Diii as well. It does however lose the rear joystick, slower flash sync speed (1/180 compared to 1/200) and slower top shutter speed. It also only has 1 SD card slot.

Beware of Canon's software that comes with the 6D. It's a piece of poo poo and causes problems. Try the following.

ShotgunWillie posted:

This is only if you use the Canon proprietary software. Connecting [the 6D] to my network, my computer then sees it as if it was plugged into USB and I can offload files as normal, albeit a little slowly. The software is a piece of poo poo, but the wifi remains perfectly functional.

6D

Good applications for the 6D:
  • All-around use for serious amateurs who want to move to full frame.
  • A less expensive full frame camera for weddings and other assignments in which photographers should have a solid backup camera.

The 5D Line



Canon's 5D line consists of three cameras. They feature full-frame, high resolution sensors, and are aimed at portrait, wedding, and studio shooters. They are:

5D | 5D Mark II | 5D Mark III

They first two have a very wide generation gap, but the original 5D is still a great still-life camera. The 5D Mark II's high ISO performance is stellar, and it also features HD video, with manual control after the latest firmware update. It's no replacement for a real video camera, but it also isn't something to just dismiss.

The 5D Mark III is pretty sweet. It's got crazy good ISO range, shoots at 6fps, and sports a brand-new 61-point AF system that should address the concerns about lackluster AF performance in the Mark II.

Good applications for the 5Ds:
  • Portraits, weddings, interior, editorial -- where IQ is important
  • They're not bad all-around performers if you can work with the autofocus (which isn't BAD, it's just not amazing)
  • With the full-frame, the II and III produce some pretty awesome video results. Movie and TV companies are beginning to use them in supplemental roles for their unique advantages. The 5Dii was used in movies like Black Swan, Captain America, Iron Man 2 and The Avengers. And in Television on shoes like House and 24 and probably many more when filming in tight locations.

The 1D Line



Canon's 1D line is tailored to professional photojournalists and sports shooters. It features high FPS, world-class autofocus, tank-like build quality and weathersealing, and a 1.3x crop factor. The line currently features 4 bodies:

1D | 1D Mark II | 1D Mark IIN | 1D Mark III | 1D Mark IV

The 1Ds Line



The 1Ds line is Canon's flagship studio camera, with huge resolution and full-frame sensors. The three cameras are:

1Ds | 1Ds Mark II | 1Ds Mark III


The 1D-X - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n5aAYpwB5zc



Then, Canon announced the answer to Nikon's D4: the 1DX. Basically, they finally stuck a full-frame sensor in a sports camera. The result is a replacement to the 1D and 1Ds lines, unifying the two. The 1DX has a brand-new, fancy schmancy AF system, shoots at 12FPS (14FPS if you lock the mirror up and capture JPEGs), and a whole bunch of other new-tech features. It's the flagship, now.

1D-X


The 1D-C



In 2012, Canon, released the 1DC with the ability to record video 4K up to 24k without downscaling. It shares the 1DX's body and specifications, but highly different firmware. You're able to capture video uncompressed to two CF cards or via HDMI to an external device. While it's geared more towards Canon's Cine lenses, you can use the EF lineup as well.

1D-C


The EOS M



The Canon EOS M is Canon's first mirror less camera with an interchangeable lens system. It has the same sensor ASP-C sensor as the Rebel Series and its rear interface also includes an expanded touch screen interface. There is also an adaptor so that you can use EF and EF-S lenses with the camera as well.

EOS M

Good applications for the EOS M
You want an inconspicuous point and shoot sized camera with a better lens system and a DSLR-sized sensor.


Still into Film? How about the EOS 3 or EOS 1v



The 1v is the only film camera still in production from Canon. The EOS 3 and others can be easily found on eBay or other online retailers specializing in used equipment. I personally have the EOS 3 and it's fantastic, weighs and handles similarly to my 5Dii, but has better auto focus. I don't use the Eye Control, though it does seem to work.

EOS 1v | EOS 3


The Lenses

woot fatigue posted:

Get the TS-E 24/3.5LII. It's the perfect travel lens for anyone going to Europe, and is a perfect walk-about lens for any city.

Canon's lenses fall into 2 main groups: EF and EF-S. There is also the EF-M line for Canon's mirrorless (EOS M) endeavors.
  • EF stands for Electronic Focus; it's just Canon's modern autofocus mount that will work on any Canon digital body without limitations.
  • EF-S stands for Electronic Focus - Short; it denotes lenses that are specially made for 1.6x crop factor cameras: The Rebels, XXDs, and the 7D. EF-S lenses will not mount or function on the 1D and1Ds series, 5D series or 6D.
  • EF-M stands for Electronic Focus - Mirrorless

USM or why does my "Nifty Fifty" sound like a blender when I focus?

USM stands for Ultrasonic Motor. Introduced to the lineup in 1987, USM spread out to many of Canon's other lenses. If you want to read an overview of USM technology, you can start here: http://cpn.canon-europe.com/content...s_technology.do


What's this STM I see on the EF-M lenses?

STM stands for Stepper Motor. STM is what Canon has been introducing in a handful of lenses including two EF-M lenses. Also included in this new club are the 40mm f/2.8 pancake, 18-135 f/3.5-5.6 IS STM and 18-55 f/3.5-5.6 IS STM. Canon hasn't yet released details about the STM motors, but they're supposed to further reduce sound noise and vibration (and perhaps breathing) that can be transferred to the video and audio while recording. My guess is that the STM have even smaller motors and more intelligent AF to allow better lens breathing.

Breathing? Let this video show you the difference between Canon's L lenses and Canon's Cine Lenses http://vimeo.com/56357604


IS or Image Stabilization

Despite being a popular feature, IS is not found on all of Canon's lenses. IS is available on the majority of the EF-S zoom lenses and on many of the longer EF zoom lenses. IS on Canon's prime lenses is primarily found on the longer telephoto lenses such as the 400mm f/2.8 IS. Recently Canon added IS to three of their EF primes, the 24mm f/2.8, 28mm f/2.8 and 35mm f/2 to draw attention from videographers

EF-S Lenses

With most Canon 1.6 crop bodies (XXXD / Rebel Series, XXD Series, 7D) an optional EF-S "kit lens" can be included. The EF-S lineup, with exception of the 60mm f/2.8 macro prime, are all zoom lenses. And out of the zoom lenses only the EF-S 17-55 f/2.8 IS has a constant aperture. Aside from the two aforementioned lenses, the EF-S lenses are slower lenses with a minimum aperture of f/3.5 The bodies of the EF-S lineup are made of plastic (like all non-L EF lenses) and are generally lighter in weight and across the board less expensive.

Despite all these "negatives", they can take excellent photos that are tack-sharp, despite the lens speed. However, if you want to do lowlight photography without a flash, you'll have to look to the EF lineup.


EF Lenses

Canon has a solid line-up of moderately-priced EF lenses as counterparts to the L-series. The L that Canon designates its top-of-the-line EF lenses stands for "luxury". Generally, L lenses feature high-quality optics, wide and constant apertures, top-notch build quality, weather-sealing (but not always), and ultrasonic motors. There are, of course, exceptions. Also, there is a bit of a cult surrounding L lenses. Do not fall into it. While lenses, like any photographic equipment, are tools that make the job easier or facilitate the fulfillment of your creative vision, do not make the mistake of believing that buying expensive equipment will magically better your photography.

The non-L lenses can, at times, keep up or even outperform the L lens counterparts in certain areas such as auto focus and when stopped down photos are virtually indistinguishable.

For example: There have been numerous tests between the 50mm f/1.8, 50mm f/1.4 and the 50mm f/1.2L and the most distinguishing aspect is the different bokeh pattern from the number of blades the irises have. Once you get to f/2 the bokeh all looks like footballs.

In the autofocus arena, the 85mm f/1.8's autofocus is probably the fastest AF lens Canon produces. While the 85 f/1.2 may be the slowest, but it does have a lot of heavy glass to move.


Third-party Lenses

In addition to Canon's lenses, there are of course third-party offerings from Sigma, Tamron, Tokina, etc.

Sigma especially has been making waves with their recently released and highly praised 35 f/1.4 lens to compete with Canon's 35mm f/1.4L. The Sigma 35's test photos have been excellent and the price tag is several hundred less than Canon's L offering. Sigma then again stunned the masses when they announced the 18-35 f/1.8 for ASP-C (crop) bodies. It will be the widest constant aperture zoom available and now I wish I still had my T2i.


Lens Adapters

As Martytoof and Clayton Bigsby have posted, you can use a mechanical adapter and physically mount and use Nikon F-Mount, Olympus OM, Leica R, and M42 lenses, albeit in stopdown metering mode, and with or without AF-assist, depending on whether or not your adapter has the required circuitry. You can also get some K mounts on there but generally have to do a little modification to the aperture lever. There's also the C/Y mount where you can find some pretty nice glass…

However, not all lenses will mount with the adapters -- you have to be careful that the rear of the lens doesn't bang into the mirror.

Furthermore, other mounts can indeed be adapted to Canon cameras, but without adapters with optics (which usually degrade image quality and magnify a bit), these other mounts will lack infinity focus. Here is the list of adaptable mounts, taken from this page.




The Flashes

Canon makes several TTL shoe-mount flashes. The latest is the 600EX-RT, which has built-in radio controls to talk to other 600EX-RTs without the need for line-of-sight or optical slaving or use of 3rd party systems like Pocket Wizards. The most popular are the 430EX II and 580EX II. The 580EX II has been discontinued, but still and excellent piece of equipment and can be found secondhand.



All feature bounce, swivel, and zoom heads as well as full-auto and full-manual operation. The 600EX-RT is a step up from the 580EX which is a step up from the 430EX. The 600 and 580ex have better controls, more power, a bounce card, a PC sync port (the 430EX does not have one, which is pretty much inexcusable on Canon's part), and the ability to act as a commander unit to control other Canon flashes remotely. Other notable parts of the Canon flash system are its macro flash, the MT-24EX.

430EX II | 580EX II | 600EX-RT | MT-24EX

There are, of course, other and older Canon flashes. That doesn't mean they're not a viable option. Look into them, or if you know about them, post about them!

Commander unit / Trancievers

These are not a flash, but a way to control other remote flashes without the use of 3rd party systems such as PocketWizards. The ST-E2 is limited to line-of-sight just as if you were to use the 580 EXII as the master. The ST-E3-RT uses radio transmitter to talk to slave 600 EX-RTs.

ST-E3-RT | ST-E3-RT

If you want to get more into Flash photography, check out the lighting thread.


I hope that this introduction to the Canon system was at least a bit useful.

geeves fucked around with this message at Jun 19, 2013 around 15:24

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Mr. Despair
Nov 4, 2009


39 perfect posts with each roll.


All you need to know about the t5i:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=baHqjUrykTU

COOL CORN
Jun 1, 2003



Oh boy a new thread

Casull
Aug 13, 2005

DJ Wannabe of the Chan of Four


God drat, I haven't kept up with Canon in a long time. That's quite a few additions the lineup since I last saw it (around the 60D's release.)

I loving laughed at the T5i review. Really, Canon? Really?

rcman50166
Mar 23, 2010

by XyloJW


Wikipedia does a pretty good job summing up the camera lines:



http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Templa...on_DSLR_cameras

pseudonordic
Aug 31, 2003

The Jack of All Trades

5d3 repazent!

mearn
Aug 2, 2011

Kevin Harvick's #1 Fan!


As the owner of a T3, I fully endorse this thread title. It's not a bad camera, and I don't blame terrible photos I take on it too often, but if I had done a bit more research and known then what I know now, spending a little more on a T3i would have been a no brainer.

Boneitis
Jul 14, 2010


Is the 60d seriously that inferior to the 50d? I was looking to upgrade from my T1i (which at this case even a Holga would be an upgrade). What are the advertised "advantages" that could outweigh all of this on the 60d?

geeves
Sep 16, 2004



rcman50166 posted:

Wikipedia does a pretty good job summing up the camera lines:



http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Templa...on_DSLR_cameras



Thanks! added to the OP

fknlo
Jul 6, 2009

ALL of them.



They announced it a few weeks after I bought a T4i. There was no remorse at all.

Chekans 3 16
Jan 2, 2012

Ha, ha, ha, It must be so!


I have a T2i and want to eventually move to a full frame body, the 6D looks attractive since it's more affordable and the features it's lacking according to the OP don't bother me too much. Is there anything else I should know about it? Should I just save up longer for a 5d?

IPvSH6T
Nov 7, 2011

Eto diskoteka v stile devyanostykh


Boneitis posted:

Is the 60d seriously that inferior to the 50d? I was looking to upgrade from my T1i (which at this case even a Holga would be an upgrade). What are the advertised "advantages" that could outweigh all of this on the 60d?

Flippy screen. More megapickels. Hipster filters.

The no more magnesium and worse controls stuff may be a bit overblown--it's still sturdy and the joystick/pad difference matters most if you're already used to the joystick.

rcman50166
Mar 23, 2010

by XyloJW


fivre posted:

Flippy screen. More megapickels. Hipster filters.

The no more magnesium and worse controls stuff may be a bit overblown--it's still sturdy and the joystick/pad difference matters most if you're already used to the joystick.

I went from a 40D to a 60D despite all the advice not to. I was able to pick it up and start shooting without difficulty. Complaints about the UI would be the last thing I would have thought of happening. The main appeal for me is the video and increased ISO performance.

Verman
Jul 4, 2005
Third time is a charm right?

I'm sure I could get used to the lack of a joystick but i love the it after having a camera without one.

As far as the 50 vs 60, anecdotally I use the 60d at work and the 50d at home and I prefer the feel of my 50 much more. THE 60 feels too plasticy for my taste and the screen flip does nothing for me.

GoldenNugget
Mar 27, 2008




The digital rev version comparing to the T3i because the T4i is so similar:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oNyuP98KO3A

milquetoast child
Jun 27, 2003

literally


I'd like to point out that the official Canon pronunciation of DSLR is "dizzler" so if we could move towards using that now and in the future, I think that would be for the best.

Inf
Jan 4, 2003

BBQ


Re: comment in the OP about the EOS-3:

As an EOS-3 owner myself, my camera's eye control AF point selection works great provided I've calibrated it. You can probably Google for the manual that describes the process; it's not at all difficult or complicated. However, it most certainly does not work out of the box, and it apparently doesn't work for other people when I've calibrated it for my own eye.

Edit: nm, I guess I either misread the OP, or you have since edited it. On first read, I thought you basically said the eye control sucked.

Inf fucked around with this message at May 11, 2013 around 03:01

Mr. Despair
Nov 4, 2009


39 perfect posts with each roll.


GoldenNugget posted:

The digital rev version comparing to the T3i because the T4i is so similar:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oNyuP98KO3A

Especially the first 30 seconds or so, where they do the same thing and then realize there's no way to fill an 8 minute segment comparing the t5i to the t4i.

BeanTaco
Apr 14, 2011



Everybody get the 40mm pancake.
This is an important message that belongs on page 1.

Quantum of Phallus
Dec 27, 2010


BeanTaco posted:

Everybody get the 40mm pancake.
This is an important message that belongs on page 1.

This is a good post.
The 40mm pancake is great on a crop body and it's my go-to lens for plant photography:


Purple1 by juliancallan, on Flickr


IMG_5252 by juliancallan, on Flickr


ban1 by juliancallan, on Flickr


IMG_5241 by juliancallan, on Flickr


Buds1 by juliancallan, on Flickr


Stump1 by juliancallan, on Flickr

All taken with the 600D

Quantum of Phallus fucked around with this message at May 11, 2013 around 09:25

harperdc
Jul 24, 2007



I think the OP needs a "Why you should stop worrying (and learn to love the Nifty Fifty)" section, especially after the derail in the last thread.

Bubbacub
Apr 17, 2001



What happened to the 70D/7D2 announcement that was supposed to be imminent like a month ago?

Drunk Badger
Aug 27, 2012


mearn posted:

As the owner of a T3, I fully endorse this thread title. It's not a bad camera, and I don't blame terrible photos I take on it too often, but if I had done a bit more research and known then what I know now, spending a little more on a T3i would have been a no brainer.

As the owner of a T3 for 10 hours, I enjoy the T3i's ability to not have me leave giant palm-prints on the screen every time I grab the camera!

The other differences will make sense once I'm finished reading everything about it.

Cute as heck
Nov 6, 2011

Cutie Pie Swag~


Canon please just give us a 50mm f/1.2 IS already

doctor 7
Oct 10, 2003

In the grim darkness of the future there is only Oakley.



Great OP. I had no idea my 60d was so terrible.

May want to update it a bit in regards to the Rebels as the T2i and T2i have the same sensor but the T4i and T5i (lol) have a definitely better one.

SoundMonkey
Apr 22, 2006

i just push buttons



harperdc posted:

I think the OP needs a "Why you should stop worrying (and learn to love the Nifty Fifty)" section, especially after the derail in the last thread.

Just don't y'know, drop it from a height of more than two inches

IPvSH6T
Nov 7, 2011

Eto diskoteka v stile devyanostykh


SoundMonkey posted:

Just don't y'know, drop it from a height of more than two inches

Or let your dog eat it.


doctor 7 posted:

Great OP. I had no idea my 60d was so terrible.

May want to update it a bit in regards to the Rebels as the T2i and T2i have the same sensor but the T4i and T5i (lol) have a definitely better one.

If you buy the 60D you will never be able to take good photos. Never.

Quantum of Phallus
Dec 27, 2010


SoundMonkey posted:

Just don't y'know, drop it from a height of more than two inches

I dropped the 50 1.8 on a shoot before and thought I broke it completely. I just pushed on the front until the gears all seemed to get back in place and now it works fine

CarrotFlowers
Dec 17, 2010

Blerg.

Just came back from Jamaica where I was asked last minute to second shoot for a wedding. I had brought my 5D just in case, but didn't bring my backup camera because I wasn't planning on actually shooting anything. While we were waiting for the bride to arrive, my black rapid connector piece decided to come loose and the whole of my 5D + 24-70 went crashing to the ground from chest height. Scratched the body a bit but still works perfectly (and since it's several years old already, the body is already scratched), and my lens hood prevented any damage to the lens. Even thought I knew they're built to last, it really eased my concerns about having to baby my camera all the time. Definitely impressed with the build quality of both body and lens.

But man, that f'n strap.

evil_bunnY
Apr 2, 2003



Did you not lock the carabiner? What happened?

CarrotFlowers
Dec 17, 2010

Blerg.

evil_bunnY posted:

Did you not lock the carabiner? What happened?

Not really sure. Apparently the last time I hooked it up, I didn't tighten the carabiner fully, and it unscrewed and when I let go of my camera it managed to slide out at precisely the right time and angle. New note to self to make sure it's screwed in tight every time.

doctor 7
Oct 10, 2003

In the grim darkness of the future there is only Oakley.



fivre posted:

If you buy the 60D you will never be able to take good photos. Never.

Should've just saved money and got a T3

HookShot
Dec 26, 2005



I'm thinking of buying my mom a DSLR for her birthday later this year. She's going to go to the Galapagos Islands in a couple years, and I figure if I get her the gear now she'll have the time to be able to learn to use it before going. She recently (like as in this past year) learned how to use a digital camera for the first time after years of using film. Her current "method" is to take one picture of whatever she takes a picture of (landscapes or her garden) with every single one of the settings on her P&S, and then keep whatever one looks the best.

The annoying thing about her P&S is it sucks balls and is too hard to actually use in manual mode, which is the other reason I want to get her a new one.

I'm just not sure if I should get her the 60D or the 7D. I have a 30D myself, which I love, but I know when I shoot wildlife sometimes I want faster FPS, the autofocus and even better ISO use although I doubt that'll be too necessary in the Galapagos... but I just don't know if it's too much and the 60D would be fine for someone like her.

I also really doubt she would take much, if any, video with it.

Thoughts?

pseudonordic
Aug 31, 2003

The Jack of All Trades

HookShot posted:

I'm thinking of buying my mom a DSLR for her birthday later this year. She's going to go to the Galapagos Islands in a couple years, and I figure if I get her the gear now she'll have the time to be able to learn to use it before going. She recently (like as in this past year) learned how to use a digital camera for the first time after years of using film. Her current "method" is to take one picture of whatever she takes a picture of (landscapes or her garden) with every single one of the settings on her P&S, and then keep whatever one looks the best.

The annoying thing about her P&S is it sucks balls and is too hard to actually use in manual mode, which is the other reason I want to get her a new one.

I'm just not sure if I should get her the 60D or the 7D. I have a 30D myself, which I love, but I know when I shoot wildlife sometimes I want faster FPS, the autofocus and even better ISO use although I doubt that'll be too necessary in the Galapagos... but I just don't know if it's too much and the 60D would be fine for someone like her.

I also really doubt she would take much, if any, video with it.

Thoughts?

Give her the 30D and get yourself the 7D

HookShot
Dec 26, 2005



pseudonordic posted:

Give her the 30D and get yourself the 7D

I have well and truly considered this option, and while I know she would be ok with it, I also know that whatever camera I buy her she will use for like 20 years (or until I next buy her a camera) so I might as well get her a nice one first.

365 Nog Hogger
Jan 19, 2008


Official Dorkroom Mod-Approved Arbiter Of What Is And Is Not Art, 2014


The 5dc is good for a lot more than still life, buster.

bisticles
Oct 3, 2002

The important thing is that you tried


What are my options for getting a lens repaired that I bought used? My 100L is all of the sudden rendering a bunch of noise and distortion, like an element is whacked out of place.

evil_bunnY
Apr 2, 2003



HookShot posted:

I'm thinking of buying my mom a DSLR

Thoughts?
Get her a PEN instead, thank me later.

BeanTaco
Apr 14, 2011



HookShot posted:

I have well and truly considered this option, and while I know she would be ok with it, I also know that whatever camera I buy her she will use for like 20 years (or until I next buy her a camera) so I might as well get her a nice one first.

In that case get the one that's not made of plastic.

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bobfather
Sep 20, 2001

I will analyze your nervous system for beer money

bisticles posted:

What are my options for getting a lens repaired that I bought used? My 100L is all of the sudden rendering a bunch of noise and distortion, like an element is whacked out of place.

Send it into Canon. Then be prepared to shell out some dough, of varying amounts depending upon what's wrong.

I have never heard of a lens element/decentering issue that cost more than a few hundred bucks to fix, and I would bet yours won't cost half that.

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