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BJPaskoff
Feb 27, 2001

Dang so this is like looking over his shoulder in real-time

Magic: The Gathering is a collectible card game where you play as a planeswalker, a powerful wizard capable of travelling between planes, summoning fantastic creatures, and casting powerful spells. Each game of Magic represents a duel between two or more planeswalkers. Magic in the game is divded into five colors: White, the color of order and balance; blue, the color of knowledge and illusion; black, the color of death and corruption; red, the color of chaos and power; and green, the color of nature and life. Each color is balanced against the others, with their various strengths and weaknesses.

First released in 1993, Magic's years of existence as the most popular collectible card game has attracted millions of players worldwide. Tournaments of varying levels are held all around the world, and the game is enjoyed just as much at the kitchen table as it is on the Pro Tour with thousands of dollars at stake. There is an organization called the DCI that sanctions and maintains these events, using tournament officials known as judges to keep the game fair and fun.

Like any other collectible game, the components can be quite pricey. Older, out-of-print cards can be hundreds of dollars, but those aren't needed to play in the game's most popular formats. In-print and just-out-of-print cards very rarely break the $50 mark, and as there's a limit of four of any one card per deck, you won't need too many to compete. Booster packs cost roughly $4 US each, but most people will agree that buying the single cards you need is a better bang for your buck... though not as fun as the "lottery" game of opening packs.

============================================

OTHER THREADS

The Magic: the Gathering Buying and Selling/Trading Thread
Don't deal with eBay or some random third-party insecure site for your Magic card needs. This is a thread to post your haves/wants and see if any other Goon wants your poo poo or has the poo poo you really need for that big tournament coming up, you know the one.

Deck Building Brewhaus
Post and critique decklists for constructed formats here.

The Magic: the Gathering Limited Thread
Draft and sealed discussion goes in here. This is a really informative thread if you're looking for tips on draft especially, as it goes into the draft archetypes of the current format as well as a glossary of commonly used draft terms you might hear at the table.

Modern: The "Cheaper" Eternal Format
Talk about the Modern format here.

Magic Card Generator
Discuss your terrible card ideas here and make us all appreciate Wizards R&D and how hard it is to actually design solid cards.

M:tG Cube: The Most Expensive Free Magic Money Can Buy
Share your cubes with other people without the risk of strangers stealing your foil Russian Dark Confidant you've blinged out your cube with!

============================================

FORMATS

Casual: Anything goes. Despite being the least talked-about format, mostly because it's not really a "format", casual play is probably the most popular form of Magic. We're talking kids buying precons and a couple of boosters and sitting around their kitchen tables here. There are other casual formats loved by players more into the game, such as Commander, Cube, Type 4, etc. More on those later.

Standard: One of the easiest formats to get into. Since it consists of nothing but the last core set and the last two blocks to be published, finding cards is relatively as most cards are still in print. Each October when the first set of a new block is released, the oldest currently-legal block in Standard gets pushed out and the new one comes in. At the same time, the oldest core set rotates out, though the newer core set comes out around July so there is some overlap. Since many Standard decks rely on those older cards that have now rotated out of the format, the metagame can change drastically when this happens. Standard is the most popular sanctioned constructed format.

Wizards has released "event decks" as a way for new players to get (somewhat) competitive decks for cheap. They contain 60 cards and a 15 card sideboard, and are competitive enough to stand a chance at FNM, but not much elsewhere.

Currently legal sets (until Sept. 27, 2013): Innistrad, Dark Ascension, Avacyn Restored, Return to Ravnica, Gatecrash, Dragon's Maze, Magic 2013, Magic 2014

Upcoming legal sets (as of Sept. 27, 2013): Return to Ravnica, Gatecrash, Dragon's Maze, Theros, Magic 2014

Extended: There is no longer an Extended format. This used to be a "super Standard" format, but Modern killed it. The end.

Modern: Magic's newest format bridges the gap between Legacy and Extended. All sets from Eighth Edition on up are legal; the "Modern" name doesn't necessarily mean the modern Magic frame, as old cards reprinted in a special set with the new frame, such as judge promos, are not legal unless they've been reprinted in a set since Eighth Edition.

Modern Banned List

Legacy: Legacy is an Eternal format like Vintage, only without the Power 9 and many other overpowered cards. For the most part, everything restricted in Vintage is banned in Legacy. Legacy has skyrocketed in popularity lately, and so has the entry fee to play in this format. Legacy staples have doubled or tripled in price on the secondary market, so the barrier of entry is very high.

Legacy Banned List

Vintage: The most powerful decks that can be created reside here in "Type 1". The insanely high expense of cards that are in almost every good deck in the format - cards known as the Power 9 because of their reputation for being the nine most powerful cards ever printed - leads players to shy away from the format. Most Vintage tournaments will be run without DCI sanctioning because they allow ten or fifteen proxies in order to make the tournament more accessable to players not willing to spend $3000 on a Black Lotus. A common misconception is that Vintage is a format of turn one kills - but in a format where turn one kills are possible, decks are fine-tuned not just to win, but to stop their opponents from going off on turn one or two as well.

Vintage Banned & Restricted List

Block Constructed: Block constructed uses only the cards from a particular block for deck construction. The smaller card pool available means that cards that would never see play in other formats get to see the light of day, simply because there isn't anything better available. Unfortunately block constructed suffers from one big flaw - because so few cards are available, the format quickly becomes set with a small number of dominating decks, and the theme of a particular block leads some players to feel like the decks are "pre-built" for them.

Limited: There are two popular limited formats: Sealed Deck, and Booster Draft. High-level limited tournaments are usually run sealed deck, with booster drafts as their top 8 playoffs. In sealed deck, a player gets six packs. With those cards, and as many extra basic lands as they wish, they have to build a deck that's at least 40 cards. Sealed is part luck (what you open), and part skill (how you build and play with your deck). Booster drafting involves each player getting three booster packs and sitting around a table. At the same time, each player opens up their first pack, takes a card out, and passes the rest of the cards in the pack to their left. This continues until all the cards in each pack are gone, then the second pack is opened and passed to the right. The third and last pack goes left again. Skilled players can sense which colors are "open" and pick cards that are strong in those colors. Then players follow the same deck construction rules as sealed deck - a minimum 40-card deck using as much extra basic land as they want. Some players consider booster drafting to be the best test of a Magic player's skill.

Two-Headed Giant: In 2HG, teams of two face off against each other. Each player has their own deck, hand, permanents, etc., but each team takes their turn at the same time. 2HG is usually sealed deck, with each team getting more product than a single person would usually get, but Standard 2HG isn't unheard of.

Two-Headed Giant Rules

Commander: Commander (previously known as EDH, or Elder Dragon Highlander) is one of the most popular casual formats. In Commander, you pick a legendary creature to serve as your "commander", and build a 100-card deck (99 plus your commander) using only one of each card, excluding basic lands. You can't use any cards which have mana symbols anywhere on them that don't match the ones on your commander's card, and the format uses the Vintage cardpool with some modifications. Your commander starts in the "command zone", and you can cast it any time you normally could cast them - but each time you cast it that way, it costs 2 more to cast. If a commander would be put into a graveyard or into exile, its owner can choose to put it back in the command zone instead, so it's hard to permanently get rid of a commander short of sending it into its owner's library. And lastly, if a player takes 21 or more damage over the course of the game from any one commander, they lose the game. The official rules can be found here.

Because of Commander's popularity, Wizards has released five Commander precons, with two new "wedge" generals (a color and its two enemy colors) per deck along with 51 new cards that are only legal in Commander, Legacy, and Vintage. The decks aren't too powerful, but provide a good base for building your own deck, and the new Commander-specific cards are only available in these precons. Five additional precons will be released on November 1st, 2013, and contain "shard"-based generals.

Official Commander Site

Cube Drafting: Booster drafting is fun, but it can get expensive, and players lose interest in drafting a set when a new one's about to come out... and this is where cube drafting comes in. A cube contains 350-700 of the best cards in Magic, usually including the Power 9. The cube is shuffled, and random packs are dealt out to each player, which are then drafted like a normal booster draft. Cube draft owners take great pride in their cube, and will often try to foil out every card possible, making their cube cost more than the average Vintage deck.

Pauper: While Pauper is most popular on Magic Online, it does see some interest in the real world as well. On Magic Online, the format is played with only commons, but in real life, "Pauper" is sometimes referred to as a constructed format where only commons and some uncommons are allowed as well. Here's a good FAQ to get started.

============================================

DIGITAL VERSIONS

There have been many digital versions of the game in the past, on Dreamcast, Playstation, PC, and even arcades, but the current and most popular version is Magic Online. Magic Online players buy digital cards and play online against people all over the world, at any time they want. The only downside to the program is, of course, that you're buying digital objects and the social aspect of the game is non-existant. Wizards used to have a redemption program where players who collected every card in a newer set could redeem them for paper versions of those cards, but that's since been discontinued. Magic Online costs $9.99, but once you sign up, you get a bunch of random cards, including some gold-bordered cards you can only play with other people who have them. Also, new sets come out much slower than their paper versions, with a short delay between the paper release and the MTGO release due to Wizards not wanting people beta testing products that haven't been officially released yet.

If you want to play for free/cheap, there are ways, though some are more difficult to set up than others.

Apprentice is slightly old and outdated, but still very popular. Its features aren't as robust as Magic Workstation, but if you don't care about all the bells and whistles, it gets the job done.

NetDraft is a way to draft online for free, but you'll usually only play one match each draft against whoever you're paired against. Good for testing your draft skills. You'll need to use Magic Workstation or another program to play though.

Duels of the Planeswalkers is an Xbox Live, Playstation, and PC game with multiple expansions. Hardcore players were disappointed that there's no deckbuilding available, just a bunch of precons you can unlock and new cards you can unlock for them in turn, but it's a fun, arcade-y version of Magic.

============================================

WHERE TO PLAY

Friday Night Magic (FNM): The most accessable tournaments for most players is FNM, which as its name suggests takes place on Friday nights at local hobby stores. FNM tournaments can range anywhere from eight to sixty-plus players, and usually pay out prizes in either packs or store credit. To make sure everyone who wants to play can play, FNM tournaments are only allowed to be Standard, Extended, Block, sealed, booster draft, or Two-Headed Giant Standard/sealed. That way, no one needs to worry about tracking down older, out-of-print cards. Competition is usually pretty lax at FNMs, with (hopefully) friendly players and a fun atmosphere. Each month, Wizards prins a special foil promo that is given out to FNM players at each event. Other local events can be run too, even if they're not FNM.

Pro Tour Qualifiers (PTQs): PTQs are the first big step for players entering the professional Magic playing world. PTQs go in "seasons", blocks of two months or so where a single format is played all over the world, though never Legacy or Vintage. PTQs are staffed by highly qualified judges, who act as impartial ways to solve rules disputes, answer rules questions, and ensure the tournament is run smoothly and fairly. The grand prize at each PTQ is an invitation to play in the Pro Tour, and at least the top eight players will be rewarded with product.

States/Champs: States, or Champs, depending on where in the world you live, is a big, fun tournament run on the same day in every state/province/what-have-you. Every participant gets a free promo card, and the top 8 players win boxes of product and a special foil promotional card. Since no huge prizes are on the line, the environment is close to a "big FNM".

Prereleases: The week before a new set comes out, players get to experience it early in a Prerelease Event. Prereleases are always sealed deck events. Prizes are usually small, because the real prize is getting to see and play with the new cards for the first time.

Prerelease Locator

At prereleases, special promo cards are available that showcase an important card from the set. The only way to get these is to play in an event, and while they're not always tournament-quality cards, they're at least high on casual appeal.

Game Day: One month after the release of a new set, stores run Game Day tournaments. These are Standard events, sometimes with special rewards given for building your deck a certain way. Everyone gets a full-art promo card, and the top 8 get foil full-frame promo cards. For many people, Game Day marks the time when players have gotten used to the new set and are ready to test out their new decks.

Game Day Locator & Information

Grand Prix (GPs): Grand Prix are open for everyone to play in, and are the largest public events, usually getting over a thousand players in attendance. While they don't feed any Pro Tours, the prizes are substantial and competition is fierce. Most GPs are two day events, with only the players with the best record being allowed to play in day two. There are usually side-events run at GPs as well, so even players who don't want to compete or players who don't make day two can get in on some fun.

Grand Prix Schedule & Information

Pro Tours: This is it - this is the big leagues. Pro Tours are by invitation only; by winning a Pro Tour, or having a rating high enough to compete. Wizards pays about $3 million U.S. divided among the players, some serious change for a card game. Players travel from all over the world to play at Pro Tours. Worlds is the biggest Magic tournament there is, held at the end of every year and drawing the biggest crowds. Even players not qualified to play in Worlds get to play in the numerous side events held by Wizards.

Pro Tour Schedule & Information

1Ks, 5Ks, 10ks, etc.: Major tournament organizers often hold large tournament for big cash prizes. Though not affiliated directly with Wizards of the Coast, the prizes are huge, they often get attendance numbers close to a PTQ, and they're often staffed by certified judges.

============================================

RESOURCES

USEFUL LINKS

MagicTheGathering.com: The official page for Magic is updated every weekday with articles from some of the most well-known people related to the game, from rules managers to Pro players to the people who make the cards you play with. You can also find tournament locations near you and information about upcoming sets.

MTGSalvation.com: MTGSalvation is widely known as the source for all new-set spoilers, keeping the most up-to-date source of new rumors and spoiled cards in the weeks leading up to a new set's release.

YuGiOhDad.com: After the owner of MTGMom.com became an actual mom, she quit updating her event calendar. This one, despite the misleading name, is meant to replace it.

StarCityGames.com: SCG is first and foremost a web store, selling not only cards but play knowledge as well. Their webpage hosts articles from the most prolific players involved in the metagame, with some articles being free and others requiring a paid membership to their site.

Magic-League.com: If you want to play in online leagues without paying for Magic Online, this is the place to look. Magic-League has thousands of players, so finding a game should never be a problem.

TheManaDrain.com: One of the premier sources for Vintage information on the internet, TMD is a forum to discuss Vintage strategy and find events.

MTG The Source: What The Mana Drain is to Vintage, this is to Legacy.

ChannelFireball.com: Luis Scott-Vargas, one of the most celebrated Magic players of all time, writes strategy articles for this blog/online store. Like StarCityGames or any of the other online stores/blogs, it hosts high prices and high-value strategy articles - though unlike SCG.com, the strategy is free.

Good Games Live: Live coverage of non-WotC big tournaments.

Wizards.com Event Coverage Archive: Archived coverage of WotC tournaments.

Gatherer: The official online database of every card ever printed, with up to date Oracle text, rulings, etc. If you're playing eternal formats like Vintage, Legacy, or even EDH, this is the best resource to finding out what your old cards actually do.

MagicCards.info: Faster than Gatherer, with a proxy printing feature, a search for prices on major online card stores, etc. If you're looking for accurate Oracle text and/or rulings, I'd still trust the official Gatherer over this, but many players use this for its other features.

DeckStats.net: Type in your decklist and get details on your curve, draw sample hands, etc.

CranialInsertion.com: A weekly rules article with answers to questions submitted by players. This is the rules article that was previously on MTGSalvation.

MTGTop8.com: A listing of the top decks from various tournaments, broken down by format. A must-use if you want to follow the shifting metagame.

IRC

There's also a Goon IRC channel for Magic on SynIRC called #mtgoon where a bunch of us lurk and occasionally bullshit about Magic, draft, play EDH, etc.

If you have an urgent rules question you need answered right away, there's the #mtgrules channel on EFNet where a lot of highly qualified judges hang out.

iOS APPS

GoldenDelicious posted:

So here are some apps I've discovered for iOS that are for Magic: The Gathering:

Deck Builder/MTG Deck Builder: This is a deck builder app that I would definitely recommend for people who want to keep their decklists on them - it is regularly updated, is well put together, and can list relevant statistics of the deck which is very well put together. It's $3.99, but I'd consider it worth it if you want to use it.

Magic Score: A simple life tracker that can keep track of life (not poison counters) for 1-4 players (and it's the only life counter app that can do multiplayer life counting, so that's something to note). Its biggest disadvantage is that if you have to turn off auto-sleep on your phone to not have to consistently turn your phone back on. However, it's free. So if you want a free life tracker, it's not bad.

MtG Life (MTG Counter on the App Store): I prefer this life tracker to Magic Score ,as you only have to tap the numbers to reduce your life total, rather than specifically push the -X on Magic Score. It's $0.99, if you want to pay a buck for a good life counter.

iGather: TheBandit mentioned this; it's actually an iPhone/iPad app (I like using it on the iPad). Apparently I cannot find it on the app store despite it being on my iPhone and iPad, though, so vOv

Gathering: Another good life tracking app; this one turns your iPhone's sleep mode off (so turn your iphone onto airplane mode unless you want to demolish your battery life), but it has a glossary of terms that are used in magic, from */* to Additional Cost to Deathtouch to Discard to Permanent to X. It also has a way to track tokens and various counters, and it can connect to Gatherer to search for cards, search magictraders.com for card prices (good for you people who use MOTL and such for trading values!) and lists all the different sets which brings up the setlists on Gatherer. I'd recommend this one over MtG Life if you don't mind pushing + and - rather than just tapping on the life totals, since it's also $0.99. Best life counter I've tried so far on the iPhone.

Sylvan Archive: Don't get this. It's out of date, poorly made, and nowhere near worth $3.99. Only purchase for MTG apps I've regretted so far.

MTGJudge: If you're a judge or RA, this is a decent tool to help you with just that - judging! It has a quick reference guide to things like penalties, layers, what the Head Judge Announcement should entail, and other good stuff. It has an up to date Oracle listing, the IPG, the Comprehensive Rules, and also a Decklist counter! It's free, too. For people who want to be a Judge or a Rules Advisor, this is a great app.

No Dice (iPad app): I love using this for testing; it's a 1v1 life counting app that also keeps track of tokens, life total, poison counters, mana being floated, how long the current turn has been going, and how long the particular game has been going. It is crazy good, and if you have an iPad and don't mind using it for MTG stuff, this is a must buy. There's a free version too that only tracks life, but it is more than worth $4.99 for all the features it has.

BJPaskoff fucked around with this message at Nov 29, 2013 around 05:45

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Chorocojo
Sep 25, 2005

Legendary Enchantment Creature -- Bird God


Oh man, now we're printed in Russian and Auras exist.

whydirt
Apr 18, 2001


Gaz Posting Brigade

Here's the cube thread if you want to add the link to the OP: http://forums.somethingawful.com/sh...hreadid=3560252

Dr. Clockwork
Sep 9, 2011

I'LL PUT MY SCIENCE IN ALL OF YOU!

Yay! This thread has some of the worst art of any core set!

Errant Gin Monks
Oct 2, 2009

One martini is all right. Two are too many, and three are not enough.


So I have seen thoughtseize drop to 20 bucks, anyone think it will go down further? I don't think the typical standard player has any idea how powerful it is going to be in constructed right now.

Tharizdun
Jan 2, 2005

The Elder Elemental Eye
@npcdel


Dr. Clockwork posted:

Yay! This thread has some of the worst art of any core set!
Impossible, because this isn't the 7th Ed Thread

I showed my friend who hasn't played Magic the Hundred-Handed Guardian and now he is in love with Theros.

Theros owns.

Top-Down owns.

Applebees
Jul 23, 2013


Eikre posted:

This is from a while back, but imagine how Top-Down it would be if instead of "destroy target planeswalker," it was "set target planeswalker's loyalty to zero."

Target planeswalker loses all loyalty.

mr. mephistopheles
Dec 2, 2009



Errant Gin Monks posted:

So I have seen thoughtseize drop to 20 bucks, anyone think it will go down further? I don't think the typical standard player has any idea how powerful it is going to be in constructed right now.

It will be cheapest right at launch before it is in a ton of competitive decks.

qbert
Oct 23, 2003

It's both thrilling and terrifying.

The most important thing I learned from the last 10 pages of the last thread is that literally any card "could work pretty well in Limited."

Zoness
Jul 24, 2011
I'm insufferably autistic

Where are the Master Decoys and Anaba Shamans in this thread? God what an awful format 9ed was.


Errant Gin Monks posted:

So I have seen thoughtseize drop to 20 bucks, anyone think it will go down further? I don't think the typical standard player has any idea how powerful it is going to be in constructed right now.

It's not a particularly easy card to evaluate for standard since its last printing was in a format where combos were much bigger, whereas aggro is a more relevant thing currently.

I mean thoughtseize is an absurdly powerful card but the 2 life is a nontrivial cost when evaluating against other disruption tools. That said it'll always be a thing in Modern.

FordCQC
Dec 22, 2007


Thoughtseize should hit $15 in a few months and stay there. Theros will be drafted for the rest of this year and most of the next (although we will drop to 2, then 1 pack per draft). This means lots and lots of Thoughtseizes being opened.

Rules question: based on the reminder text for Bestow, can you counter a card cast for its Bestow cost with Essence Scatter?

Eej
Jun 17, 2007

HEAVYARMS


qbert posted:

The most important thing I learned from the last 10 pages of the last thread is that literally any card "could work pretty well in Limited."

And now you know why everyone loves Limited!

2MB
Feb 3, 2009


FordCQC posted:


Rules question: based on the reminder text for Bestow, can you counter a card cast for its Bestow cost with Essence Scatter?

Looks like it would to me. Theros is gonna bring a ton of unseen little interactions to the table. Its the part of magic I love the most, all the the little intricacies that pop up from the rulings.

EDIT: Scratch that, it seems like it becomes an Aura spell if you pay the bestow cost.

"(If you cast this card for its bestow cost, it's an Aura spell with enchant creature. It becomes a creature again if it's not attached to a creature)"

Seems to imply that its not a creature when cast that way.

2MB fucked around with this message at Sep 3, 2013 around 21:46

C-Euro
Mar 20, 2010

Actually, Lucy, my trouble is football. I just don't understand it. Instead of feeling happy, I feel sort of let down.

Go Lions.


One thing you might want to change in the OP is that the Modern thread now includes Legacy and Vintage () stuff, so it's more of an eternal formats thread these days. Might also want to note that decklists sometimes get posted there as well.

Tamagod Sushi
Oct 26, 2009

One Bad Muthapaca

Sweet, 9th Edition, where they reprinted Hypnotic Spectre

Errant Gin Monks posted:

So I have seen thoughtseize drop to 20 bucks, anyone think it will go down further? I don't think the typical standard player has any idea how powerful it is going to be in constructed right now.

I'm pretty sure competitive standard players know just how good Thoughtseize, considering it's played in pretty much any format that isn't pauper. Not sure about the price though, but I think it'll float around the $15-20 point for a few months before rising back up in a year and more. I can't really see it being cheaper than 14 at anytime though.

Like Zoness points out there's just nothing else on the level of its power in terms of disruption for B, even if it's not immediately played in Standard due to aggro decks.

Tharizdun
Jan 2, 2005

The Elder Elemental Eye
@npcdel


It's an Enchantment Creature - Aura in that case. Essence Scatter should still hit it.

Tamagod Sushi
Oct 26, 2009

One Bad Muthapaca

Tharizdun posted:

It's an Enchantment Creature - Aura in that case. Essence Scatter should still hit it.

From the Mechanics Article

'If you cast a bestow card for its bestow cost, it's never a creature spell. Instead, it's an Aura spell with enchant creature, so you have to target a creature to cast it. If that creature has a heroic ability, this will trigger it, just as any other Aura spell would.'

Man bestow is going to be a bag of fun to explain to new players.

BXCX
Feb 17, 2012

not even in a bad way


ark42.com/mtg is a useful page that might be worth putting in the OP. It's got some good tools for Pricing, Value History, Trading, and Visualizing the values of cards (based on SCG prices as far as I can tell).

Some comedy value visualizations:
Homelands
Fallen Empires
Worldwake

Elysiume
Aug 13, 2009

It's me you should fear, you stupid, dead things.


Tamagod Sushi posted:

I'm pretty sure competitive standard players know just how good Thoughtseize, considering it's played in pretty much any format that isn't pauper. Not sure about the price though, but I think it'll float around the $15-20 point for a few months before rising back up in a year and more. I can't really see it being cheaper than 14 at anytime though.

Like Zoness points out there's just nothing else on the level of its power in terms of disruption for B, even if it's not immediately played in Standard due to aggro decks.
Old Thoughtseize looked cooler. It looks much more like seizing a thought.

Bread Set Jettison
Jan 8, 2009

the invisible dong of the free market will trickle down piss on the animes

Elysiume posted:

Old Thoughtseize looked cooler. It looks much more like seizing a thought.


New thoughtseize looks like "Oh god, what was I just thinking I dont remember aaag"

Also is the dude turning into a Theros-zombie? His skin is turning grey and theres a gold mask in the background...

Molybdenum
Jun 24, 2007
Melting Point ~2622C

Don't you get it? HE is the thought in my massive planeswalker brain!

Entropic
Feb 21, 2007



Apparently they hosed up YMTC voting AGAIN somehow. http://www.wizards.com/magic/magazi...lc-mtgrss#88352

Jet Set Jettison posted:

New thoughtseize looks like "Oh god, what was I just thinking I dont remember aaag"

Also is the dude turning into a Theros-zombie? His skin is turning grey and theres a gold mask in the background...

I like the idea that he was in the middle of casting a fireball or something and then just completely blanked and forgot how to to do it and that's why his hand is a bunch of ashes.

Karnegal
Dec 24, 2005

A display of humility is required of those who still possess such frailties.

-Elesh Norn, Grand Cenobite


Elysiume posted:

Old Thoughtseize looked cooler. It looks much more like seizing a thought.


Aww, the new art is goofy as poo poo, he almost has googly eyes. gently caress new foils, I'm sticking with non-foil Lorwyn

meanolmrcloud
Apr 5, 2004

rock out with your stock out



Thoughtsieze is about the best answer to people worried about the whole black and enchantment debate. It's a masterstroke to have it in theros.

Fish Of Doom
Aug 18, 2004
I'm too awake for this to be a nightmare

Wow, I thought for sure they would at least make Thoughtseize mythic in its reprint. I mean it's only one of the top 10 best black cards of all time.

The value will come down, but it's always going to be played in constructed, so I'd be surprised if it ever dipped below $10. Since the older version has better art, it will probably hold better value than the new one.

Homo for Hitler
Jul 8, 2013

Bong
Rips
For
Hitler


This is a dumb question I know, but can anybody tell me what the name of the enchantment card was that reads as "when another enchantment comes into play, put a 2/2 cat(?) token into play and if the enchantment is an aura you may attach it to the token". It is a standard card and I believe white. I've been searching for a little while now but can't find it. Thanks in advance.

Entropic
Feb 21, 2007



Tonetta posted:

This is a dumb question I know, but can anybody tell me what the name of the enchantment card was that reads as "when another enchantment comes into play, put a 2/2 cat(?) token into play and if the enchantment is an aura you may attach it to the token". It is a standard card and I believe white. I've been searching for a little while now but can't find it. Thanks in advance.

It's not an enchantment, it's a creature. Ajani's something or other.

e: Ajani's Chosen. http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/C...iverseid=370750

Kasonic
Mar 6, 2007

Tenth Street Reds, representing


A 1CMC card that can never be more than 1-for-1 would never be Mythic, thankfully.


Edit: vvvv just because a Planeswalker is bad doesn't stop it from being a Planeswalker.

Kasonic fucked around with this message at Sep 3, 2013 around 23:58

Homo for Hitler
Jul 8, 2013

Bong
Rips
For
Hitler


Entropic posted:

It's not an enchantment, it's a creature. Ajani's something or other.

e: Ajani's Chosen. http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/C...iverseid=370750

Thank you so much!

50 pounds of bread
Sep 27, 2006

SCUMBOT 5000 BEEP BOOP

I feel bad because ember swallower is the card I am most excited about so far.

Tharizdun
Jan 2, 2005

The Elder Elemental Eye
@npcdel


Kasonic posted:

A 1CMC card that can never be more than 1-for-1 would never be Mythic, thankfully.

Shame the same can't be said for 2-CMC pure card disadvantage engines.

Nihnoz
Aug 24, 2009

ararararararararararara

Tibalt is a really tragic figure.

Jon Joe
Oct 19, 2011

Sicked Wick


Nihnoz posted:

Tibalt is a really tragic figure.

He really represents Red.

AndItsAllGone
Oct 8, 2003



Is there any way to add loyalty counters to a planeswalker without using their abilities? That's the only way I can imagine him to be playable.

BXCX
Feb 17, 2012

not even in a bad way


Proliferate effects and Doubling Season!

Fizbin
Nov 1, 2004
Zoom!

AndItsAllGone posted:

Is there any way to add loyalty counters to a planeswalker without using their abilities? That's the only way I can imagine him to be playable.

http://wiki.mtgsalvation.com/article/Proliferate
would do it.

AndItsAllGone
Oct 8, 2003



I think I'll make a casual deck based around Plaguemaw Beast, a creature engine, and Tibalt. My goal is to win one game in my casual group.

Tharizdun
Jan 2, 2005

The Elder Elemental Eye
@npcdel


Vorel of the Hull Clade and the various Gideons works as well.

Orange Fluffy Sheep
Jul 26, 2008

No EXP received.

9th ed is when I started, and it may be why I have such a fetish for white borders.

Notably Modern Legal thanks to 9th:

Anarchist maybe? Biorhythm which should be playable somewhere somehow because killing a player with no creatures sounds funny. Blackmail is sort of good, at least it was in Ravnica standard before Thoughtsieze showed up. Form of the Dragon is a red card with a moat effect but no one cares, you're a dragon.

Gift of Estates's non-Portal printing is here. Greater Good was part of a combo deck with the Kamigawa dragons and Goryo's Vengeance. Hell's Caretaker has a really metal name. Good ol' Kird Ape played with Stomping Ground to give Zoo one of its big one drops. Magnivore is here which I'm sure excites someone. I want to believe that Shard Phoenix is relevant somewhere. Blue's new friend Sleight of Hand is here to ease the sting of Ponder's ban. I seem to recall Summer Bloom. Was it 12post? Weathered Wayfarer cemented catching up in lands as a white thing in this set.

And that's about it unless Wildfire is a bigger deal than I thought.

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GonSmithe
Apr 25, 2010

Goony for Goomy


Orange Fluffy Sheep posted:

9th ed is when I started, and it may be why I have such a fetish for white borders.

Notably Modern Legal thanks to 9th:

Anarchist maybe? Biorhythm which should be playable somewhere somehow because killing a player with no creatures sounds funny. Blackmail is sort of good, at least it was in Ravnica standard before Thoughtsieze showed up. Form of the Dragon is a red card with a moat effect but no one cares, you're a dragon.

Gift of Estates's non-Portal printing is here. Greater Good was part of a combo deck with the Kamigawa dragons and Goryo's Vengeance. Hell's Caretaker has a really metal name. Good ol' Kird Ape played with Stomping Ground to give Zoo one of its big one drops. Magnivore is here which I'm sure excites someone. I want to believe that Shard Phoenix is relevant somewhere. Blue's new friend Sleight of Hand is here to ease the sting of Ponder's ban. I seem to recall Summer Bloom. Was it 12post? Weathered Wayfarer cemented catching up in lands as a white thing in this set.

And that's about it unless Wildfire is a bigger deal than I thought.

Early Harvest was used in a Heartbeat of Spring deck, with the aforementioned Greater Good and Weird Harvest. Sudden Impact was in Owling Mine. Also Yavimaya Enchantress was changed to a Human Druid even though the art clearly shows a Yavimayan Elf (this was changed in 10th edition).

Also, going through the whole set and HOLY poo poo is it awful. How did I play this crap in limited (answer: badly because I was an even worse limited player then than I am now)?

GonSmithe fucked around with this message at Sep 3, 2013 around 23:54

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