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macnbc
Dec 13, 2006

brb, time travelin'






Want some adventure games? 'Course you do!

This thread is for all things adventure. Past, present, and future.

Adventure games have been around about as long as video and computer games have. Dating back to the 1970s with titles such as Adventure, and Zork, adventure games are one of the oldest and most persistent genres out there. Despite having been declared dead a dozen times over, they're still alive and kicking today with new titles large and small being created.

In fact, some might say now's the best time to get into adventure games since the 90s. Telltale Games has been pushing an excellent crop of them out there with the Sam & Max, Tales of Monkey Island, and a little game called The Walking Dead that you might have heard of.

What makes adventure games special? They’re more about making you think and feel rather than gauging reflexes. They’re about exploring new worlds, learning new things, and solving mysteries.

Adventure games have also found a whole new market thanks to Kickstarter. Popular adventure game Kickstarters thus far have been Broken Age (from Tim Schafer), Dreamfall Chapters: The Longest Journey (from Ragnar Tørnquist), Tesla Effect: A Tex Murphy Adventure (from Chris Jones), Broken Sword: The Serpent's Curse (from Charles Cecil) and Jane Jensen's Moebius (from Derek SmartJane Jensen). Some of these are actually starting to come out and they're not bad*!
*Except for Moebius



Good news! There's an awful lot out there to pick from. It depends on whether you want to start with the classics or jump right in with the newer stuff.

If you want the classics, then there's basically 2 companies to start with: Sierra and Lucasarts.

Sierra
Sierra was one of the early players in adventure games and pumped out a lot of good poo poo before dieing out. They had an obsession with putting "Quest" in their titles. Their games were known for having some extremely challenging and unforgiving puzzles. Be warned that you can render the game unwinnable and not realize it for several hours.
Highlights include:
King's Quest series
Space Quest series
Police Quest series
Quest For Glory series
Leisure Suit Larry series
Gabriel Knight series
The Castle of Dr. Brain & The Island of Dr. Brain
Torin's Passage
Freddy Pharkas: Frontier Pharmacist

Lucasarts
Lucasarts hit their heyday in the late 80s and early 90s. They were known for being more forgiving than Sierra titles, and tended to have more engaging characters.
Highlights include:
Maniac Mansion
Day of the Tentacle
Monkey Island series -1&2 only. 3 & 4 remain out-of-print.
Sam & Max Hit The Road
Loom
The Dig
Full Throttle
Indiana Jones and the Fate of Atlantis
Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade
Grim Fandango

Other Classics
There are others from this era that weren't from the big 2 companies but are easily worth a playthrough.
Recommended titles are:
Myst series - Myst 3 and 4 remain out of print, but all others are available.
The Longest Journey / Dreamfall
Tex Murphy series
The Journeyman Project series
Broken Sword series
The 7th Guest
Zork series
The Last Express
Syberia 1 & 2
Toonstruck
The Neverhood
I Have No Mouth And I Must Scream
Gobliiins series
Beneath A Steel Sky
Discworld Noir

Modern Adventures - PC
As I said before, adventure games are back! These are games made in the last decade that come highly recommended.
Much like the classic wave, there are a couple of go-to companies that are steadily producing adventures. These include:

Telltale Games
Sam & Max series
Tales of Monkey Island
Strong Bad’s Cool Game for Attractive People
The Walking Dead
Back To The Future: The Game
The Wolf Among Us

Wadjet Eye Games
Blackwell series
Primordia
Resonance
Gemini Rue

Daedalic Entertainment
Deponia series
Edna & Harvey series

Other Popular Modern Adventures
Time Gentlemen, Please!
To The Moon
Machinarium
Samorost 1 and 2
Book of Unwritten Tales
Ether One
LA Noire
Kentucky Route Zero
Year Walk (Originally iOS)
The Room (Originally iOS)

Modern Adventures - Console/Mobile
Adventure games aren’t just for PCs any more! In addition to finding ports of classic titles for consoles and mobile devices, you’ll also find some great original titles!
Some examples:
Zack & Wiki: Quest for Barbaros Treasure (Wii)
Heavy Rain (PS3)
Phoenix Wright series (DS, 3DS, iOS)
Professor Layton series (DS, 3DS)
Journey (PS3)
Ghost Trick: Phantom Detective (DS, iOS)
The Room and The Room 2 (iOS, Android)
Device 6 (iOS)
Beyond: Two Souls (PS3)

Other suggestions are welcome!


I have some older adventure games but they don't work on my new PC! How can I make these work?

It's a puzzle! Don't you play adventure games? OK, fine, here's a hint guide.
The most common solution is ScummVM which acts as a sort of wrapper to allow older games to work with newer systems. ScummVM works on Windows, Linux, Mac OS, Android, among others. To see if the game you're thinking about is compatible, check here.
DOSbox is also a common tool, however it's less intuitive and user-friendly than ScummVM.
If you are buying classic titles from sites such as GOG or Steam, then you shouldn't have to worry about this. The compatibility work should already be done for you!

macnbc fucked around with this message at Oct 30, 2014 around 20:37

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epmode
Feb 11, 2008



God I love adventure games. HOWEVER! I feel like this thread is incomplete without a recommendation for Sierra's best adventure series, Quest for Glory. (well, it's either that or Space Quest)

Unlike most of the other games in this thread, Quest for Glory has this adventure/RPG hybrid thing going on that's unique to this day. If you're interested, go with the VGA remake of 1 and 2* and skip part 5 entirely.

*QfG2's remake isn't an official release but it absolutely does justice to the game



As for modern stuff that isn't mentioned in the OP, the two Ben and Dan games are excellent. Best comedy writing in an adventure game since Lucasarts. I also love the Blackwell series from Wadjet Eye.

epmode fucked around with this message at Oct 4, 2013 around 02:01

macnbc
Dec 13, 2006

brb, time travelin'


epmode posted:

God I love adventure games. HOWEVER! I feel like this thread is incomplete without a recommendation for Sierra's best adventure series, Quest for Glory. (..well, it's either that or Space Quest)

Unlike most of the other games in this thread, Quest for Glory has this adventure/RPG hybrid thing going on that's unique to this day.

Added to OP!

And hybrids are OK I think. I know some people don't consider Heavy Rain or LA Noire adventure games, but they're "close enough" in my book.

Edit: To bring over some news from the old thread now that it's locked off; Cyan (makers of Myst, Riven, and their best work Cosmic Osmo) is planning a Kickstarter. It could launch as early as next month.

It's apparently a sci-fi adventure game that is a new IP rather than another Myst title, but aims to be sort of the spiritual successor stylistically. Everything else they're being cryptic about.

macnbc fucked around with this message at Oct 4, 2013 around 02:11

Farecoal
Oct 15, 2011

???


Do you guys think The Raven is any good?

epmode
Feb 11, 2008



Farecoal posted:

Do you guys think The Raven is any good?

While I hear it goes downhill in the second and third episodes, it's absolutely worth playing just for the first part. It's one of the few German adventure games I've seen that isn't plagued with awful voice acting and a questionable localization.

Rock Paper Shotgun wrote this:

quote:

The Raven manages to be something almost unique in adventure gaming. It’s a calm, comfortable experience, managing to do murder mystery without being about a sassy 20-something young female cop with a sexy haircut discovering ancient Satanic symbols in neon paint in a grimy crime scene, etc etc. Instead it’s Poirot in the 60s, a TV special you’d never tune in for but can’t turn away from.

They talk about it a bit more in the review but the main character is a big reason I liked the game so much.

epmode fucked around with this message at Oct 4, 2013 around 02:13

choobs
Mar 25, 2004
Never bring a duck to a cock fight.

Europe (Germany in particular) is also a font of modern adventure gamers. Some popular ones:

King Art:
The Book of Unwritten Tales (and the semi-sequel The Critter Chronicles)
The Raven

I haven't played either of these, but I've heard great things especially about The Book of Unwritten Tales

The Daedalic games:
The Whispered World
Deponia
Chaos on Deponia
Goodbye Deponia (coming later this month)
Edna & Harvey
Harvey's New Eyes
And more

Of these I've only played the Deponia games, which I loved, and The Whispered World, which I hated but met a lot of critical acclaim when it came out.

Benoit Sokal made Syberia and Syberia 2 which were great and good respectively. I played his next game Paradise which was kind of a disaster and I haven't heard much good about anything else he's done, though I believe Syberia 3 is supposed to come out next year, and I'm hoping for a return to form.


Also, I've been really enjoying the Blackwell games from Wadjet Eye as well. I really enjoy the DVD-style commentary they put on their games, excluding Gemini Rue's which was super dry and not very interesting compared to the rest. The game itself is great though.

Brain dump over.

Edit: Syberia 1/2 came out 11 and 9 years ago respectively, so i guess they don't really qualify as "Modern" anymore...

Moridin920
Nov 15, 2007


Indiana Jones and the Fate of Atlantis was one of my favorite games as a kid.

Oh, and Torin's Passage was a good Sierra one you missed.

Moridin920 fucked around with this message at Oct 4, 2013 around 03:32

TheMopeSquad
Aug 5, 2013


My favorite adventure games not mentioned were the Legend of Kyrandia from Westwood, the second and third in particular.

Shout out for Companions of Xanth as well, a nice little adaptation of Piers Anthony's book "Demons Don't Dream".

Capuano
Mar 17, 2009


What a great thread idea! I just started playing Grim Fandango again a couple of days ago. I never finished it the first time, but I remember liking it a lot.

Waldorf Sixpence
Sep 6, 2004

Often harder on Player 2


There are two non-LucaSierra titles missing from the OP.

I Have No Mouth And I Must Scream, which is technically available on GOG but buggy as poo poo and I still haven't found a fix that makes it playable, and

Toonstruck, the best adventure game with the most incredible voice cast. I challenge anyone to find an adventure game with better voice acting.

E: Additionally, for lack of anywhere better to ask, does anyone know if Fables from the TTG website comes with a Steam code? And also how much the shipping for the DVD will be to the UK? The whole season is MUCH cheaper on their site than Steam so I'd rather buy it there if possible.

EE: I don't think it does. Steam it is!

Waldorf Sixpence fucked around with this message at Oct 4, 2013 around 12:28

Babby Sathanas
May 16, 2006

bearbating is now adorable


I'm sad that you haven't listed Feeble Files in the OP, which is available on GOG. It's one of those hidden-classics like I Have No Mouth. Made by the same guys who did Simon The Sorcerer but so much better. It's hilarious and the puzzles aren't horrendous. (Save one one bit half way through the game.)

[edit]

The post icon for this thread is poo poo Post

Veotax
May 16, 2006

Oh my goodness!


Has there been any more word about when The Journeyman Project: Pegasus Prime GOG release is coming out? Last I heard, there was some problem with developmen but they haven't updated their Facebook page since June.

Jimbo Jaggins
Jul 19, 2013


choobs posted:

Benoit Sokal made Syberia and Syberia 2 which were great and good respectively. I played his next game Paradise which was kind of a disaster and I haven't heard much good about anything else he's done, though I believe Syberia 3 is supposed to come out next year, and I'm hoping for a return to form.

Edit: Syberia 1/2 came out 11 and 9 years ago respectively, so i guess they don't really qualify as "Modern" anymore...

I really liked the first Syberia but the only thing about Syberia 2 that kept me playing was wanting to see the end. The first one had a really nice structure to it, you had a string of small and unique locations that were mostly self-contained in regards to items and puzzles, all the 'chunks' of the game were just the right size. You didn't find yourself wandering over 100s of different screens looking for items you might have missed. Syberia 2 was a lot worse in that regard and is a large part of why I consider it to be a worse game, it felt like everything was padding. The Yukol village for example was far far bigger than it had to be, confusing to navigate and it seems like a lot of items were purposefully hidden or interaction spots obscured to make the game longer. Particularly annoying examples were the icicles you had to use the catapault on, the shrine out in the snow and the hidden parts of the stone circle at the last location.

There were other annoying things about it too such as the antagonists being cartoon villians. I don't mean just being cartoonishly villianous either, there's a big dumb guy who isn't really bad and a short guy with an annoying voice who exploits him. It was really stereotypical and lazy.

A game than hasn't been mentioned yet that I also like and conincidentally has a similar structure to the first Syberia is Sanitarium. It's a horror point and click thats divided into chapters each with their own mini-story thats actually part of and a obscured retelling of a larger overall story. You wake up in an asylum with amnesia and you have to piece together who you are and why you're there and the chapters alternate between being in the asylum itself and hallucinations which are all like little horror stories of their own and have a good variety of different and unrelated settings.

Raineko
Mar 12, 2012


The walking dead is a really good adventure game, I recommend it if you don't have it.

Rexides
Jul 25, 2011



For the mobile inclined, Broken Sword has an awesome port for Android. It was part of a Humble Bundle deal a while back, and I finished it about a month ago.

Having been raised on a diet of Lucas Arts adventure games, I have to admit that I didn't enjoy the plot or the characters that much, but it's pretty popular so dunno, someone might be interested for a good mobile port of a classic.

SpaceGoatFarts
Jan 5, 2010


I believe the Neverhood and Samorost 1 & 2 should be mentionned somewhere on this thread. Even if they aren't cult classic, they are good and explore another artistic style that is close to stop-motion movies. Samorost 1 is also free to play.

Also I wonder if the Discworld games are any good? Never tried them.

Finally, the Gobliiins series (1 to 3, from Coktel Vision, not the ugly sequel) have a special place in my heart for being very funny to play, with clever puzzles, and looking completely different from all other adventure games.

SpaceGoatFarts fucked around with this message at Oct 4, 2013 around 13:14

Babby Sathanas
May 16, 2006

bearbating is now adorable


SpaceGoatFarts posted:

I believe the Neverhood and Samorost 1 & 2 should be mentionned somewhere on this thread. Even if they aren't cult classic, they are good and explore another artistic style that is close to stop-motion movies. Samorost 1 is also free to play.

Neverhood is DEFINITELY cult-classic.

quote:

Also I wonder if the Discworld games are any good? Never tried them.

Stay far away from Discworld 1. It breaks every adventure game rule about having good puzzles or not being able to permanently screw yourself over. It's full of bugs, isn't even that funny and is just a terrible game all-in-all.

Discworld Noir is widely regarded as a "good game" though. It at least has atmosphere in spades. Is worth trying out.

Prism Mirror Lens
Oct 9, 2012

~*"The most intelligent and meaning-rich film he could think of was Shaun of the Dead, I don't think either brain is going to absorb anything you post."*~






SpaceGoatFarts posted:

Finally, the Gobliiins series (1 to 3, from Coktel Vision, not the ugly sequel) have a special place in my heart for being very funny to play, with clever puzzles, and looking completely different from all other adventure games.

Also from Coktel Vision, Woodruff and the Schnibble of Azimuth was one of my favourite games as a kid. I got it packaged up with a bunch of learning games, and in retrospect it was hilariously inappropriate for children (with puzzles involving painting a bikini on a nudey poster and talking to your dad's prostitute pal in the Red Light District), but the art and atmosphere were great. Get a walkthrough for it though - the puzzles aren't helped by the bizarre translation, game- and sequence-breaking bugs, and endgame deaths where you're screwed if you haven't saved.

Dreylad
Jun 19, 2001

One of the most pathetic aspects of human history is that every civilization expresses itself most pretentiously when the decay which leads its to death has already begun


SpaceGoatFarts posted:

Finally, the Gobliiins series (1 to 3, from Coktel Vision, not the ugly sequel) have a special place in my heart for being very funny to play, with clever puzzles, and looking completely different from all other adventure games.

I only played Gobliiins 1 & 2 on the Amiga way back when, but they were great games. A mixture of Lost Vikings-type 3 person team (which may have changed to 4 in the second game? Can't remember) with point and click adventure and a bit of timing. Good stuff.

Stare-Out
Mar 11, 2010

not all who wander are lost


The Curse of Monkey Island is still my favorite one ever, I still have the original CD-ROM somewhere and even managed to find a Mac version of it. For a game that came out in 1997 it still looks absolutely gorgeous, that art style is so amazing and I would kill for a HD remake like MI1 and MI2 got. Escape from Monkey Island I could take or leave, it looks completely ancient now and controls like rubbish, and honestly I don't care for the Tales of Monkey Island games either. It just feels like a game that never should've gone 3D. And I've never been impressed with Telltale Games' adventure stuff. Played through Back to the Future and it was "okay" but didn't do much for me just like "Tales". I've only played through the first Walking Dead and that didn't exactly blow me away either.

Does Disney own Monkey Island now? Maybe they'd be more open to HD-fying CMI one of these days.

elf help book
Aug 5, 2004

Lightning... It flashes bright, then fades away. It can't protect; it only destroys.


Unless original assets exist, please don't remake Curse of Monkey Island.

Babby Sathanas
May 16, 2006

bearbating is now adorable


Stare-Out posted:

Does Disney own Monkey Island now? Maybe they'd be more open to HD-fying CMI one of these days.

What would be gained from this? Literally nothing IMO.

Polo-Rican
Jul 3, 2004

granny smith apples -
the best apples


This thread is my childhood. When I was in fifth or sixth grade I bought this "Lucasarts Adventure Set" box for something like $15. It had full versions of The Dig, Sam & Max Hit The Road, Day of the Tentacle, & Indiana Jones and the Fate of Atlantis. What a loving value.

I'm not one of those nerds who's like "All Kids Should Be Forced to Sit Down And Complete The Original Zelda," but I feel like these kinds of adventure games could be great for kids, since they put so much emphasis on exploration, puzzle solving, and most importantly, dialogue choices.

The LucasArts games are the best and most polished in my opinion, but I recommend "Return to Zork" for anyone looking for a really long, complex, difficult, surreal, and totally insane time. Trailer: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9afP1pRo2RI

Polo-Rican fucked around with this message at Oct 4, 2013 around 14:02

A.G.Pennypacker
Oct 5, 2006
I AM A BIG DUMB BUTT THAT LIKES TO LICK MY OWN BUTT AND SMELL MY OWN BUTT AND WHEN THE OCCASION ARISES LICK AND SMELL OTHER PEOPLES BUTTS

Everytime people post about this game called Syberia, I just keep thinking about this other old adventure game called Cyberia and I always get really confused

Stare-Out
Mar 11, 2010

not all who wander are lost


Baby Sathanas posted:

What would be gained from this? Literally nothing IMO.
Nothing beyond crisper visuals and the game being widely available again. But I'd happily take those.

Jimbo Jaggins
Jul 19, 2013


Dreylad posted:

I only played Gobliiins 1 & 2 on the Amiga way back when, but they were great games. A mixture of Lost Vikings-type 3 person team (which may have changed to 4 in the second game? Can't remember) with point and click adventure and a bit of timing. Good stuff.

They went in a sort of reverse order, 3 goblins in the first, 2 in goblins 2 and 1 on Goblins 3. Goblins 2 is the best one, got rid of the stupid life bar and the puzzles made a bit more sense so its the best one to start with. Gobliiins itself is pretty good so if anyone is going to play them start with 2 then try 1 if you like it. Goblins 3 is crap though, there's pretty much no logic and sense to any of the 'puzzles' at all, its just using random objects on random things.

ScummVM supports them now so you can play them on pretty much anything.

Baby Sathanas posted:

Stay far away from Discworld 1. It breaks every adventure game rule about having good puzzles or not being able to permanently screw yourself over. It's full of bugs, isn't even that funny and is just a terrible game all-in-all.

Discworld Noir is widely regarded as a "good game" though. It at least has atmosphere in spades. Is worth trying out.

Discworld 1 isn't that bad, it's definately worth playing if you like the books at least. I never noticed any bugs and I can only think of one way you might be able to screw yourself over but thats more of a minor design oversight. It's not like a Sierra game, there's no instant deaths because you cannot die and there's no 'oops you forgot obscure item from hours ago, game over' sorts of stupidity. There are some really really stupid puzzles though, but you can always use a walkthrough if you get stuck. 2 and Noir are definately much better games though.

Hakkesshu
Nov 3, 2009

All creature will die and all the things will be broken. That's the law of samurai.


Stare-Out posted:

Nothing beyond crisper visuals and the game being widely available again. But I'd happily take those.

I think the low resolution is starting to show in that game, on modern monitors. It's very aliased in some spots and I seem to remember the color depth looking a little rough, also? IIRC, it's only 16-bit. I definitely noticed it aging more than I liked the last time I played it.

Either way I'd love to see a re-release where they touched as few of the assets as possible, but maybe making it widescreen and upscaling it isn't feasible with the original art.

Hakkesshu fucked around with this message at Oct 4, 2013 around 14:26

Stare-Out
Mar 11, 2010

not all who wander are lost


They managed to stick fairly closely to the art style established by CMI in the HD remakes of the first two games, so I'd think touching CMI up for HD wouldn't be completely out of the question while retaining the original look and feel. And I agree, the 4:3 aspect ratio, rough edges on animated assets and the color depth are really the only blemishes the game has. Even the audio quality seemed alright last time I played it, though I'm sure that would have to be improved as well. Good thing Dominic Armato & Co. seem to be eager to be in just about anything Monkey Island.

macnbc
Dec 13, 2006

brb, time travelin'


Thanks for the suggestions everyone! OP has been updated with the bulk of them. I'm thinking I might try and convert the icons over to links to each game's store pages on GOG and Steam, but that might become a character limit issue, so we'll see.

Veotax posted:

Has there been any more word about when The Journeyman Project: Pegasus Prime GOG release is coming out? Last I heard, there was some problem with developmen but they haven't updated their Facebook page since June.

I have a line with one of the ex-Presto guys on Facebook and spoke with him about it about a month ago. Latest is that the person heading up the ScummVM work on it hasn't had a lot of time to work on it lately because of life stuff. As it stands right now the port as it was on Mac OS is complete, but they're still working on it to bring in features from the unreleased Playstation version of the game. (Like interactive cinematics and such.)

So no timetable at the moment, but worst case scenario is that it can be released as-is.

Jimbo Jaggins
Jul 19, 2013


ScummVM should probably be mentioned in the OP really.

Hakkesshu
Nov 3, 2009

All creature will die and all the things will be broken. That's the law of samurai.


Well, in the spirit of the month, how about we recommend some horror adventure games?

Harvester Games have released two titles: Downfall and The Cat Lady. Both are available on Desura, and they are some of the scariest/most disturbing horror games ever made by my estimation. Downfall is a bit shakier, production-wise, and being a more traditional point and click game, it has its share of nonsensical puzzles, but it's one of the few games where I'll excuse it because it aids the surreal atmosphere.

The Cat Lady is just excellent all-around. The voice acting is spotty, but structurally it's really unique and it doesn't feel like any other adventure game out there. It has a really consistent vision and goal, and deals with themes like depression and death in really honest ways, which I've never seen before in a game. Highly recommended; here's a post I made ages ago describing one of its early pivotal moments:

Hakkesshu posted:

You play as a mid-40s woman who commits suicide, but through supernatural means gets a chance (or is forced, depending on how you look at it) to return to life.

Chapter 3 is set after a particulary harrowing event that I won't spoil, as you return to your apartment. The whole chapter takes place in this one location and is purely based around trying to avoid a mental breakdown. You do a series of mundane tasks to make yourself feel better like taking a shower, getting some food, paying the electric bill, drinking coffee, smoking, etc. While you don't have much freedom here, the game introduces two psyche gauges and whichever one you fill up first decides what happens. I don't quite know how the system works, but it seems as though there are several different gradients that can lead to a different outcome, like in which order you do things and what you decide to interact with in your apartment. For instance, one dilemma is having to decide for how long you want to heat your burger in the microwave.

The chapter ends with a verbal altercation between you and another tenant in the apartment block who complains about loud noise. Following this, my character broke down and started randomly wandering around the apartment, crying out of frustration and despair. I assumed this was a game over, and the character would end up killing herself again, but to my surprise it merely concluded the chapter. The game has multiple situations like this where something I thought would lead to a fail state was just a legitimate choice. I was actually pretty taken aback by some of the things you can do or say to other people without being reprimanded.

Anyway, the game can be pretty awkward at times, but most of it is incredibly well-done and it seems clear the person who made it has had intimate experiences with extreme depression. Check it out if this sounds cool to you.

Someone else write a thing about the Chzo games!

Hakkesshu fucked around with this message at Oct 4, 2013 around 14:53

Megadyptes
Oct 7, 2009

Yeah... If you hit them hard their heads bleed all over the ice and their legs convulse.


I wasn't expecting much of The Cat Lady when I first played it but I was pleasantly surprised. It's a really good game.

Hank Morgan
Jun 17, 2007

Light Along the Inverse Curve.


Other than the lack of an actual ending Curse of Monkey is just about perfect as it is. It's probably the high water mark of sprite based graphic adventures before 3D came to wash the genre away for a decade.

Waldorf Sixpence
Sep 6, 2004

Often harder on Player 2


The Discworld games are fairly decent but google for the game-breaking bug in 1 so you don't gently caress up forever. Also some of the puzzles are a bit cat hair moustache, but it's not so bad. Two is much, much better. Rincewind is voiced by Eric Idle in both so that should convince you enough to try them. Noir was one I couldn't get into, it was ugly, miserable and didn't seem like Discworld to me.

hangedman1984
Jul 25, 2012



Stare-Out posted:

The Curse of Monkey Island is still my favorite one ever, I still have the original CD-ROM somewhere and even managed to find a Mac version of it. For a game that came out in 1997 it still looks absolutely gorgeous, that art style is so amazing and I would kill for a HD remake like MI1 and MI2 got. Escape from Monkey Island I could take or leave, it looks completely ancient now and controls like rubbish, and honestly I don't care for the Tales of Monkey Island games either. It just feels like a game that never should've gone 3D. And I've never been impressed with Telltale Games' adventure stuff. Played through Back to the Future and it was "okay" but didn't do much for me just like "Tales". I've only played through the first Walking Dead and that didn't exactly blow me away either.

Does Disney own Monkey Island now? Maybe they'd be more open to HD-fying CMI one of these days.

I can't agree with the bolded statement enough. I'll never understand why the didn't go for a style reminiscent of Curse, 2d with the gorgeous hand drawn style.

Awesome Welles
Nov 1, 2010

You are such pests! Now, what is it you want? In your depths of your ignorance, what is it you want? Whatever it is you want, I can't deliver it because I just don't see it.

MERRY CHRISTMAS
FUCKERS


macnbc posted:

I have a line with one of the ex-Presto guys on Facebook and spoke with him about it about a month ago. Latest is that the person heading up the ScummVM work on it hasn't had a lot of time to work on it lately because of life stuff. As it stands right now the port as it was on Mac OS is complete, but they're still working on it to bring in features from the unreleased Playstation version of the game. (Like interactive cinematics and such.)

So no timetable at the moment, but worst case scenario is that it can be released as-is.

Oh my god I had no idea this was a thing that was actually happening. Who or what is still left over from Presto Studios, anyway? I guess they still have the source code and rights to everything or did that have to get ironed out?

I'm also curious to see what people's opinions are on Space Quest 6. I know it's considered the black sheep of the series in a lot of circles, but it's one of my favorites aside from 3 and 4. Aside from that stupid loving puzzle where you have to reprogram the datacorder. I did like clicking off the device with the hand icon though.

"You missed! HA!"

A.G.Pennypacker
Oct 5, 2006
I AM A BIG DUMB BUTT THAT LIKES TO LICK MY OWN BUTT AND SMELL MY OWN BUTT AND WHEN THE OCCASION ARISES LICK AND SMELL OTHER PEOPLES BUTTS

In my mind I remember the datacorder puzzle just being a primitive DRM* thing, like a 'look in the instruction book for the answer!', but was it more complicated than that?

*copy protection, not DRM, I guess. You know what I mean.

Ugly In The Morning
Jul 1, 2010


A.G.Pennypacker posted:

Everytime people post about this game called Syberia, I just keep thinking about this other old adventure game called Cyberia and I always get really confused

You aren't the only one. I used to love that game and the sequel when they both came out. I'm reluctant to go back, though, I get the feeling that they've aged incredibly poorly. Or it'll be a victim to my higher standards now that I'm not in elementary school.

Awesome Welles
Nov 1, 2010

You are such pests! Now, what is it you want? In your depths of your ignorance, what is it you want? Whatever it is you want, I can't deliver it because I just don't see it.

MERRY CHRISTMAS
FUCKERS


A.G.Pennypacker posted:

In my mind I remember the datacorder puzzle just being a primitive DRM* thing, like a 'look in the instruction book for the answer!', but was it more complicated than that?

*copy protection, not DRM, I guess. You know what I mean.

Yeah, it's one of those classic "Turn to page 12 for the answer" type puzzles that were bullshit if you didn't have a manual readily available (I didn't). IIRC, the solution was included with a joke manual that was also included with the game, which made it more annoying because for a kid like me at the time it was just another thing to get lost in a sea of game boxes and booklets.

Even with the solution it's just tedious. I love the rest of the game though.

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Stare-Out
Mar 11, 2010

not all who wander are lost


hangedman1984 posted:

I can't agree with the bolded statement enough. I'll never understand why the didn't go for a style reminiscent of Curse, 2d with the gorgeous hand drawn style.
I wonder if EMI was originally a PS2 exclusive or if it was used as the main design platform. That could've had a hand in why EMI went 3D, to "show off" what a new generation of consoles can do. Somehow that then just caught on and they've been 3D ever since, for better or (more often) worse.

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