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ReindeerF
Apr 20, 2002

Rubber Dinghy Rapids Bro


Hi. I listen to some podcasts. Some I listen to because I really enjoy the content, some I roll my eyes at a lot, but listen to so that I can stay in touch with how the media is playing things back home and some I can't remember why I listen to.

Recently, I lost a few of the regular podcasts that I enjoyed, including Political Junkie and Talk Of The Nation. Granted, neither was the greatest thing ever, but I enjoyed the corny humor and political trivia on PJ and TOTN did cover some interesting topics on a weekly basis. I've tried a number of replacements, like KCRW's Left, Right & Center and so on, but I find them pretty grating. I'd like to listen to Diane Rehm, but as superficial as it sounds I can't get past the voice - I've sincerely tried. So, tossing my list out there, I'm hoping some of the other dinosaurs who still listen to podcasts (they're SO last decade) will toss out some suggestions. We haven't done this in a while and I'm sure I'm missing out on some good stuff I just haven't found. I am low on content here is what I'm saying. he;lp

Here's what I've got, in order of what percentage of the podcasts I listen to (i.e. not necessarily correlated to how much I enjoy it):

Sinica: An interesting take on Chinese current events, history, culture and other things from a couple of prominent expats in China. I'm not fascinated by China, but the hosts and guests are almost always good, they help explain to morons like me outside of China what's going on really well and Goldkorn is awesome.

Moyers & Company: Bill Moyers. Nothing further to explain.

Slate Political Gabfest: It's like the Washington cocktail circuit in audio form. I listen to keep in touch with what these kinds of people are thinking. Occasionally it's entertaining. About 5% of eac show I have to pull the earphones out of my ear to keep from yelling in a crowded skytrain.

On The Media: When it's good, it's really good. It seems to go for weeks slapping together old content and replying it, then months with new stuff, then a mix, then back to repeats, but Bob Garfield reports on obscure aspects of big stories and will hold people's feet to the fire and they cover a wide variety of media-related stuff.

The Bugle: Still among the funniest podcasts around for me, and about the only funny current events podcast, but I don't know if I'm getting older or it's getting a bit stale, because I haven't been laughing as much in recent months.

On Point: Not always the best, but Tom does try to cover a wide range of topics and will grab normal people and talk about economic issues, class issues and interesting stuff that you don't hear much in the public sphere outside of ideological bubbles. Carl from Nashville is the best call-in guest.

Fresh Air: I run really hot and cold on this. Sometimes I don't listen for weeks because it's all television and music talk and sometimes I listen for a week straight because it's all interesting writers and public figures. Kind of unpredictable, but she gets good guests.

Real Time: Yeah, yeah, he's annoying, has some stupid beliefs and makes me rip the headphones out of my ear to avoid yelling in the skytrain, but sometimes it's funny and occasionally he has good guests too. It fills an hour a week, that's about all I can say.

BBC Documentaries: This one I turn to on long road trips. It's hot or cold depending on the subject, but if you download like 50 episodes there's enough in there to make it worthwhile. Ideologically it can be all over the map, so you can't predict for sure what angle they're going to take.

Welcome To Night Vale: If you like old time radio shows, but with a sort of quirky sci fi twist, Welcome To Night Vale is excellent. I picked it up from the GBS post about it. It's bizarre, but works somehow.

NSFW Live: NSFWcorp. If you don't know it, it's basically the self-promoting TechCrunch guy who is always feuding with some tech person and who hired all the eXiled writers and added in an assortment of other writers. I listen only when Ames & Dolan are on together as they can be really entertaining - or when one of their special feature reporters is on, like the Latin American guy whose name I forget. Otherwise it's often 15 minutes of Carr ranting about some digerati feud and PandoDaily and I don't care at all.

So, that's what I've got. I've paid it forward or whatever. Now I need suggestions! Hopefully other people will pick up podcasts they like too. I've been trying out a few that I didn't mention because I'm not sure if I like them yet. The China History Podcast is a good example of that. I've also tried out a bunch that I don't like, such as the podcast of every single Sunday Morning Show.

ReindeerF fucked around with this message at Oct 7, 2013 around 14:36

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Fandyien
Feb 10, 2012


There are some good history ones out there.

Mike Duncan's History of Rome, and his new one, Revolutions. The new one is about various revolutionary periods and the context from which they emerged.
Dan Carlin's Hardcore History is sometimes a little less academic then Mike Duncan but I still think he has some really compelling episodes. His newest one about the Spanish-American war and occupation of the Philippines is rad as hell.
Lars Brownworth did 12 Byzantine Rulers which basically documents the history of the Byzantine empire through it's most significant emperors, and it's incredible. He also did Norman Centuries which tracks the history of the Norman rulers/Barons from their viking origins to the Sicilian kingdom they ran briefly.
There's also Stuff You Missed in History class which I think is put out by UVA, and it's a little pop-history but still interesting enough.

Finally I suspect most people here are familiar with it but Brian Dunning's Skeptoid is a good rebuttal to a lot of conspiracies and nonscientific nonsense.

Postorder Trollet89
Jan 12, 2008
Sweden doesn't do religion. But if they did, it would probably be the best religion in the world.

Dan Carlin's Common Sense Podcast is also good for more contemporary stuff. If you like Hardcore History you should definately check it out.

Axetrain
Sep 14, 2007

Cutting me off at every turn

Fandyien posted:


There's also Stuff You Missed in History class which I think is put out by UVA, and it's a little pop-history but still interesting enough.

The how stuff works podcasts are all a good listen, if a bit light. They make for good work commute listening and their Stuff Mom never told you is interesting discussion of women's issues and gender relations in general.

The history of Rome podcast often gets recommended and for good reason, it's an amazing look at Ancient Rome from the early kingdom through the Republic and the Empire. It's now complete after years and is very long but if you want to keep going after listening to that then this History of the Byzantine Empire podcast which is underway is a great listen about what happened after the fall of the western empire and how the eastern half continued on.

gradenko_2000
Oct 5, 2010

Some missions, you just can't get rid of a bomb

I've actually listened to about half a dozen episodes of Dan Carlin's Common Sense, but D&D ripped into him something fierce in the GOP Rebuilding thread and now I don't know what's what. I'm far too leftist to agree with most of what he says, although his placing of current events in historical context is somewhat interesting.

Hardcore History still rules though.

R. Mute
Jul 27, 2011



Isn't Hardcore History basically Cracked.com the audiobook?

e: Mike Duncan is better, but his theoretical background is also pretty lightweight, which really shines through. He does his best to point out other points of view, to his credit.

R. Mute fucked around with this message at Oct 7, 2013 around 17:41

Postorder Trollet89
Jan 12, 2008
Sweden doesn't do religion. But if they did, it would probably be the best religion in the world.

R. Mute posted:

Isn't Hardcore History basically Cracked.com the audiobook?



I wouldn't go quite that far. Yes it's typical popular history narrative and Dan has no academic credentials whatsoever but he is a great storyteller and keeps it intresting and objective.

R. Mute
Jul 27, 2011



I'm frowning, now.

Purgey
Nov 5, 2008


Tank Riot is a frequently meandering but enjoyable podcast by three Everydudes in Madison, WI. They are pretty unabashedly left wing but take the time to approach subjects with a least a modicum of objectivity. They have a large catalog of podcasts on a wide range of subjects.

As a Midwesterner, they are My People so I enjoy listening to them.

Fandyien
Feb 10, 2012


R. Mute posted:

I'm frowning, now.

He's not totally objective because that's obviously impossible in history, but he tries to lay things out as thoroughly as he can while presenting both sides (but commenting on the validity of the more correct one).

Kro-Bar
Jul 24, 2004


They can be infuriatingly "truth is in the middle" sometimes, but I really enjoy Emily Bazelon's occasional insights into SCOTUS on Slate's Political Gabfest.

Kro-Bar fucked around with this message at Oct 7, 2013 around 19:28

ReindeerF
Apr 20, 2002

Rubber Dinghy Rapids Bro


To paraphrase Toby Ziegler, John Dickerson is the guy who runs into the store to get Satan a pack of cigarettes.

mcmagic
Jul 1, 2004


The Majority Report http://www.majority.fm

Thats my favorite lefty podcast. Sam Seder used to be an Air America host and he's a pretty funny guy as well NTM he argues with libertarians a lot which is entertaining. Also he has better guests than any other podcast i've heard.

slogula
Oct 2, 2013


Decode DC Andrea Seabrook left NPR, (where she was a congressional correspondent,) to report on the dysfunction in DC. The podcast forgoes the partisan narrative and focuses more on the long-term structural aspects of federal politics. For example: this weeks episode is about the how the justice system is suffering under sequestration and shutdown.

Democracy NOW!: for your daily leftist news.

Benjamin Walker's Theory of Everything A weird blend of short fiction and interviews. Massively enjoyable.

In Our Time with Melyvin Bragg BBC. Melvin convenes a panel of experts on some academic subject. The episode on hell got me hooked on this one.

ReindeerF
Apr 20, 2002

Rubber Dinghy Rapids Bro


slogula posted:

Decode DC Andrea Seabrook left NPR, (where she was a congressional correspondent,) to report on the dysfunction in DC. The podcast forgoes the partisan narrative and focuses more on the long-term structural aspects of federal politics. For example: this weeks episode is about the how the justice system is suffering under sequestration and shutdown.
Ah crap, I completely forgot about this one - thanks for that! I listened to her exit interviews and appearances, but lost track.

DayReaver
May 6, 2007
Guy Debord is the only one who gets my name

Fandyien posted:

There are some good history ones out there.

Mike Duncan's History of Rome, and his new one, Revolutions. The new one is about various revolutionary periods and the context from which they emerged.
Dan Carlin's Hardcore History is sometimes a little less academic then Mike Duncan but I still think he has some really compelling episodes. His newest one about the Spanish-American war and occupation of the Philippines is rad as hell.
Lars Brownworth did 12 Byzantine Rulers which basically documents the history of the Byzantine empire through it's most significant emperors, and it's incredible. He also did Norman Centuries which tracks the history of the Norman rulers/Barons from their viking origins to the Sicilian kingdom they ran briefly.
There's also Stuff You Missed in History class which I think is put out by UVA, and it's a little pop-history but still interesting enough.

Finally I suspect most people here are familiar with it but Brian Dunning's Skeptoid is a good rebuttal to a lot of conspiracies and nonscientific nonsense.

That's really, really similar to my own lineup of favorites. I can see how some might not like Dan Carlin, but the guy is really honest about not being any sort of professional historian and he does a great job of really humanizing a lot of big picture issues and really allowing you to put yourself inside of the varies historical moments he discusses. I listened to the entire History of Rome podcast series, too, and really enjoyed it, but it might as well be called "Mike Duncan reads you the largest encyclopedia encyclopedia entry ever created." It's dry and pretty much mostly factual with a bit of humor thrown in, but if you're okay with that you'll really like it. I didn't realize he came out with a new series though, definitely going to check that one out.

One item I can add that I didn't see anyone mention is The Ancient World Podcast with Scott Chesworth. It's pretty similar to Mike Duncan's style, but pretty much covers all the pre-Roman stuff starting at the beginning of recorded history.

ChaosSamusX
Jul 18, 2010


gradenko_2000 posted:

I've actually listened to about half a dozen episodes of Dan Carlin's Common Sense, but D&D ripped into him something fierce in the GOP Rebuilding thread and now I don't know what's what. I'm far too leftist to agree with most of what he says, although his placing of current events in historical context is somewhat interesting.

Hardcore History still rules though.

When did they rip into Dan Carlin in the Rebuilding thread?

E: nvm, checked, and it actually was in the recent one.

ChaosSamusX fucked around with this message at Oct 8, 2013 around 02:19

cbirdsong
Sep 8, 2004

Commodore of the Apocalypso

ChaosSamusX posted:

When did they rip into Dan Carlin in the Rebuilding thread?

E: nvm, checked, and it actually was in the recent one.

Got a link handy?

Rutger
Mar 17, 2013


http://www.novaramedia.com A weekly marxist podcast with lots of interesting guests

ChaosSamusX
Jul 18, 2010


cbirdsong posted:

Got a link handy?

Apparently people were none too happy with him taking a middle of the ground line on the shutdown of all things.

Badger of Basra
Jul 25, 2007
Don't tell Maliki!

I can't recommend the BBC's A History of the World in 100 Objects enough. I thought the earlier stuff was better than the more modern episodes, but that's just me. Really worth a listen.

midnightclimax
Dec 3, 2011

Freedom Fighter


I really like some of the lectures on offer at iTunes U, edX and Coursera. Apart from the latter two, most of them can be found via http://openculture.com/ separated into their respective categories. I mention this because iTunes is a bad interface to browse them, and some universities only label their lectures with an internal code (looking at you, history department of UC Berkeley).

So far I've mostly listened to stuff concerning european history and philosophy; Yale, Berkeley and Stanford seemed to be good choices for history, Oxford for philosophy. For US students this might be self-evident, myself I don't know much about what Ivy League department to go to for specific schools. Talking about Oxford, check out their archive of Locke Lectures (http://www.philosophy.ox.ac.uk/podc...s/past_lectures) if you're interested in contemporary philosophy.

Currently I'm following a lecture on Kierkegaard by the University of Copenhagen (https://class.coursera.org/kierkegaard-001/class/index), looks to be good. Feel free to join me!

EDIT: personally I dl all the videos and listen to them via audio-player. Most of the time it's just the prof talking into the camera, not really worth processing all the visual input.

Fandyien
Feb 10, 2012



Yeah, I just tried to listen to Common Sense yesterday and it was a shocking divergence in quality from Hardcore History. Hardcore History is great and I never really feel like Carlin's being disingenuous in there but he sure as gently caress does a terrible job with Common Sense, which I guess I should have expected. I got halfway through his shutdown episode when I realized that.

Ocean Book
Sep 27, 2010

- hi

Dan Carlin is like the 'stopped clock is right twice a day' analogy except he's more of a clock that spins randomly. It's more enjoyable of a podcast if you think of it as listening to your friend explain his somewhat naive political beliefs than as someone to mine for solid ideas and analysis.

Some better episodes for those who listen to his more recent mediocre ones.

On the implications of soft police force

On the implications of internationalizing western values

On the vapid performatism of presidential debates

Really it is better to go through the archives and see if there's one about a topic that sounds interesting rather than assuming every episode he puts out is good. They often are full of dumb wrong opinions. However I still like to listen to his dumb/wrong opinions because I only get to hear from him every once in a while

Ocean Book fucked around with this message at Oct 12, 2013 around 07:25

slashtom
Jan 5, 2012
VeteranX

Podcasts definitely get me through the day.

I listen to Adam Carolla, he's a little much most of the time but he's funny and entertaining. I listen to pretty much all of carolla digital.

In addition, NPR Planet Money, Eve online stuff, real time, andrew dice clay, npr with tom ashbrook, this american life, macbreak weekly, the vergecast, it's all politics, accidental tech podcast.

Quantumfate
Feb 17, 2009

Angered & displeased, he went to the Blessed One and, on arrival, insulted & cursed him with rude, harsh words.

When this was said, the Blessed One said to him:


"Motherfucker I will -end- you"

I have no political podcasts to contribute; though Tweet Me Harder is a comedy podcast about two guys who just bullshit together on the most random things. It's very enjoyable, though sadly ended. Mostly I'm coming in to say that a lot of the reasons people don't like common sense is because Dan Carlin is a flaming libertarian. If you can't stand that, you'll hate it. But all in all, it's not that bad considering who it comes from. I dislike it because I find it too ridden with pontification and sophistry, but it's less so than most cable news.

Hardcore History is the poo poo though, I highly recommend the one he did recently on millennialist Munster. Astounding.

Antwan3K
Mar 8, 2013


Rutger posted:

http://www.novaramedia.com A weekly marxist podcast with lots of interesting guests

Can't recommend this enough, though I think they would rather refer to themselves as anarchists or anarcho-syndicalists

Rutger
Mar 17, 2013


Antwan3K posted:

Can't recommend this enough, though I think they would rather refer to themselves as anarchists or anarcho-syndicalists

Cool, I actually didn't know that. I consider myself an anarchist as well (counting down to somebody calling me a liberal in disguise). Though, they are obviously very inspired by Marx, which is great.

Zohn
Jul 21, 2006

Trust me, pinko, you ain't half he-man enough for Mickey Spillane's Rye Whisky.

Uhh Yeah Dude's mission statement is 'America through the eyes of two American-Americans', and is regarded by many goons and by me to be the greatest podcast of all time. Every episode is a sort of incredulous look at the insanity of modern american life hosted by Jonathan Larroquette (son of actor John Larroquette and former teenage rastafarian prophet) and Seth Romatelli (had a scene with Britney Spears in the movie Crossroads, is incredibly neurotic and hilarious).

menino
Jul 27, 2006

Pon De Floor

mcmagic posted:

The Majority Report http://www.majority.fm

Thats my favorite lefty podcast. Sam Seder used to be an Air America host and he's a pretty funny guy as well NTM he argues with libertarians a lot which is entertaining. Also he has better guests than any other podcast i've heard.

Seconding this one. Seder is rarely dull and has great guests.

Koramei
Nov 11, 2011

I just pretend to be nice.


Badger of Basra posted:

I can't recommend the BBC's A History of the World in 100 Objects enough. I thought the earlier stuff was better than the more modern episodes, but that's just me. Really worth a listen.
Seconding this- and while I think a few towards the very end where he got the actual creators of the objects in to talk to weren't nearly as good as the others, I enjoyed the rest of them a lot, and the final episode with the solar light was surprisingly interesting. He gets a bunch of high profile guests on too which is kinda neat.

slogula posted:

In Our Time with Melyvin Bragg BBC. Melvin convenes a panel of experts on some academic subject. The episode on hell got me hooked on this one.
This one has some really really good episodes, but I think they're incredibly dependent on how the guests are. Melvyn's voice puts me to sleep though so that doesn't help.

R. Mute posted:

Isn't Hardcore History basically Cracked.com the audiobook?

e: Mike Duncan is better, but his theoretical background is also pretty lightweight, which really shines through. He does his best to point out other points of view, to his credit.
Hardcore History is amazing and Dan Carlin tells history like nobody else, and is mostly very accurate, but you should never take his opinion or facts as sacrosanct.

But you shouldn't completely trust what Mike Duncan, or any other history podcast presenter says either. Honestly, the History of Rome was really informative and extremely comprehensive, and I would definitely recommend it, but I don't understand why it gets quite as much love as it does around here. It isn't really so well told, written or accurate, and while I grew to really like Mike Duncan, a lot of his jokes fall kinda flat. About the only way in which it's remarkable is just how loving much of it there is. It isn't the podcast to end all podcasts, it's just a generally good starting point for Roman History.

edit: also it isn't just to do with them being amateur historians that makes them less trustworthy- Lars Brownworth, who does 12 Byzantine Rulers and The Norman Centuries is an actual historian and also one of the most biased of all of them. These are all just jumping off points into the actual topics, and nice for general information. It's not like you should be taking any one history book as sacrosanct, either, really.


And since most of what I'd recommend has been said already: Laszlo Montgomery's History of China. It's 5000 YEARS OF HISTORY in nice podcast form. Of the China podcasts I've tried to listen to it's definitely the best.

Koramei fucked around with this message at Oct 13, 2013 around 14:19

Sick_Boy
Jun 3, 2007

The reason Milton wrote in fetters when he wrote of Angels and God, and at liberty when of Devils and Hell, is because he was a true poet and of the Devil's party without knowing it.


The Best of the Left: A decent compilation of bits and segments on a single topic which changes each week.

Citizen Radio: A very Sui Generis podcast that deals with progressive issues in the broadest sense of the term (they've been recently discussing mental health a lot, for instance) and undercovered stories. Also very funny. http://www.wearecitizenradio.com

Wait Wait don't Tell Me: The podcast version of the NPR show. Good to at least get a primer of what happened during the week.

Badger of Basra
Jul 25, 2007
Don't tell Maliki!

Koramei posted:

This one has some really really good episodes, but I think they're incredibly dependent on how the guests are. Melvyn's voice puts me to sleep though so that doesn't help.

Also Melvyn is kind of an rear end in a top hat sometimes. Most of the time because he's trying to move the show on, to be fair.

Communocracy
Oct 5, 2004
Because it works so well in Canada

I listen to Behind The News with Doug Henwood, a leftist radio show broadcast out of KPLA Berkeley. The guests they have are usually pretty top notch and while I'm by no means an expert their political analysis is very detailed and professional, to the point of sounding a bit dry to the uninitiated.

I think they are all decent but here is a recent episode I enjoyed:

http://www.leftbusinessobserver.com/Radio.html#S130808
August 8, 2013 Penny Lewis, author of Hardhats, Hippies, and Hakws: The Vietnam Antiwar Movement as Myth and Memory, on how elites didnít oppose that war and the working class didnít support it, and what that means today

edit: also the arabist.net podcast seems pretty on point, though not speaking arabic or having been to the middle east I can't say for sure how accurate. They record the podcast in Cairo. They haven't done a new episode in 6 months which always worries me but hopefully that's a result of a busy work schedule and not of being assaulted by one of Egypt's many angry mobs.

Communocracy fucked around with this message at Oct 14, 2013 around 23:50

MeatwadIsGod
Sep 30, 2004

Behold! It is I! I bestow upon you...my dirty dipey!

Fandyien posted:

Yeah, I just tried to listen to Common Sense yesterday and it was a shocking divergence in quality from Hardcore History. Hardcore History is great and I never really feel like Carlin's being disingenuous in there but he sure as gently caress does a terrible job with Common Sense, which I guess I should have expected. I got halfway through his shutdown episode when I realized that.

To Dan Carlin's credit, he's never really pushed Common Sense on Hardcore History. I've never listened to Common Sense because he basically leaves it at, "Hey, I'm doing another podcast. If you really love Hardcore History but get dicey about politics then just keep listening to this show and don't bother listening to Common Sense." That being said, many of his Hardcore History episodes would be right up the alley of anyone on this forum. Death Throes of the Republic, which I'd consider his magnum opus, would probably benefit anyone interested in current American politics just by way of analogy to the Roman Republic in its last days. A comparatively more relevant and recent episode would be something like Radical Thoughts which deals with how ideas that upset the status quo - communism, unionism, anarchism, etc. - develop and spread, particularly in unstable economies.

midnightclimax
Dec 3, 2011

Freedom Fighter


I recently finished a couple of podcasts/lectures on western history & philosophy, they're all pretty good if you need to refresh your memory, or maybe you're looking for an introduction:

Western Culture: Political, Economic & Social Thought, Integrated Liberal Studies (Anderson)
http://www.uwalumni.com/andersonlectures.aspx
HIST 202: European Civilization, 1648-1945 (Merriman)
http://oyc.yale.edu/history/hist-202#overview
History 5: European Civilization from the Renaissance to the Present (Hesse)
http://history.berkeley.edu/content...y5courselecture
https://itunes.apple.com/us/itunes-...ley/id354823664
Philosophy for Beginners (Talbot)
http://www.philosophy.ox.ac.uk/podc...y_for_beginners
HIST 210: The Early Middle Ages, 284Ė1000 (Freedman)
http://oyc.yale.edu/history/hist-210
General Philosophy (Millican)
http://www.philosophy.ox.ac.uk/podc...eral_philosophy
Knowing and Representing: Reading (between the lines of) Hegel's Introduction (Brandom)
http://www.pitt.edu/~brandom/multimedia.html

No prior knowledge needed, except for the last one on Hegel. That stuff is pretty 4D chess, even with a bit of knowledge of german idealism.

ChickenRiceNPeas
Jun 8, 2009


The Economist has a pretty good selection of special reports as well as audio copies of their free editors picks every week or so.

https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast...d151230264?mt=2
https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast...d291942390?mt=2
https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast...d313848583?mt=2
https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast...d313848632?mt=2

There's some good selections in "Great Speeches in History". Although it hasn't been updated in a while.

https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast...d204935202?mt=2

Politico also has a podcast. New episodes are released somewhat sporadically and so far it hasn't been very good (in my limited opinion) but you might some enjoyable content here and there

https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast...d616794121?mt=2

marchantia
Nov 5, 2009

WHAT IS THIS

You guys know there's a whole forum here for podcasts? I would check out the Historial, Informational, and Educational Podcasts thread to start with.

midnightclimax
Dec 3, 2011

Freedom Fighter


marchantia posted:

You guys know there's a whole forum here for podcasts? I would check out the Historial, Informational, and Educational Podcasts thread to start with.

I think it's beneficial to have a thread about educational resources in a sub-forum about contemporary politics. The option to symlink stickies would probably be the best solution for a lot of community-overlap on SA.

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pangstrom
Jan 25, 2003



Great thread, thanks I will check some of these out.

60-second science - most of these are a waste of time but not much time and the ones that aren't are worth it
99% Invisible - about design and architecture and city infrastructure and the people behind that and better than that sounds
Common Sense with Dan Carlin - non-insane libertarian, basically
Dan Carlin's Hardcore History - good if infrequent satisficing for people like me who want to know history but can never pull the trigger on doing it the right way
Frontline - investigative journalism
NSFWCORP - found out about this from ReindeerF. The War Nerd Wednesdays are my favorite.
Omega Tau - science and engineering and aerospace and I'm bracing myself for one about gassing Jews (i.e. it's German)
On the Media - What ReindeerF said
QuackCast - Mark Crislip debunks alternative medicine
RadioLab - Malcolm-Gladwell-style thing that's less just-so-BS than Gladwell. Very compressed and has an audiophile sensibility.
Real Time with Bill Maher - What ReindeerF said
The Economist - Some are laughable but if it's about a foreign country I usually learn something

-Other non-D&D-related ones-
Ace on the House - about home repair/improvement and Carolla complaining about youth and airlines
The Brian Lehrer Show - It's D&D-related but mostly about NYC (I only listen to about half because it's a lot of content). I haven't ever listened to something with better callers. Callers are still awful!
The Dr. Drew Podcast - About mental health, mostly addiction. He is much more the real deal than the other media doctors. Lots of confusing subtext (Drew's crazy wife does some psychic podcast and he makes the audio engineer say those ads).
The F Plus - basically "something awful link of the day" where they read the content in silly voices and crack wise and make me feel old
The Film Vault - about movies. I like it but if you didn't I wouldn't hold it against you.

pangstrom fucked around with this message at Oct 29, 2013 around 21:29

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