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PleasureKevin
Jan 2, 2011

rip steve jobs
iOS 1 - iOS 7


I feel really guilty because I am really into this article about the history of the Gamecube, but I can't make it through a single page of any of my college text books from the last 3 years without multiple breaks. I just find them so boring. I've gotten really into other books about business, but these text books loving suck. I feel like I want to learn it, but I find it impossible to force myself to read it. So I feel I enjoy the subject matter, but it's written terribly. But I question whether it's just the fact that I "have" to read these books, so I reject it as some anti-authority thing.

This year I decided to quit drinking because I felt like missing classes due to late nights and hangovers was probably lame. So I started with enthusiasm. But it seems clear this isn't going to be a cure all at all. I was determined that I could stick my nose in the books and keep it there, but I can't.

Each semester I try some new college tipz or flash card apps or other system, and each year I have to take a class 2 or 3 times to even pass with a C.

It was only last semester that I realized I'm not even enrolled in a program properly. I have so little idea of what I'm doing and nobody to talk about general school stuff with. God do I ever love group projects because then I am assigned peers that have to listen to me now and then and I can get some idea of what a student is supposed to be doing. So far they are all super lazy and I have no idea how they get through it.

Before I started school I went to some manner of doctor and told him I was entirely sure I was going to bomb. I had like 3 sessions with him and all he said was that I'd be fine and I was worrying too much.

I'll make another doctor's appointment tomorrow and try get on the pills, I guess.

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Womens Jeans
Sep 13, 2007
POO IS FUN

So drop out and get a job.

PleasureKevin
Jan 2, 2011

rip steve jobs
iOS 1 - iOS 7


Womens Jeans posted:

So drop out and get a job.

This was my solution to high school. I just feel like there is more that I want to do and I need an education for it.

BlueChocolate
Jan 4, 2014


College is one of the most interesting places you'll ever be in your life. How can you hate it?

PleasureKevin
Jan 2, 2011

rip steve jobs
iOS 1 - iOS 7


BlueChocolate posted:

College is one of the most interesting places you'll ever be in your life. How can you hate it?

I don't, ignore title.

Text Book posted:

All organizations have a business cycle that describes their operation. Gildan's model begins with the acquisition if materials to make T-shirts, socks, fleeces, and underwear. The finished products are then sold to Gildan's customers. The customers pay Gildan's for their purchases and the cycle begins again.

PleasureKevin fucked around with this message at Jan 9, 2014 around 09:16

Jon Joe
Oct 19, 2011

Sicked Wick


Good job on quitting drinking, seeing a doctor, and taking medication!

What do you enjoy doing with you time, besides reading articles on the gamecube?

Corvus corone
Oct 14, 2012


PleasureKevin posted:

and each year I have to take a class 2 or 3 times to even pass with a C.

Sound like College Is Not For You. Or rather, you are not mature enough for college. Unless it really is a issue of depression/ADD/whatever, why the hell would you WANT to be medicated? It isn't fun, trust me, and even if you are mentally ill pills are probably not going to address the entire problem anyway.

Just out of curiosity, what were you going to college to be?

PleasureKevin
Jan 2, 2011

rip steve jobs
iOS 1 - iOS 7


Jon Joe posted:

Good job on quitting drinking, seeing a doctor, and taking medication!

What do you enjoy doing with you time, besides reading articles on the gamecube?

I read a lot about businesses I like and RSS feed from tech blogs and stuff. I gently caress around with blogs sometimes. I started working on a startup and designed an app and even got some developers in in it but it's stagnated. Sometimes I try study Japanese but I'm also terrible at that.

Corvus corone posted:

Unless it really is a issue of depression/ADD/whatever, why the hell would you WANT to be medicated? It isn't fun, trust me, and even if you

Just out of curiosity, what were you going to college to be?

I submit myself to the authorities of medical science in whether there is a medical problem and whether I need medication. I didn't mean to say I had determined myself to be ill or decided myself a treatment.

I'm studying business management and I really like technology startups and wanted to be involved in one.

PleasureKevin fucked around with this message at Jan 9, 2014 around 09:26

Jon Joe
Oct 19, 2011

Sicked Wick


PleasureKevin posted:

I read a lot about businesses I like and RSS feed from tech blogs and stuff. I gently caress around with blogs sometimes. I started working on a startup and designed an app and even got some developers in in it but it's stagnated. Sometimes I try study Japanese but I'm also terrible at that.

That sounds really cool!

HEY GAL
Oct 11, 2012

People hear that there's going to be a fight, and that they could earn five or six cents a day if they get in on it; they immediately form themselves into bands like migrant fruit-pickers and sell their services to whoever wants to hire them.

Your problem is your lovely major, OP. I wouldn't read that crap either.

quote:

All organizations have a business cycle that describes their operation. Gildan's model begins with the acquisition if materials to make T-shirts, socks, fleeces, and underwear. The finished products are then sold to Gildan's customers. The customers pay Gildan's for their purchases and the cycle begins again.
What the gently caress even is this.

Tommofork
Dec 25, 2007

This is where I begin to speculate what being a
man of my word costs me


Not normal behaviour, speak to your doctor to cover medical your bases, speak to a therapist to cover your mental bases.

Ignore shitposters. Dropping out in reaction to this stuff would be trying to fit your life around whatever issue it turns out to be. Dropping out or deferring if you can while you get this sorted out is not a terrible idea though.

Also,

a travelling HEGEL posted:

What the gently caress even is this.

Yeah really. Does it really need to be clarified just in case anyone was wondering if a business gets stuff, makes stuff, sells stuff, repeats?

Slightly Toasted
Feb 9, 2009



You hate college now but real life sucks much much more. I was pretty down on school too and skipped a bunch of classes and had a mediocre gpa but now that I'm finished and working I'm super miserable and bummed that I couldn't at least appreciate it.

Also you should probably take something you enjoy and not stupid business. If you don't enjoy it now chances are you never will.

Slightly Toasted fucked around with this message at Jan 9, 2014 around 13:17

College Ruled
Apr 25, 2012

"It seems another associate has taken my friendly attitude as to insinuate desires that would exist outside the bounds of professional courtesy."

Courtesy of: 01001100 01001100 01001010 01001011 01010011 01101001 01001100 01101011


Why do you necessarily need to go to college? Have you considered other routes of specialization?

Thundercracker
Jun 25, 2004

Proudly serving the Ruinous Powers since as a veteran of the long war.


Those lovely textbooks are preparing for the unbelievably dull and pointless meetings and presentations and memos you'll have to attend to as a real-life business person.

Your group projects are preparing you for corporate culture, which is filled with idiots covering their asses.

If your class and books were exciting, they'd be doing a poor job of preparing you for business work.

You still have time. Be a hobo instead. Probably more statisfying in the long run.

Thundercracker fucked around with this message at Jan 9, 2014 around 14:15

cname
Jan 24, 2013


PleasureKevin posted:

I started working on a startup and designed an app and even got some developers in in it but it's stagnated.

gently caress college, do this! There's money here. Starting you own company might not be the best idea, but you could easily find a salaried position as an app designer/programer. You might have to work a few contract positions, before you get hired full time, but it's totally doable without a college education. Not having a degree simply means you'll need to prove your skills, before they fully hire you.

What language(s) are you familiar with?

Do you still have the half-finished app? Even if it's a total piece of poo poo, a programing director will be totally with "Here's what I was trying to do. Here's what I was able to accomplish. Here's what I'd need to do, to make it a finished product. Here are the mistakes I made and how I learned from them."

cname fucked around with this message at Jan 9, 2014 around 14:51

PleasureKevin
Jan 2, 2011

rip steve jobs
iOS 1 - iOS 7


cname posted:

gently caress college, do this!

If I could program, I would.

Maybe I should start apply for random stuff on AngelList?

Tommofork posted:

Yeah really. Does it really need to be clarified just in case anyone was wondering if a business gets stuff, makes stuff, sells stuff, repeats?

There's illustrations for good measure.

PleasureKevin fucked around with this message at Jan 9, 2014 around 15:32

Cicero
Dec 17, 2003

Jumpjet, melta, jumpjet. Repeat for ten minutes or until victory is assured.

cname posted:

gently caress college, do this! There's money here. Starting you own company might not be the best idea, but you could easily find a salaried position as an app designer/programer. You might have to work a few contract positions, before you get hired full time, but it's totally doable without a college education. Not having a degree simply means you'll need to prove your skills, before they fully hire you.
I'm pretty sure by "designer" he means idea guy who got a few coder friends to spend some time on his idea before they lost interest.

PleasureKevin posted:

If I could program, I would.
What a shame that you weren't born with the coding gene that gives individuals the inherent talent to write programs.

Professor Tomtom
Oct 22, 2010

PHD in Directionology


Major in liberal arts.

Timelord
Jan 17, 2008

I wish I were dead


PleasureKevin posted:

If I could program, I would.

Maybe I should start apply for random stuff on AngelList?


There's illustrations for good measure.



That textbook and major are a waste of time.
Does your college have a career center? They usually have people who can help you find what you are interested in doing.
If the problem is meaning and purpose within what you study, you might want to go either lit/english or it could be the sciences, its impossible for us to diagnose for you.

Konar
Dec 14, 2006


Cicero posted:

What a shame that you weren't born with the coding gene that gives individuals the inherent talent to write programs.

Yeah but this guy has to take college business classes 2 or 3 times to get a C, don't really think he is a great candidate to teach himself as it's always harder motivating yourself than doing it in a traditional classroom environment.

Have you considered digging ditches OP?

Pycckuu
Sep 13, 2011


I'm assuming you go to school in the US. Go speak to you academic adviser. If you don't have one assigned to you for some reason, you can probably go to your department's website and look up a person you can talk to and they'll direct you from there. Your adviser will help you get back on track and get properly enrolled in the program. If don't like your major, you can always change to a different program (STEM is all the rage now a days). However, books in STEM degrees are even more cut and dry and the courses require a lot more commitment.

Also if you want some motivation to study better, go to a job search website and see what the jobs in your field require. You'll probably see a lot of things like "internship experience is a plus" and "GPA above 3.0 required." If you want to graduate and have a job, you will have to realize that adult life is not all about fun and play. Sometimes you'll have to power through some boring poo poo to get where you want. That's why accountants make accountant money and baristas at the totally rad indie coffee shop down the street don't.

Contra Calculus
Nov 6, 2009


Now sheathe your bloody sword, or I'll take it from you and shove it up some place even GRRM would never find


College, for me, was an extremely tough experience. Textbooks are extremely wordy and filled with information that can easily overwhelm someone and cause them to lose motivation and focus. It really takes a lot of self-discipline to get yourself to sit down and read them. I am an EE major and the textbook material is rife with massive equations and I'm dyslexic so it was even worse than reading history textbooks in high school for me.

I'll give you some tips that have helped me:

If you get an assignment, do it ASAP. I mean ASAP even if it's not due for two weeks. The material is going to be fresh in your mind then and not three days later. Procrastination can potentially destroy your college career and it nearly did mine at one point.

There is an excellent program called ColdTurkey that I use whenever I feel I lack self-control and just want to sit and bitch on internet forums all day: http://getcoldturkey.com/
You can set blocks for when you are unable to use certain sites and/or programs on your computer so you have total focus in that block of time.

Finally, definitely don't rule major depression out as a cause for a lack of motivation. See a school counselor as soon as you can to help you out with depression and focus. Also, don't be discouraged if the first one doesn't work the first time. I think I had to see 6 different counselors before I found one that worked for me.

I don't know what your major is, but if you aren't finding it interesting, consider looking at other majors if you can. Just anything that remotely tickles your fancy. Also, please for the love of god, network and socialize in college. I don't mean go to keggers and orgies, I mean go to career fairs, make friends, join clubs, WHATEVER! Networking is more likely to get you a job than anything else, honest-to-god.

College makes you work hard, it takes time, and it can put you in a load of debt, but it has a payoff. Also, if you ever need to, you can visit SAL on this very forum if you have a question or really need help with something.

Cicero
Dec 17, 2003

Jumpjet, melta, jumpjet. Repeat for ten minutes or until victory is assured.

Konar posted:

Yeah but this guy has to take college business classes 2 or 3 times to get a C, don't really think he is a great candidate to teach himself as it's always harder motivating yourself than doing it in a traditional classroom environment.
Ok, but on the other hand, the OP claims that his problem is that the textbooks he's reading are too boring for him so he can't focus. If he self-teaches programming, he can use whatever books and online tutorials he wants and skip around to only the information he needs, so it should be no problem, right?

(you are 100% right)

Skinny King Pimp
Aug 25, 2011
Skinny Queen Wimp

Either change your major because yours is probably going to be worthless if that's the level of business classes at your school. You hate what you're studying, so you have an incredibly hard time forcing yourself to do it, which is essentially normal. If I hate a class, I am incapable of getting an A, but if I love a class, it takes essentially no effort to get an A.

And I dunno, look into the trades, too. You can make bank and if you're the kind of person who gets a lot of satisfaction out of working hard and making things, it'd be right up your alley.

Lagomorphic
Apr 21, 2008

AKA: Orthonormal

PleasureKevin posted:

If I could program, I would.

If only there were some sort of institution created to teach you things you don't know...

Seriously though your tech blogs business articles are primarily written to be entertainment your textbooks are primarily written to be a source of information about a subject you are presumably interested in. Introductory level textbooks are also going to be filled with a bunch of poo poo you may already know explained in great detail. You need to learn how to skim through those sections quickly so you can get to the things you don't already know.

If you want to create an app development startup a programming major with a minor in business would be much more practical. Idea guy isn't a job and you don't actually seem very interested in the actual "business" part of the tech business anyways.

Contra Calculus
Nov 6, 2009


Now sheathe your bloody sword, or I'll take it from you and shove it up some place even GRRM would never find


Feh, I don't know why everyone says to switch to STEM degrees. I have my bachelor's of science in electrical engineering and a 3.8 GPA for my undergrad and the market is still cutthroat for me. I still say networking will give you a better chance at getting a job than anything else.

Do what you enjoy doing. Honestly.

ArbitraryC
Jan 28, 2009
Pick a number, any number.

The secret is no one reads the text books unless they have a specific question they need answered by the textbook. For the most part if you pay attention in class and take notes, you should have 99% of homework and exam material covered, the textbook is there for when the in class examples/explanations left you with more questions about the material. This can change a bit when you get to the hardest classes in your program (or if you go on to grad school) in which case you might be expected to read the relevant chapters prior to class, but by a glance at the material you currently seem to be working on I would guess you really don't need to do much aside from skim those chapters.

Obvious exceptions for lit based classes where the required reading is a book, but I can tell you from personal experience that for most classes to fill out your general education requirement (like history/economics/etc) you can usually get away without even buying the textbook if you have at least one friend who has it on the rare occasions you can't just google the material.

Lagomorphic
Apr 21, 2008

AKA: Orthonormal

Contra Calculus posted:

Feh, I don't know why everyone says to switch to STEM degrees. I have my bachelor's of science in electrical engineering and a 3.8 GPA for my undergrad and the market is still cutthroat for me. I still say networking will give you a better chance at getting a job than anything else.

Do what you enjoy doing. Honestly.

I don't necessarily disagree with you but it really doesn't sound like he enjoys the business courses he's taking and he's far more interested in the development side of the tech industry. Also a business major is going to be about as useful as a philosophy major unless you're either planning on going for an MBA or an accounting certification.

Pycckuu
Sep 13, 2011


Contra Calculus posted:

Feh, I don't know why everyone says to switch to STEM degrees. I have my bachelor's of science in electrical engineering and a 3.8 GPA for my undergrad and the market is still cutthroat for me. I still say networking will give you a better chance at getting a job than anything else.

Do what you enjoy doing. Honestly.

There is a perception that these fields will have jobs available in the future even for those with a bachelor's degree. If you go to a jobs website and look for EE jobs, there will be a bunch of new positions posted every day. You won't see that for something like history or anthropology. Companies want some combination of good grades and experience in the form of internships, and those are also widely available for engineering and math students looking for a degree.

You are right though, the most important thing is to do what you like, since you'll be doing it for the next 40 years after you finish college.

anirtak
Apr 5, 2008


PleasureKevin posted:

It was only last semester that I realized I'm not even enrolled in a program properly. I have so little idea of what I'm doing and nobody to talk about general school stuff with. God do I ever love group projects because then I am assigned peers that have to listen to me now and then and I can get some idea of what a student is supposed to be doing. So far they are all super lazy and I have no idea how they get through it.

Most schools have services to help deal with this sort of thing. At my old school, it was called "Student Academic Success Service" and you could find a tiny link to it on the school's main homepage. They had 'career counsellors' who would sit down with you and look at what you wanted to do, which courses you'd already taken, and what courses would help you most over the next couple of years. Somebody doing that with you would definitely have caught that you weren't even enrolled in a program, and would help you make a plan so that you weren't taking endless intro courses with textbooks as worthless as the examples you've posted.

I worked for them for awhile too as a 'student mentor'...I basically got paid to sit in an office so people could drop in and talk poo poo about that general school stuff. Like, "is this prof just a dick or am I in the wrong?", "how long SHOULD this be taking me?", "does everyone hate course XYZ4001?" etc etc. You should see if there's something similar, since the main criteria for being hired were 'not lazy, aka knows how to work/can talk to people normally' and that'd be a better source of info than your lazy groupmates.

Ultimately, your school *wants* you to pass and do well, because a) not flunking out means you'll pay them a degree's worth of tuition and b) university rankings tend to look at how many graduates get jobs after graduation, (ie. they did at least ok), and they want to maximize that stat.

(edit: fixed a typo)

anirtak fucked around with this message at Jan 9, 2014 around 17:34

Nichole
Nov 5, 2009


From what you said about group projects I got the impression that you have no friends. You have no one to talk to? Are you really lonely? How often do you hang out with friends? I get the impression that your problem isn't just that you get bored with your books and can't stay focused, but that you are just overall unhappy. Talking to a doctor/therapist is a good start, but just being on medication will not be a big fix if you don't address other areas in your life that need work.

PleasureKevin
Jan 2, 2011

rip steve jobs
iOS 1 - iOS 7


Contra Calculus posted:

Finally, definitely don't rule major depression out as a cause for a lack of motivation. See a school counselor as soon as you can to help you out with depression and focus. Also, don't be discouraged if the first one doesn't work the first time. I think I had to see 6 different counselors before I found one that worked for me.

Do you have do be sad to be depressed? My mood seems very good to me.

I made a doctor's appointment just now and I guess I'll see a councillor today or tomorrow.

Skinny King Pimp posted:

And I dunno, look into the trades, too. You can make bank and if you're the kind of person who gets a lot of satisfaction out of working hard and making things, it'd be right up your alley.

When I was a kid I could not fathom how my Dad went to work each morning. I really dreaded the idea of working 9 to 5 ever since I was young. Later I would read about companies like Google, Apple and Zappos and finally be able to picture myself working and liking it. I think being able to take a small idea and grow it, and being able to see that my actions have a large affect on something, is what will keep me productive in a career. This is confirmed by my experience in the workforce. Usually at a new job I will try extremely hard (and usually stand out and do well) for about 3 months, but by month 6 I see how little influence I have and I become tardy and disinterested.


Cicero posted:

Ok, but on the other hand, the OP claims that his problem is that the textbooks he's reading are too boring for him so he can't focus. If he self-teaches programming, he can use whatever books and online tutorials he wants and skip around to only the information he needs, so it should be no problem, right?

I was pretty successfully able to learn Photoshop through such tutorials. Beginning around age 11 I have tried to teach myself things like Japanese or programming. I only got as far as a few phrases or things in QBasic. I don't know why I don't get very far. I guess I'm just lazy. Each time I try pick it up again I start a stage 1, and I feel that stage 1 is so easy that I get bored and quit. This is similar to what happens in college. I'll feel like the beginning of a course is too easy and slack off. But then by the time the course gets hard I've already missed stuff and I have to try catch up, which I never successfully do.

One time I went to a Japanese website and printed off about 100 pages. I thought the "Japanese" looked pretty weird. Turns out I didn't have a Japanese language pack enabled and it was all just random ASCII characters or whatever. God drat, think of the printer ink I wasted.

ArbitraryC
Jan 28, 2009
Pick a number, any number.

PleasureKevin posted:

I was pretty successfully able to learn Photoshop through such tutorials. Beginning around age 11 I have tried to teach myself things like Japanese or programming. I only got as far as a few phrases or things in QBasic. I don't know why I don't get very far. I guess I'm just lazy. Each time I try pick it up again I start a stage 1, and I feel that stage 1 is so easy that I get bored and quit. This is similar to what happens in college. I'll feel like the beginning of a course is too easy and slack off. But then by the time the course gets hard I've already missed stuff and I have to try catch up, which I never successfully do.
I find that claiming something is too easy or almost done already is like my number 1 excuse for not doing something I should do with respect to schoolwork. If it's so easy just do it. What I think you'll find is the entire course feels easy if you keep up with it the entire time, where things get hard is when you're trying to do something you haven't actually learned yet because you weren't paying attention when it was taught. If you just pay attention in class and take good notes, most of the material should feel fairly easy.

If you can't pay attention and take good notes, consider getting therapy/medication for your attention deficit issues?

Devils Affricate
Jan 22, 2010


It's not like your teachers will be able to telepathically tell whether or not you read every sentence of your text book. If you're running into moronically obvious information, just skim over it and look for something you actually don't know yet. Most introductory books will start by explaining everything with intense detail, because there's always going to be that one guy who has no idea what a basic business cycle is.

That said, if you like programming, for the love of god just switch to programming. Not because it's some kind of perfect solution of a major that will always get you jobs, but because it's the only thing so far that you mentioned having a real interest in so far. No poo poo you feel like you "can't program" right now. That's because you haven't studied it.

Romes
Jun 18, 2003



lol, this IS ridiculous... I mean a blank man with a job? Come onnnnnnnnnn!


Real Reply:
I thought similar things when I was in school so I just sucked it up and tried to find new ways to study. Try group studying where you read out loud and take turns. It's much more interesting coming from people whom hopefully you find a bit more interesting. Plus you can quiz each other, etc. You can try studying from materials online as well. Research the topics in the chapters and find them on Google. For me, honestly, I don't know why but I enjoy reading things from a screen WAY MORE than reading them from a book.

Also, when you finally graduate and never "have" to read anything again, that's when you'll find your thirst for knowledge will kick in... because now you're not forced to learn, you just want to (hopefully). At least that's how it is for me. I hated any reading assignment ever given to me, and pretty much never did it (even though I could read pages and pages about things that interested me online). Now I find I love learning anything and everything I can. Knowledge leads to wisdom.

Lord Of Texas
Dec 26, 2006



ArbitraryC posted:

The secret is no one reads the text books unless they have a specific question they need answered by the textbook. For the most part if you pay attention in class and take notes, you should have 99% of homework and exam material covered, the textbook is there for when the in class examples/explanations left you with more questions about the material.

For the level of class it looks like you're taking OP (intro to accounting), this is pretty much the case. Just attend every class, pay attention and take notes, skim the chapters, and you'll do fine. The need to read the chapters does vary from class to class, so just pay attention to what the professor says.

When you do truly need to study, grab your study materials and get the gently caress away from the internet. Studying is never going to be more interesting than whatever bullshit you can find on the internet, but in the long term it is much more rewarding than whatever dumb video game history article you were reading.

quote:

Feh, I don't know why everyone says to switch to STEM degrees. I have my bachelor's of science in electrical engineering and a 3.8 GPA for my undergrad and the market is still cutthroat for me. I still say networking will give you a better chance at getting a job than anything else.

Do what you enjoy doing. Honestly.

Your individual anecdote and circumstances do not undo the massive amount of statistics that show some degree paths have much better job prospects and earning potential than others. "Doing what you enjoy" with no thought given to your future earnings is childish and idealistic. The reality is most people enjoy what they are good at and don't enjoy what they suck at. Find something you are competent at that has good potential for earning, and if it's not your ~one true calling~ then tackle your ~one true calling~ during your free time.

sforzacio
Nov 6, 2012



Why in the gently caress would you quit drinking in college? You need to pick it back up man.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qYx7YG0RsFY

College Ruled
Apr 25, 2012

"It seems another associate has taken my friendly attitude as to insinuate desires that would exist outside the bounds of professional courtesy."

Courtesy of: 01001100 01001100 01001010 01001011 01010011 01101001 01001100 01101011


Lord Of Texas posted:

Your individual anecdote and circumstances do not undo the massive amount of statistics that show some degree paths have much better job prospects and earning potential than others. "Doing what you enjoy" with no thought given to your future earnings is childish and idealistic. The reality is most people enjoy what they are good at and don't enjoy what they suck at. Find something you are competent at that has good potential for earning, and if it's not your ~one true calling~ then tackle your ~one true calling~ during your free time.

You can definitely find a major or trade that you won't hate and, in turn, won't sink you into debt. It's no use training for a job you already think you'll hate and then only be able to take home about 2/3 of your pay after loans.

I don't even have a degree yet, but my job experience in a STEM field has net me a shitload of money.

Vomik
Jul 29, 2003

Melting.


Are you at a CC?

Tbh, if it takes 3 tries to get a C in a class which would require no textbook studying , you are probably hosed.

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Lord Of Texas
Dec 26, 2006



College Ruled posted:

You can definitely find a major or trade that you won't hate and, in turn, won't sink you into debt. It's no use training for a job you already think you'll hate and then only be able to take home about 2/3 of your pay after loans.

I don't even have a degree yet, but my job experience in a STEM field has net me a shitload of money.

Other than cases where you are 100% sure you will despise a certain career (vegan in the meat packing industry, etc.), most college students have no idea what they will actually enjoy anyway. Until you're gotten to the point in a degree where you're doing internships or other entry-level work in your field, you won't really know what a career is like anyway. Not to mention that the experience of individual jobs and employers within an industry vary wildly in terms of how they play out.

Obviously don't pursue a career you know you'll hate hate, and include "what you enjoy" as a factor, but too many people parrot "just do what you enjoy and things will sort themselves out!" when that advice is tremendously naive and dangerous.

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