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AvianPundit
Feb 14, 2013

Lollercide

My husband and I looked into adopting a dog around November time. We asked three different organizations.

First we went to a rescue, and as soon my husband and I mentioned we live in an apartment (a spacious two-bedroom), it was a deal-killer. We have a tiny front yard as well. The idiots we spoke to at this rescue couldn't seem to grasp the concept of "walk" and "park" for the dog's exercise needs. They kept maintaining that our living space was too small. And I agree that while an apartment isn't the most ideal situation for a dog, it's still very doable. Just ask all the happy, healthy dogs in Manhattan. I pointed out that if we adopt a dog from them, it would be far better off with us than in a kennel--it would be getting a lot more exercise and it would have a lot more room. The woman talking to us was stumped for a moment, and then she got rude and pissy and stuck to her guns anyway. We asked for our application fee back (I had to mention a cousin in the IRS who can investigate their non-profit status, and then she gave it back to us.)

Next we went to an animal shelter. They called our landlord to make sure it was cool and checked some references, and all of that panned out. Then they called us in again, assured us the process was "almost done" but they just had a few more questions. After that, we would be bringing home the cream and white pitbull we clicked with and were quickly falling in love with. During these "few more questions", they grilled us about our plans for children. I'm 26 and my husband is 28. We have no plans for kids in the near future. We told her that. She asked us about five years from now. We said it's possible our minds might change, but that's not something we're thinking about at the moment. Then she began asking us dumb, pointless questions like "What if you have a child five years from now and she turns out to be allergic to the dog?" and "What if you have a child and the dog bites her?" even though this dog we were trying to adopt was billed as being good around kids of all ages! The lady grilling us didn't like that we were unable to give her a clear answer to her what-ifs because they don't even apply. Molly the sweet, loving pitbull is still up for adoption because a lot of people don't want them. They have a bad rap. My husband and I were willing to overlook the stigma and give a friendly pitbull and loving yet firm environment, but the shelter decided to punish us because we don't know whether or not we'll have kids in the next decade. I would have understood her position if we said we would be trying to have kids soon, but we said just the opposite of that! They denied a forever home to Molly because we don't have a loving crystal ball, even though we assured the interviewer we would do everything possible to make sure everyone in our family (dog included) is happy.

The last place we checked (a humane society) fell through right away because they strongly urged home visits and hinted that they wouldn't consider you if you don't agree to them--and if they don't like what they see, they can terminate the adoption process without telling you why or take the dog back without telling you why. I value my privacy. They're not my parole officers, I'm just trying to get a drat dog from them.

These experiences left a bad taste in my mouth. My husband and I went on vacation in December, and agreed that after we got back we would just go to a pound and walk out with a dog for the $30 fee or whatever it is. I can't fathom how they turn so many people away for such dumb, pointless reasons and then they complain that they're overwhelmed by too many unwanted animals.

But then during our vacation, we encountered a stray and decided to take him home with us so I guess it all happened for a very good reason. Had any of these attempts not fallen through, we would not have this loving, sweet muttfreeloader living with us and enriching our lives.

However, trying to adopt a dog was very frustrating at the time.

AvianPundit fucked around with this message at Jan 17, 2014 around 16:17

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cryingscarf
Feb 4, 2007

~*FaBuLoUs*~


Pounds ARE shelters. Same words for the same thing. IIRC shelters tend to be city run and will be more flexible on adoption criteria (some will adopt to whoever has money, others will do a questionnaire/interview owners a little and sometimes do home visits. It ranges). Humane societies sometimes can be just like shelters in their criteria, but some go a step further and do home visits. Rescues most of the time are the extreme end of the spectrum where no one is a good dog owner ever. There are exceptions to these, of course, but this is what I have noticed from experience. Think of it as you would shopping for a used car. There are good places and bad places, and it is up to you to figure out which one works for you.

Home visits aren't bad if they are done right. I have seen them done where someone just comes in to make sure you're not a psycho hoarder (animal or item), that your house isn't unsafe, and get a feel for what kind of person you are. At the shelter I used to volunteer for, we asked if people would be okay with a home visit even though they rarely did them just as a test. If they say no then it was a red flag.

When I was looking to get a dog, I fell in love with this little italian greyhound I found on Petfinder, but of course he was in an iggy rescue. I contacted them and things were going well up to the point of getting a home visit and they randomly cut it off there saying I should look elsewhere. It was heartbreaking but then I went to the local shelter to check out a puppy that caught my eye but I thought would be too energetic for this period in my life. The shelter did a little questionnaire, asked for references, talked to my landlord, and asked for my parents contact info (requirement for college students). I got the stupid mutt and I don't regret it <3

cryingscarf fucked around with this message at Jan 17, 2014 around 16:25

Esmerelda
Dec 1, 2009


I volunteer at a great shelter (city ran, 93% live release rate last year ) and help out a few other rescues when I have time and there are times where we just say "no" to people because of their circumstances and/or the dog they're looking at.

The city shelter does not do home visits but they do make you fill out an application and, if you rent, call your landlord unless you have your lease with you that states it's a-okay. Pitbulls, of which there are many, have an extra step as far as getting specific permission if there's a HOA or landlord involved because "landlord won't allow" is a pretty common reason for pits being surrendered. Also, the shelter staff relies heavily on volunteers to give feedback on the potential adopter and the dogs themselves which can lead to the staff denying the adoption. That isn't done out of spite but mostly because something raised the "will be re-surrendered in the future" flag.

The rescues that I occasionally volunteer for range from being more strict to not strict enough. It really just varies depending on the organization.

Our dog came from the shelter I volunteer at. We rent, are gone for 9 hours a day, have cats, have kids that visit and are trying to have a kid ourselves. The dog we adopted is cool with all of that, which is why we picked her. Unfortunately many people come in and say "ooo, pretty" and don't bother to think of how the animal will fit in with their living situation. Especially with pitbulls who range from dog aggressive/high-prey/drive/only dog ever to my dog that who is lazier than the cats which is why our shelter is a bit more aggressive with questions where they are concerned.


As for your specific experience, apartment living would only come into play here if you're looking at a high energy breed (or dog.) The next set of questions would revolve around how long you would be gone, where the dog would be while you were gone, access to the outdoors, your willingness to exercise your dog and all of that stuff that keeps "dog eats everything, take it back" conversations from happening. We have volunteers with pits who live in apartments, it would be silly to deny someone else just because of that.

Slugworth
Feb 18, 2001


For every well intentioned and potentially good pet owner that has trouble with the policies, fifty people who really shouldn't have pets get weeded out. I almost got rejected when adopting my dog because a girlfriend and I had adopted a cat seven years earlier, and my girlfriend took it when we broke up and I never legally transferred ownership. It was in a good home with her, I hadn't abandoned it, but on paper I looked no different from the people who get bored of a pet and dump it on someone else. Because of my interview however, they let it slide.

Superconsndar
Jul 4, 2007

hello hello frankie you called I can't hear a thing


Just go to the pound like you're planning. That poo poo is exhausting and a lot of rescues/shelters shoot themselves in the foot constantly with it.

Minclark
Dec 24, 2013


Slugworth posted:

For every well intentioned and potentially good pet owner that has trouble with the policies, fifty people who really shouldn't have pets get weeded out. I almost got rejected when adopting my dog because a girlfriend and I had adopted a cat seven years earlier, and my girlfriend took it when we broke up and I never legally transferred ownership. It was in a good home with her, I hadn't abandoned it, but on paper I looked no different from the people who get bored of a pet and dump it on someone else. Because of my interview however, they let it slide.

Wow! any idea how long that sorta stuff stays on file? We had something similar happen a few years back and I guess I should go take care of paperwork before I plan on getting a new dog.

OP: But yeah going to a rescue is a hastle. 5 acres of land 1,500 sq foot house for 2 adults and they were pointing too I didn't have a fence to keep coyotes out. Don't mind the hen house the coyotes would just go straight for the dog. So we went to craigs list and adopted someones dog whose owner had died and the next of kin were cat people. Love my adorable mutts!

AvianPundit
Feb 14, 2013

Lollercide


The first rescue we looked into was a bust. The process was cut off as soon as we said we live in an apartment. They didn't bother checking with the landlord, they didn't bother asking us about our daily schedules and physical activity. While my husband has a full-time job, I work (mostly) from home and if I have to step out for work, it's for no more than a few hours on any given day and I am very athletic and outdoorsy (my husband and I both are). They didn't give us a chance to explain all this. They just assumed that any dog would be unhappy in an apartment or any space that isn't the size of a small mansion. *sigh*

The shelter (second place we checked) rejected us for a completely different reason after vetting the pet policy with the land lord (he said it was cool), asking about breed policies, and checking our references. All that stuff panned out, and I completely understand why they do that. They just hate people who may or may not have children one day in the very distant future. And this place has rejected a friend of mine because they already have young-ish kids (7 and 10).

Engineer Lenk
Aug 28, 2003

Mnogo losho e!

Slugworth posted:

For every well intentioned and potentially good pet owner that has trouble with the policies, fifty people who really shouldn't have pets get weeded out. I almost got rejected when adopting my dog because a girlfriend and I had adopted a cat seven years earlier, and my girlfriend took it when we broke up and I never legally transferred ownership. It was in a good home with her, I hadn't abandoned it, but on paper I looked no different from the people who get bored of a pet and dump it on someone else. Because of my interview however, they let it slide.

This, though it may be more optics than reality. The folks in the shelter form opinions and make judgments based on the people who surrender animals. It's a balancing act between doing a deep dive into your life - badgering you with questions and requiring home visits, or accepting that you may send some dogs into unstable situations where they'd get bounced back to you, abandoned or euthed. Some folks get super-protective over adopting out pits (which in the shelter where I volunteer have to jump over much higher bars than other breeds), because they know if the dog doesn't work out and the owners don't bring it back it'll probably be euthed.

demozthenes
Feb 14, 2007

Wicked pissa little critta


AvianPundit posted:

"What if you have a child five years from now and she turns out to be allergic to the dog?" and "What if you have a child and the dog bites her?"

Why would you consider these questions pointless? I'd say that they're pretty important things to ask yourself before bringing home an animal.

Superconsndar
Jul 4, 2007

hello hello frankie you called I can't hear a thing


If I had a child and the dog bit it I'd either rehome or euth the dog depending on the circumstances, and I'd tell them so. If a shelter turned me down because of this I would laugh SO hard.

Fluffy Bunnies
Jan 9, 2009

Half Dog.

Half Horse.

All Awesome.

I'd have skipped out of all of those shelters calling random people on craigslist who want to get rid of their dogs for free and aren't a loving inquisition

wtftastic
Jul 24, 2006

"In private, we will be mercifully free from the opinions of imbeciles and fools."

demozthenes posted:

Why would you consider these questions pointless? I'd say that they're pretty important things to ask yourself before bringing home an animal.

If they appear otherwise normal and responsible, then what purpose does interrogating her reproductive decisions/ schedules serve?

I love being asked by people who are more or less strangers when I plan on having kids!

(I adopted B with my boyfriend in tow, and no one asked me about it.)

Siochain
May 24, 2005

"can they get rid of any humans who are fans of shitheads like Kanye West, 50 Cent, or any other piece of crap "artist" who thinks they're all that?

And also get rid of anyone who has posted retarded shit on the internet."


The place we got our dog and both cats from is good - application process (free), ~maybe~ a home visit and a no-questions-asked 2 week "return" window after adopting. The home visit (we had one when we got the dog) was literally them driving up, knocking on the door, and confirming that we lived there and it wasn't a fetid shithole.

My brother tried to adopt a dog from the local humane society after his two 12/13 year old large-breed mutts passed away. He lives on a farm, has tons of time, and loves dogs. They would ~not~ let him adopt a dog if he wasn't willing to fence in the entire quarter-section of land he lived on. Yeah. So he went onto our version of Craigslist and ended up with a pair of dog-aggressive mutts he had to put down after they tore into each other out of the blue (yeah yeah long story not my dogs not my business). Now he's just bummed on getting another dog.

tldr; gently caress shelters that are stupid

demozthenes
Feb 14, 2007

Wicked pissa little critta


It's probably a good idea to have the next 10-12 years roughly plotted out in terms of major life-changing events before taking home a young animal. You're not doing the shelter or the dog a big charitable favor if you end up returning it because you suddenly don't have a yard or if you decide to have a kid.

Don't take it so personally that you weren't picked as a good fit for this particular dog. Nobody is "punishing" you. Why don't you get a better idea of your answers with regards to kids, yards, living situations, etc. first and then go ask some coordinators about the available dogs that would be the best fit for your life, instead of getting attached to one specific photo on Petfinder?

wtftastic posted:

If they appear otherwise normal and responsible, then what purpose does interrogating her reproductive decisions/ schedules serve?

You don't think that kids at home/plans to have kids is an important factor to consider before sending an animal to that home? It's the first question out of every coordinator's mouths at both shelters where I volunteer.

wtftastic
Jul 24, 2006

"In private, we will be mercifully free from the opinions of imbeciles and fools."

demozthenes posted:

It's probably a good idea to have the next 10-12 years roughly plotted out in terms of major life-changing events before taking home a young animal. You're not doing the shelter or the dog a big charitable favor if you end up returning it because you suddenly don't have a yard or if you decide to have a kid.

Well I guess my lack of trust fund and home ownership rules me out, sorry Bailey, bringing you back to the shelter. I don't even know what the gently caress I'll be doing in 10 years, let alone 5.

You asked about when people are going to have kids, not if they have them. If they have them, then yes, that matters because you can figure stuff out with a real live person instead of some theoretical future child.

cryingscarf
Feb 4, 2007

~*FaBuLoUs*~


Be realistic for a moment, if all shelters and rescues were like petstores and let anyone with the money and ability to sign a form take the dog, people would be on here bitching about THAT. Shelters have their policies of figuring out if people are a right match to a dog. It is dependent on area or manager. You see it all the time here on PI. "Go to a shelter and they will be able to match you with an adult dog that fits what you need". How would they do this without asking about your personal life or maybe doing a home visit?

Another example is the shelter I got Dex that had the policy of college students needing parental approval. That was VERY reasonable to me. Because it just takes one phone call and if everything is fine then the process rolls on. I am sure a lot of college students impulsively trying to get a dog were stopped by this requirement (as they should have been). I get that it is frustrating when shelters go over the top with criteria/rescues in general. But don't let those frustrations leak over into shelters doing the right thing.

Edit: if you go to a *REASONABLE* shelter and have nothing to hide, then whats the harm in going through the process. It is their job to wonder if you are John and Jane Smith down the street that have no idea what you are doing, because that is what they mostly deal with. Don't get offended by it, be honest with them, and they will see that you know what you are doing (or get your resources TO know what you are doing) and help you get a good fit of a dog.

AvianPundit
Feb 14, 2013

Lollercide



That is not what happened. We did not get attached to any pictures on Petfinder. We told both rescues that they should decide which dogs would be a good match for our lives--the pitbull I mentioned was picked out by the shelter for us based on our lifestyle and what we told them, and then we just happened to click when we were introduced to her. At no point did we insist on any particular dog. We walked into each one of them figuring they were the experts at matching personalities and lifestyles to pets. We mentioned that we wanted a dog on the calmer side, probably a middle aged or senior dog. That was our only request.

We do not plan to have kids. Right now, I don't want any. I don't see myself wanting any. I said that to them. Then they asked if there's a chance we'll change our minds in five or ten years. We were honest and we said said that yes, there is a possibility we may end up having kids in five to ten years but we will probably not. My husband and I are 28 and 26 respectively. We may want kids when we're 38 and 36, but that's such a far-off what-if scenario that they should not have posed such specific questions. We were honest, and we didn't have anything to hide. That's why they rejected us. I should have told them I was infertile or some poo poo like that.

Our answer to the allergy question: "We would try to find the best possible rehoming solution for the dog." (WTF else would we do?)

Our answer to the bite question: "That depends on what prompted the bite. If the dog bit our child seemingly out of nowhere then we would probably have it euthanized. If our child instigated the lashing out, then we would have to think hard. We would probably call a trainer and have a long talk with the child about how to behave around animals--and that's if the kid was clearly pestering the hell out of it. It would honestly depend on the circumstances."

From the horse's mouth, I kid you not, we were rejected shortly thereafter because "We see that the dog would not come first in your family if you have kids." We said, "We don't even know if we will. Probably not. We told you that." She said, "Well, you might!"

This shelter has a history of not adopting pets out to homes with children, though.

AvianPundit fucked around with this message at Jan 17, 2014 around 20:29

cryingscarf
Feb 4, 2007

~*FaBuLoUs*~


AvianPundit posted:

This shelter has a history of not adopting pets out to homes with children, though.

Then this is one of those shelters with stupid criteria and see my comment earlier on finding a shelter that isn't crazy (because those are more common than the crazy ones, in my experience). My last reply wasn't aimed at you but at everyone getting butthurt about home visits.

Engineer Lenk
Aug 28, 2003

Mnogo losho e!

AvianPundit posted:

Our answer to the allergy question: "We would try to find the best possible rehoming solution for the dog." (WTF else would we do?)

Our answer to the bite question: "That depends on what prompted the bite. If the dog bit our child seemingly out of nowhere then we would probably have it euthanized. If our child instigated the lashing out, then we would have to think hard. We would probably call a trainer and have a long talk with the child about how to behave around animals--and that's if the kid was clearly pestering the hell out of it. It would honestly depend on the circumstances."

From the horse's mouth, I kid you not, we were rejected shortly thereafter because "We see that the dog would not come first in your family if you have kids." We said, "We don't even know if we will. Probably not. We told you that." She said, "Well, you might!"

This shelter has a history of not adopting pets out to homes with children, though.

This is just nuts. Crazy petladies have a way of throwing their weight around in a number of organizations (though this is more frequent in rescues than in shelters). Sorry for your bad luck with those guys, good luck with your freeloader.

mcswizzle
Jul 26, 2009


AvianPundit posted:

"We see that the dog would not come first in your family if you have kids."

e: for some reason this got under my skin. anecdote follows of my brothers experience with his dog after his first son was born

As a person who loves my dogs very much, and will also likely at some point in the future procreate...wouldn't you generally put your family first, in a situation where the dog was becoming aggressive? Not to say I would euthanize the dog, but diligently work to rehome her to a good and loving place.

I mean, first and foremost the goal is to cohabit with the animal in a successful and happy way. Once it's realized that that is impossible, you move to find the next best solution.

My brother and his wife rescued a black lab mutt who got up to be ~110 lbs by the time he was grown. He was a great dog, albeit he had no idea he was so big. When my first nephew was born, Moxie continued to be a great dog for a few months. There was never any unsupervised interaction between nephew and dog. And what interaction there was tended to be good. My brother and his wife have always been responsible dog owners, and tend to be very careful and meticulous with any decisions.

Moxie, after a few months, started to show signs of aggression around my nephew. He never caused harm, never reacted to any situation but was obviously agitated by the kid. Moxie would growl and snarl when nephew was around, and while they did their best to manage the situation, it became clear that it was not going to improve. They had a local trainer (not sure if it was a behaviorist) come to the home and while it's possible they might have been able to reduce the reaction in the dog over time, my nephew was growing and becoming more independent. Meaning he would be more handsy, harder to keep contained and almost impossible to watch 100% of the time (you can't crate kids, I guess).

They agonized over what to do for more than a month, and after discussing with each other, and the rescue from which they got Moxie in the first place, came to the decision to surrender him back to the rescue (turns out this was part of the contract they had signed initially adopting Moxie). My brother made the trip on his own with Moxie, stopped and got him his favorite meal (burger king burger!) and spent the weekend in a hotel 3 hours away from his home so that he could properly say goodbye to the dog he had had for years at that point.

Honestly, I don't know what happened to Moxie after being surrendered. I like to think he got adopted to a no-kid home somewhere, but I can't honestly know. But I do completely agree with how he handled the situation. And I can't imagine anyone being in the same situation that would say "we had the dog first, I guess we'll put the kid up for adoption instead". And I think it's ridiculous, hyperbolic as it may be, for someone to ask a question (and expect an answer) to that effect.

mcswizzle fucked around with this message at Jan 17, 2014 around 21:06

demozthenes
Feb 14, 2007

Wicked pissa little critta


OP, are you located in a place like Manhattan or Brooklyn or San Francisco or LA or Cambridge? I've noticed that certain areas have a higher concentration of crazy rescues vs. regular ones, they tend to be both wealthy and liberal.

AvianPundit posted:

From the horse's mouth, I kid you not, we were rejected shortly thereafter because "We see that the dog would not come first in your family if you have kids." We said, "We don't even know if we will. Probably not. We told you that." She said, "Well, you might!"

This shelter has a history of not adopting pets out to homes with children, though.

Batshit, find another shelter.

Abbeh
May 23, 2006

When I grow up I mean to be
A Lion large and fierce to see.
(Thank you, Das Boo!)

Here's a good answer to anyone ever who asks you "do you plan on having kids in the next few years":
That's absolutely none of your business.

I've been asked by shelters and also by bosses, and it's never an OK question to ask someone regardless of what they say.
We had a shelter refuse to let us even PET a dog because they didn't think she'd be a good fit (I bet she would have been a better fit than Zoso...) and also after we started the adoption process and they OK'd it with our landlord, they gave the dog we'd looked at to someone else while we were driving over to pick him up. When we asked why they said they didn't like the dog going to an apartment.

Skizzles
Feb 21, 2009

Live, Laugh, Love,
Poop in a box.


AvianPundit posted:

"We see that the dog would not come first in your family if you have kids."

The hell is this poo poo? Do they honestly expect you to try and rehome the kids instead or something? Rescues/shelters like this piss me off to no end.

I have volunteered or worked for a couple of shelters. One was a city-run shelter, one was a private non-profit humane society. I've worked with a couple of rescues as well. None of them had such strict, asinine policies. The only thing most of them required was for you to fill out an adoption application, pay the fee, and introduce your current dog(s) to the new dog to make sure they get along. The most extensive thing I had to do when doing adoptions was call landlords to make sure pets are okay - perfectly acceptable. I think home visits are a little extreme, but are totally fine as long as they're just making sure you don't live in a poo poo hole. People who get pissy and refuse to adopt to you because your house isn't ~*~*PERFECT~*~ or you don't have a fenced yard need to get hosed.

Point is, I know some shelters/rescues can be annoying as hell, OP. Just keep looking. Every shelter is different and I'm sure you can find a dog that fits with you really well. Good luck. And if they ask anymore goddamn questions about "what if the dog bites your kid" and poo poo, just say you'll hire a behaviorist to work with you. That is probably the only thing that will make them happy.

Bananaquiter
Aug 20, 2008

Ron's not here.

As an adoptions counselor, I've never even considered asking people if they plan on having kids soon (I do give pregnant women the stink eye when they ask to meet puppies though, like hell lady). I work in an offsite and even though we have no home visits and same-day adoptions our main branch has criticized us for having too many obstacles like "required dog meets." The main branch has, on the other hand, adopted out animals to a hoarder, exchange students, a literal homeless person (like he didn't have an address, and they still gave him a puppy!), and an animal abuser (the poor dog escaped from the property, was scanned and returned to this person, and then their property was later raided by humane society). So I guess I consider them too lax.

I only call landlords for pitbull adoptions or people living in apartments in [college town].

Double Plus Good
Nov 4, 2009


I didn't really know much about pound vs. shelter vs. rescue stuff before I got Angel. A lot of the organizations I checked out while browsing around in my area had some weird policies, like signing a contract consenting to home visits at any time even after adopting. And stuff like the profiles being written in first person and calling the dog's previous owner "a bad mommy" and stuff like that. Also, I don't know if this is a southern thing, but almost all the rescues I looked at required a fenced yard, even for small breeds known for apartment compatibility and low energy dogs. I think there's this conception down here that all dogs need a big ol' yard to run and poop in, and that if you live in an apartment you're probably on welfare or something. So I figured if it came down to that I'd just put my parents' house info down on all the applications, since one of them would be coming with me to check the dogs out anyway.

But yeah, I get the frustration. You're good people and you know you're good people, but crazy animal people have probably had a ton of run-ins with even crazier animal people, so they're wary. All the paperwork and hurdles to jump is why so many people go to craiglist or some rando whose had puppies, though. I was talking to my uncle, who wanted to get their family a dog, about all the local organizations and how great my little dog is. As soon as I mentioned paperwork he was like "nah." Got their dog off craigslist from a hoarder!

Rodent Mortician
Mar 17, 2009

SQUEAK.


Double Plus Good posted:

I think there's this conception down here that all dogs need a big ol' yard to run and poop in, and that if you live in an apartment you're probably on welfare or something. So I figured if it came down to that I'd just put my parents' house info down on all the applications, since one of them would be coming with me to check the dogs out anyway.

I think there's a tendency in more southern areas to let dogs roam free and the fenced yard thing has become bigger lately. My uncle boasted last year at Christmas that the local pound wouldn't adopt him puppies because he didn't have a fence, and none of his other dogs had had problems without a fence, yadda yadda, and he showed them because he got two puppies from a coworker and ARE RIGHTS, etc.

The two puppies he adopted got hit by a car about 2 weeks after being adopted because they were in the road eating roadkill.

Double Plus Good
Nov 4, 2009


Rodent Mortician posted:

I think there's a tendency in more southern areas to let dogs roam free and the fenced yard thing has become bigger lately. My uncle boasted last year at Christmas that the local pound wouldn't adopt him puppies because he didn't have a fence, and none of his other dogs had had problems without a fence, yadda yadda, and he showed them because he got two puppies from a coworker and ARE RIGHTS, etc.

The two puppies he adopted got hit by a car about 2 weeks after being adopted because they were in the road eating roadkill.

Yeah, when I think about it I do see less roaming dogs now than when I was a kid. Still a ton of outside cats, though. It just sucks for people with ample apartment room who understand about leashes and dog parks and all that. That sucks about the puppies.

Fauxtool
Oct 21, 2008

Anime is serious business!

I went through a similar line of bullshit with my second one.
The rescue employee did a home visit and asked me to rearrange my living room and to install baby gates all over the place. I did a trial stay and she called me so many times during i told her to keep the loving dog. They sound so desperate to find the dogs homes until you actually try and get a dog.

My first shelter dog was great. "He likes you, pay us and he's yours." "Here's some food and a leash"

Fauxtool fucked around with this message at Jan 18, 2014 around 06:37

Sassy Pickle
Sep 4, 2004


I've gotten five different dogs from the pound over the years, never made too big a fuss over picking them out. Each has been a great dog.

AvianPundit
Feb 14, 2013

Lollercide

demozthenes posted:

OP, are you located in a place like Manhattan or Brooklyn or San Francisco or LA or Cambridge? I've noticed that certain areas have a higher concentration of crazy rescues vs. regular ones, they tend to be both wealthy and liberal.


Batshit, find another shelter.

We are in the N. Jersey/NYC area, yes.

demozthenes posted:

It's probably a good idea to have the next 10-12 years roughly plotted out in terms of major life-changing events before taking home a young animal. You're not doing the shelter or the dog a big charitable favor if you end up returning it because you suddenly don't have a yard or if you decide to have a kid.

We do have the next 5-10 years roughly plotted out. We live in a pet-friendly apartment right now, plan to stick with our careers, will be looking to buy a house in this area within the next 3-5 years, and we don't want kids.

It's only honest and realistic to acknowledge that there is a small possibility we might decide to make some adjustments along the way--and this can of worms was only opened because the rear end in a top hat who performed our final interview decided to grill us about it. The guy who did our preliminary interview asked a lot of the same questions but he was fine with "No, we don't want children" "Is there even a slight chance you might change your minds?" "Perhaps, but not in a very, very long time."

I didn't know we had to commit a blood pact that we would stick to the proposed outline.

AvianPundit fucked around with this message at Jan 18, 2014 around 15:27

Rodent Mortician
Mar 17, 2009

SQUEAK.


Double Plus Good posted:

Yeah, when I think about it I do see less roaming dogs now than when I was a kid. Still a ton of outside cats, though. It just sucks for people with ample apartment room who understand about leashes and dog parks and all that. That sucks about the puppies.

Yeah, and I think the problem is a combination of rescues not being flexible and of bad things happening when you bend your own rules, which then kind of reinforces the 'people are jerks' mindset that develops. Like, as an example, we insisted that people not put their guinea pigs/rabbits/etc in their kid's bedrooms mainly because so many people develop allergies when they're huffing hay dust all night, and it seemed like every time someone came to us and seemed perfect except that, and we bent the rule, we'd get the animals back within a year because of allergies.

Minclark
Dec 24, 2013


Rodent Mortician posted:

Yeah, and I think the problem is a combination of rescues not being flexible and of bad things happening when you bend your own rules, which then kind of reinforces the 'people are jerks' mindset that develops. Like, as an example, we insisted that people not put their guinea pigs/rabbits/etc in their kid's bedrooms mainly because so many people develop allergies when they're huffing hay dust all night, and it seemed like every time someone came to us and seemed perfect except that, and we bent the rule, we'd get the animals back within a year because of allergies.

This is a well explained reason for a rule. I wish more of the rules had posted reasons like this. Honestly talking more than just shelters with that request but shelters too!

Hardwood Floor
Sep 25, 2011



Had issues like this with the rescue we got our cats from. Loads of requirements, and when we actually got the cats their level of care at the rescue was not the best. Eye problems, worms everywhere, and weird scrapes all over their paw pads. Also one of them got microchipped twice and we never received the microchip info for him.
There's also a no kill shelter I swing by occasionally since we're looking at dogs and it's always chaos there. Sick animals on the floor, and set up in such a way that if you pick up an animal or put it on a leash and walk out, no one would notice. Ridiculously awful. Meanwhile the kill shelter is awesome. Organized, friendly, always have someone helping out in every room.

Aerofallosov
Oct 3, 2007

It was so peaceful beneath the glittering stars.


Skizzles posted:

The hell is this poo poo? Do they honestly expect you to try and rehome the kids instead or something? Rescues/shelters like this piss me off to no end.

I have volunteered or worked for a couple of shelters. One was a city-run shelter, one was a private non-profit humane society. I've worked with a couple of rescues as well. None of them had such strict, asinine policies. The only thing most of them required was for you to fill out an adoption application, pay the fee, and introduce your current dog(s) to the new dog to make sure they get along. The most extensive thing I had to do when doing adoptions was call landlords to make sure pets are okay - perfectly acceptable. I think home visits are a little extreme, but are totally fine as long as they're just making sure you don't live in a poo poo hole. People who get pissy and refuse to adopt to you because your house isn't ~*~*PERFECT~*~ or you don't have a fenced yard need to get hosed.

Point is, I know some shelters/rescues can be annoying as hell, OP. Just keep looking. Every shelter is different and I'm sure you can find a dog that fits with you really well. Good luck. And if they ask anymore goddamn questions about "what if the dog bites your kid" and poo poo, just say you'll hire a behaviorist to work with you. That is probably the only thing that will make them happy.

I think it stems from the kids doing things like provoking the dog (intentionally or unintentionally), the dog bites and either gets returned or put down. Or even just abandoned somewhere. Or Little Timmy wants a dog, doesn't realize how much work it is, the dog gets neglected, goes bonkers and gets returned, put down or abandoned.

Sort of like the pregnant ladies who want to meet puppies, then have to rehome it as soon as they have the baby. I see plenty of postings of cats and dogs being given up because they just had a baby or kids and don't want/can't keep it anymore.

That said, the shelter sounds overly anal about it.

AvianPundit
Feb 14, 2013

Lollercide

Aerofallosov posted:

I think it stems from the kids doing things like provoking the dog (intentionally or unintentionally), the dog bites and either gets returned or put down. Or even just abandoned somewhere. Or Little Timmy wants a dog, doesn't realize how much work it is, the dog gets neglected, goes bonkers and gets returned, put down or abandoned.

Sort of like the pregnant ladies who want to meet puppies, then have to rehome it as soon as they have the baby. I see plenty of postings of cats and dogs being given up because they just had a baby or kids and don't want/can't keep it anymore.

That said, the shelter sounds overly anal about it.

Yeah, there's a history of dogs getting surrendered and/or euthed because of jackass kids trolling them until they nip or bite. It sucks for everyone all around. Children are rough on dogs. I get it. Shelters could try to eliminate these situations by placing the dogs they deem pretty bombproof in homes with young children or with couples they think might have children within a dog's lifetime. Some of the crap my childhood dog put up with from me? Some of the crap my brother's rescue dog puts up with from my young nieces (5 and 8)? ...There are so many family-friendly dogs who would be fine with kids, and it's the shelter's job to determine if a dog is or not. Sometimes poo poo happens, and it's unfortunate when it does, but shelters shouldn't poo-poo placing dogs in homes with kids if they deem the situation appropriate. I understand the shelter's hesitation if a family with young children wants a specific dog that she shelter deemed ill-suited for, say, children under 12 because they really want a labradoodle and they fell in love with the pics on Petfinder.

In fact, one of the things I told our initial adoption counselor was that while it wasn't a deal-breaking requirement, we would have preferred a dog who gets along fine with young children because it would be grand to not need to put the dog in the other room when my nieces come over. Our initial adoption counselor thought that was a very reasonable request, and we were later paired with a dog who was deemed well-suited around children of all ages. The adoption counselor was not the woman who later rejected the application--the adoption counselor was conveniently not in that day, and her bullshit verdict surpassed his prior approval.

AvianPundit fucked around with this message at Jan 19, 2014 around 03:47

Skizzles
Feb 21, 2009

Live, Laugh, Love,
Poop in a box.


Aerofallosov posted:

I think it stems from the kids doing things like provoking the dog (intentionally or unintentionally), the dog bites and either gets returned or put down. Or even just abandoned somewhere. Or Little Timmy wants a dog, doesn't realize how much work it is, the dog gets neglected, goes bonkers and gets returned, put down or abandoned.

Sort of like the pregnant ladies who want to meet puppies, then have to rehome it as soon as they have the baby. I see plenty of postings of cats and dogs being given up because they just had a baby or kids and don't want/can't keep it anymore.

That said, the shelter sounds overly anal about it.

No I'm well aware, and this is why I would have never adopted out a puppy to a pregnant woman (but fortunately I never had to deal with that). Now that I think about it I don't think any dog I adopted out was ever returned, which is a nice thought. I agree that a dog is a commitment and you should do all you can to make it work for everyone involved, but the wording that shelter used is irritating, as far as the dog not coming first.

AvianPundit
Feb 14, 2013

Lollercide

Skizzles posted:

No I'm well aware, and this is why I would have never adopted out a puppy to a pregnant woman (but fortunately I never had to deal with that). Now that I think about it I don't think any dog I adopted out was ever returned, which is a nice thought. I agree that a dog is a commitment and you should do all you can to make it work for everyone involved, but the wording that shelter used is irritating, as far as the dog not coming first.

Yeah, she seemed to find it preposterous that we would try to rehome the dog if we had a child that turned out to be allergic. What else would we do? Give our kid to CPS? Make our kid put up with severe allergies? ...That would suck. We assured her that we would do everything we could to give the dog a loving forever home, and that we were probably not going to have children anyway. However, she couldn't wrap her mind around the fact that if goodness forbid some weird poo poo went down and push really came to shove (like severe allergies or the dog suddenly attacking our kid pretty much out of nowhere), we would have to put our hypothetical children first.

I know a family whose rescue dog attacked their 9yo daughter because she happened to step foot in the kitchen while the dog was rooting through the garbage. He turned and lunged at her. Yeah, no. That poo poo wouldn't fly.

AvianPundit fucked around with this message at Jan 19, 2014 around 04:33

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Lareine
Jul 22, 2007


AvianPundit posted:

Yeah, she seemed to find it preposterous that we would try to rehome the dog if we had a child that turned out to be allergic. What else would we do? Give our kid to CPS? Make our kid put up with severe allergies? ...That would suck. We assured her that we would do everything we could to give the dog a loving forever home, and that we were probably not going to have children anyway. However, she couldn't wrap her mind around the fact that if goodness forbid some weird poo poo went down and push really came to shove (like severe allergies or the dog suddenly attacking our kid pretty much out of nowhere), we would have to put our hypothetical children first.

Maybe enough people jokingly said that they WOULD put the kid up for adoption that she thinks that it's a reasonable action to take.

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