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FuzzySkinner
May 23, 2012



I've been in between unemployed and underemployed since January.

I'll spare any details about my college degree, but it's pretty much useless in my view, and I'm finding the career field I would have used it in pretty crowded out at this point.

I have found that I'm not adverse to getting up early in the morning, and performing a form of hard labor. What I don't want is to work at a place that doesn't believe in any form of small benefits (such as....I don't know..giving people a lunch break), or doesn't believe in at least a little bit of a form of "Work-life balance". (I can work weekends, I do not care. Just again, do not work me to the point where I'm working 80 hour weeks, and only getting paid for 40).

I've accepted that my dreams are pretty much dead at this point, so yeah, just any sort of advice. Job Interviews have been a literal living hell for me, and I'm tired of it.

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Normal Adult Human
Feb 12, 2012

Nah.


What's your college degree?

moana
Jun 18, 2005

one of the more intellectual satire communities on the web

probably bfc

FuzzySkinner
May 23, 2012



Normal Adult Human posted:

What's your college degree?

Sports Administration, with a minor in Business.

You laugh at this, but it was something I was sincerely good at, and I loved doing it. I did two internships at college, both of them dealing with marketing and ticket sales.

Unfortunately both positions didn't lead me anywhere. The first? Well management changed and everyone got fired. The 2nd? The organization couldn't afford to hire me, but loved what I was doing for them.

Jobs aren't there, and my connections in the field have gotten me nowhere. I've expanded my search to include anything I feel I would remotely be good at, but again, that's landed me exactly nothing.

e: Jobs are technically "There", but the number of applicants is drat near impossible to climb over.

FuzzySkinner fucked around with this message at Aug 6, 2014 around 23:49

MAKE NO BABBYS
Jan 28, 2010


...so find a construction job with a company/for a contractor that doesn't suck? Work on an oil rig? Natural gas rig? Entry-level trades position? Landscaping? Warehouse work? Forklift driving? Work on a boat? Work in hauling? Work for a recycling service (like EcoHaul)? Work for the city/county public works? Work in maintenance for a school or university?

gently caress man, it's not that hard.

FuzzySkinner
May 23, 2012



MAKE NO BABBYS posted:

...so find a construction job with a company/for a contractor that doesn't suck? Work on an oil rig? Natural gas rig? Entry-level trades position? Landscaping? Warehouse work? Forklift driving? Work on a boat? Work in hauling? Work for a recycling service (like EcoHaul)? Work for the city/county public works? Work in maintenance for a school or university?

gently caress man, it's not that hard.

I just need to find where to find those jobs.

That's where I'm struggling.

How do I say..get a job as the aforementioned forklift operater without a license? I feel under qualified for stuff like that. I have applied for jobs similar to that in nature and have in fact received a similar answer back.

FuzzySkinner fucked around with this message at Aug 7, 2014 around 00:01

Steampunk iPhone
Sep 2, 2009


FuzzySkinner posted:

I've been in between unemployed and underemployed since January.

I'll spare any details about my college degree, but it's pretty much useless in my view, and I'm finding the career field I would have used it in pretty crowded out at this point.

I have found that I'm not adverse to getting up early in the morning, and performing a form of hard labor. What I don't want is to work at a place that doesn't believe in any form of small benefits (such as....I don't know..giving people a lunch break), or doesn't believe in at least a little bit of a form of "Work-life balance". (I can work weekends, I do not care. Just again, do not work me to the point where I'm working 80 hour weeks, and only getting paid for 40).

I've accepted that my dreams are pretty much dead at this point, so yeah, just any sort of advice. Job Interviews have been a literal living hell for me, and I'm tired of it.

Hey OP, while searching for a job can be stressful you sound really burnt out and pessimistic. I think that a small dose of LSD -- around 150 micrograms -- might change your perspective a little and give you more motivation.

ejstheman
Feb 11, 2004


Steampunk iPhone posted:

Hey OP, while searching for a job can be stressful you sound really burnt out and pessimistic. I think that a small dose of LSD -- around 150 micrograms -- might change your perspective a little and give you more motivation.

Can we please stop making this stupid joke over and over?

Steampunk iPhone
Sep 2, 2009


ejstheman posted:

Can we please stop making this stupid joke over and over?

It's not a joke, you shithead. LSD has many psychotherapeutic uses but this information has been systematically suppressed by the government.

Danger
Jan 4, 2004

all desire - the thirst for oil, war, religious salvation - needs to understood according to what he calls 'the demonogrammatical decoding of the Earth's body'

Have you tried getting into a protracted property war with your grieving neighbor?

Loopyface
Mar 22, 2003


Pick a trade, go to the local union hall for that trade, take a stupid-easy test, and sign up as an apprentice. Plumbers and electricians make good money, elevator guys make ridiculous money. You'll get paid for working, and you'll get paid for training. Or whatever.

FuzzySkinner
May 23, 2012



Joke post aside I do feel rather hopeless, pessimistic and burnt out. My emotions have been pretty much being depressed, or being really angry, with a few spikes of occasional happiness sprinkled in.

You come out of college thinking you're remotely qualified to work at some of these places, and then you discover that according to their standards you're not. After that you start questioning whether it was even worth going to college in the first place.

My father and others keep trying to tell me it's not my fault, it's the economy, etc. But I don't feel it is.

I hate the job interviews I've been apart of. There was one that was literally so soul shattering and so damaging to my self esteem it's still loving with me to this day.

FuzzySkinner fucked around with this message at Aug 7, 2014 around 01:09

Tautologicus
Oct 3, 2013


Take some time to yourself, stop trying to mush yourself into other people's dumb gay worlds. When you start realizing you can live your life on your own terms and in your own way, you'll be better suited to jump through other people's hoops to get what you want. Or you'll just keep doing your own thing, maybe start a business, maybe travel forever, who knows.

Salt Fish
Sep 11, 2003

fear itself


Go get a job, any job. Like literally open up the newspaper and apply for whatever dishwashing gig you can find. You're not going to be in a good state of mind sitting around doing nothing and its flat out better than being unemployed. Having a lovely job is the first step towards having a not-lovely job.

Saeku
Sep 22, 2010


What have you been doing since January, and how have you supported yourself? What were the jobs you were underemployed at?

Saeku fucked around with this message at Aug 7, 2014 around 01:18

FuzzySkinner
May 23, 2012



Saeku posted:

What have you been doing since January, and how have you supported yourself? What were the jobs you were underemployed at?

Big Box Home Improvement Store from end of March until just recently.

I actually really liked it because they seemed to actually respect their employees, the staff was very good, and they indeed had basic things like allowing people to take breaks or have a lunch break.

You laugh at the last two but I literally interviewed for a logistics job that didn't believe in giving employees lunch breaks of any type despite having them work from 7:30-7:30.

Wish it was permanent, but they couldn't afford me anymore. They said I was hard working, flexible and a good employee on my exit interview, then offered to be any sort of reference if I went for another job in their company.

pringledingle
Apr 3, 2013


If you're not adverse to traveling, hit up north Dakota or eastern Montana. Big bucks in gas poo poo

Liquid Communism
Mar 9, 2004

Congratulations on not getting fit in 2011!

And for shitting up the Shadowrun 5E thread in 2014!


ObamaCaresHugSquad posted:

Take some time to yourself, stop trying to mush yourself into other people's dumb gay worlds. When you start realizing you can live your life on your own terms and in your own way, you'll be better suited to jump through other people's hoops to get what you want. Or you'll just keep doing your own thing, maybe start a business, maybe travel forever, who knows.

This is great advice... if you're independently wealthy and don't actually need to work in the first place.

bieber the creator
Sep 24, 2003

craving wonton soup irl


You went to college... to learn how to sell tickets?

Drunk Nerds
Jan 25, 2011

THUNDERDOME LOSER

It would help if you told me your city.
Also, I hope your main point of focus has been other similar chains to that big box store

Saeku
Sep 22, 2010


FuzzySkinner posted:

Big Box Home Improvement Store from end of March until just recently.

I actually really liked it because they seemed to actually respect their employees, the staff was very good, and they indeed had basic things like allowing people to take breaks or have a lunch break.

You laugh at the last two but I literally interviewed for a logistics job that didn't believe in giving employees lunch breaks of any type despite having them work from 7:30-7:30.

Wish it was permanent, but they couldn't afford me anymore. They said I was hard working, flexible and a good employee on my exit interview, then offered to be any sort of reference if I went for another job in their company.

Throwing it out there: a good retail reference + arbitrary university degree with a business minor = retail management qualifications.

FuzzySkinner posted:

My father and others keep trying to tell me it's not my fault, it's the economy, etc. But I don't feel it is.

I hate the job interviews I've been apart of. There was one that was literally so soul shattering and so damaging to my self esteem it's still loving with me to this day.

Tell me more about this.

Drunk Nerds
Jan 25, 2011

THUNDERDOME LOSER

ObamaCaresHugSquad posted:

Take some time to yourself, stop trying to mush yourself into other people's dumb gay worlds. When you start realizing you can live your life on your own terms and in your own way, you'll be better suited to jump through other people's hoops to get what you want. Or you'll just keep doing your own thing, maybe start a business, maybe travel forever, who knows.

Holy poo poo. Lafllolomghahaha.
Are you 15 years old/trust fund. I can't even comprehend how you could possibly read the OP and think this advice would apply in the slightest way

FuzzySkinner
May 23, 2012



Drunk Nerds posted:

It would help if you told me your city.
Also, I hope your main point of focus has been other similar chains to that big box store

Yeah I've looked into that.


bieber the creator posted:

You went to college... to learn how to sell tickets?

Further explanation is needed.

Venues need help finding people to buy group and season ticket packages.

It's a skill that's very surprisingly complex at times and there's a lot of arrangements that need to be made for such a thing. You're pretty much doing cold calls and trying to find leads for people who would fit into these credentials. It's a great challenge, and can be very fun when you're doing it for sports like Women's Volleyball.

It's quite a bit different than what one expect when I tell you "Ticket Sales. I imagine you thought I was referring to just hanging out a box office during game days. Not so much.


Saeku posted:

Tell me more about this.

I walked into an interview with some for a outside sales position with a guy who's company (Paycheck software) seemed to be based around high pressure sales. He noticed that I was a bit nervous for the interview and kept making backhanded comments about it. He then proceeded to mock my resume a bit, and told me I wasn't remotely qualified to work for his company.

e: To make things even more bizarre, I've noticed they've yet to fill the position per the job sites I've seen.

pringledingle posted:

If you're not adverse to traveling, hit up north Dakota or eastern Montana. Big bucks in gas poo poo

Looked into it, and am trying to figure out where my skills would fit me in that area.

FuzzySkinner fucked around with this message at Aug 7, 2014 around 02:05

Bip Roberts
Mar 29, 2005



FuzzySkinner posted:

It's a skill that's very surprisingly complex at times and there's a lot of arrangements that need to be made for such a thing. You're pretty much doing cold calls and trying to find leads for people who would fit into these credentials. It's a great challenge, and can be very fun when you're doing it for sports like Women's Volleyball.

Lol apparently too complex for you.

FuzzySkinner
May 23, 2012



Bip Roberts posted:

Lol apparently too complex for you.

Eh, Not really.

I can do it, and was doing it when I was an unpaid intern. Had a blast in fact. I loved trying to organize group nights, and I loved seeing people I was responsible for getting to the arena/stadium to watch a game.

Finding a position to match that? Not so much.

I was told by those working in College Programs (where I really wanted to go) that there was no room for me, that I had no experience, that I shouldn't even try, and that I should go do minor league sports teams for a few years so it would show up on my resume.

I then interviewed with minor league sports teams that kept saying I didn't have enough experience, and wasn't qualified to work for them.

So I'm kind of trapped in some weird middle ground.

e: To add, I was always told to go do "sales" by anyone even remotely involved in the field to do it. They said that was the job most in demand for teams and organizations for entry level positions.

FuzzySkinner fucked around with this message at Aug 7, 2014 around 02:21

potee
Jul 23, 2007

Or, you know.

Not fine.


FuzzySkinner posted:

Eh, Not really.

I can do it, and was doing it when I was an unpaid intern. Had a blast in fact. I loved trying to organize group nights, and I loved seeing people I was responsible for getting to the arena/stadium to watch a game.

Finding a position to match that? Not so much.

I was told by those working in College Programs (where I really wanted to go) that there was no room for me, that I had no experience, that I shouldn't even try, and that I should go do minor league sports teams for a few years so it would show up on my resume.

I then interviewed with minor league sports teams that kept saying I didn't have enough experience, and wasn't qualified to work for them.

So I'm kind of trapped in some weird middle ground.

e: To add, I was always told to go do "sales" by anyone even remotely involved in the field to do it. They said that was the job most in demand for teams and organizations for entry level positions.

So what I'm getting from this is your contacts and people in your industry have told you exactly what you have to do but it's less special than your volunteer work in college so you don't wanna.

Do what literally everyone else does grind it out in a mediocre entry level job for a couple years jfc what is wrong with you

FuzzySkinner
May 23, 2012



potee posted:

So what I'm getting from this is your contacts and people in your industry have told you exactly what you have to do but it's less special than your volunteer work in college so you don't wanna.

Do what literally everyone else does grind it out in a mediocre entry level job for a couple years jfc what is wrong with you

No, not so much.

I am doing exactly as I am being told but there is nothing there in terms of entry level positions for the aforementioned positions. I've applied for positions with minor league teams all during this on-going process, only to be met with the "Thanks but someone we felt was more qualified was hired" answer. That's EXACTLY what I was told to do, and I am being met with the EXACT same answers the guy in the college field told me I'd be met with if I applied for a job within his type of sports organization.

When the "mediocre entry level" jobs you're describing are not taking you for the EXACT SAME REASONS I was told not to go work in College Sports? There's clearly a problem, and I am not meeting some form of basic criteria these people are looking for.

I'm not acting like I'm special or above this. Money or "prestige" is not the issue. The issue is the fact I cannot even get my foot at the door at ANY level right now.

FuzzySkinner fucked around with this message at Aug 7, 2014 around 03:15

intensive purposes
Jul 1, 2009


It sounds like you are looking in the right places. Have you tried reaching out to people you met through your internships? Let your old supervisors know you are looking for work in your field. Ask if they know of any good opportunities at other venues/organizations, and to please let you know if they hear of an opportunity in the future.

It also sounds like maybe you ought to apply to the college jobs in your field even though you've been discouraged. Nothing to lose, right?

Secks Cauldron
Aug 26, 2006

I thought they closed that place down!


FuzzySkinner posted:

I walked into an interview with some for a outside sales position with a guy who's company (Paycheck software) seemed to be based around high pressure sales. He noticed that I was a bit nervous for the interview and kept making backhanded comments about it. He then proceeded to mock my resume a bit, and told me I wasn't remotely qualified to work for his company.

e: To make things even more bizarre, I've noticed they've yet to fill the position per the job sites I've seen.
Would you want to work for a company where it's okay for people to act like this? That interviewer actually did you a favor by showing you just how lovely the work environment would be. When you have a job interview, you are evaluating the company just as much as they're evaluating you.

I recommend that you start reading the Ask A Manager blog. She has a lot of great advice about interviews, resumes, etc.

Snatch Duster
Feb 20, 2007

[ASK] ME ABOUT BEING
A BIG, FAT BLOB.

Fatty fatty bum bum, that's me!


http://www.sportism.net

Right up your ally. Its a sales job, what do you expect to do out of college with abusiness degree!?, but its selling to CEO,SVP, etc to F500 comapnies for corporate events. You go to the events too and get network with powerful people. After a year you should have a solid network, recruiters sucking your dick, and several offers from the companies you sold to.

Its a 9-5 job and you get out what you put in. Huge commission too. My bro worked there made 6 figs in 8 months, he wasnt the exception to the rule either.

Snatch Duster fucked around with this message at Aug 7, 2014 around 05:29

Fuck da Mods
Jun 27, 2013

I've got the power


The second you settle for a pleb job you're gonna be stuck with it. Make hot own opportunities, start a sports blog and get native advertising money

Eddain
May 6, 2007


If you don't mind being hated by most of America you can always apply for a government job like TSA. You have federally mandated breaks, health/life insurance, some minor government perks. Guaranteed pay with absolutely no chance of unpaid overtime. Easy promotions as long as you aren't a dumbass.

The hardest part is just looking for openings. https://www.usajobs.gov/ has the listings but they only open up every so often since there's a waiting list once you actually get through the application process.

You could also get a job with the US Postal Service. They make really good money.

Tautologicus
Oct 3, 2013


Drunk Nerds posted:

Holy poo poo. Lafllolomghahaha.
Are you 15 years old/trust fund. I can't even comprehend how you could possibly read the OP and think this advice would apply in the slightest way

Well I am in my late 20's and I do have a small VA disability pension, but I don't think it is necessary to have any amount of money to 'break out' somehow. Maybe a few thousand and the will to move anywhere in the world and make something work. More has been done with less. If you let yourself be constrained by expectations then you will be constrained. Or if you have a huge amount of student debt then good luck I guess. Not everyone can live life the way they want to but that was their choice.

Tamarillo
Aug 6, 2009


Hello OP, I run a sport graduate programme. Sport is a hard industry to break into, and the global market is flooded with sport graduates because a huge majority of them chose to study sport because 'I liked sport at school'.

What do I look for in a graduate in my programme?
- Sport degree or other tertiary qualification but with a strong personal link to sport
- Extensive volunteering experience (internships, coaching school teams etc)
- Good academic grades (or above average grades if they have juggled a full time athletic career at the same time)
- Some indication of leadership potential

The major area people fall over in is the volunteering experience. Love it or hate it, the sport industry is run on the back of volunteers and to stand out from the rest of the "hurrburr i like a sport" people you have to show that you're committed enough to the sector that you've volunteered your own time. I guess it depends on where you actually want to end up in a sport sector career, but your internships were basically in events and sales, not sport. For my programme at least I would want to see you volunteering in a coaching capacity for kids sports, or doing team management or something.

The tragedy is that, at least here, the universities don't loving tell their students how important volunteering is. I get hordes of totally unprepared graduates applying who have almost no understanding of the sport sector in practice because they've only read about sport in a textbook, watched a match here and there and spent two weeks filing and making coffee at a lovely internship or, in your case, cold calling people to try and sell tickets. Ask them about the national and regional bodies that run sport here and they have no clue. It's almost criminal that the tertiary sector refuses to get on board with reality and prepare these students with the knowledge they need to actually get jobs.

Again I can only speak for what goes on in my neck of the woods, but probably the two 'tracks' to get into the sport sector are:
- People who want to work hands on with elite athletes - strength & conditioning specialists, nutritionists etc - tack yourself onto a club level team and work your way up through city/regional/cross-state representative teams; or
- Sport management/administration - easiest way is to start in community sport (e.g. clubs, schools [not actually schools themselves but organisations that manage school sport in a region] - not colleges). Talk to your local regional sporting body about opportunities there.

I am curious to understand why your interviews were soul destroying though. I do all the graduate interviews here and while obviously not everyone gets the job in the end I wouldn't describe them as terrible.

E: If you are a Browns fan, here's a job advertisement aggregator thing in your area: http://www.jobsinsports.com/sports-jobs/Cleveland-OH ; or the local city sport organisation http://clevelandsports.org/ or what about these folks http://www.ohsaa.org/ or maybe talk to these folks http://www.coybl.org/

Tamarillo fucked around with this message at Aug 7, 2014 around 08:10

Tautologicus
Oct 3, 2013


And "taking some time to yourself" can also mean getting a minimum wage job while you figure yourself out. Get the expectations and pressure off your back. You don't have to be anyone. gently caress what they told you in school, they just want alumni money and feel like their education was worth a drat.

Binary Logic
Dec 28, 2000



Tamarillo posted:



The major area people fall over in is the volunteering experience. Love it or hate it, the sport industry is run on the back of volunteers and to stand out from the rest of the "hurrburr i like a sport" people you have to show that you're committed enough to the sector that you've volunteered your own time. I guess it depends on where you actually want to end up in a sport sector career, but your internships were basically in events and sales, not sport. For my programme at least I would want to see you volunteering in a coaching capacity for kids sports, or doing team management or something.

The tragedy is that, at least here, the universities don't loving tell their students how important volunteering is. I get hordes of totally unprepared graduates applying who have almost no understanding of the sport sector in practice because they've only read about sport in a textbook, watched a match here and there and spent two weeks filing and making coffee at a lovely internship or, in your case, cold calling people to try and sell tickets. Ask them about the national and regional bodies that run sport here and they have no clue. It's almost criminal that the tertiary sector refuses to get on board with reality and prepare these students with the knowledge they need to actually get jobs.

I was going to make the same suggestion. Volunteer at various sports events and charity races. Be good at it and reliable, get to know the organizers, make yourself valuable to the org, then look into paid positions.
Charity runs, Spartan Race, Warrior Dash, Colour Run, triathlons etc all have professional companies doing the organizing, and many of them are growing. You would not be selling group tickets but are promoting and trying to 'sell' entries, and they would all appreciate someone who could sign up large groups and corporate teams to their events.

Ginette Reno
Nov 18, 2006

BEST IN THE WORLD

ObamaCaresHugSquad posted:

And "taking some time to yourself" can also mean getting a minimum wage job while you figure yourself out. Get the expectations and pressure off your back. You don't have to be anyone. gently caress what they told you in school, they just want alumni money and feel like their education was worth a drat.

This is what I'm doing right now. I've got a degree of similar usefulness to the OP - Creative Writing - and I'm working a lovely food service job. Not because I want to, but eh it's income. I'd like a better job and am looking, but at least I'm doing something in the meantime even if it's lovely.

That would be my advice to you, OP. Just keep working, even if it's a lovely job and even if you don't necessarily need the income because your parents will prop you up or whatever. You can always search for better work while working, and having any kind of job - even a lovely one - is preferable to being a bum.

Tuxedo Gin
May 20, 2003

Classy.

Check the job/HR website of every city and town within an hour of you and look for jobs in their recreation department.

xov
Nov 14, 2005

DNA Ts. Rednum or F. Raf


This is actually a sincere suggestion. If you have a Chick-Fil-A or Hobby Lobby or any other Christian-run business in your area, please apply there. If you can tolerate morning prayers and things like that, I've found that the staff at these companies are among the most pleasant and kind you'll ever meet, and tend to have extremely good work ethic and drama is kept to a minimum.

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my bony fealty
Oct 1, 2008


Look up temp companies in your area, find a lovely office job, it'll be boring but probably pretty chill and you will make more than retail. There are thousands of companies that need entry-level data entry stuff. I did this for about a year until I found my current position that while having nothing to do with my actual degree is something my skillset uniquely qualifies me for.

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