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movax
Aug 30, 2008



Lief posted:

Could somebody break down for me what VT-d and TXT are and how they affect system performance? I've tried looking it up for myself but the amount of jargon is enough to make a legislator blush.

If you have to ask what TXT is, it probably isn't for you. From what I've seen, it's really geared for business use, and really shines when some disgruntled employees steals a desktop (or loses a laptop) and the data on the machine hopefully remains safe. Pretty sure it needs a TPM to even function.

VT-d is a virtualization extension that boosts performance of guest VMs by giving them among other things, DMA access to host hardware (basically the ability to remap DMA and interrupts). I want to say that this is most helpful when you're running a bare metal hypervisor like ESX, but I'm not 100% sure about that.

I don't think the average enthusiast would miss either of these (especially not TXT) in return for having an unlocked multiplier; I know I won't.

^^ VT-x is the generic virtualization tech that Intel intro'd to match up with AMD's AMD-V. It gives you extended page tables from the CPU, stopping the VM monitor from having to handle page faults.

VT-c is for network stuff, I don't know too much more about that. An Intel brief I saw split them up thusly: CPU is VT-x, Chipset is VT-d and Network is VT-c. It was some Xeon 5500 virtualization brief.

e: You don't need any specific hardware extensions to virtualize. Having them could greatly enhance your VM performance, however.

movax fucked around with this message at 23:54 on Jan 3, 2011