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  • Locked thread
totalnewbie
Nov 13, 2005

I was born and raised in China, lived in Japan, and now hold a US passport.

I am wrong in every way, all the damn time.

Ask me about my tattoos.


Toadstool posted:


So I've got this 1999 Camry and one of the turn signal cluster light lenses was missing. In its place someone stuck in a translucent green wrapper from some Asian candy in the hole where the plastic lens used to be. I've been looking online for the past hour and can't find a replacement. Does anyone know where I can find a tiny green plastic lens for my Camry?

Sounds like the perfect opportunity to sample various Asian candies to me.

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floydpepper
Nov 7, 2004

"It Don't Make You A Bad Person"

Quick one.
2001 Toyota Camry 2.2L 4Cyl

Misfire on Cyl 4

Replaced plugs as they needed it anyways. There was oil on Cyl 4 plug. Still same issue.
Switched wires on coil pack. Moved cyl 1 to Cyl 4 and Cyl 4 to Cyl 1. Still same Cyl 4 misfire.

I was thinking next step to replace valve cover gasket. Would seeping oil into the plug cause a misfire?

I know it is probably a stupid question, but I'm trying to do as much as I can by myself.

Mercury Ballistic
Nov 14, 2005

not gun related

My 04 wrx with 5 speed manual has a smell that comes from the vents. The clutch is 3000 miles new, as is the flywheel. The smell shows up when the car is warm and the car is stopped. The smell to me smells like burning clutch but it shows up even if I baby it. The smell is stronger the faster I drive.

The wheels/brakes are not hot and the smell only comes through the vents, I cant smell it outside the car at all. I have looked several times and tightened everything I can see and see no signs of a leak of anything. I thought it might be oil dripping on the exhaust, but see no smoke and the smell only comes through the vents.

Other than this issue the car drives great, the clutch grabs well, acceleration is good, etc. The mechanic is going to look at when I can afford to loan out the car but that is a few weeks away.

Any ideas anyone?

Frozen Pizza Party
Dec 13, 2005



Mercury Ballistic posted:

My 04 wrx with 5 speed manual has a smell that comes from the vents. The clutch is 3000 miles new, as is the flywheel. The smell shows up when the car is warm and the car is stopped. The smell to me smells like burning clutch but it shows up even if I baby it. The smell is stronger the faster I drive.

The wheels/brakes are not hot and the smell only comes through the vents, I cant smell it outside the car at all. I have looked several times and tightened everything I can see and see no signs of a leak of anything. I thought it might be oil dripping on the exhaust, but see no smoke and the smell only comes through the vents.

Other than this issue the car drives great, the clutch grabs well, acceleration is good, etc. The mechanic is going to look at when I can afford to loan out the car but that is a few weeks away.

Any ideas anyone?

Could be various engine smells coming through the firewall plug, which may have come dislodged. My engine stink got noticeably stinkier when I forgot to put the plug back in after running an amp wire.

EightBit
Jan 7, 2006
I spent money on this line of text just to make the "Stupid Newbie" go away.

floydpepper posted:

Quick one.
2001 Toyota Camry 2.2L 4Cyl

Misfire on Cyl 4

Replaced plugs as they needed it anyways. There was oil on Cyl 4 plug. Still same issue.
Switched wires on coil pack. Moved cyl 1 to Cyl 4 and Cyl 4 to Cyl 1. Still same Cyl 4 misfire.

I was thinking next step to replace valve cover gasket. Would seeping oil into the plug cause a misfire?

I know it is probably a stupid question, but I'm trying to do as much as I can by myself.

Replacing the valve cover gasket won't do much for this problem. Get the engine warm and run a compression test on all cylinders. Betting that number four will show low compression to go with the oil on the spark plug. Which would mean that the rings on that piston are worn out. If it shows good compression, it's likely a valve seal.

Rontalvos
Feb 22, 2006


In my 2000 2.5L manual Subaru Outback wagon I've got this strange rattling sound coming through the firewall. In 2nd, 3rd, or 4th gear when the RPMs are above 3k and the gas pedal is 1/2 depressed or more, it sounds like somebody is rattling a marble inside a plastic cup down below the pedals. Only happens during acceleration under those conditions.

At first I thought "weird sound during high throttle, predetination?" but I just put in a full tank of 91 octane and the noise is the same. I can try to get audio of it tonight but it's been happening for about 2 weeks now and the car behaves normally otherwise.

Mercury Ballistic
Nov 14, 2005

not gun related

Rontalvos posted:

In my 2000 2.5L manual Subaru Outback wagon I've got this strange rattling sound coming through the firewall. In 2nd, 3rd, or 4th gear when the RPMs are above 3k and the gas pedal is 1/2 depressed or more, it sounds like somebody is rattling a marble inside a plastic cup down below the pedals. Only happens during acceleration under those conditions.

At first I thought "weird sound during high throttle, predetination?" but I just put in a full tank of 91 octane and the noise is the same. I can try to get audio of it tonight but it's been happening for about 2 weeks now and the car behaves normally otherwise.

First thought is exhaust heat shield. They migrate out of position and make a clattering noise.

floydpepper
Nov 7, 2004

"It Don't Make You A Bad Person"

EightBit posted:

Replacing the valve cover gasket won't do much for this problem. Get the engine warm and run a compression test on all cylinders. Betting that number four will show low compression to go with the oil on the spark plug. Which would mean that the rings on that piston are worn out. If it shows good compression, it's likely a valve seal.

Thanks! I'll check the compression and go from there.

antiga
Jan 16, 2013



Hi thread. My 03 Camry XLE broke down last weekend, I wasn't driving but I'll summarize as best as I can. Exited highway after ten minute drive and noticed a vibration, then an odd smell through cabin vent, maybe rubber. Shortly thereafter, smoke (not very dark looking but hard to tell) appeared from right side of hood. Pulled over immediately, but when doing so had little to no power from the accelerator. Left the car to cool and several hours later the engine did not turn over. Everything happened within a half mile.

The mechanic whom I trust just called and confirmed it needs a head gasket replacement and timing chain motor. He quoted $1700 plus $500 more if the head itself is cracked. More importantly, his shop doesn't have the manpower to do it and he recommended taking it to a Toyota dealer which will undoubtedly cost more.

The car has 155,000 miles and hasn't had many issues in my three years of ownership, only a new catalytic converter one year ago. I know it needs a forward oxygen sensor, and I have two brand new tires and two average tires. There is some minor denting and rust on front wheel well which i do not believe would be awful to repair. Edmund's tmv suggests it's worth $3300 ignoring the recent problem, kbb says $4799. I live in a high col area, which was included in both estimates.

Haven't called dealers yet to get quotes, but is this car worth repairing?

Parts Kit
Jun 9, 2006

durr
i have a hole in my head
durr


Is it true that, under normal conditions, the alternator should not be pushing more than at most 15 volts through your electrical system and should be closer to 14v +/- a small fraction?

If that question is too broad as is the vehicles in question are a 87 Mazda B2000 and a 2006 Civic SI.

Raluek
Nov 3, 2006

WUT.


Parts Kit posted:

Is it true that, under normal conditions, the alternator should not be pushing more than at most 15 volts through your electrical system and should be closer to 14v +/- a small fraction?

If that question is too broad as is the vehicles in question are a 87 Mazda B2000 and a 2006 Civic SI.

True. Measured at the battery (there is some loss in the wiring, so it might be higher at the alternator itself) it shouldn't go more than 15V. Overcharging points to a bad connection, a bad wire, or a failing voltage regulator.

NumbersMatching320
Oct 24, 2010

RESALE VALUE, MEIN HERR




Pillbug

Parts Kit posted:

Is it true that, under normal conditions, the alternator should not be pushing more than at most 15 volts through your electrical system and should be closer to 14v +/- a small fraction?

If that question is too broad as is the vehicles in question are a 87 Mazda B2000 and a 2006 Civic SI.

14.7 volts. If the number 15 even comes into play you have a problem, either a bad connection on the voltage sense wire (most likely) or a slightly bad regulator.
(efb)

Parts Kit
Jun 9, 2006

durr
i have a hole in my head
durr


Awesome. That'll make my project more simple since at least one component is able to take up to 15 volts.

Thank you both.

Computer Serf
May 14, 2005
DIDN'T FOLLOW RSF RULES BUT GOT LUCKY AND INSTEAD OF GETTING BANNED GOT THIS SHITTY CUSTOM TITLE!! LOVES TO MASTURBATE @ ZOOS

Buglord

I'm interested in a used 4runner, and want to have my mechanic inspect one at a persons house.

A common issue with 4runners is the "pink milkshake", caused by faulty radiator fluid overflowing into the transmission causing havoc.
Say that were to have happened, and the owner had flushed the transmission out and put new fluid in, would my mechanic have a chance to spot this issue?

Should I just buy a junker with 250k for ~$2500 and replace the transmission, throw in a rebuilt engine, overhaul everything etc?

Geoj
May 28, 2008

BITTER POOR PERSON


antiga posted:

Hi thread. My 03 Camry XLE broke down last weekend, I wasn't driving but I'll summarize as best as I can. Exited highway after ten minute drive and noticed a vibration, then an odd smell through cabin vent, maybe rubber. Shortly thereafter, smoke (not very dark looking but hard to tell) appeared from right side of hood. Pulled over immediately, but when doing so had little to no power from the accelerator. Left the car to cool and several hours later the engine did not turn over. Everything happened within a half mile.

The mechanic whom I trust just called and confirmed it needs a head gasket replacement and timing chain motor. He quoted $1700 plus $500 more if the head itself is cracked. More importantly, his shop doesn't have the manpower to do it and he recommended taking it to a Toyota dealer which will undoubtedly cost more.

The car has 155,000 miles and hasn't had many issues in my three years of ownership, only a new catalytic converter one year ago. I know it needs a forward oxygen sensor, and I have two brand new tires and two average tires. There is some minor denting and rust on front wheel well which i do not believe would be awful to repair. Edmund's tmv suggests it's worth $3300 ignoring the recent problem, kbb says $4799. I live in a high col area, which was included in both estimates.

Haven't called dealers yet to get quotes, but is this car worth repairing?

You might be able to source a relatively cheap salvage engine and have it installed for less than the initial quote, to say nothing if it needs a new head.

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


Don't think about replacing stuff till you know if it actually needs replacement. Maybe budget for it, but don't just throw new parts on because the old ones might maybe have had a problem.

STR
May 12, 2006

I thought I was a nice jester


Raluek posted:

True. Measured at the battery (there is some loss in the wiring, so it might be higher at the alternator itself) it shouldn't go more than 15V. Overcharging points to a bad connection, a bad wire, or a failing voltage regulator.

It can also point at a bad ground to the alternator (yeah I know this falls into bad connection, but still). The alternator usually grounds through the engine block, so it's a good idea to check the engine-to-body ground strap/wire for corrosion. Every modern car I know of has the voltage regulator built into the alternator itself, so if there's a flaky ground, it thinks the output voltage is too low, and bumps it up to compensate. Next thing you know, you have 18 volts.

The same thing also happens if the negative battery terminal connection is making poor contact.

antiga posted:

Hi thread. My 03 Camry XLE broke down last weekend,

Haven't called dealers yet to get quotes, but is this car worth repairing?

It's worth repairing, but not at dealer rates. Also, tell whoever was driving to pay more attention to the temp gauge - head gaskets very rarely fail without some form of overheating involved, and they would have noticed a pretty decent loss in power long before it got to the point of dying. More than likely a hose failed and dumped all the coolant - usually you get a ton of steam from under the hood when it happens, but at highway speeds it likely just went under the car (but the smell of coolant should have come in through the vents unless the climate control was on recirculate).

I'd consider $1700 to be rather high for a head gasket job on a 4 cylinder, but at the same time, if it got hot enough to seize, there's a reasonable chance the head will need work, and the possibility that the bottom end of the engine (everything below the head) may need work too. At $1700, you could spend a little bit more and get a used engine dropped in. If it's the V6 model, then that's ... a little high, but reasonable. You didn't mention which engine, so I'm assuming it's the 4 cylinder.

Also, there is no "timing chain motor". That engine does have a timing chain, but it's driven by the engine itself (the chain connects the camshafts to the crankshaft). It's good practice to replace the tensioner for it while it's apart, and with the miles it has, it won't hurt to replace the chain itself (especially after being overheated so badly) - it's likely stretched a bit over the years. A lot of engines run the water pump off of the timing belt or timing chain (your engine has a chain) - I don't know if your engine runs the pump from the chain, but if it does, it's also good practice to replace the water pump anytime you touch the timing chain. It's more of a "it's an extra 30 minutes of labor to do it while it's already apart, versus 8 hours of labor if it fails later" things that adds a (relatively speaking) small amount to the bill.

If it were my car, I'd get it fixed, replace all of the cooling system hoses, and not let anyone drive it until you tell them how important the temperature gauge is. Obviously, figure out why it overheated to begin with. Likely a split hose, but it could also have been a cracked radiator. A sudden failure would probably be a hose, unless you've been smelling coolant for awhile.

Panda Time posted:

I'm interested in a used 4runner, and want to have my mechanic inspect one at a persons house.

A common issue with 4runners is the "pink milkshake", caused by faulty radiator fluid overflowing into the transmission causing havoc.
Say that were to have happened, and the owner had flushed the transmission out and put new fluid in, would my mechanic have a chance to spot this issue?

Should I just buy a junker with 250k for ~$2500 and replace the transmission, throw in a rebuilt engine, overhaul everything etc?

Did the owner tell you this had happened? The vast majority of car owners will have no idea this has happened until the transmission starts acting up. And no, there really won't be any way to tell easily, the only indication would be a brand new radiator, or brand new transmission cooler in front of it. If the coolant has been changed on schedule, it's possible it's on the original radiator, and never had the pink milkshake. The transmissions don't last very long after drinking a strawberry milkshake, for what it's worth.

Also, even if it hasn't happened, at 250k, unless it's all highway miles, the transmission is likely getting pretty tired. I'd keep enough saved up for a used transmission either way. As long as it's not the old 3.0 V6, I'd probably buy it (avoid the 3.0 at all costs - all the power of the 4 cylinder, with the mileage of a V8, and an appetite for head gaskets that makes Subarus with massive turbos jealous - the 3.0 was replaced with a much better 3.4 V6 late in the 1995 model year). Expect plenty of oil leaks no matter what engine it has.

If it's old enough to be a 4 cylinder, that engine will still be running long after everyone on this forum is dead, as long as the timing chain guides get replaced every decade. I've never experienced the 3.4 in person, but if it's anything like most Toyota engines (barring the 3.0's appetite for head gaskets, and the 22RE's appetite for timing chain guides), it'll be pissing oil everywhere for most of its life, but will run forever with just basic maintenance.

STR fucked around with this message at 11:39 on Feb 6, 2015

Charles
May 9, 2004

zoom-zoom


Toilet Rascal

Can I get a Kenwood stereo out without the special keys or do I have to find myself some?

two_beer_bishes
Jun 27, 2004


CharlesM posted:

Can I get a Kenwood stereo out without the special keys or do I have to find myself some?

I've done it with a metal coat hanger. Chop it up to make the two halves and bend it.

STR
May 12, 2006

I thought I was a nice jester


e: ^^^^ beaten, but a coat hanger is a bit on the thick side to fit. Works fantastic on factory Ford stereos though.

You can, it's just kind of a pain.

If you built your own PC, or you're comfortable enough inside your PC to remove a couple of covers, remove a couple of the expansion slot covers from the back panel. They should work - they're slightly thicker and wider, but should slide in with a bit more effort compared to the original keys. The keys are just thin sheet metal, and all they do is shove a couple of tabs to the side to release the stereo. If you have tin snips, cut them in half (lengthwise) to make it easier.

If not, they're a couple of bucks on ebay. $8 on Amazon with shipping (and qualify for Prime).

Also, if you used a mounting kit instead of a single DIN dash opening, just remove the mounting kit with the stereo attached. You'll be able to see where the cage locks the head unit in place, and can easily open it enough to remove the stereo with just your fingernails or a couple of small flathead screwdrivers.

If you're removing it to replace it with another stereo, Pioneer uses a similar removal key, pretty sure Alpine's is similar as well.

Charles
May 9, 2004

zoom-zoom


Toilet Rascal

Yeah I see them on Prime but it would take until Tuesday to get here. I don't know how it was installed but there is literally no bass so I kinda wanna check out the wiring job. I can spare some expansion slot covers though.

STR
May 12, 2006

I thought I was a nice jester


Honestly, anything thin that will slide into the slots will work. They should be dead center between the top and bottom, once you remove the trim ring (which should just pop off with a little prying).

Expansion slot covers are just the first thing that come to mind, since they're an easy way to get ahold of long skinny pieces of sheet metal. If they're not totally flat, you'll probably need to use tin snips to cut them in half. Basically anything at least 4 inches long that's thin and sturdy enough to slide into the slots will work (that eliminates CSB from this round).

No bass sounds like some speakers may be wired backwards - if you have two speakers, and one is wired backwards, you get funky sound and no bass (nor much midrange) at all. If four speakers, two are out of phase. If it's a head unit you didn't install, it's very possible the PO wired it up wrong. Aftermarket speakers do seem to give a bit less bass compared to factory IMO, but also sound far better overall.

STR fucked around with this message at 12:40 on Feb 6, 2015

Charles
May 9, 2004

zoom-zoom


Toilet Rascal

I suppose it's possible it's out of phase, I didn't really think of that. I think the way the stock stereo worked is there is a high pass filter on the door speakers and tweeters and all the bass is passed through to the rear-deck woofers, which don't seem to work. But I don't know that for a fact. I'll ask on a Mercedes forum because nobody here loves the W202.

antiga
Jan 16, 2013



some texas redneck posted:

It's worth repairing, but not at dealer rates. Also, tell whoever was driving to pay more attention to the temp gauge - head gaskets very rarely fail without some form of overheating involved, and they would have noticed a pretty decent loss in power long before it got to the point of dying. More than likely a hose failed and dumped all the coolant - usually you get a ton of steam from under the hood when it happens, but at highway speeds it likely just went under the car (but the smell of coolant should have come in through the vents unless the climate control was on recirculate).

I'd consider $1700 to be rather high for a head gasket job on a 4 cylinder, but at the same time, if it got hot enough to seize, there's a reasonable chance the head will need work, and the possibility that the bottom end of the engine (everything below the head) may need work too. At $1700, you could spend a little bit more and get a used engine dropped in. If it's the V6 model, then that's ... a little high, but reasonable. You didn't mention which engine, so I'm assuming it's the 4 cylinder.

Also, there is no "timing chain motor". That engine does have a timing chain, but it's driven by the engine itself (the chain connects the camshafts to the crankshaft). It's good practice to replace the tensioner for it while it's apart, and with the miles it has, it won't hurt to replace the chain itself (especially after being overheated so badly) - it's likely stretched a bit over the years. A lot of engines run the water pump off of the timing belt or timing chain (your engine has a chain) - I don't know if your engine runs the pump from the chain, but if it does, it's also good practice to replace the water pump anytime you touch the timing chain. It's more of a "it's an extra 30 minutes of labor to do it while it's already apart, versus 8 hours of labor if it fails later" things that adds a (relatively speaking) small amount to the bill.

If it were my car, I'd get it fixed, replace all of the cooling system hoses, and not let anyone drive it until you tell them how important the temperature gauge is. Obviously, figure out why it overheated to begin with. Likely a split hose, but it could also have been a cracked radiator. A sudden failure would probably be a hose, unless you've been smelling coolant for awhile.

Thanks for the reply. It is the 4-cylinder model. If it helps put things in perspective, the mechanic estimated 12 hrs at $100/hr which is not an unreasonable labor rate for this area. I will call other independent shops in the area to get quotes.

I was in the car when this happened, the temperature gauge never spiked. It was a very cold day, the gauge was on C at first and when we pulled over (with smoke) it was still below half. I can't blame the driver on this one, it all happened very quickly and the smoke was the first indication that something was really wrong. The smell came into the cabin maybe 15 or 20 seconds before the smoke appeared.

Regarding the timing chain motor, those were the exact words out of his mouth. I did not ask for any clarification because it's obviously beyond my expertise. I will try to clarify when I talk to the other shops.

antiga fucked around with this message at 15:24 on Feb 6, 2015

Motronic
Nov 6, 2009


MOTRONIC FOR MODERATOR, MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN


Grimey Drawer

Panda Time posted:

I'm interested in a used 4runner, and want to have my mechanic inspect one at a persons house.

A common issue with 4runners is the "pink milkshake", caused by faulty radiator fluid overflowing into the transmission causing havoc.
Say that were to have happened, and the owner had flushed the transmission out and put new fluid in, would my mechanic have a chance to spot this issue?

Should I just buy a junker with 250k for ~$2500 and replace the transmission, throw in a rebuilt engine, overhaul everything etc?

It's raspberry milkshake and it's not an overflow.

There is a transmission cooler IN the regular radiator. It rots and ATF is pushed into the coolant loop when it running. Then you turn it off and the pressurized coolant makes it's way into the transmission cooler loop. This kills the transmission in short order.

So if it has raspberry milkshake it needs a trans and radiator.

There is no need to replace the motor.

If all seems well with this truck just make sure the timing belts and rollers are recent or replace them. Also get an external trans cooler and attach it, and "loop" the stock trans cooler in the radiator (just run a hose from the outlet to the inlet) so it doesn't leak coolant when it eventually rots through.

LeeMajors
Jan 20, 2005

. . . and the car would pass him, the driver perhaps feeling a slight chill as if he had driven through an air pocket, his sleeping wife and children stirring uneasily, as if all had been touched with a bad dream at the same instant.

Panda Time posted:

I'm interested in a used 4runner, and want to have my mechanic inspect one at a persons house.

A common issue with 4runners is the "pink milkshake", caused by faulty radiator fluid overflowing into the transmission causing havoc.
Say that were to have happened, and the owner had flushed the transmission out and put new fluid in, would my mechanic have a chance to spot this issue?

Should I just buy a junker with 250k for ~$2500 and replace the transmission, throw in a rebuilt engine, overhaul everything etc?

I just bought this guy a month ago.



155k, 2000 LTD. One owner. No known issues.

It has the 3.4 V6, which I like. Described frequently among Toyota nerds as the most reliable workhorse engine built by Toyota.



This is it. The consensus is that it really has no known issues with the engine except the oil leaks. I myself have a slight valve cover gasket leak, but it hasn't shown up in the oil level over the past 1000mi. Seems pretty minor. I'll get around to replacing them eventually.

Anyways, I did the trans cooler mod a week or so ago and it was pretty easy.



Hammered the brackets so they don't interfere with anything, reroute the transmission lines to the cooler and then run a loop from the old nipples on the radiator so if it does corrode you won't lose all your coolant. I'm not incredibly mechanically inclined, and I knocked it out in about 3hrs. That's probably on the long side. Hardest part was removing old hoses from the steel transmission lines--they are tucked over your lower control arm.

Like was mentioned before--basic maintenance, and it'll run like a tank.
_________________________________________

To add a stupid question:

Full disclosure, I have driven a Prius for awhile, and had two basically brand-new cars before it--so forgive my ignorance.

I have a bit of white vapor startup--has some exhaust smell, but nothing major. I live in a humid environment (literally 300yards from the water), and it's pretty cold right now for us. There is a bit of water flow out of exhaust.

Being the oldest vehicle I have ever owned, I have head gasket concerns obviously.

It has some smell to it, but I'm not sure what 'sweet' smell people talk about. Doesn't seem to linger after the car has warmed up a bit. Maybe a short jet if it's still cold outside. Haven't had it long enough to have warm weather yet.

No rough idle--starts and holds steady at 700-750 when warm, 600 in D. No misfires, CELs or anything.

Should I be concerned?

LeeMajors fucked around with this message at 19:31 on Feb 6, 2015

zundfolge
Apr 11, 2007


That's perfectly normal. It's just condensation.

Slavvy
Dec 11, 2012

Absolutely the most reliable, easiest to maintain motorcycles on the road today...Yah cunts.

LeeMajors posted:

Should I be concerned?

No.

Also that's hardly the best tractor engine toyota ever made; the most I can say about it is it doesn't have any real flaws (this in itself is a MASSIVE achievement for most other brands) and is a lot better than it's boat-anchor of a predecessor.

LeeMajors
Jan 20, 2005

. . . and the car would pass him, the driver perhaps feeling a slight chill as if he had driven through an air pocket, his sleeping wife and children stirring uneasily, as if all had been touched with a bad dream at the same instant.

Slavvy posted:

No.

Also that's hardly the best tractor engine toyota ever made; the most I can say about it is it doesn't have any real flaws (this in itself is a MASSIVE achievement for most other brands) and is a lot better than it's boat-anchor of a predecessor.

Yeah I figured as much.

The 2TRFE in my old tacoma was a beast also. The 22RE?

Slavvy
Dec 11, 2012

Absolutely the most reliable, easiest to maintain motorcycles on the road today...Yah cunts.

22R is certainly the most tractor-like. No power, no economy, no refinement - goes forever.

The problem is you guys miss out on all the really good diesel lumps like the 1HD, 1KZ, 5L, 1HZ etc. They're all unkillable and easily attain moon-and-back mileage provided the car doesn't rot away around them.

Most reliable toyota engine is still the 4AFE and I'll duct-tape deathmatch anyone who tries to imply otherwise.

This is a list of things that gently caress out on the 4AFE:

1. the ignition coil when the distributor shaft oil seal fails at 200,000km.

And they fixed that when they went to a wasted spark, distributorless setup on the later cars.

LeeMajors
Jan 20, 2005

. . . and the car would pass him, the driver perhaps feeling a slight chill as if he had driven through an air pocket, his sleeping wife and children stirring uneasily, as if all had been touched with a bad dream at the same instant.

Slavvy posted:

The problem is you guys miss out on all the really good diesel lumps like the 1HD, 1KZ, 5L, 1HZ etc. They're all unkillable and easily attain moon-and-back mileage provided the car doesn't rot away around them.

There's an old LandCruiser turbodiesel (RH drive ) that I see around Charleston from time to time with the 1KZ. I'd murder any one of you for it.

Are most of those engines overseas?

two_beer_bishes
Jun 27, 2004


some texas redneck posted:

e: ^^^^ beaten, but a coat hanger is a bit on the thick side to fit. Works fantastic on factory Ford stereos though.

drat, you're right, sorry. I was thinking about my old taurus that I put a kenwood deck in.

Raluek
Nov 3, 2006

WUT.


two_beer_bishes posted:

drat, you're right, sorry. I was thinking about my old taurus that I put a kenwood deck in.

Those Ford radio tools are available at Oreillys for like $7, for future reference. Looks like Walmart has 'em for a few bucks less too.

two_beer_bishes
Jun 27, 2004


Raluek posted:

Those Ford radio tools are available at Oreillys for like $7, for future reference. Looks like Walmart has 'em for a few bucks less too.

Yeah this was 10 years ago when they were much harder to find for cheap

Slavvy
Dec 11, 2012

Absolutely the most reliable, easiest to maintain motorcycles on the road today...Yah cunts.

LeeMajors posted:

There's an old LandCruiser turbodiesel (RH drive ) that I see around Charleston from time to time with the 1KZ. I'd murder any one of you for it.

Are most of those engines overseas?

They are common as dirt all over not-america. I'm sure someone from the US can explain this better but a combination of strange fuel pricing and lack of market diesel acceptance because of some dumb poo poo GM did in the 80's (note: this reason for why things are the way they are in the US is repeated time and again; the big three really hosed you guys in innumerable ways, back in the day) means that Toyota never bothered to bring out diesel cruisers/4runners there.

Also if it's a landcruiser (not a prado - two different but very similar vehicles) it'll be a 1HD which is like the KZ's really large 6 cyl bodybuilder brother.

Fun fact: Toyota's series of light buses use the 1HD!

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


You say that like they don't keep trying to gently caress us. Ford really doubled down on ruining diesels for another few hundred thousand people by churning out 6.0s and 6.4s for a number of years.

Fortunately they stopped that nonsense and stopped buying garbage from Navistar, by all accounts I've heard their new internally developed 6.7 is quite nice.

LeeMajors
Jan 20, 2005

. . . and the car would pass him, the driver perhaps feeling a slight chill as if he had driven through an air pocket, his sleeping wife and children stirring uneasily, as if all had been touched with a bad dream at the same instant.

kastein posted:

You say that like they don't keep trying to gently caress us. Ford really doubled down on ruining diesels for another few hundred thousand people by churning out 6.0s and 6.4s for a number of years.

Fortunately they stopped that nonsense and stopped buying garbage from Navistar, by all accounts I've heard their new internally developed 6.7 is quite nice.

Working in EMS with F450s, the 6.7 is not rated for that kind of duty.

As far as other work.....I'm sure it's fine.

We murder the 6.7's at a rate commensurate with the old 6.0s we had.

Slavvy posted:

They are common as dirt all over not-america. I'm sure someone from the US can explain this better but a combination of strange fuel pricing and lack of market diesel acceptance because of some dumb poo poo GM did in the 80's (note: this reason for why things are the way they are in the US is repeated time and again; the big three really hosed you guys in innumerable ways, back in the day) means that Toyota never bothered to bring out diesel cruisers/4runners there.

Also if it's a landcruiser (not a prado - two different but very similar vehicles) it'll be a 1HD which is like the KZ's really large 6 cyl bodybuilder brother.

Fun fact: Toyota's series of light buses use the 1HD!



Gotta be the HD then. It's a LandCruiser. Either way, thanks a lot GM/Ford/etc.

Didn't they also gently caress up public transit in LA in the 40s?

LeeMajors fucked around with this message at 23:47 on Feb 6, 2015

Slavvy
Dec 11, 2012

Absolutely the most reliable, easiest to maintain motorcycles on the road today...Yah cunts.

Well, Henry Ford was best mates with Hitler and their shared wetdreams of everyone having their own car and a massive autobahn network spanning europe and the americas left a legacy still felt today - lovely public transport for all! As well as a bunch of totally unnecessary but really sweet driving roads in the US.

Leperflesh
May 17, 2007






Smellrose

California had really restrictive emissions regulations for diesels for passenger vehicles throughout the 80s and 90s, and (I assume) many manufacturers didn't feel it was worth bringing motors to the US if they couldn't sell them in California (roughly 20% of the US market).

That's just what I've heard, though, I have nothing to back that up.

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Fender Anarchist
May 20, 2009

Fender Anarchist



Slavvy posted:

As well as a bunch of totally unnecessary but really sweet driving roads in the US.

With 25MPH speed limits.

Anyway, RE the Ford engines I'd like to see a proper comparison between the 6.7 and the old 7.3 (which still seems to be the engine to have from its era, and even over a lot of newer ones.)

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