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learnincurve
May 15, 2014

Smoosh

MASSIVE metal washers, the kind that are used with washing machine bolts, are your friend. Some will be marketed as sewing weights, but you want the ones from a diy store fir £2 for 10. Holds the material in place when you are marking and cutting.

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HelloIAmYourHeart
Dec 29, 2008

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Fallen Rib

Admiral Goodenough posted:

Is there a word for when you see something cool and your brain goes "pretty, gotta try" even when it's way out of your league? Crafting hubris?

I believe that's called "inspiration".

You might do a GIS for "ombre half square triangle" or "spectrum hst quilt" or whatever. I think that fabric selection is going to be key in a gradient quilt.

there wolf
Jan 11, 2015

by Fluffdaddy


Admiral Goodenough posted:

This one is so beautiful, do you know of there is a pattern somewhere for it? I've never quilted before but I am willing to learn just for this one. Is quilting easy to scale up in size, by cutting larger pieces?

E. Actually wow, now that I looked at the photo in full size I can see how small some of those squares/triangles are. I might just try to draft a pattern that only uses triangles of the same size but keeps the gradient colors.

Ugh, I can't believe I forgot to put the source on that. It's an improve quilt called Juicy by Charlotte Newland, and so no, there's no pattern. It's also only 44 x 48", so right size for a first quilt, but very finicky with how small some of the pieces are.

Quilting in general requires a lot of relatively simple math, and if you're comfortable with basic geometry and algebra it's really easy just to make your own patterns and improve a lot. Most patterns are easy to scale up, but the more irregular the pattern, the more variety of shapes, and the more sides your individual shapes have, the trickier it gets.

It would probably take me an hour or two to draft this pattern, and another to scale it because of how irregular it is. If you want to try drafting a simplified version- it looks like it's mostly a set block size, and those blocks are made up of a mix of solid, half-square triangles, 4patch, and 4patch half-square triangles.

So if you're making 2 kinds of blocks (if you're making 4 kinds of blocks) I'd start by figuring out how small a half-square you want to make (and then double that for the final block size). Figure out how big you want the final quilt and how many blocks you need, then draw those in a grid and start turning some of them into HST (and 4 patches, 4 patch HST)and adding the color gradient. Then you use that pattern to tell you how many pieces you need of each shape (in either size) and in what color. Sort it all by color and that tells you how much fabric you'll need to get.


And if anyone else wants inspiration for modern quilts The Modern Quilt Guild has a gallery of all their winners on their website.

learnincurve
May 15, 2014

Smoosh

For a first quilt I absolutely 100% recommend place mats to make a table look fancy. Use the same size triangles or squares and lay them out in front of you to make the pattern you want and use the 1/4 foot with the guide to assemble. Fabric glue the sandwich together and then “stitch in the ditch” (along each patche edge) and then bias bind to make it all look tidy.

HelloIAmYourHeart
Dec 29, 2008

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Fallen Rib

Quarter inch foot is the best foot.

Comrade Quack
Jun 6, 2006
Witty closing remarks have been replaced by massive head trauma and general stupidity.

Fallen Rib

HelloIAmYourHeart posted:

Quarter inch foot is the best foot.

They make others?



Did anyone else make that patchwork plague doctor mask going around? I had to modify the eyeholes so I could wear glasses. Can’t attach a photo from mobile though...

Lead out in cuffs
Sep 18, 2012

"That's right. We've evolved."

"I can see that. Cool mutations."



HelloIAmYourHeart posted:

Quarter inch foot is the best foot.

Lol I was just eyeballing it using the zipper foot and a conveniently-placed screw on my machine. I definitely should get one of these before I make my next quilt. I also see they have dedicated stitch-in-the-ditch feet, which also seems like a brilliant idea.

learnincurve
May 15, 2014

Smoosh

If anyone has a lower end Singer machine I cannot tell you how much better the official walking foot is than the cheap knockoffs - only issue is I have one of the high end singers with auto tension and boy does this machine not get along with walking feet. I have to put the walking foot on my cheap backup machine instead.

HelloIAmYourHeart
Dec 29, 2008

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Fallen Rib

Comrade Quack posted:

They make others?


Well, if I try to do a zigzag stitch with my quarter inch foot, the needle hits the foot and snaps, so I need at least ONE different foot.

learnincurve
May 15, 2014

Smoosh

Newbie advice bit: Those big sets on Amazon for a tenner are the ones you want, I have absolutely no idea which are the Chinese ones and which are the ones that came with the machine.

Look for this foot in the set, it’s the overlocking foot, you stick it on zig zag and it tidied up the edges

Only registered members can see post attachments!

YggiDee
Sep 12, 2007




Fallen Rib

Are there any good resources out there specifically for hand-sewing? The hypnotic repitition of the back stitch cools down my raging ADHD for a few hours but the extent of my knowledge comes from 'I read an online plushie tutorial and managed not to stab myself'.

there wolf
Jan 11, 2015

by Fluffdaddy


YggiDee posted:

Are there any good resources out there specifically for hand-sewing? The hypnotic repitition of the back stitch cools down my raging ADHD for a few hours but the extent of my knowledge comes from 'I read an online plushie tutorial and managed not to stab myself'.

What do you want to make? Most of the stuff I have is for English paper-piecing, hand quilting, and embroidery.

YggiDee
Sep 12, 2007




Fallen Rib

I don't really know? I like stuffed animals, and I just made a little hat with kitty-ears. I like the idea of making flat pieces of fabrics into 3D things, but probably not clothing. It just kinda boils down to, there's a lot I don't know and I don't know what's important to know. Does it matter if I'm using cotton or polyester thread? Is the brand of thread important at all or is it just a preference thing? The local craft store has an absolutely overwhelming range of fabrics and I'm usually too nervous to ask the staff WTF 'bonded fleece' is vs regular fleece.

learnincurve
May 15, 2014

Smoosh

What I like doing is making a regular simple quilt with big blocks and then cutting out big hearts, stars, and so on sewing them on leaving a hole for the stuffing. Gives a 3D effect- you can add all sorts ribbons, pretty buttons you have found and so on. Please forgive the fact that this now needs a wash, table cover with a cushion panel in the centre.

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HelloIAmYourHeart
Dec 29, 2008

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Fallen Rib

YggiDee posted:

I don't really know? I like stuffed animals, and I just made a little hat with kitty-ears. I like the idea of making flat pieces of fabrics into 3D things, but probably not clothing. It just kinda boils down to, there's a lot I don't know and I don't know what's important to know. Does it matter if I'm using cotton or polyester thread? Is the brand of thread important at all or is it just a preference thing? The local craft store has an absolutely overwhelming range of fabrics and I'm usually too nervous to ask the staff WTF 'bonded fleece' is vs regular fleece.

Type of thread/fabric is probably more important to worry about when using a sewing machine and/or making something that is going to see heavy use, like a coat or a quilt (or, if you're me, a coat out of a quilt). If you're making fun little things by hand, just use whatever works and feels good, for both thread and fabric.

And visit us in the embroidery thread!

there wolf
Jan 11, 2015

by Fluffdaddy


YggiDee posted:

I don't really know? I like stuffed animals, and I just made a little hat with kitty-ears. I like the idea of making flat pieces of fabrics into 3D things, but probably not clothing. It just kinda boils down to, there's a lot I don't know and I don't know what's important to know. Does it matter if I'm using cotton or polyester thread? Is the brand of thread important at all or is it just a preference thing? The local craft store has an absolutely overwhelming range of fabrics and I'm usually too nervous to ask the staff WTF 'bonded fleece' is vs regular fleece.

So the way most of us learned what we know is just by finding patterns we wanted to do and then following the guidelines on what materials to get to accomplish it. The same thing you did with your fleece hat. You can get an intro sewing book to get a stronger foundation in just that, but if you know at this point you like making stuffed animals, then why not start there? The internet is full of free patterns. You could also look at books which will have have a general guide on materials and technique followed by patterns, or premade kits that just give you all the materials already.

And as someone who worked in a fabric store for many years, don't be afraid to ask questions. Most craft people are if anything too eager to help out, and can give more specific advise if they know what your project is.

For fun, here is the first and only stuffed critter I ever made. Guess what beloved children's cartoon character this is supposed to be-

HelloIAmYourHeart
Dec 29, 2008

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Fallen Rib

That's fantastic.

Lead out in cuffs
Sep 18, 2012

"That's right. We've evolved."

"I can see that. Cool mutations."



Frankentotoro is watching you sleep...


I unironically agree that it's fantastic, though.


Edit: for the op, sewing things onto existing objects, ie applique, embroidery, sequins, etc, might scratch your itch while also being smaller and more tractable projects.

Lead out in cuffs fucked around with this message at 00:58 on Dec 14, 2020

Kaiser Schnitzel
Mar 28, 2006

Schnitzel mit uns




Hello Hobbyists and Crafters of all sorts! Our friends from Creative Convention are visiting with their Travelling Showcase of Wonders and they want to see all the cool and fantastic things you've been working on! Go show them off and admire the handiwork of other talented goons!

https://forums.somethingawful.com/showthread.php?threadid=3946255

Comrade Quack
Jun 6, 2006
Witty closing remarks have been replaced by massive head trauma and general stupidity.

Fallen Rib

YggiDee posted:

I don't really know? I like stuffed animals, and I just made a little hat with kitty-ears. I like the idea of making flat pieces of fabrics into 3D things, but probably not clothing. It just kinda boils down to, there's a lot I don't know and I don't know what's important to know. Does it matter if I'm using cotton or polyester thread? Is the brand of thread important at all or is it just a preference thing? The local craft store has an absolutely overwhelming range of fabrics and I'm usually too nervous to ask the staff WTF 'bonded fleece' is vs regular fleece.

If you haven't run across her stuff yet you might want to check out Choly Knight / Sew Desu Ne. She has some tutorials and beginner friendly plush patterns free on her website. https://cholyknight.com/tutorials/

Lead out in cuffs
Sep 18, 2012

"That's right. We've evolved."

"I can see that. Cool mutations."



Comrade Quack posted:

If you haven't run across her stuff yet you might want to check out Choly Knight / Sew Desu Ne. She has some tutorials and beginner friendly plush patterns free on her website. https://cholyknight.com/tutorials/

Oh god. Now I've ordered a bunch of minky, am making an otter for my 7-week-old, and having ideas for gifts for friends, nieces, etc. What have you done?

Tesdinic
Dec 20, 2020

Crazy Cat-Loving Crafter

Lead out in cuffs posted:

Oh god. Now I've ordered a bunch of minky, am making an otter for my 7-week-old, and having ideas for gifts for friends, nieces, etc. What have you done?

That happens every time I even glance at her emails. And minky is hard to find here!

Tesdinic
Dec 20, 2020

Crazy Cat-Loving Crafter

YggiDee posted:

I don't really know? I like stuffed animals, and I just made a little hat with kitty-ears. I like the idea of making flat pieces of fabrics into 3D things, but probably not clothing. It just kinda boils down to, there's a lot I don't know and I don't know what's important to know. Does it matter if I'm using cotton or polyester thread? Is the brand of thread important at all or is it just a preference thing? The local craft store has an absolutely overwhelming range of fabrics and I'm usually too nervous to ask the staff WTF 'bonded fleece' is vs regular fleece.

I highly recommend doing some small felt projects! Especially if you are hand sewing as opposed to a machine. The material is dirt cheap - found at Dollar Stores - and the material is very beginner friendly. I adore making 3D objects, myself.

Try some ornaments or desserts (my personal favorite). Templates are all over Pinterest!

As for thread, for hand sewing and starting out it really doesn't matter. I recommend finding an "all purpose" thread. You can even use dollar store sewing thread if you want, but if you want to use it for a sewing machine as well I recommend all-purpose.

Comrade Quack
Jun 6, 2006
Witty closing remarks have been replaced by massive head trauma and general stupidity.

Fallen Rib

Lead out in cuffs posted:

Oh god. Now I've ordered a bunch of minky, am making an otter for my 7-week-old, and having ideas for gifts for friends, nieces, etc. What have you done?

Spread Christmas cheer? I really want to make her plague doctor pattern, but *gestures to large amounts of more pressing matters*

Lead out in cuffs
Sep 18, 2012

"That's right. We've evolved."

"I can see that. Cool mutations."



What's the lowdown on snaps? I'm contemplating making a baby onesie for my kid, and snaps seem to work a lot better than zips. I started looking into plastic snaps, and went down a giant rabbit hole. Apparently KAMSnaps seem to be the good ones, but they're hard to get in Canada.

Some sellers on Amazon have them, but Amazon's kinda lovely for finding genuine anything, and this is easy to fake. Meanwhile, there are kits like this, which are definitely fake/off-brand, and have good reviews, but when you read into the reviews, a lot of people say the snaps break easily.

I looked into ordering directly from the kamsnaps website, but they want as much in postage as the cost of the order. It might be worthwhile if I end up making a lot of clothing over time, but there's a good chance it'd be me paying US$50 for notions for just a couple of projects.

And I guess there are sew-on snaps, too? How are those for durability? I guess they're just slightly more fiddly to install?

YggiDee
Sep 12, 2007




Fallen Rib

When I'm ironing fresh seams, should I be using steam?
(also, thanks for the links, I made it out to the fabric store before the province shut down again and I'm having a blast trying to make hoodies and stabbing myself in the process)

Bingo Bango
Jan 7, 2020

Hoagiefest is here again


It can depend on the fabric sometimes, but usually yes - steam is your friend

YggiDee
Sep 12, 2007




Fallen Rib

I'm mostly using polyester fleece because it was 8$ per metre and very soft. I also got half a metre of gorgeous maroon faux fur but I have no idea wtf I'm doing with it yet, maybe an absolutly luxurious hat.

bones 4 beginners
Jan 7, 2018

"...a masterpiece that no one can read too often, or admire too much."


Hey I'm new to sewing machines and got one second hand off the local version of craigslist and I'm having a tough time figuring it out.

It's a singer 9020. I've threaded it and when I go to test stitch its a bit of a mess. When I adjust the tension towards 0, it does nothing, and when I adjust it towards 9, it will make like two stitches with the bottom thread, very far apart, with a bunch of tangling loops with the top thread.

Pics:
From about 3-0 looks like this:


4-9 looks more like this:


Also this little fella popped out while I was cleaning under the slide plate and I don't know where he belongs.


Thought I'd take a chance that someone here might have advice before lugging it to a repair shop.

Lead out in cuffs
Sep 18, 2012

"That's right. We've evolved."

"I can see that. Cool mutations."



Are you sure it's threaded correctly and the bobbin/case is properly installed? That seems like something is way off if you can't get it to see right no matter where you adjust the tension.

If you didn't get a manual with it to show the parts/threading, you can probably find one online.

there wolf
Jan 11, 2015

by Fluffdaddy


bones 4 beginners posted:

Hey I'm new to sewing machines and got one second hand off the local version of craigslist and I'm having a tough time figuring it out.

It's a singer 9020. I've threaded it and when I go to test stitch its a bit of a mess. When I adjust the tension towards 0, it does nothing, and when I adjust it towards 9, it will make like two stitches with the bottom thread, very far apart, with a bunch of tangling loops with the top thread.

Your shuttlehook is failing to pickup the needle thread on most passes. Since you're sometimes getting stitches and a lot of loose tangles on the topside, that means the problem is tension on the bobbin. Check the manual found a copy on just by googling the model make sure the bobbin is properly installed, and how to adjust the tension on the case. And what Lean said about making sure it's properly threaded in general.

bones 4 beginners
Jan 7, 2018

"...a masterpiece that no one can read too often, or admire too much."


Thanks for the advice guys. I've got a copy of the manual but it's a bit sparse. I'm fairly certain the top thread is done right as I followed along multiple videos and the manual but I am admittedly a total newb so I'll give it another go.

The bobbin area I'm much less certain about and will definitely be focusing more on it. I'm going to try to get that paperclip spring thing back in there too.

HelloIAmYourHeart
Dec 29, 2008

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Fallen Rib

Is it the right bobbin for the machine? You'd be astonished at how often that happens with secondhand machines.

effika
Jun 19, 2005
Birds do not want you to know any more than you already do.

HelloIAmYourHeart posted:

Is it the right bobbin for the machine? You'd be astonished at how often that happens with secondhand machines.

Or even modern machines if they are Singers; my manual said one type and the website said another! Both kinds worked but the one from the website works a smidge better.

Don't buy modern Singers

eighty-four merc
Dec 22, 2010


In 2020, we're going to make the end of Fight Club real.


Hey y'all, I signed up at a MakerSpace to use their shop equipment and took a free sewing class last night and got to run a Singer 4423 and sew a covid mask

I'm wanting to practice on the fabric from ratty old Carhartt double knee pants I never wear anymore but haven't thrown out for some reason. I mostly plan to sew tool bags and pouches and other poo poo for work, and work on my work clothes as needed, so I want to make sure I'm understanding how to work with the material

I also have an old 12oz unlined duck coat I waxed that I'm either gonna try to make into a vest or a hat or just harvest the fabric for something else I'll use (this one I'd actually want to make something "good" with, bc it had a long service life so I'm fond of it)

Some questions:

1. Wtf needle / thread combo should I be using? Singer manual says, #14 and all purpose thread for medium weight cotton duck. Elsewhere online I'm seeing #18 for 12oz duck and a whole bunch of poo poo for the threads

2. The Singer manual, when it calls for a #18 needle, says to put heavy duty thread in the upper and all purpose in the bobbin. What's the reasoning there?

3. Are there any additional considerations for sewing already-waxed canvas? I did some light research and it seemed like it doesn't matter but I don't want to gently caress up these people's machine or burn through a bunch of needles

Thanks gang

there wolf
Jan 11, 2015

by Fluffdaddy


The real answer is that this kind of niche attention to detail in thread and needle selection is not important for what you're doing, and to not sweat it so much. You're not using strange and finicky material, and you're not creating special effects that require really precise use of your materials to pull off.

1. Needle sizes vs fabric- #8 fine silk and cambric, #10 taffeta, sheers, shirting #12 mid-weight cottons, flannel, knits, #14 denim, fleece, #16 upholstery fabric, leather #18 heavy leather, heavy canvas. There's variation in that of course because you get different weights and thickness of the same material, but for cotton duck I'd use a #14/denim needle.

For thread, an all-purpose is probably fine. Poly is usually preferred for clothing because it's got a little more stretch and durability, but it will wear away at natural fibers over time so if your fabric is a little more worn you might want to go with cotton.

2. Putting different threads on the needle an bobbin is usually about not wasting more expensive decorative or thick threads in places where it's not going to be seen/needed as much. There are some effects you can create by differing them, but its like using elastic on one side so you end up with a certain style of rouching.

3. The only thing I can think of is wax building up on the needle from repeated punching, but assuming that's even an issue, you just wipe it off.

HelloIAmYourHeart
Dec 29, 2008

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of night windows



Fallen Rib

You can purchase teflon coated needles to avoid buildup, but I'd ask the maker space people if they're okay with it first. Depending on how much the wax "sheds" (?), it could gunk up the feed dogs or get into the bobbin area.

One of my fellow sewing students was working with a really grippy, rubbery fabric, and he ended up sandwiching it between two sheets of tissue paper to help it slide along. That might be an option for keep as much wax away from the machine as possible.

there wolf
Jan 11, 2015

by Fluffdaddy


It really does depend on how much wax is in the material, but since that's not a known problem with waxed fabrics it's probably a minor issue if one at all. The difference with rubbery, sticky stuff is that you get a lot more friction between the material and the needle, which heats the needle up more and stuff starts melting onto it creating a rougher surface which means more friction... We had someone with some particularly cheap vinyl I think it was, that just filled the bobbin case with little fragments of plastic because the needle was so cruddy it was punching holes through the fabric rather than piercing it.

eighty-four merc
Dec 22, 2010


In 2020, we're going to make the end of Fight Club real.


Thanks for the feedback / info gang

I'll be sure to keep an eye on feed dog / bobbin area while I'm working

One thing I forgot to ask: far as selecting stitch length goes on salvage fabric, should I think twice about just matching it to the existing stitches on the garment it was harvested from?

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Lead out in cuffs
Sep 18, 2012

"That's right. We've evolved."

"I can see that. Cool mutations."



eighty-four merc posted:

Thanks for the feedback / info gang

I'll be sure to keep an eye on feed dog / bobbin area while I'm working

One thing I forgot to ask: far as selecting stitch length goes on salvage fabric, should I think twice about just matching it to the existing stitches on the garment it was harvested from?

It should be fine to match it to the stitch length, although you might want to think about making it slightly shorter.

Sometimes garments have longer stitches than is ideal, because it's faster (and hence cheaper) to sew them that way. This isn't always the case, though, and is probably better to try to judge when you have more experience. (Or ask someone with more experience to judge for you. Or :justpost: here I guess.)

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