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Pondex
Jul 8, 2014



I ended up passning on it. There was a bit too many red flags with the seller to buy it sight unseen.

But I did find a Pfaff Ambition 1.0 used from a store. En route to me right now. :homebrew:

e: Look at that sexy beast. Now watch me use about 7% of its capabilities.

Pondex fucked around with this message at 16:48 on Oct 1, 2021

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HelloIAmYourHeart
Dec 29, 2008

Send us signals in the glow
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Fallen Rib

At my sewing class this past Monday, my instructor (who has sold sewing machines for 40 years) said the Designer 1 was THE most popular sewing machine for like a decade straight. She sold at least two every single week, and this is at a store that sells like 150 machines a year.

learnincurve
May 15, 2014

Smoosh

fabulous machine, the stitching quality/definition* reminds me of those wonderful old singer straight stitch machines - which is something the modern singers lost recently.


*hard to describe like stitching in bold

Pondex
Jul 8, 2014



HelloIAmYourHeart posted:

At my sewing class this past Monday, my instructor (who has sold sewing machines for 40 years) said the Designer 1 was THE most popular sewing machine for like a decade straight. She sold at least two every single week, and this is at a store that sells like 150 machines a year.

That's kind of nuts considering the pricetag. Who did they all go to?

HelloIAmYourHeart
Dec 29, 2008

Send us signals in the glow
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Fallen Rib

Pondex posted:

That's kind of nuts considering the pricetag. Who did they all go to?

The shop is more upscale and located in an upper middle class neighborhood. The main demographic seems to be older white ladies. They're a Pfaff and Husqvarna licensed dealer and they sell those super fancy embroidery machines that cost like $7000-$15,000 pretty regularly too.

Comrade Quack
Jun 6, 2006
Witty closing remarks have been replaced by massive head trauma and general stupidity.

HelloIAmYourHeart posted:

The shop is more upscale and located in an upper middle class neighborhood. The main demographic seems to be older white ladies. They're a Pfaff and Husqvarna licensed dealer and they sell those super fancy embroidery machines that cost like $7000-$15,000 pretty regularly too.

Older white ladies with disposable income is pretty much the demographic. Brother/Baby Lock have a lot of machines in the same price range. I think at one point I was told the MSRP on their top of the line embroidery combo machine was $20,000. That same dealer sells some Bernina machines, I donít think they carry Bernina machines that expensive, but the Bernina machines they do carry seem more expensive than similar Brother machines.

Iím in an embroidery machine group on Facebook thatís a trip. Iíll see posts people just getting interested as a hobby make for machine recommendations and theyíll get a lot of suggestions for those $10-20K machines like thatís just a common expense for someone first getting into a hobby. Iíll also see retired women talking about purchasing a $7,000 machine for their snowbird houses. Which is extra bonkers for embroidery because of the thousands of colors of thread (and thousands of dollars) Iím sure they arenít ferrying back and forth. So yeah I expect boomers are on a whole different level of disposable income.

learnincurve
May 15, 2014

Smoosh

Itís kind of funny not funny because in the U.K. you switch $ to £ and add a 0 to the American price as machines are so hideously expensive here. We tend to have utter poo poo machines you would pay $50 for, none of your mid range machines, and then expensive investment machines you expect to last your lifetime.

sleppy
Dec 25, 2008



https://twitter.com/4xx1111/status/1415834950767632384

Does anyone know how to refer to this style of stitching or what I would call this fabric that seems like machine made tapestry? I know I've seen similar on cheap pillows that must me machine made too, but can only find other examples on that twitter account. I feel like I'm missing the vocabulary to get what I want on google, but am curious how it's made.

EDIT:
That person's site ended up listing it as a 'Jacquard woven tapestry' which is the answer I was looking for. The loom and process is just as interesting and complicated as you'd imagine, and was a precursor to modern computers.

sleppy fucked around with this message at 23:48 on Oct 4, 2021

HelloIAmYourHeart
Dec 29, 2008

Send us signals in the glow
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Fallen Rib

I think those are called jacquard woven blankets.

I'm at the quilt shop and the most expensive machine here is a Husqvarna Designer Epic 2 for $18k.

cloudy
Jul 3, 2007

Alive to the universe; dead to the world.

Question! I have never sewn spandex before, but I am going to work on something made of spandex soon. (Going to do something loose-fitting, not tight and stretchy actually... I just really wanted the cool iridescent finish on the fabric for a costume).
My sewing machine manual is kind of confusing about the needle. I've read you need a stretch needle, but i'm unsure if what was included with the machine is actually a stretch needle. I can't tell any discernable difference between the standard and the blue-shank needles, maybe it's just not something that is visble.

Do ya'll think this is a stretch needle suitable for spandex?



Arsenic Lupin
Apr 11, 2012

This particularly rapid💨 unintelligible 😖patter💁 isn't generally heard🧏‍♂️, and if it is🤔, it doesn't matter💁.



That needle has a blue shank, but not a ball point. For sewing knits you want a ball-point (also labeled 'jersey') needle, because a normal sharp needle will pierce the fibers and you want the needle to shove them aside. Buy Schmetz, not Singer; Schmetz needles are much higher quality.

Be sure to sew multiple trial seams on scraps; getting the tension and stitch length right takes some fiddling.

cloudy
Jul 3, 2007

Alive to the universe; dead to the world.

Thank you! Great explanation.

effika
Jun 19, 2005
Birds do not want you to know any more than you already do.

Arsenic Lupin posted:

That needle has a blue shank, but not a ball point. For sewing knits you want a ball-point (also labeled 'jersey') needle, because a normal sharp needle will pierce the fibers and you want the needle to shove them aside. Buy Schmetz, not Singer; Schmetz needles are much higher quality.

Be sure to sew multiple trial seams on scraps; getting the tension and stitch length right takes some fiddling.

The only thing I will mention is that Singer needles are a hair longer than Schmetz. It usually doesn't make a difference but if you can't get nice stiches and you're on a Singer, go back to Singer needles.

Arsenic Lupin
Apr 11, 2012

This particularly rapid💨 unintelligible 😖patter💁 isn't generally heard🧏‍♂️, and if it is🤔, it doesn't matter💁.



effika posted:

The only thing I will mention is that Singer needles are a hair longer than Schmetz. It usually doesn't make a difference but if you can't get nice stiches and you're on a Singer, go back to Singer needles.

Did not know! Thanks. I bulk-ordered Organ needles a few years back, and they're awesome for straight stitch. Japanese, and insanely cheap.

Olothreutes
Mar 31, 2007



So I've been trying to make the old Singer 457 from my grandmother work, and it just hasn't been. After tinkering with all manner of stuff I just took the top off of it and discovered that the bevel gears that are meant to drive the bobbin mechanism are destroyed. Is it worth trying to find a replacement gear (only the one that attaches to the bobbin drive is broken, the one attached to the primary mechanism seems fine) or should I just relegate this to scrap? It's otherwise, seemingly, a very nice machine.

E: now that I'm less annoyed, it's apparently a $7-10 part and maybe an hour of my time. Definitely just going to fix it, and hope I don't find anything else broken while I do it.

Olothreutes fucked around with this message at 04:13 on Oct 20, 2021

cloudy
Jul 3, 2007

Alive to the universe; dead to the world.

cloudy posted:

Question! I have never sewn spandex before, but I am going to work on something made of spandex soon. (Going to do something loose-fitting, not tight and stretchy actually... I just really wanted the cool iridescent finish on the fabric for a costume).
My sewing machine manual is kind of confusing about the needle. I've read you need a stretch needle, but i'm unsure if what was included with the machine is actually a stretch needle. I can't tell any discernable difference between the standard and the blue-shank needles, maybe it's just not something that is visble.

Do ya'll think this is a stretch needle suitable for spandex?

I definitely learned some things making these shiny joggers, lol. Turns out the printed shiny/iridescent finish was too tough for the stretch/ballpoint needle to get through, so I ended up with tons of skipped stitches. I switched to just the blue-shank needle with the sharp point and things went much better. Also learned that for parts where an overlocking stitch wasn't necessary, a walking foot was really helpful because this material slid everywhere and caused a lot of issues with just a regular presser foot. Walking foot really saved the day in some parts. Just some fun learning experiences for an amateur!
Thanks again for the needle input. I definitely think I have a better understanding of how the needles and different materials will interact!

photos of shiny pants and shiny jacket:

https://twitter.com/c10udy/status/1454705608465190912?s=20

cloudy fucked around with this message at 23:43 on Nov 2, 2021

effika
Jun 19, 2005
Birds do not want you to know any more than you already do.

cloudy posted:

I definitely learned some things making these shiny joggers, lol. Turns out the printed shiny/iridescent finish was too tough for the stretch/ballpoint needle to get through, so I ended up with tons of skipped stitches. I switched to just the blue-shank needle with the sharp point and things went much better. Also learned that for parts where an overlocking stitch wasn't necessary, a walking foot was really helpful because this material slid everywhere and caused a lot of issues with just a regular presser foot. Walking foot really saved the day in some parts. Just some fun learning experiences for an amateur!
Thanks again for the needle input. I definitely think I have a better understanding of how the needles and different materials will interact!

photos of shiny pants and shiny jacket:

https://twitter.com/c10udy/status/1454705608465190912?s=20

That's fantastic!

And the walking foot is so important in sewing spandex or slinky knits that I've even had to use it to put in a zipper.

Thanks for the needle info - I love the look of that fabric and I'm sure some will end up in my stash at some point.

BonerGhost
Mar 9, 2007



cloudy posted:

I definitely learned some things making these shiny joggers, lol. Turns out the printed shiny/iridescent finish was too tough for the stretch/ballpoint needle to get through, so I ended up with tons of skipped stitches. I switched to just the blue-shank needle with the sharp point and things went much better. Also learned that for parts where an overlocking stitch wasn't necessary, a walking foot was really helpful because this material slid everywhere and caused a lot of issues with just a regular presser foot. Walking foot really saved the day in some parts. Just some fun learning experiences for an amateur!
Thanks again for the needle input. I definitely think I have a better understanding of how the needles and different materials will interact!

photos of shiny pants and shiny jacket:

https://twitter.com/c10udy/status/1454705608465190912?s=20

Holy poo poo those joggers

Does that material rustle?

cloudy
Jul 3, 2007

Alive to the universe; dead to the world.

Oh it rustles. (Not as loud as those 90's windbreakers though 😆). I think its meant for leotards and leggings and stuff, so I am not using it as intended!

HolHorsejob
Mar 13, 2020

In the land of Hyrule, there echoes a legend. A legend held dearly by the Royal Family tells of a boy... A boy who, after battling evil and saving Hyrule, crept away from the land that made him a legend... Done with the battles he once waged across time, he embarked on a journey...


What's a good place for someone that's interested in sewing to start? I have a leather jacket I want to make alterations to, but I don't have any experience sewing and I'd like to take a class or something. What's a good place to learn all the basics, ideally that doesn't involve crash-coursing alone with online tutorials?

learnincurve
May 15, 2014

Smoosh

HolHorsejob posted:

What's a good place for someone that's interested in sewing to start? I have a leather jacket I want to make alterations to, but I don't have any experience sewing and I'd like to take a class or something. What's a good place to learn all the basics, ideally that doesn't involve crash-coursing alone with online tutorials?

If you are in america then https://www.joann.com/projects-learning/classes-events/#instore has been all the rage for a while now among my American friends. They do digital lessons and the basic beginner classes online are free, iirc the store lessons are $35 a session.

cloudy
Jul 3, 2007

Alive to the universe; dead to the world.

Also, if you're in a decently-sized suburb there might be a sewing center/retailer that is locally owned near you. The one near me does all kinds of classes. Maybe look up nearby sewing machine retailers / quilting suppliers and they might be involved in teaching classes as well!

Lead out in cuffs
Sep 18, 2012

"That's right. We've evolved."

"I can see that. Cool mutations."





It's also worth noting that leather is pretty challenging to sew, often needing specialized needles, thread, and a heavier-duty sewing machine than the average household one. And alterations on a jacket can be pretty complex themselves. Just saying that if you are completely new to sewing, you may want to work your way up before taking on altering a leather jacket. Try some simpler general sewing projects (e.g. make a bag). Try some alteration projects on easier material (e.g. thrift store waistcoat?). And try some simpler leatherwork projects (e.g. make a wallet or bag?)

The good news is that you should be able to find in-person classes that will let you learn and practice all of these.

Horn of Arby's
May 29, 2004
what? no catfood?


I'm finally in a spot where I can both purchase a sewing machine and have the space for a GIANT table, but I'm in the paralysis of analysis of what to get. I grew up using an old school Singer and most recently sold my Bernina Nova. However, I want to sew everything. Clothing, quilting, and bags made of thicker material. The Bernina struggled with several layers of canvas, but it may have just been my model. Am I asking too much by looking for something that will sew knits, canvas, and have droppable feed dogs/a walking foot for quilting? Is it possible without spending some ridiculous amount of money? Older machines are fine by me. Any advice would be so appreciated!

effika
Jun 19, 2005
Birds do not want you to know any more than you already do.

If you don't mind getting an industrial machine, even one of the more home-use ones like a Sailright (sold to work on Sailright canvas) will handle lots of thick stuff no problem.

I know some quilters like a separate machine too because they are all about that Perfect Straight Stitch and free-motion with a bigger harp.

I find any machine that has adjustable tension a d presser foot pressure plus the ability to use a walking foot will do good for knits and fine for quilts.

So... What's your priority? And how much of your budget do you want to go where? You could spend it all on a nice Bernina quilter, stalk eBay for a vintage Viking for an all-purpose machine and save up for a special canvas machine, etc.

Horn of Arby's
May 29, 2004
what? no catfood?


effika posted:

If you don't mind getting an industrial machine, even one of the more home-use ones like a Sailright (sold to work on Sailright canvas) will handle lots of thick stuff no problem.

I know some quilters like a separate machine too because they are all about that Perfect Straight Stitch and free-motion with a bigger harp.

I find any machine that has adjustable tension a d presser foot pressure plus the ability to use a walking foot will do good for knits and fine for quilts.

So... What's your priority? And how much of your budget do you want to go where? You could spend it all on a nice Bernina quilter, stalk eBay for a vintage Viking for an all-purpose machine and save up for a special canvas machine, etc.

I haven't done much in the way of quilting, so my priority I suppose would be in the all-purpose with the ability to do some heavy duty. I haven't heard of Sailright - I'll check them out. Would it be too heavy to manage knits as well? I'd like to avoid 3 machines, I can maybe justify 2.

effika
Jun 19, 2005
Birds do not want you to know any more than you already do.

Horn of Arby's posted:

I haven't done much in the way of quilting, so my priority I suppose would be in the all-purpose with the ability to do some heavy duty. I haven't heard of Sailright - I'll check them out. Would it be too heavy to manage knits as well? I'd like to avoid 3 machines, I can maybe justify 2.

Definitely search around for what others are using to sew canvas etc. Some of them may be able to get the right accessories for a better time with some weights of knit.

Knits really benefit from a walking foot/dual feed system and changing the presser foot pressure and sometimes some tension adjustment. Other than that they're not much different than wovens, which I also think benefit from all the same stuff knits do. So look for a machine/accessories pack does them and you'll be pretty set!

You may also want to look at anything used that your dealers get in.

Sorry I can't be more help on specific brands and models.

Horn of Arby's
May 29, 2004
what? no catfood?


effika posted:

Definitely search around for what others are using to sew canvas etc. Some of them may be able to get the right accessories for a better time with some weights of knit.

Knits really benefit from a walking foot/dual feed system and changing the presser foot pressure and sometimes some tension adjustment. Other than that they're not much different than wovens, which I also think benefit from all the same stuff knits do. So look for a machine/accessories pack does them and you'll be pretty set!

You may also want to look at anything used that your dealers get in.

Sorry I can't be more help on specific brands and models.


Nope that's all very helpful. Thank you!

Gripweed
Nov 8, 2018

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I found an old abandoned Singer sewing machine. The wood is hosed, it's peeling apart, but the mechanical parts seem Ok, when I move the circle part on the end another little part moves under the needle. Although I can't get the pedal to move. It's got very "was in good working order when it was moved to the garage 50 years ago" vibes.

Are there any resources I can look at to find out if it's possible/worth it to try to restore the machine?

Lead out in cuffs
Sep 18, 2012

"That's right. We've evolved."

"I can see that. Cool mutations."





Gripweed posted:

I found an old abandoned Singer sewing machine. The wood is hosed, it's peeling apart, but the mechanical parts seem Ok, when I move the circle part on the end another little part moves under the needle. Although I can't get the pedal to move. It's got very "was in good working order when it was moved to the garage 50 years ago" vibes.

Are there any resources I can look at to find out if it's possible/worth it to try to restore the machine?

Yeah the wood doesn't matter - you can find an old replacement table/box, or even get a plastic aftermarket one.

Googling around is a good idea. There are a ton of hobbyist websites (often with 90s-grade web design) with a lot of info. You can also get parts on eBay/Etsy/specialist websites. I can't remember any off the top of my head, but when I've gone looking for my ancient Singer, they've been easy to find.

(It's worth noting that Singers were absolutely ubiquitous for nearly 100 years, with factories around the world all producing high-quality machines to a common standard, so there are tons of them, and tons of parts, still out there. Quality started falling off hard in the 1960s-70s, though. )

Also, when you say the "pedal", do you mean a treadle (ie a device that supplies the motive power), or a foot switch that controls an electric motor? Singers came in treadle, hand cranked and electric. You'll need to decide whether you actually want a non-electric machine in terms of effort to use.

Gripweed
Nov 8, 2018

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Lead out in cuffs posted:

Yeah the wood doesn't matter - you can find an old replacement table/box, or even get a plastic aftermarket one.

Googling around is a good idea. There are a ton of hobbyist websites (often with 90s-grade web design) with a lot of info. You can also get parts on eBay/Etsy/specialist websites. I can't remember any off the top of my head, but when I've gone looking for my ancient Singer, they've been easy to find.

(It's worth noting that Singers were absolutely ubiquitous for nearly 100 years, with factories around the world all producing high-quality machines to a common standard, so there are tons of them, and tons of parts, still out there. Quality started falling off hard in the 1960s-70s, though. )

Also, when you say the "pedal", do you mean a treadle (ie a device that supplies the motive power), or a foot switch that controls an electric motor? Singers came in treadle, hand cranked and electric. You'll need to decide whether you actually want a non-electric machine in terms of effort to use.

this thing is extremely not electric

HelloIAmYourHeart
Dec 29, 2008

Send us signals in the glow
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Fallen Rib

Gripweed posted:

I found an old abandoned Singer sewing machine. The wood is hosed, it's peeling apart, but the mechanical parts seem Ok, when I move the circle part on the end another little part moves under the needle. Although I can't get the pedal to move. It's got very "was in good working order when it was moved to the garage 50 years ago" vibes.

Are there any resources I can look at to find out if it's possible/worth it to try to restore the machine?

What kind of "worth it" are we talking here? Like, do you want to experience fixing up an antique, or do you want a functional sewing machine? Because those may or may not be the same thing in this case.

If you're talking monetarily, you'll almost certainly spend more on parts/labor/etc fixing it up than you would on buying a basic new machine that will have more functionality than the Singer (not nearly as much style, though. Old Singers are gorgeous).

Lead out in cuffs
Sep 18, 2012

"That's right. We've evolved."

"I can see that. Cool mutations."





Yeah if you count labour, and your goal is to get a functional sewing machine, there are definitely better ways. These include buying an old electric singer that's been refurbished. But if you want a fun project restoring a machine that's likely older than your grandparents, you should definitely take that on!

Metaline
Aug 20, 2003




Hey, my grandfather turned an antique treadle Singer electric by attaching a lawnmower motor to it...somehow.

Lead out in cuffs
Sep 18, 2012

"That's right. We've evolved."

"I can see that. Cool mutations."





Metaline posted:

Hey, my grandfather turned an antique treadle Singer electric by attaching a lawnmower motor to it...somehow.

The treadle drives the machine via a belt, which is actually pretty easy to adapt onto an electric motor.

The tricky bit is that it's nice to have speed control when sewing, and lawnmowers don't usually. Maybe a weedeater motor, though...

learnincurve
May 15, 2014

Smoosh

Start to 9000 rpm nicely replicates my experience with a Singer Overlocker though.

Gripweed
Nov 8, 2018

ASK ME ABOUT MY
UNITED STATES MARINES
FUNKO POPS COLLECTION





HelloIAmYourHeart posted:

What kind of "worth it" are we talking here? Like, do you want to experience fixing up an antique, or do you want a functional sewing machine? Because those may or may not be the same thing in this case.

If you're talking monetarily, you'll almost certainly spend more on parts/labor/etc fixing it up than you would on buying a basic new machine that will have more functionality than the Singer (not nearly as much style, though. Old Singers are gorgeous).

I guess I meant worth it as, would I have a good sewing machine at the end, and would I be happy to know that I had saved something special from the dump. It's kind of looking like I wouldn't have a lot of fun trying to sew with one of thses things compared to a modern sewing machine, and the world is lousy with these things so it wouldn't be a tragedy if one was lost. Maybe I'll see if there's some place I can leave it where someone with more interest in such things would find it

Lead out in cuffs
Sep 18, 2012

"That's right. We've evolved."

"I can see that. Cool mutations."





Gripweed posted:

I guess I meant worth it as, would I have a good sewing machine at the end, and would I be happy to know that I had saved something special from the dump. It's kind of looking like I wouldn't have a lot of fun trying to sew with one of thses things compared to a modern sewing machine, and the world is lousy with these things so it wouldn't be a tragedy if one was lost. Maybe I'll see if there's some place I can leave it where someone with more interest in such things would find it

I mean, the actual sewing mechanism on those things is excellent. My primary machine is a 90+ year old electric Singer, and I really enjoy it. But it does lack zigzag and stretch stitch, which can be limiting.

But if your goal is to get into sewing, then yeah, you have much easier options available to you.

HelloIAmYourHeart
Dec 29, 2008

Send us signals in the glow
of night windows



Fallen Rib

Gripweed posted:

I guess I meant worth it as, would I have a good sewing machine at the end, and would I be happy to know that I had saved something special from the dump. It's kind of looking like I wouldn't have a lot of fun trying to sew with one of thses things compared to a modern sewing machine, and the world is lousy with these things so it wouldn't be a tragedy if one was lost. Maybe I'll see if there's some place I can leave it where someone with more interest in such things would find it

Obviously what you need to do is repurpose it in a different way...


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Arsenic Lupin
Apr 11, 2012

This particularly rapid💨 unintelligible 😖patter💁 isn't generally heard🧏‍♂️, and if it is🤔, it doesn't matter💁.



Gripweed posted:

this thing is extremely not electric
Aha! So it's a treadle machine, right? Shaped something like this? They're a dime a dozen. Every woman in America who could afford one had one of these, up until every woman in America who could afford one had an electric machine. People make them into coffee tables and I don't even wince, because there are hundreds of thousands left.

Sewing on a treadle machine is like bicycling on a pennyfarthing: you do it because you think it's cool and interesting, but it's not the best tool for the job. Treadle machines are tiring because you're moving the treadle for each stitch. They don't do any stitches other than forward or backward. You''ll have to become a big ol' sewing machine nerd to repair one that's not in good repair, and why bother? If you actually want a working treadle machine they aren't expensive.

Now, if you were talking about a Singer Featherweight, that would be a different matter. Featherweights are electric machines that were designed to be easy to transport (hence the name). They sew an absolutely perfect even-tension straight stitch. You can buy zigzag attachments if you want to, but they're a hassle to adjust. A Featherweight is more like a mint-condition perfectly-tuned vintage plane. It does its one task exceedingly well, and if that's all you want to do (straight stitch and buttonholes) there are few better tools. (The one I link to is priced for collectors.) If you know its limitations and can live with them, it's a jewel.

I own a Featherweight. I also own a modern Bernina, which does zigzag and all the other specialty stitches a person might need. I love my Featherweight because it's ready to go out of the box. I love the Bernina because, while it takes some fiddling, it does the fiddly stuff.

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