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RedFish
Aug 6, 2006
..blue fish, one fish, two fish: blue fish need not apply.

After hearing the glowing reviews of bamboo fabric, I am interested in trying it as I love anything that involves bamboo from a pro-green standpoint.

I purchased some ballpoint needles (and some universal spares, very glad they fit my machine) and have some patterns that call for stretch/jerseys/knits.

I've gotten the impression, however, that working with stretch fabrics is a difficult task and am wondering where I would start in terms of learning how to work with it before I shell out for bamboo fabric.

Speaking of patterns, I hope there is a hell reserved for those who draft the instructions for patterns. I swear I spent more time trying to figure out what the christ they were talking about than actually sewing my garment, which was easy once I translated their half-baked gibbering into sense. :argh:

Lastly, I'm currently painting a skirt. I'm using Tulip Sosoft paints because it's all that Joann's had, and a pair of black and white Scribblers which I've learned the hard way to just squeeze out and use with a brush. I wanted to start small before I got ahead of myself and spent a ton of money on paints online. I'm reminded of how much I hate working with acrylics in general, and fabric paint just compounds their fatal flaws, but I'm hoping it's just the quality of the brands I'm working with. Does anyone have a favourite brand of fabric paint of which they could sing praises?

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Goldaline
Dec 20, 2006

my dear

RedFish posted:


Lastly, I'm currently painting a skirt. I'm using Tulip Sosoft paints because it's all that Joann's had, and a pair of black and white Scribblers which I've learned the hard way to just squeeze out and use with a brush. I wanted to start small before I got ahead of myself and spent a ton of money on paints online. I'm reminded of how much I hate working with acrylics in general, and fabric paint just compounds their fatal flaws, but I'm hoping it's just the quality of the brands I'm working with. Does anyone have a favourite brand of fabric paint of which they could sing praises?

Patterns always suck. Toss them out and draft your own from clothes you have. Totally worth it.

And cheapest/best method I've found? Get some textile medium (liquitex makes one, as does delta) and mix it with craft-grade acrylics. Heat set with an iron when you're done. Or if you're feeling fancy you could use thickened dyes, which is what I generally use, the process is a total pain in the rear end, but it gives you really nice color quality and doesn't get stiff like paint.

moana
Jun 18, 2005

one of the more intellectual satire communities on the web


Hurray! I made my first thing in forever, it seems. My boyfriend got me a sewing machine for my birthday, so I tried out the tutorial linked in the OP to make a zippered pouch. It came out pretty darn well for my first sewing-thing!




RedFish
Aug 6, 2006
..blue fish, one fish, two fish: blue fish need not apply.

Goldaline posted:

Patterns always suck. Toss them out and draft your own from clothes you have. Totally worth it.

And cheapest/best method I've found? Get some textile medium (liquitex makes one, as does delta) and mix it with craft-grade acrylics. Heat set with an iron when you're done. Or if you're feeling fancy you could use thickened dyes, which is what I generally use, the process is a total pain in the rear end, but it gives you really nice color quality and doesn't get stiff like paint.

Thickened dyes? Interesting, I must know more! Do you just gradually add water to powdered dyes until you have a fluid paste? How easily do they layer? Do they blend as you paint like a watercolour would? Do you use mordant as you go? Is there anyway to treat the fabric around it to keep the edges from bleeding? Do you think cutting out a design in waxed paper and then ironing it onto the garment beforehand might keep the dyes from bleeding?

Thanks for the paint tip; I'll have to try that next. When you say craft-grade acrylics, though, do you mean like a fine art acrylic or the kind you'd use to paint knicknacks?

And hells yes on the pattern suckage. The amount of tinkering, darting, pinning, and altering they take not to scream 'handemade clothing!' is retarded, and trying to fit it on yourself without a dressform shaped like you is impossible. I actually went into the bathroom at one point, for the mirror, to add some front darts and called my guy in to stand behind me and hold my boobs up out of the way so I didn't have to lean over to see what I was doing. Eurgh.

squirrellypoo
Feb 8, 2003


RedFish posted:

I purchased some ballpoint needles (and some universal spares, very glad they fit my machine) and have some patterns that call for stretch/jerseys/knits.

I've gotten the impression, however, that working with stretch fabrics is a difficult task and am wondering where I would start in terms of learning how to work with it before I shell out for bamboo fabric.
Nope, nothing particularly difficult with knits or bamboo. If you're using a standard sewing machine, just use ballpoint needles and a narrow zigzag stitch (or if your machine's got it, the stretch stitch, though beware that those are a BITCH to rip out!). Don't stretch the fabric as you sew, or you'll get gross puckers! If you find that it's stretching of its own accord, you may want to invest in a walking foot for your machine, but it's by no means necessary. Test out your zigzag stitches on some scraps first, and stretch the scraps a bunch using varying stitch lengths and widths until the thread doesn't break when you stretch it.

And if you've been having THAT many problems with the fit of patterns, I'm going to go out on a limb here and say you're using bad patterns. There are good companies, and then there's Simplicity (oh snap!). Patterns are really good for showing you beginning techniques and the general construction order that most garments take, but after a while, you won't even need to look at the instructions at all, and when that day comes, you will discover the holy nirvana of patterns - Burda World of Fashion magazine. And Patrones (I've got my eye on a Prada dress from the last issue, omg), but those are like golddust.

Goldaline
Dec 20, 2006

my dear

RedFish posted:

Thickened dyes? Interesting, I must know more! Do you just gradually add water to powdered dyes until you have a fluid paste? How easily do they layer? Do they blend as you paint like a watercolour would? Do you use mordant as you go? Is there anyway to treat the fabric around it to keep the edges from bleeding? Do you think cutting out a design in waxed paper and then ironing it onto the garment beforehand might keep the dyes from bleeding?

Thanks for the paint tip; I'll have to try that next. When you say craft-grade acrylics, though, do you mean like a fine art acrylic or the kind you'd use to paint knicknacks?

And hells yes on the pattern suckage. The amount of tinkering, darting, pinning, and altering they take not to scream 'handemade clothing!' is retarded, and trying to fit it on yourself without a dressform shaped like you is impossible. I actually went into the bathroom at one point, for the mirror, to add some front darts and called my guy in to stand behind me and hold my boobs up out of the way so I didn't have to lean over to see what I was doing. Eurgh.

Noo, less water would just make ridiculously strong dye that would spread everywhere. https://www.prochemical.com makes a print paste and a thickener, either of which you use with a 4:1 water/urea solution to make a lovely snot-like goo that you mix with your watered-down dyes. Add some soda ash or baking soda to fix it. I haven't really used it for painting, mostly for screen printing and warp-painting, but it gives you lovely intense colors on cotton or silk. It won't work on polyester though, and you can only work with dark on light. I think they would blend somewhat, they blend together when you immersion dye. The more thickener you add the less it will bleed--which is how I can use it for screen printing things like below.




Or when doing a warp-painting (the "plaid" stripes going horizontally were painted before the warp went on the loom, and they fade as the go up)

Click here for the full 2048x1536 image.


And I'm staunchly anti-dart. Screw that noise. Thankfully I don't really make tailored garments, because I don't have the patience for that sort of thing.

seriouslywtf
Jul 10, 2003

Seriously. WTF?

I kind of like darts. :(

RichBomb
Nov 16, 2004
a strange and terrible saga

Met with a patternmaker today, more jeans soon :woop:

justasmile
Aug 22, 2006

Everybody's free to feel good...

boscokitty posted:

It sounds like the bobbin isn't completely in the right place, and it's not catching the top thread and pulling it down. Do you have a manual for it? I know that on the Singer website, if you have the model number (which is probably printed or engraved on the side), you can order a manual for $10-15 dollars. It might be something to consider.

I downloaded the manual when I got the machine, but no luck in fixing the problem. In attempting to fix it, I've noticed a few other things. Namely, the machine will go a couple stitches before the top thread will de-thread itself from the needle. The thread doesn't break, and everything keeps feeding fine. It's almost as if it slips out of the needle's eye (but the needle is completely intact, so it's not possible for it to slip out).

I'm very confused as to what is going wrong with this. It's an older machine (1930's), so I understand it may have some issues, but I was really hoping to fix this without having to pay a ton to take it in. Does anyone else have any suggestions? I've tried adjusting the tension with no luck. I just want to be able to sew!

handbags at dawn
Mar 8, 2007

by T. Finninho


justasmile posted:

I downloaded the manual when I got the machine, but no luck in fixing the problem. In attempting to fix it, I've noticed a few other things. Namely, the machine will go a couple stitches before the top thread will de-thread itself from the needle. The thread doesn't break, and everything keeps feeding fine. It's almost as if it slips out of the needle's eye (but the needle is completely intact, so it's not possible for it to slip out).

I'm very confused as to what is going wrong with this. It's an older machine (1930's), so I understand it may have some issues, but I was really hoping to fix this without having to pay a ton to take it in. Does anyone else have any suggestions? I've tried adjusting the tension with no luck. I just want to be able to sew!
The only thing that I can think of would be if you weren't pulling the two threads out a couple of inches and holding them back behind the stitching so the machine won't pull the thread ends back into the sewing, but that's not what it sounds like you're doing.

You might go to the Sewing In General/Sewing Machines forum on craftster.org - there are a lot of people on there that have older Singer machines, and a lot of people who just know a ton about machines in general.

RedFish
Aug 6, 2006
..blue fish, one fish, two fish: blue fish need not apply.

I've been hankering to make myself some shirts and jackets, but until I get a dressform that's shaped like my boobs, I will have to stick to skirts.

I made a skirt tonight (it's currently 7:33 a.m.) without making a muslin first, which was a bit of a thrill. I used fabric I wasn't terribly keen on, so if it sucked there was no big loss. It did, however, have a full circle flounce and butt darts, which was a bit of fun to deal with once I got to the flounce and realized I'd forgotten to account for the 4 inches I'd taken in from the body of the skirt. Whoops.

I also got to have at least twice the hemming fun of a normal skirt, and I'm feeling like a huge sewing nerd for being so chuffed with my hem. It's basically a rolled hem, but pressed twice to get the raw edge sealed in and the curve of the circle perfectly maintained, which was very painstaking.

Am I abnormal for preferring french seams? I hate zig-zagging my seams to finish them, it takes forever.

I also took advantage of the darts and curved side seams to get friendly with my new tailor's ham. I've realized that I actually enjoy pressing more than sewing at the moment. It's so rewarding to shape the fabric with the iron and revel in the knowledge that what you're trying to achieve would be impossible without the iron action.

Question: How much 'ease' is factored into patterns? I've yet to make something based on my waist measurements that didn't feel like a tent once I put it on, and require several inches to be taken in.

seriouslywtf
Jul 10, 2003

Seriously. WTF?

Here's a gathered pencil skirt that I just finished up. It's just like a normal pencil skirt, but I lengthened the two front side panels so that I could gather them. I only lengthened them by 30% or so and probably ought to have gone 50%, but it still turned out well. (I live life on the edge and don't make stuff with muslins first.)




RedFish posted:

Question: How much 'ease' is factored into patterns? I've yet to make something based on my waist measurements that didn't feel like a tent once I put it on, and require several inches to be taken in.
I have the same experience, but I always just kind of accept that whatever I'm making is going to have to be tailored anyway so I don't mind. But yeah, it's always way too large in the waist, now that I think about it.

seriouslywtf fucked around with this message at 13:50 on Aug 9, 2008

Pile of Kittens
Apr 23, 2005

Why does everything STILL smell like pussy?



RedFish posted:

Question: How much 'ease' is factored into patterns? I've yet to make something based on my waist measurements that didn't feel like a tent once I put it on, and require several inches to be taken in.

Yeah, I made a McCall's cloak pattern in the Small size (supposedly for a bust of 32") (also what does bust have to do with cloaks) and it had eight inches of what I call "vertical ease" and the shoulders were more than a foot too wide, even when I drew the neckline to my actual neck. I understand making things too big for fat people, but how does having a 32" bust tell the pattern that I have like, 40" shoulders??

Spiffy
Dec 15, 2003

by Ozma


Is there a drawback to learning how to sew on a serger? I've got a pretty good line on a singer from the 70s at what I'd consider a rather good price (though lacking a manual.. urk.). The only thing that'd hold me back is if they are inherently more difficult to use.

Either way I am looking forward to what will hopefully be a very entertaining hobby come September.

Bagleworm
Aug 15, 2007
I has your rocks

Spiffy posted:

The only thing that'd hold me back is if they are inherently more difficult to use.

I got myself a serger and dived into it. The only thing that I was worried of was threading it properly (Doesn't take long to learn), and then getting the correct tension settings for every project. Both come easily with practice. It's so quick and easy to put together clothes, I absolutely adore it.

Celluloid
Jan 28, 2006
mad scientist

Do we talk about knitting clothes in this thread?

Does anyone have experience with knitting machines? I have used one of the small circular knitting machines to make fun little things and found it to be very easy.
I have a large collection now of 1940's sweater and hat patterns, but I know jack about knitting (and don't really have the time to do anything other than crank a lever).

I know knitting by hand is a time-consuming process, but can be easy to learn.
I'd like to use a knitting machine to cut down the time.

Does anyone have any GOOD websites with instructions/videos? Youtube seems only to have circular machine vids.

RedFish
Aug 6, 2006
..blue fish, one fish, two fish: blue fish need not apply.

Does anyone know what name is of the sewing tool that functions like two tracing wheels side by side that allow you to run along the cut edge of a fabric piece and it marks off the seam allowance?

I saw it in my travels and now I'm hankering to get one because I'm tired of having to trot my gauge over an entire seam and then sketch in the seam line. My sewing machine doesn't have measurements on it's foot plate, and even if it did managing curves using the plate is annoying and gives me puckering on my seams.

I've been googling like a madwoman but can't find the tool that I'm looking for. I could make one by lashing two tracing wheels together but then I'll have to dick around to get the measurements exact and it won't be adjustable.

justasmile
Aug 22, 2006

Everybody's free to feel good...

I figured out how to make my machine work (and feel terribly stupid)! I was threading right to left, instead of left to right. At least it was an easy fix.

My first project on my new (old) machine was a set of pillowcases. Next up are an apron and finishing a jumper I started in June. I'm a little concerned about this jumper, since the pattern ended up being too big and baggy. I started tailoring it, but I got busy and haven't touched it since. It's my first significant off-pattern project (aside from easy things like pillowcases and aprons).

I know people listed some websites earlier, but are there any other reputable sites that offer affordable fabrics? There aren't any fabric stores in the town my college is located in, and I'd love to be able to have fabric delivered instead of having to drive to the Cities for new projects.

BrideOfUglycat
Oct 30, 2000

I am a beautiful person, you GODDAMN IDIOTS


I hope this is the right thread to find help! :-)

I'm preparing to teach myself how to sew. My mom gave me my grandmother's electric sewing machine, a Montgomery Ward's UHT J1909. It's got to be from the 60's because my grandmother has been dead since 1983 and no one has used it since then. Unfortunately for me, that means no one has a clue where the manual is and I have no idea what all the parts are for or how to use it.

Is there a generic sewing machine guide I can use or a generic "How to use this machine" sheet I can look at? Is there anywhere I can go for help? I did a google search for the model number and it apparently doesn't exist. :-P

handbags at dawn
Mar 8, 2007

by T. Finninho


BrideOfUglycat posted:

I hope this is the right thread to find help! :-)

I'm preparing to teach myself how to sew. My mom gave me my grandmother's electric sewing machine, a Montgomery Ward's UHT J1909. It's got to be from the 60's because my grandmother has been dead since 1983 and no one has used it since then. Unfortunately for me, that means no one has a clue where the manual is and I have no idea what all the parts are for or how to use it.

Is there a generic sewing machine guide I can use or a generic "How to use this machine" sheet I can look at? Is there anywhere I can go for help? I did a google search for the model number and it apparently doesn't exist. :-P
I'm not finding J1909 as a model, but are you sure it's not 1904 or 1939? Because those are models listed here: http://www.sewusa.com/Sewing_Machine_Manuals/Wards_Signature_Sewing_Machines.htm

You can't really look at a "generic sewing machine guide," as not all models thread the same, you don't put the needle in all models the same direction, etc., etc.

handbags at dawn
Mar 8, 2007

by T. Finninho


RedFish posted:

Does anyone know what name is of the sewing tool that functions like two tracing wheels side by side that allow you to run along the cut edge of a fabric piece and it marks off the seam allowance?

I saw it in my travels and now I'm hankering to get one because I'm tired of having to trot my gauge over an entire seam and then sketch in the seam line. My sewing machine doesn't have measurements on it's foot plate, and even if it did managing curves using the plate is annoying and gives me puckering on my seams.

I've been googling like a madwoman but can't find the tool that I'm looking for. I could make one by lashing two tracing wheels together but then I'll have to dick around to get the measurements exact and it won't be adjustable.
It's called a "double tracing wheel." http://www.friendsofpr.com/regine/wheel.jpg.jpg

http://www.voguefabricsstore.com/store/catalog/Notion-Clover-Double-Tracing-Wheel-p-1196.html

Pile of Kittens
Apr 23, 2005

Why does everything STILL smell like pussy?



Celluloid posted:

Do we talk about knitting clothes in this thread?

Does anyone have experience with knitting machines? I have used one of the small circular knitting machines to make fun little things and found it to be very easy.
I have a large collection now of 1940's sweater and hat patterns, but I know jack about knitting (and don't really have the time to do anything other than crank a lever).

I know knitting by hand is a time-consuming process, but can be easy to learn.
I'd like to use a knitting machine to cut down the time.

Does anyone have any GOOD websites with instructions/videos? Youtube seems only to have circular machine vids.

There's a "Show me your knits!" thread farther back in the forums! Go bump it. We're also on Ravelry as "Show me your knits" group.

BrideOfUglycat
Oct 30, 2000

I am a beautiful person, you GODDAMN IDIOTS


boscokitty posted:

You can't really look at a "generic sewing machine guide," as not all models thread the same, you don't put the needle in all models the same direction, etc., etc.

I'm sure. It's got the plaque on the side with the model number and serial number. Unfortunately for me, Montgomery Wards is out of business and I don't know who acquired their sewing division. :-/

guaranteed
Nov 24, 2004

Do not take apart gun by yourself, it will cause the trouble and dangerous.

You might try contacting this seller, and see whether they can help. A service manual is not a lot of help compared to an operator's manual, but if your model is in there, it's better than nothing.

RedFish
Aug 6, 2006
..blue fish, one fish, two fish: blue fish need not apply.


I couldn't decide between :glomp: and :woop: so I had to use both!

Thanks so much!

RichBomb
Nov 16, 2004
a strange and terrible saga



vs.



sure to be an ugly battle, will post results soon.

handbags at dawn
Mar 8, 2007

by T. Finninho


RedFish posted:

I couldn't decide between :glomp: and :woop: so I had to use both!

Thanks so much!

No problem - my google-fu was just stronger than yours today. :)

gum bichromate
Sep 4, 2006

~*~*~*~*~*~*~* I AM NOT A SLAVE! TO A BREED!! THAT DOESN'T EXIST!!! THE BEAUTIFUL PIBBLE, THE BEAUTIFUL PIBBLE
~*~*~*~*~*~*


RichBomb posted:



vs.



sure to be an ugly battle, will post results soon.

That machine is so gorgeous. Did you rig up the motor yourself? How does it work?

RichBomb
Nov 16, 2004
a strange and terrible saga

It's a legitimate industrial so it came as a unit, table, motor and head. The motor uses a belt drive to spin the wheel on the head. The pedal is sensitive as hell, it goes from a soft purr that barely moves the dogs at all to NOM NOM NOM FEED ME SOME OF YO FINGERS in about 1/2 an inch. The stitches are beautiful and tight.

Just picked up my pattern, hopefully have a pair up by Tuesday.

RichBomb fucked around with this message at 04:33 on Aug 18, 2008

trinity3infinity
Jul 25, 2007


Hi, I'm new to this thread and was hoping that some more experienced sewers could give me some pointers about pattern drafting. I've done a few projects on my own, but always with a pattern bought from my local craft store. I've recently have become inspired to do a cartoonish version of rogue for halloween. Here's what she looks like:



I was wondering:

- What is the standard seam allowance? I know I should add some length and I usually do a 3/8" allowance when sewing unless another is indicated in the pattern that I am following.

- I have an idea of how to do darts based on previous experience, but considering that I will be using a spandex type fabric I am unsure if darts will be necessary.

- Since it's been a while since I've worked with stretch fabric and I don't remember what type of needle I should use to use with my machine.

- I can remember a method on doing sleeves, but again, since this is stretch fabric, does anyone have any good ideas on how I could do a sleeve with spandex and have it appear smooth?

Thanks in advance to any pointers anyone has.

Goldaline
Dec 20, 2006

my dear

trinity3infinity posted:

Hi, I'm new to this thread and was hoping that some more experienced sewers could give me some pointers about pattern drafting. I've done a few projects on my own, but always with a pattern bought from my local craft store. I've recently have become inspired to do a cartoonish version of rogue for halloween. Here's what she looks like:



I was wondering:

- What is the standard seam allowance? I know I should add some length and I usually do a 3/8" allowance when sewing unless another is indicated in the pattern that I am following.

- I have an idea of how to do darts based on previous experience, but considering that I will be using a spandex type fabric I am unsure if darts will be necessary.

- Since it's been a while since I've worked with stretch fabric and I don't remember what type of needle I should use to use with my machine.

- I can remember a method on doing sleeves, but again, since this is stretch fabric, does anyone have any good ideas on how I could do a sleeve with spandex and have it appear smooth?

Thanks in advance to any pointers anyone has.

I doubt you'll need to use any darts. Look for a good 4-way stretch spandex, and you'll need ball point needles for your machine.

I know I work in the worst way (woo for no concept of 'proper' garment making) but here's how I'd go about it. Got a pair of cotton (sewn) leggings? Good. Got a tight, stretchy long sleeve t-shirt? Great. Use these as your base. Get some big butcher paper, and lay it all out. I would trace out the leggings first, then sort of 'attach' the shirt at the point where the leggings and shirt would meet on your body. You'll end up with a seam up the mid-back and mid front of the 'shirt' part, just add that in. Then take your new butcher paper pieces and mark where it's black and where it's yellow. It looks like black 'gusset' sort piece on the side will eliminate the side seam there, you'll end up with some odd sort of princessy seam.
And then, um, cut and sew? Serging would be way more secure though, I'd think.

I'm sorry if that didn't totally make sense, I'm awful at explaining things. Let me know if you can't find a pre-made pattern, or if someone else doesn't have an easier way and I'll draw something up to make it more clear.

squirrellypoo
Feb 8, 2003


trinity3infinity posted:

- What is the standard seam allowance? I know I should add some length and I usually do a 3/8" allowance when sewing unless another is indicated in the pattern that I am following.

5/8" or 1/2" are the most common, but if you're drafting your own pattern, you'll make your life much easier to make up your pattern without any seam allowances, then add them on when you cut your fabric (that way you can "walk the seams" on the pattern and make sure everything matches up, and if you need to alter it, you don't have to subtract the s.a.s, alter, then add them back on!

As far as commercial patterns go, Jalie are known for their activewear, and they have a ballet unitard pattern that might work for you. Necklines are pretty trivial to change...

quote:

- I have an idea of how to do darts based on previous experience, but considering that I will be using a spandex type fabric I am unsure if darts will be necessary.
No, you won't need them.

quote:

- Since it's been a while since I've worked with stretch fabric and I don't remember what type of needle I should use to use with my machine.
Either a ballpoint or a stretch needle, depending on your fabric, and you'll want to pick up a twin needle or two for hems, also.

And Goldaline, your method made perfect sense to my eyes, anyway. :)

trinity3infinity
Jul 25, 2007


Goldaline posted:

I doubt you'll need to use any darts. Look for a good 4-way stretch spandex, and you'll need ball point needles for your machine.

I know I work in the worst way (woo for no concept of 'proper' garment making) but here's how I'd go about it. Got a pair of cotton (sewn) leggings? Good. Got a tight, stretchy long sleeve t-shirt? Great. Use these as your base. Get some big butcher paper, and lay it all out. I would trace out the leggings first, then sort of 'attach' the shirt at the point where the leggings and shirt would meet on your body. You'll end up with a seam up the mid-back and mid front of the 'shirt' part, just add that in. Then take your new butcher paper pieces and mark where it's black and where it's yellow. It looks like black 'gusset' sort piece on the side will eliminate the side seam there, you'll end up with some odd sort of princessy seam.
And then, um, cut and sew? Serging would be way more secure though, I'd think.

I'm sorry if that didn't totally make sense, I'm awful at explaining things. Let me know if you can't find a pre-made pattern, or if someone else doesn't have an easier way and I'll draw something up to make it more clear.


That does make sense to me. It's actually sounding easier than I've been trying to plan out in my head. I just haven't sewn in quite some time and couldn't quite grasp how I would go about this. I just need to now estimate how much yardage I'll need. I was thinking of doing an invisible zipper in the back as well. Unfortunately, I don't have a serger, but I would do it that way too. I had some cotton leggings once upon a time, I'll have to find them. Thanks for the idea!

squirrellypoo posted:

5/8" or 1/2" are the most common, but if you're drafting your own pattern, you'll make your life much easier to make up your pattern without any seam allowances, then add them on when you cut your fabric (that way you can "walk the seams" on the pattern and make sure everything matches up, and if you need to alter it, you don't have to subtract the s.a.s, alter, then add them back on!

As far as commercial patterns go, Jalie are known for their activewear, and they have a ballet unitard pattern that might work for you. Necklines are pretty trivial to change...

Doing the seam allowance that way will be so much easier! Thanks! I think I'll try to use that pattern as a reference from what I can see on the back of it in the picture and then use Goldaline's idea as the actual base of my pattern. It will help me estimate how much fabric I'll have to buy too.

I am thinking of buying the fabric online. I could go around town where I live to try to find bright green and bright yellow spandex, but I am thinking that I would rather pay a little extra for S+H to get exactly what I want. Are there any online vendors that anyone would recommend? I've looked at https://www.spandexworld.com and it has the colors I want at an okay price. Other places I've looked either don't have the right colors or it's a wholesaler.

squirrellypoo
Feb 8, 2003


trinity3infinity posted:

I am thinking of buying the fabric online. I could go around town where I live to try to find bright green and bright yellow spandex, but I am thinking that I would rather pay a little extra for S+H to get exactly what I want. Are there any online vendors that anyone would recommend? I've looked at https://www.spandexworld.com and it has the colors I want at an okay price. Other places I've looked either don't have the right colors or it's a wholesaler.
I've seen other sewers go on and on about Spandex House, so it might be worth checking there, too.

RichBomb
Nov 16, 2004
a strange and terrible saga

Third pair of jeans.












handbags at dawn
Mar 8, 2007

by T. Finninho


I'm not that knowledgeable about jeans (just enough to know people get really weird about them) - but I do have to say I'm loving the insides of the pockets. :3:

haximus prime
Nov 23, 2007
buttes

I'm new to sewing in general and I don't really know how to 'end'. Once I finish getting something together, what do I do to make sure it wont come apart?

Cherry Hammer
Jan 31, 2005

what's a cherry hammer?

If you're sewing on a machine, the easiest way is to do an inch of forward stitch, an inch backwards, and then back forwards.

From there, you can "wiggle" the thread on the side you sewed on, until you see the thread from the other side. Then pull the backside's thread through and knot the two ends together.

haximus prime
Nov 23, 2007
buttes

I'm only using a needle and thread, although I guess I can do the same thing?

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Ashcans
Jan 2, 2006

Let's do the space-time warp again!



As someone brought up costuming... I am a huge nerd, and therefore I have decided to make a Rocketeer costume - I actually knocked together a version last year, and now I'd like to take the time to do it properly. One of the hurdles on this is his jacket. Last year I solved this by simply taping a panel of leather with faux buttons to an existing leather jacket. It was serviceable, but the materials weren't matched and it was impossible to open or close. So I'd like to actually make a replica of the movie prop.

I was thinking of using this pattern as a starting point, and I suppose that I will have to wing the details and differences myself. I have done a fair amount of sewing and costuming, so I feel like I'm capable, but I had some questions to pitch:

1) The pattern is for denim; one of the reasons I picked it was that this seemed closer in weight to a leather than other patterns for wool or fleece. What sort of things do I need to watch out for, being as I'm making it out of a different material?

2) What material options do I have for this? I've worked with leather before but not to actually make a whole garment. It's also expensive, and I worry about not being able to fit the whole pattern on one side and ending up with different shades. Is there a decent synthetic product that I could use? If I go for actual leather, any idea what sort of weight I should aim at?

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